Apr 21, 2024  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Architectural Technologies

  
  • ARC 172 - Materials & Assemblies III

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    A deeper investigation into building materials and assemblies through the Construction Specification Institute’s MasterFormat accounting and management system.
    Prerequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Examine Wood Light Frame Construction

    1. Describe the evolution of Wood Light Frame Construction

    2. Explain Contemporary Wood Light Frame as it relates to Platform Framing

    3. Discuss framing configurations and spacing of members

    4. Illustrate the essentials of Wall and Floor Framing

    5. Make sense of Roof Types and Roof Slopes

    6. Paraphrase the essentials of Roof Framing

    7. Explain Sheathing

    8. Summarize Exterior Wall Finishes

    9. Explain characteristics and installation of Horizontal Siding

    10. Graphically construct an Eave, Rake, and Ridge

    11. Summarize the makeup and installation of Gypsum Board

    12. Identify the Fire-Resistance Ratings of Wood Light Frame Assemblies

     

    2. Summarize Structural Insulated Panels

    1. Describe the construction of a Structural Insulated Panel

    2. Recall the methods of fastening Structural Insulated Panels

     

    3. Characterize Steel and Structural Steel Components

    1. Summarize the making of modern Steel

    2. Give examples of the Skeletal Frame

    3. Describe the various Structural Steel shapes

    4. Classify Steel Roof Deck from Floor Deck

    5. Give examples of corrosion protection of Steel

    6. Give examples of fire protection of Steel

     

    4. Report on Structural Steel Construction

    1. Summarize the preliminary layout of Framing Members

    2. Discuss the differences between bolted and welded connections

    3. Illustrate connections between framing members

    4. Review what Steel Detailing and Fabrication are

    5. Explain Steel Erection and how it differs from Fabrication

     

    5. Demonstrate aspects of Cold-Formed (Light-Gauge) Steel Construction

    1. Identify Cold Formed Steel framing members

    2. Explain the components in CFS Framing in Gypsum Board Interior Partitions

    3. Explain the use of CFS Framing for Exterior Walls

    4. Explain the classification of CFS Buildings as Type V(B) construction

  
  • ARC 173 - Materials & Assemblies IV

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    A deeper investigation into building materials and assemblies through the Construction Specification Institute’s MasterFormat accounting and management system.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the use of Lime, Portland Cement, and Concrete

    1. Relate the types of Lime used in construction

    2. Describe the types of Portland Cement

    3. Describe Air-Entrained Portland Cement

    4. Identify the basic ingredients of Concrete

    5. Summarize the method of making Concrete

    6. Review the steps of Placing and Finishing Concrete

    7. Explain the reaction of Portland Cement and Water

    8. Review the use of Water-Reducing Concrete Admixtures

    9. Give examples of High-Strength Concrete

    10. Discuss Steel Reinforcement

    11. Identify the intended use for Welded Wire Fabric (Mesh)

    2. Investigate Concrete Construction

    1. Discuss the versatility of Reinforced Concrete

    2. Identify Formwork and Shores

    3. Review Architectural Concrete and Form Liners

    4. Restate the Principles of Reinforcing Concrete

    5. Describe Corrosion Protection of Steel Reinforcement

    6. Explain Elevated Concrete Floor Systems

    7. Paraphrase the basics of Precast Concrete

    8. Give examples of Structural Precast Concrete Members

    9. Explain Reinforced-Concrete Tilt-Up Wall Construction

    10. Summarize Connections in a Tilt-Up Wall Building

    11. Describe Aesthetics of Tilt-Up Wall Buildings

    3. Differentiate Masonry Materials

    1. Explain Masonry Mortar

    2. Make sense of Mortar Joint Thickness and Profiles

    3. Summarize Dimensions of Masonry Units

    4. Give examples of Bond Patterns in Masonry Walls

    5. Review The Craft and Art of Brick Masonry Construction

    6. Discuss Efflorescence in Brick Walls

    7. Identify Expansion Control in Brick Walls

    8. Describe Concrete Masonry Units

    9. Explain the Construction of a CMU Wall

    10. Review Natural Stone

    11. Review the principles of Stone Selection

    12. Explain Glass Masonry Units

    4. Examine Exterior Wall Cladding

    1. Define Rainwater Infiltration Control

    2. Describe Rain-Screen Exterior Cladding Principles

  
  • ARC 183 - Materials and Assemblies V

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A conclusion to the investigation into building materials and assemblies through the Construction Specification Institute’s MasterFormat accounting and management system.
    Prerequisite:   with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Examine Exterior Wall Cladding
      1. Summarize Anchored Masonry Veneer Assembly
      2. Give examples of Aesthetics of Brick Veneer
      3. Make sense of Precast Concrete Curtain Wall
      4. Review Portland Cement Plaster (Stucco)
      5. Describe Exterior Insulation Finish Systems (EIFS)
      6. Explain Thin Stone Cladding
      7. Generalize the basics of Insulated Metal Panels
    2. Discriminate between Glass, Glazing, and Light Transmitting Plastics
      1. Describe the Manufacture of Flat Glass
      2. Give examples of the various types of Heat-Modified Glass
      3. Describe the relationship of Glass and Solar Radiation
      4. Explain the relationship between Glass and Long-Wave Radiation
      5. Describe an Insulating Glass Unit (IGU)
      6. Interpret R-Value (or U-Value) of Glass
      7. Discuss Glass and Glazing
      8. Summarize Safety and Laminated Glass
      9. Make sense of Fire-Resistant Glass
      10. Describe Plastic Glazing
      11. Give examples of Glass for Special Purposes
      12. Illustrate the Anatomy of a Glazing Pocket
    3. Discriminate aspects of Windows and Doors
      1. Classify Window Styles
      2. Give examples of Window Materials
      3. Paraphrase Window Installation and Surrounding Details
      4. Review Classification of Doors
      5. Develop Door Frames
      6. Give examples of Fire-Rated Doors and Windows
    4. Differentiate various Glass Wall Systems
      1. Describe Glass-Aluminum Curtain Walls
      2. Explain Stick-Built Glass Curtain Walls
      3. Give examples of Other Glass-Aluminum Wall Systems
      4. Review Nontraditional Glass Walls
    5. Investigate Low-Slope Roofs
      1. Review Low-Slope Roof Fundamentals
      2. Describe Built-Up Roof Membranes
      3. Discuss Single-Ply Roof Membranes
      4. Explain Low-Slope Roof Flashings
      5. Identify Protected Membrane Roofs
    6. Examine Steep Roofs
      1. Recall Steep-Roof Fundamentals
      2. Review Asphalt Singles and Roof Underlayment
      3. Give examples of Valley Treatment on an Asphalt Shingle Roof
      4. Paraphrase Ridge and Hip Treatment on an Asphalt Shingle Roof
      5. Summarize Flashings on an Asphalt Shingle Roof
      6. Recall the Essentials of Clay and Concrete Roof Tiles
      7. Interpret Clay and Concrete Tile Roof Details
      8. Explain Sheet Metal Roofs

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ARC 187 - Contract Doc Tech I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A beginning investigation into the Construction Specification Institute’s “Contract Documents Technologist” certification material and examination.
    Competencies
    1. Characterize the Project Manual and its parts
      1. Interpret the principles of the CSI UniFormat system of construction systems and assemblies
      2. Recite the history and principles behind the CSI MasterFormat system of construction material and assembly categorization
      3. Recall the principles of the CSI PageFormat system within specifications
      4. State the principles of the CSI SectionFormat system within specification sections
      5. Review the Construction Documents and their relationships to the other documents
      6. Identify Division 01-General Requirements
      7. Recall the Methods of Specifying
      8. Explain Product Evaluation
      9. Summarize Allowances, Alternates, and Unit Prices
      10. Give examples of Specification Language
    2. Break down the responsibilities of the participants within the construction process
      1. Identify the different Construction Contract types
      2. Describe Modifications and substitution procedures
    3. Differentiate the documents within the construction process
      1. Classify the Organizational formats
      2. Interpret construction documents
      3. List the Project Phases
      4. Define the Bidding Requirements
      5. Summarize the Conditions of the Contract
      6. Describe the Specifications
      7. State the purpose of the Drawings
      8. Relate the Coordination of Drawings and Specifications
      9. Explain ?Substitutions?
      10. Give examples of the various types of Warranties
      11. Describe Preliminary Project Descriptions and Outline Specifications
    4. Discuss Project Conception

  
  • ARC 188 - Contract Doc Tech II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Concluding the investigation into the Construction Specification Institute’s “Contract Documents Technologist” certification material and examination.
    Prerequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Distinguish the purpose of the AIA A-201 ?General Conditions of the Contract?
      1. Make sense of the various Contractual relationships
      2. Generalize the rights, duties, and responsibilities of the parties
      3. Interpret the Contract provisions
      4. Discuss the relationship and organization of construction documents
    2. Differentiate documents within the procurement / pre-construction process
      1. Review Pricing methods
      2. Explain Purchasing by owner
      3. Discuss Pricing considerations
      4. Review requirements of competitive pricing
      5. Identify Project information
      6. Summarize the Bidding and Negotiating processes
      7. Explain Subcontracting requirements
      8. Identify the Notice to proceed, letter of intent to award, and executed agreement
      9. Discuss Preconstruction submittals
      10. Identify Roles and responsibilities
      11. Define meeting documentation
      12. Review Verification of site conditions
    3. Characterize documents within the construction process
      1. Interpret the various organizational formats
      2. Discuss interpretation of the construction documents
      3. Identify the Project Phases
      4. Describe the Bidding Requirements
      5. Review the Conditions of the Contract
      6. Describe the Specifications
      7. Give examples of the Drawings
      8. Make sense of coordinating Drawings and Specifications
      9. Discuss Substitutions
      10. Classify the various types of Warranties
      11. Describe the Preliminary Project Descriptions and Outline Specifications
    4. Distinguish the procedures associated with Life Cycle Activities
      1. Describe “Commissioning”
      2. Discuss Roles and responsibilities of facility manager
      3. Give examples of facilities operations and maintenance
      4. Summarize what Facility evaluations are and why they are performed
      5. Explain “Decommissioning”

  
  • ARC 190 - Presentation Graphics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Exploration into architectural presentation graphics, schematics and finish presentation styles. Students will have an option of media to produce presentation graphics for their portfolios.
    Prerequisite:   with a C or better or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Discuss Software, Tools and Techniques
      1. Describe manual rendering tools, software available, intended purpose of each application and project phases application to each
      2. Define the use of computer modeling to “block” out a perspective view
      3. Recall the theory of “artistic license” and its appropriate boundaries
    2. Prioritize the use of Color
      1. Discuss the meaning and connotations of using color
      2. Review the appropriateness of using colors, or certain colors or materials, through particular phases of the design process
    3. Contrast types of Line Quality (Sketch vs Hardline)
      1. Employ the meanings inferred in line quality
      2. Establish the use of various line qualities for renderings in different phases of a project
    4. Characterize what it means to show Foliage and Vegetation
      1. Debate the inclusion of vegetation, its appropriateness and inappropriateness within a rendering with respect to the artist’s intent and the phase of the project being represented
      2. Employ multiple techniques to show foliage appropriate for the phase of the project and focus of the rendering
    5. Diagram the importance of using Shade and Shadow
      1. Discuss the use of shade and shadow, its appropriateness in different situations and the required realism of it within renderings with respect to the artist?s intent
      2. Explain the effect of different shade and shadow techniques in renderings
      3. Conclude the appropriate use of shade and shadow for the intent of each rendering and the effect it will cause for the viewer
    6. Design reflection, composition, entourage and related finishing touches
      1. Discuss the use and intent of environmental reflection, both positive and negative effects
      2. Examine the use of foreground, background and middle-ground in the composition of a rendering
      3. Characterize the use of entourage, acceptable limitations and how those limitations will differ depending on the type of project and artistic intent of the rendering
    7. Adapt 3D techniques and styles to develop assigned presentations
      1. Employ the use of various techniques and styles for exploration of new possibilities
      2. Assess appropriateness of what is shown
    8. Present a Schematic Design rendering series for a hypothetical client
    9. Present a Design Development rendering series for a hypothetical client
    10. Present a final rendering series, appropriate for a presentation to a Board of Directors, investors or a publication

  
  • ARC 273 - Architectural Design

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students design, develop, and document a residential project from initial conception to final design and documentation.
    Prerequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Compose an architectural program for a house for a family of four, two parents, one daughter and one son
      1. Identify “required” rooms and/or spaces
      2. Distinguish “needs” from “wants”
      3. Prioritize items in each category
    2. Organize, by hand, using tracing paper or flimsy, required program elements, using the “bubble diagram” technique, a functional layout in a Plan view
      1. Examine spatial relationships of spaces to allow or disallow visual and/or audible connections
      2. Rearrange program elements of the “bubble diagram” to incrementally improve the design
      3. Distill Floor Plans from your final “bubble diagram”
      4. Prioritize information for annotating room names or functions
      5. Design Front, Rear and Side Exterior Elevations from the Floor Plan
      6. Reorganize and Formulate design improvements
    3. Present the Schematic Design version to the Instructor and other students
    4. Transfer/translate the design to a computer 3D modeling application
      1. Develop a Roof Plan
      2. Adapt and refine the functionality, aesthetic, and performance of the design
      3. Propose flooring, wall covering, trim, and exterior materials
    5. Present the Design Development version to the Instructor and other students
    6. Present your Final Design layout to your instructor and class
      1. Integrate criticisms from ongoing discussions
      2. Review the process to date

  
  • ARC 932 - Internship

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 8
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides practical experience in an architectural, engineering, or construction related environment. Includes employer/supervisor evaluations and instructor visits/interview.
    Prerequisite: Must be in Program Major and either ARC 124  with a C or better, or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Describe duties completed through internship
      1. Utilize knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for architectural technology careers
      2. Use effective communications skills for employment
      3. Develop techniques of good listening
      4. Understand importance of ability to carry on a professional conversation
      5. Develop an awareness of good communication skills
      6. Recognize importance of retraining and learning new skills
    2. Apply techniques and skills learned in the course work
      1. List the required skills involved in the internship
      2. Learn to work under pressure and deadlines
      3. Develop habits of accuracy, thoroughness, professional techniques and the importance of good communication
    3. Develop objectives that measure directed activities and performance standards
      1. List goals related to internship activities
      2. Select six of the most appropriate listed goals
      3. List the activities to achieve each listed goal
      4. Develop performance standards to determine when goals are achieved
    4. Observe policies, procedures, and regulations
      1. Identify employer expectations
      2. List employer policies and procedures
      3. Observe all company regulations
    5. Project professionalism
      1. Arrive on time
      2. Develop abilities to show initiative
      3. Develop pride in doing a job well
      4. Complete tasks within acceptable standards
    6. Complete the 120 hours of on-the-job training


Art

  
  • ART 101 - Art Appreciation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core


    A general survey course that explores in chronological sequence many artists and their lives, styles and media. The student will use art to recognize global cultural diversity and connect to universal human experience as expressed through art.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the purposes and definitions of visual arts
      1. State the characteristics and purposes of general works of art
      2. Describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects
      3. Recognize the vocabulary of various artistic styles and art works
      4. Distinguish artistic periods with emphasis on style not chronology including but not limited to Prehistoric, Egyptian, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Modern, Post-Modern and Contemporary
    2. Interpret visual elements of art
      1. Identify common characteristics of visual arts across various cultures
      2. Explain distinguishing characteristics of works of art by various cultures
      3. Define the elements and principles of design for a better understanding of art
      4. Evaluate and critique works using principles of design
    3. Identify the major traits of each media of art
      1. Label media available for two-dimensional styles of art
      2. Label media available for three-dimensional styles of art
      3. Identify visual arts by mediums and techniques
    4. Analyze one specific work of art in an essay or presentation
      1. Categorize and identify the art elements
      2. Determine how the subject matter and art elements are related
      3. Interpret how this information helps define a meaning for the  work
      4. Evaluate and critique works using elements and principles of  design
    5. Synthesize various architectural spaces
      1. Classify visual arts in relationship to architectural spaces
      2. Explain the relationship of artistic characteristics in comparison to architectural spaces
      3. Evaluate and critique works using elements and principles of design
    6. Research various contemporary artists
      1. Assess various styles and characteristics of individual artists 
      2. Interpret design sensibilities of individual artists 
      3. Explain the role of diverse artistic styles and culture regarding individual artists

     

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • ART 102 - Arts for Elementary Education

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Designed for students in education and recreation to assist them with design, construction and planning for multi-art forms and materials for instructional situations.
    Competencies
    1. Provide a dynamic productive teaching experience
      1. Choose a creative project that will require problem solving
      2. Discuss the art elements that you will use
      3. Plan a one-hour session
      4. Motivate by relating to known artists
      5. Give clear directions; provide direction, not dictation
      6. Emphasize the process, not the product
      7. Show examples of the project
      8. Peer, guided critique of teaching performance
    2. Have the class clean up
    3. Display the finished work
    4. Define the visual elements of art
    5. List the artistic skills children should develop
    6. Explain personal fulfillment through art.
    7. Develop an appreciation for the role of art in society
    8. Develop an appreciation for our common artistic heritage
    9. Define media available for children’s use
    10. Suggest creative ways to use each medium.
    11. Identify arts of various cultures
    12. Identify one dozen major artists and their technqiues
    13. Relate artists to teaching assignments
    14. Explore an artist and that artist’s work
      1. Research that artist
      2. Report to class on that artist and artist’s work
    15. Record all class projects in idea book showing tools, techniques and motivation of teaching concepts
    16. Read and annotate assigned materials

  
  • ART 133 - Drawing Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    study of the tools and techniques necessary for entry-level visual arts in drawing. Emphasis on still life using gesture, contour, shape, plane, volume and value/tonal techniques. Basic drawing skills with pencil, charcoal and eraser are explored.
    Competencies
    1. Use gesture and contour techniques to create line drawings
    2. Create drawings using positive shape and negative space principles
    3. Render still life set ups using line to create shape, plane, and volume
    4. Create a value scale using a variety of mediums.
    5. Demonstrate how light affects form.
    6. Create renderings with charcoal and eraser using toned-ground techniques
    7. Select optimum types of charcoal, eraser, and paper surfaces for drawing techniques
    8. Develop repetitive marks and patterns to achieve texture.
    9. Utilize varying line width and line weight in order to create form and depth.
    10. Demonstrate knowledge of linear perspective and foreshortening.
    11. Identify the basic elements and principles of design and apply them in a composition.
    12. Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful composition.
    13. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

  
  • ART 136 - Life Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Drawing and painting a live model. Emphasis on structure, movement and expression.
    Competencies
    1. Use gesture and contour techniques to create line drawings of the figure
    2. Create drawings using positive shape and negative space principles
    3. Render the figure using line to create shape, plane, and volume
    4. Create a value scale using charcoal
    5. Render the figure using value to create shape, plane, and volume
    6. Create renderings with charcoal and eraser using toned-ground techniques
    7. Select optimum types of charcoal, eraser, and paper surfaces for drawing techniques

  
  • ART 143 - Painting

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Acrylic painting with emphasis on still life, landscape and individual composition.
    Competencies
    1. Identify components of color in relationship to painting
      1. Recall features of the color wheel and color mixing
      2. Display an understanding of color harmony
      3. Demonstrate an ability to unify and vary color throughout composition.
      4. Examine principles of color theory
      5. Utilize visual effects of color schemes 
    2. Identify achromatic, monochromatic, complementary schemes, etc.
      1. Implement and categorize elements of art and principles of design
      2. Develop artistic vocabulary
      3. Show the importance balance, space and placement in composition
      4. Demonstrate active use of negative and positive space/shapes.
    3. Classify artistic categories
      1. Identify still life, portrait, landscape, genre, and historical compositions     and techniques, etc.
      2. Differentiate artistic styles including still life, landscape, etc. 
      3. Demonstrate an ability to paint representational forms via still-life compositions. 
    4. Implement and analyze a variety of painterly techniques in painted compositions. 
      1. Identify blending, dry-brushing, glazing, scumbling, gestural, impasto and sgraffito techniques, etc.
      2. Demonstrate effective use of blending, dry-brushing, glazing, scumbling,  gestural, impasto and sgraffito techniques, etc. 
      3. Distinguish between mediums including glazing, fluid, gel, retarder, etc. and their uses.
    5. Demonstrate and determine archival painting practices
      1. Distinguish between professional, student and hobby grade paint, supports, mediums and other painting materials.
      2. Execute quality craftsmanship.
      3. Determine painting compositions by properly signing work.
    6. Apply elements and principles of design as a way to critique and evaluate art
      1. Utilize proper artistic vocabulary in a group and individual critique atmosphere.
      2. Identify problematic areas in terms of composition and execution.
      3. Identify areas of the composition that achieve effective use of the medium.
      4. Synthesize what is said in critique to one’s own compositions.
      5. Utilize a variety of mediums as they apply to different techniques in a final product.
      6. Create compositions utilizing techniques and processes as a  culmination of art
      7. Critique both individual and group compositions.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ART 148 - Landscape Painting

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Landscape painting using any water-based media. Study of the elements of art to aid in composition and development of a personal painting style. Field trips will be required.
    Competencies
    1. Apply media techniques and processes with sufficient skill, confidence, and sensitivity that their intentions are carried out in their art works
    2. Conceive and create landscape paintings that demonstrate an understanding of how the communication of their ideas relates to media techniques and processes that they use
    3. Communicate ideas at a high level of effectiveness in a minimum of 5 different landscape paintings
    4. Initiate, define, and solve challenging landscape painting problems using intellectual skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
    5. Exhibit their landscape paintings and participate in guided critiques of their work

  
  • ART 173 - Ceramics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Comprehensive “hands-on” introductory experience working clay. The discovery “process” of finding one’s unique sense of touch is stressed. Fundamental techniques demonstrated in hand-building and wheel-throwing. Concepts in ceramic art discussed, connecting cultures, artists and contemporary objects.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate a sensitivity/awareness to the material of clay.
    2. Demonstrate basic forming techniques and processes
    3. Demonstrate conversational familiarity with ceramic vocabulary
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of ceramic art history
    5. Identify formal and personal artistic concepts
    6. Demonstrate and communicate an appreciation of quality in this art media
    7. Demonstrate the ability to develop and improve skills
    8. Attend and participate in a good studio atmosphere
    9. Create at least one piece that they feel strongly about
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of one’s relationship to the material through storytelling
    11. Articulate/communicate ideas and concepts in their own work with others

  
  • ART 174 - Ceramics II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Series of forms, individual help from a professional artist. Topics in ceramics: the “figure,” large-scale works, architectural terra-cotta restoration, outdoor claybodies, building slide portfolio, photographing work, shows and galleries. Kiln firing.
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an increased sensitivity/awareness to the material of clay
    2. Communicate their individual direction/”focus” based on their work
    3. Demonstrate conversational familiarity with an expanded ceramic vocabulary
    4. Communicate a working understanding of issues in contemporary ceramics
    5. Identify and recognize contemporary artists in clay and other materials
    6. Demonstrate confidence and ability in firing kilns and finishing their own work
    7. Conduct and communicate research related to the development of concepts in the series of their work
    8. Demonstrate improvement in their work

  
  • ART 176 - Tilemaking

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Design and fabricate tiles for specific applications, while emphasizing critical processes of working with clay. Transforms two-dimensional drawings to pieces in three dimensions. Study new theories in “Visual Communication.”
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate a sensitivity/awareness to the material of clay as it applies to tilemaking
    2. Demonstrate an ability to use basic forming techniques and processes as they apply to tilemaking
    3. Demonstrate conversational familiarity with ceramic vocabulary as it applies to tilemaking
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of “Tilework”
    5. Differentiate between applied and integrated decoration in the architectural use of tilework
    6. Create and present a personal story or “mythology” in tile
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of a “step by step” approach to an introduction of ceramics through making tile by hand
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of a “hands on” three-dimensional visual perspective to two-dimensional graphic design

  
  • ART 184 - Principles of Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students will learn the basic principles of photography. Topics will include basic camera operation, film developing, darkroom techniques and special effects. The camera will become an instrument to explore and communicate ideas, goals and visions effectively.
    Competencies
    1. Use the basic 35mm SLR camera
      1. Explain basic parts of the 35mm SLR camera
      2. Identify basic types of 35mm SLR cameras
      3. Discuss functions of adjustable 35mm SLR cameras
      4. List shutter settings on standard 35mm SLR cameras
      5. Describe all F stops found on adjustable 35mm SLR cameras
      6. Define ‘Depth of Field.”
      7. Demonstrate the panning technique for establishing subject focus and blurred background
      8. Explain “focal length” of various lens types
      9. Determine the differences between a wide-angle, normal, telephoto and mirror lenses
      10. Discuss the pros and cons of automatic versus manual 35mm SLR cameras
    2. Use various types of film and film speeds for the correct job application
      1. Label a negative and positive image from instructor supplied samples
      2. Explain the differences between photographic film and paper
      3. Define and give verbal examples of the uses of slow, medium and fast films
      4. Demonstrate the use of the film ISO on a light meter and on a 35mm SLR camera
      5. Identify the word “grain” as it deals with emulsion and explain why it may or may not be desirable in a photographic image.
      6. Discuss the word “contrast” as it relates to photographic images
      7. Analyze various ways of packaging film and define the word “formats.”
      8. List how one should select the best film for high-speed shots, scenic views, portraits, high resolution pictures, low-light level shots and all-around picture taking
      9. Explain how film and photographic paper should be stored
      10. Describe the effects of accidental exposure to light on film and paper.
      11. Identify the effects of age and rough film handling
    3. Use good metering techniques when photographing
      1. Define the term “aperture” and write out the standard scale of aperture settings
      2. Describe what a “stop” is as a measure of exposure
      3. Determine a scale of equivalent exposure settings by writing them out according to given aperture and shutter speeds
      4. Describe the differences between “underexposure” and “overexposure”.
      5. Explain the similarities and differences between an in-camera meter, a hand-held meter, an incident meter and a reflected light meter
      6. Define what is meant by “TTL metering”.
      7. Describe the differences in metering patterns between averaging, restricted angle and spot meters
      8. Demonstrate how an incident light meter and a reflected light meter are used to determine exposure
      9. Define the term “bracketing” and how it helps insure an optimum exposure
      10. Explain how creative use of exposures can alter the appearance and mood of the subject
      11. Define the “f/16 sunlight rule”.
      12. Interpret the meter for initial camera settings
      13. Point out the component parts of a photograph or an actual meter, and explain how each part works
      14. Demonstrate proficiency in transferring the readings from the meter to the camera, including the film index, shutter speed, aperture and EV settings, if the camera is so equipped
      15. Demonstrate how to take a close-up reading, a back-lit reading, and a substitute reading
    4. Create a black and white negative image
      1. Identify the purpose of the film developing process
      2. List the steps in the film developing process
      3. List the various parts of a plastic film developing tank
      4. Demonstrate proficiency in loading 35mm film onto plastic film developing reels, with eyes closed
      5. Demonstrate proficiency in reading a film developing time-temperature chart for its recommendations
      6. Demonstrate proficiency in organizing the various pieces of equipment and chemicals in preparation for developing
      7. Demonstrate how to clean the various implements used in the development process.
      8. Demonstrate proper agitation techniques for film development, stop and fix cycles
      9. Explain how to set up the film development timer and how chemicals are poured in and out of a tank at the proper times
      10. Describe the effect on the film resulting from under or overdevelopment
      11. List the effects on the film resulting from over or underexposure using normal development times
      12. Describe what is meant by “pushing” the film
      13. Define what is meant by a “good negative
      14. Describe how inconsistent development and shortened or lengthened development affects the negative
      15. Define the term “working solution” and its purpose
      16. Define the term “stock solution” and its purpose
      17. Define the term “concentrate” and its purpose
      18. Label at least three types of contamination possible in any darkroom processing area
      19. Organize the implements, equipment and chemicals necessary to process a roll of 35mm film
      20. Demonstrate knowledge of the film processing procedures and steps, by developing rolls of film
      21. Identify the health and environmental concerns arising from the various photographic processes and how to control them to prevent personal injury or environmental problems
    5. Print a black and white positive image of various sizes
      1. Identify differences between resin coated (RC) and fiber based paper
      2. List differences between the various weight papers
      3. Process the paper under the appropriate safelight
      4. Identify the various surfaces of paper
      5. Identify the appropriate size paper for general use
      6. Describe proper storage and handling procedures
      7. Describe the desirable features of a good darkroom
      8. Demonstrate proficiency in using an enlarger properly
      9. Describe all the necessary equipment needed to produce a print
      10. Select the proper chemicals and set them up for printing
      11. Describe the potential hazards in using photographic chemicals
      12. Describe the procedures used to overcome the potential chemical hazards
      13. Demonstrate proficiency in setting up for contact printing, and in making contacts, including test strip procedures as well as the final print itself
      14. Demonstrate proficiency in using alternate contact printing methods
      15. Demonstrate proficiency in analyzing the print, and how to correct faults
      16. Demonstrate proficiency in using local exposure control including dodging and burning
      17. Demonstrate proficiency in processing the print from beginning to mounting the print.
      18. Select a photo printed with the correct exposure and contrast from a group of six prints of differing contrast.
      19. Demonstrate proficiency in setting up and using an enlarger, including making a print through to mounting.
    6. Recognize a problem when it occurs and fix that problem. (Troubleshooting)
      1. Recognize any film exposure problem by examining the negatives and determine if the cause is under or overexposure.
      2. Determine whether any under or overexposure was caused by equipment malfunction by examining the camera and any accessories used during the exposure
      3. Determine whether or not any under or overexposure was caused by unusual subject tones, light or dark backgrounds affecting meter readings, or operator error
      4. Determine the cause of any blank frames that occur, and what caused them
      5. Analyze the cause of fogged film, whether it occurred in the camera, in processing or from an external source
      6. Recognize flare and take corrective steps
      7. Keep equipment clean and in good working order
      8. Describe what “vignetting” is and take corrective steps to avoid it in the future or use it correctly
      9. Recognize multiple or overlapped exposures and tell how to avoid this problem and have camera repaired
      10. Recognize uneven frame spacing and have camera repaired
      11. Recognize torn sprockets or torn film as an operator error in camera/film handling
      12. Analyze negative scratches and determine source of the problem
      13. Select from a negative collection and a print ring around, good negatives and prints that show proper contrast. From those that are not of proper contrast, tell which are from poor exposure and which are from poor subject contrast or film development or
      14. Analyze films that show uneven density and correct processing errors
      15. Describe the print processing procedures and times for a given set of conditions, and from a set of instructor-provided sample prints, tell what problems are present in each print. (Too dark, too light, poor enlarging techniques, exposure to light, or po
      16. Test camera and enlarger for lens sharpness, movement blurring, partial or overall blur and recommend corrective action
      17. From a set of instructor-supplied negatives, analyze other film handling and processing marks such as blank frames, splotches, crescent marks, air bells, reticulation, pinholes, static marks, surface marks and other errors.

  
  • ART 186 - Principles Digital Photograph

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students will learn the basic principles of digital photography. Topics will include basic camera operation, composition, metering, computer tips and tricks and shooting tips and tricks. The digital camera in conjunction with the computer will become instruments to explore visual communication effectively. This course requires a DSLR digital camera, minimum 12.0 megapixels, capable of interchangeable lenses.
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Operate and use the basic DSLR digital camera.
      1. Show the basic parts of the digital DSLR camera.
      2. Identify basic types of digital SLR cameras.
      3. Discuss functions of adjustable digital SLR cameras.
      4. List shutter settings on standard digital SLR cameras.
      5. Describe all F/stops found on adjustable digital SLR cameras.
      6. Determine the differences between a wide-angle, normal and telephoto lenses.
    2. Use good metering techniques when photographing.
      1. Define the term “aperture” and write out the standard scale of aperture settings.
      2. Describe what a “stop” is as a measure of exposure.
      3. Describe the differences between “underexposure” and “overexposure.”
      4. Define what is meant by “TTL metering.”
      5. Describe the differences in metering patterns between averaging, restricted angle and spot meters.
      6. Demonstrate how an incident light meter and a reflected light meter are used to
      7. determine exposure.
      8. Define the term “bracketing” and how it helps insure an optimum exposure.
      9. List the various ISO speed settings and how they make your camera more or less light sensitive.
    3. Apply various types of ISO speeds for the correct job application.
      1. Describe the difference between ISO speeds and noise.
      2. Define how one would use the various speed settings on your digital camera in different situations.
      3. Demonstrate the use of ISO on a light meter and on a digital DSLR camera.
      4. List how one should select the best speed for portraits, high resolution pictures, low-light level shots and all-around picture taking.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of Photoshop/ Lightroom Basics.
      1. Identify and explain the purpose of the tools and menus that are most often used in editing digital photography images.
      2. Understanding the relationship between pixels, image resolution, image quality, image size, and the Photoshop and JPEG file format.
      3. Know how to read a histogram and understand its relationship to the digital image.
    5. Classify memory devices and file types associated with digital cameras.
      1. Demonstrate the various options available for downloading images from your digital camera to your computer.
      2. Understand and be able to explain the advantages and disadvantages of working with the Digital RAW and JPEG file formats in Photoshop.
      3. Develop a strategy for archiving and retrieving digital captures.
    6. Critque understanding of Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority Modes.
      1. Demonstrate the procedure for taking a photograph in shutter priority mode.
      2. Explain the reason for taking an image in aperture priority mode.
      3. Identify different uses for aperture priority and shutter priority modes.
    7. Use the camera controls to take a photograph in the manual mode.
      1. Explain and demonstrate a how to set the camera to manual mode
      2. Demonstrate how to expose an image in the manual mode.
      3. Explain the advantages of using the camera in the manual mode.
    8. Identify the basic difference between lenses.
      1. Describe what a long focal length lens would be used for.
      2. Explain and demonstrate the use of a short focal length lens.
      3. Identify what a normal focal length lens would be used for.
    9. Critique the principals of art, design and composition.
      1. Demonstrate simplicity/ emphasis.
      2. Execute the rule of thirds.
      3. Discuss perspective or point of view.
      4. Identify leading lines.

  
  • ART 189 - Commercial Photography 1

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is designed for students who want to further enhance their photographic knowledge and abilities. It is an application of the skills learned in Digital Photography with an emphasis on professional jobs and assignments used in commercial photography. A portfolio from each student is required by the end of the course.
    Prerequisite: ART 186 ART 225 , ART 292  
    Competencies
     

    1. Differentiate camera equipment and accessories used for commercial photography assignments.
      1. Demonstrate the selection of a camera’s advanced features and interchangeable lens capability.
      2. Show the capabilities and limitations of their personal cameras.
      3. Make informed decisions about lens choices for particular assignments.
      4. Identify lighting devices for particular assignments.
      5. Describe peripheral devices for professionals (tripods, shutter release, etc.)
      6. Demonstrate appropriate software for the desired effect.
      7. Identify characteristics of camera shooting modes.
    2. Evaluate various qualities of light and be able to recognize, produce, and control various lighting conditions including: diffused, direct, direct diffused and back light.
      1. Describe the basic concepts of degree of diffusion and direction of light.
      2. Evaluate shooting effectively with available light.
      3. Identify a variety of lighting diffusers and reflectors
      4. Outline the purposes for using more than one lighting device, and how to position fill lights to achieve certain effects, such as studio, on camera, existing, supplemental, (reflectors, etc)
    3. Classify different flash units used in the studio for commercial lighting.
      1. Identify studio main light.
      2. Discuss studio fill light.
      3. Explain studio kicker light.
      4. Identify studio background light
    4. Apply the multi step process of “workflow” while working commercial photography assignments.
      1. Demonstrate the multi-step process of workflow in Image capture.
      2. Identify the multi-step process of workflow as it relates to image editing.
      3. Summarize the multi-step process of workflow as it relates to image output.
    5. Use of the camera controls on a digital camera.
      1. Set the White balance.
      2. Adjust the ISO.
      3. Set the Resolution.
      4. Demonstrate how to set the Burst mode.
      5. Adjust the Auto bracketing.
      6. Set the Histograms, etc.
      7. Demonstrate how to set the Exposure Modes (Auto, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, and Continuous).
    6. Identify memory devices and file types associated with digital cameras.
      1. Demonstrate what pixels are and how they are used in digital photography.
      2. Describe digital file formats as they pertain to image capture (i.e. RAW, TIFF, JPEG).
      3. Summarize compression in digital file sizes as they pertain to image capture (i.e. Extra Fine, Fine, Basic, and Normal).
      4. Identify the difference between High and Low Resolution and how they are linked to pixilation.
      5. Discuss compression in digital file sizes as they pertain to image capture (i.e. Extra Fine, Fine, Basic, and Normal).
      6. Adjust necessary equipment used for downloading memory devices (i.e. cables, card readers, or drives).
      7. Identify necessary equipment used for downloading memory devices (i.e. cables, card readers, or drives).
    7. Critque the principles of art, design and composition.
      1. Demonstrate simplicity/emphasis.
      2. Execute the rule of thirds.
      3. Discuss perspective or point of view.
      4. Identify leading lines.
    8. Demonstrate understanding of digital image resolution.
      1. Describe how to crop an image.
      2. Change an image size properly.
    9. Evaluate digital images in both a printed and/or electronic format.
      1. Analyze/critique photographic work.
      2. Develop a portfolio of commercial photography digital images.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to print their photographs for display
      4. Describe how to display an image for presentation
    10. Select On-Location Lighting
      1. Describe the techniques for using portable supplemental flash
      2. Set up studio lights and demonstrate on-location lighting using techniques.
    11. Demonstrate Workplace Readiness Skills:
      1. Demonstrate effective speaking and listening skills with clients.
      2. Show time, task, and resource management skills.
      3. Use critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.
    12. Prepare a computer to correctly display digital images.
      1. Adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Use filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, retouching.

  
  • ART 190 - History of Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Students will study the history, language and meaning of photography, including its evolving technology, notable contributors and reflection of our changing culture. Students will also learn about the social impact of photography as a news medium, the principles of photographic aesthetics and contemporary issues.
    Competencies
    1. Define photography
      1. Define depth of field
      2. Define aperture
      3. Define shutter speed
      4. Define exposure
    2. Analyze technology leading up to modern photography
      1. Explain the camera obscura
      2. Describe the pinhole camera
      3. Examine the development of chemical photography
      4. Describe Joseph Niepce and Louis Daguerre’s techniques
    3. Assess technological events during the late 19th century
      1. Describe the invention of celluloid film
      2. Examine Eadweard Muybridge and his high-speed horse photography
      3. Describe Kodak’s history and their introduction of the Brownie and 120 film
      4. Assess the impact of Thomas Edison’s kinetoscope
    4. Describe photography’s trends from the civil War to World War II
      1. Examine the photography of Matthew Brady and Alexander Gardner
      2. Discuss Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis’s photography of the poor in New York in the 1900s
      3. Discuss Ansel Adams, Man Ray, Brassai, Albert Renger-Patzsch, and Alfred Stieglitz’s impact on photography as an art form
      4. Discuss the depression-era photography of Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Arthur Rothstein
      5. Describe how the Leica camera popularized 35mm photography
    5. Discuss photojournalism and propaganda during World War II
      1. Describe how the works of Margaret Bourke-White, Robert Capa, Joe Rosenthal, George Silk, John a. Bushemi, and Charles Eugene Sumners brought World War II to the news
      2. Study the use of photography and propaganda by the United States, Britain, and Nazi Germany during World War II
    6. Investigate photography during the 1950s and the booming suburban lifestyle, TV, and the Cold War
      1. Explore the portraits of Eve Arnold, Richard Avedon
      2. Examine the “slice of life” and unusual images by Elliot Erwiit
      3. Study Robert Doisneau’s romatic Paris photography
      4. Explain Ernst Haas’s use of shutter speed
      5. Examine images used by the United States and Soviet Union to further their respective Cold War agendas
      6. Study the introduction of the Hasselblad, Polariod and Pentax cameras
    7. Discuss photography’s reflection of the changing political and cultural times during the 1960s
      1. Investigate African American photographers such as Gordon Parks, Roy Decarava, and Moneta Sleet
      2. Discuss the Civil Rights photography of Charles Moore, Danny Lyon, Ivan Massar and John Phillips
      3. Investigate the Vietnam War through the camera lens and Eddie Adams, Don McCullin and Larry burrows
      4. Examine the 60s culture through the lens of Baron Wolman, Diane Arbus, David Bailey, Elliot Landy and Jim Marshall
      5. Clarify the artistic influence of Norman Parkinson and Duane Michaels
    8. Analyze photography trends in the 1970s and 1980s including street and experimental photography as well as women photographers of the time
      1. Examine street photography by Robert m Johnson, Allan Tannenbaum, and Andrew Stark and the color work of William Eggleston
      2. Study women photographers of the 1970s, including Annie Leibowitz, Jo Spence, and Donna Ferrato
    9. Analyze the 1990s and 2000s: Study the impact of the digital age
      1. Explore how the Internet has changed the way photographers take and share photos
      2. Discuss how digital cameras change the way pictures are taken and processed
      3. Describe about how Photoshop has opened new doors for photographers (while closing others) and the distinction between a photograph and a digital illustration
    10. Explain photographic aesthetics and its evolution
      1. Discuss the importance of composition, light shadow, line, texture, color, and depth of field
      2. Explore how juxtaposition can create meaning
      3. Explain how film, camera, and lens choice affects an image

  
  • ART 192 - Portrait Photography 1

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course an in-depth look at portrait photography. Emphasis will be on developing and refining your techniques in a variety of settings and lighting conditions. Projects will examine critical and aesthetic issues in portrait photography from singles to large groups, under studio and location settings. Both traditional and digital photography will be covered.
    Prerequisite: ART 186 , ART 225 , ART 292   
    Competencies
     

    1. Evaluate different professional portrait photography styles.
      1. Create casual style portraits.
      2. Demonstrate storytelling style portraits.
      3. Show classic style portraits.
      4. Create personal style portraits.
    2. Evaluate different lighting techniques used in portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate Rembrandt lighting
      2. Show Butterfly Lighting
      3. Demonstrate High Key Lighting
      4. Show Short lighting
      5. Discuss Split Lighting
    3. Critque location portrait photography.
      1. Create family location portraits.
      2. Demonstrate environmental executive portrait
    4. Evaluate different studio lights used in portrait photography.
      1. Identify Main Light
      2. Discuss Fill Light
      3. Explain Kicker light
      4. Identify Hair light
    5. Assess portrait photography business practices.
      1. Identify pricing used in portrait photography
      2. Analyze marketing decisions
      3. Develop a promotional calendar
      4. Create a professional presentation album
    6. Evaluate the basic features of digital cameras.
      1. Describe the differences between normal-focal length for digital camera lenses and traditional camera lenses.
      2. Make adjustments for contrast, color balance and exposure using a digital camera.
      3. Demonstrate how to use histograms to create better images.
      4. Identify the uses for shutter priority and aperture priority.
    7. Work with models.
      1. Demonstrate speaking skills while working with models
      2. Pose models
    8. Prepare a computer to correctly display digital images.
      1. Adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Use filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, levels, masks, retouching.
      4. Describe the ethics of altering images.
      5. Sumarize the relative advantages and disadvantages of a number of kinds of printers and printer technologies.
    9. Evaluate the fundamental design elements and know how to use them effectively to create a composition and communicate a message.
      1. Describe the impact that framing and cropping have on an image.
      2. Use the “rule of thirds”.
      3. Apply contrast to enhance your images.
      4. Show how point of view can affect the interpretation of an image.
      5. Identify some of the “rules of thumb” employed by photographers involved in portraiture and landscape including managing motion, balance, and tension.
      6. Describe how to present your work to agencies and galleries.
      7. Compose you photographs for specific audiences
    10. Analyze the appropriate use of the camera controls on a digital camera.
      1. Set the White balance
      2. Regulate the ISO
      3. Set the Resolution
      4. Demonstrate how to set the Burst mode
      5. Adjust the Auto bracketing
      6. Discuss the Histograms, etc.
      7. Adjust the Exposure Modes (Auto, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, and Continuous).
    11. Evaluate memory devices and file types associated with digital cameras.
      1. Demonstrate what pixels are and how they are used in digital photography.
      2. Describe digital file formats as they pertain to image capture (i.e. RAW, TIFF, JPEG).
      3. Summarize compression in digital file sizes as they pertain to image capture (i.e. Extra Fine, Fine, Basic, and Normal).
      4. Identify the difference between High and Low Resolution and how they are linked to pixilation.
      5. Compare common memory cards and camera compatibilities.
      6. Identify necessary equipment used for downloading memory devices (i.e. cables, card readers, or drives).
      7. List the workflow necessary to transfer files from a camera to another storage device.
    12. Evaluate digital images in both a printed and/or electronic format.
      1. Analyze/critique photographic work.
      2. Develop a portfolio of portrait photography digital images.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to print their photographs for display.
      4. Describe various options for displaying images
      5. Display an image for presentation

  
  • ART 194 - Portfolio Photography 1

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This is the keystone course in the DMACC Professional Photography Program. All other courses in the program have been developing competencies to make this course successful. Here the student puts it all together to produce a highly effective and professional quality portfolio that helps the student gain employment in their chosen career area. The final portion of the course is devoted to the portfolio exhibits and a comprehensive exam covering the graduates gained knowledge over the course of the program.
    Prerequisite: ART 186 , ART 225  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ART 292  
    Competencies
     

    1. Point out the basic features of digital cameras and know how to use them.
      1. Demonstrate composition of a digital image and the factors that affect its quality and file size.
      2. Show how digital images are transferred to a computer for storage and manipulation.
      3. Explain the differences between normal-focal length for digital camera lenses and traditional camera lenses.
      4. Identify how to make adjustments for contrast, color balance and exposure using a digital camera.
      5. Describe the basic differences between various digital cameras on the market and weigh the relative advantages and disadvantages, conveniences and costs, associated with their use.
      6. Demonstrate how to use scanners.
      7. Use histograms to create better images.
      8. Describe what a color management does.
      9. Demonstrate how to store digital images.
    2. Prepare a computer to correctly display digital images.
      1. Adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Use filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, levels, masks, retouching.
      4. Discuss the ethics of altering images.
      5. Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of a number of kinds of printers and printer technologies.
    3. Evaluate understanding of photographic business practices.
      1. Describe legal practices such as copyright, work for hire, royalties, and selling usage rights.
      2. Show how to present your work to agencies and galleries.
    4. Use fundamental design elements.
      1. Describe the impact that framing and cropping have on an image.
      2. Demonstrate how to use the “rule of thirds”.
      3. Use contrast to enhance your images.
      4. Demonstrate how point of view can affect the interpretation of an image.
      5. Identify some of the “rules of thumb” employed by photographers involved in portraiture and landscape including managing motion, balance, and tension.
      6. Describe how to present your photographs to agencies and galleries.
      7. Summarize how to compose for photographs for specific audiences
    5. Analyze various qualities of light and be able to recognize, produce, and control various lighting conditions including: diffused, direct, direct diffused and back light.
      1. Summarize the basic concepts of degree of diffusion and direction of light.
      2. Analyze a variety of lighting equipment including lights, diffusers and reflectors, supports for lighting devices
      3. Discuss the purposes for using more than one lighting device, and how to position fill lights to achieve certain effects, such as studio, on camera, existing, supplemental, (reflectors, etc)
      4. Identify a variety of flash units, flash meters, and flash accessories, and understand how they are used.
      5. Calculate exposure meter reading.
      6. Identify the arrangement used in lighting for portraits and reflective objects, and to enhance the appearance of textured surfaces.
    6. Analyze photographs using vocabulary for photography and art to discuss weaknesses and strengths of various photographs.
      1. Discuss and debate the possible intention of various photographs
      2. Use reflection in evaluating own work.
      3. Describe portfolio strategies that are audience specific.
    7. Evaluate different lighting techniques used in portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate Rembrandt lighting
      2. Show Butterfly Lighting
      3. Adjust High Key Lighting
      4. Create short lighting
      5. Demonstrate Split Lighting
    8. Access different studio lights used in portrait photography.
      1. Identify Main Light
      2. Discuss fill Light
      3. Identify kicker light
      4. Discuss hair light
    9. Create location portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate family location portraits
      2. Show environmental executive portrait
    10. Evaluate different memory devices and file types associated with digital cameras.
      1. Demonstrate what pixels are and how they are used in digital photography.
      2. Describe digital file formats as they pertain to image capture (i.e. RAW, TIFF, JPEG).
      3. Summarize compression in digital file sizes as they pertain to image capture (i.e. Extra Fine, Fine, Basic, and Normal).
      4. Identify the difference between High and Low Resolution and how they are linked to pixilation.
      5. Identify common memory cards and camera compatibilities.
      6. Show necessary equipment used for downloading memory devices (i.e. cables, card readers, or drives).
      7. Demonstrate the workflow necessary to transfer files from a camera to another storage device.
    11. Analyze the appropriate use of the camera controls on a digital camera.
      1. Set the White balance
      2. Describe how to set the ISO
      3. Adjust the Resolution
      4. Calculate how to set the Burst mode
      5. Set the Auto bracketing
      6. Demonstrate how to set the Histograms, etc.
      7. Discuss how to set the Exposure Modes (Auto, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, and Continuous).
    12. Prepare a computer to correctly display digital images.
      1. Adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Use filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, levels, masks, retouching.
      4. Discuss the ethics of altering images.
      5. Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of a number of kinds of printers and printer technologies
    13. Create an Electronic Portfolio.
      1. Demonstrate how to create a photography portfolio website
      2. Create different categories for photographic work on the website.
    14. Create a Gallery Quality Printed Portfolio.
      1. Create photography prints for gallery display.
      2. Demonstrate how to mount prints for gallery display.
      3. Summarize how to display mounted prints for gallery display.

  
  • ART 195 - Design: Exploring Art Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    An introduction to basic techniques in media such as paper-making, clay, fibers and soft sculptures. Students will explore a variety of traditional approaches to express a contemporary vision.
    Competencies
    1. Define the following principles of design
      1. Line
      2. Shape
      3. Texture
      4. Color
      5. Balance
      6. Unity
      7. Pattern
      8. Emphasis
      9. Repetition and rhythm
    2. Play design game
      1. Take turns (two or more players) dividing space
      2. Color in with cray-pas
      3. Discuss which composition works best in terms of arrangement of line, shape, and color
    3. Plan Agam design
      1. Show slides of Agam’s work
      2. Paint two 7” x 10” pictures related in color, shape, and design
      3. Number back sides and cut the two paintings into strips 2” wide
      4. Accordion pleat 7” x 20” oaktag, glue one picture to one side of fan fold, then the other
      5. Mount on matt board
    4. Demonstrate techniques and uses of plaster mask making
      1. Create plaster face masks of each student; work in teams
      2. Discuss design possibilities
      3. Show slides from nature and art history
      4. Show slides on white plaster faces so student can get ideas of how to paint designs on the plaster
      5. Make a fancy or art history influence mask
      6. Use the plaster mask for a paper mold, or use mask for part of a life-sized sculpture, i.e., George Segal
    5. Demonstrate techniques for making handmade paper
      1. Plan a cardboard mold
      2. Make a frame and deckle
      3. Prepare slurry
      4. Make several sheets of paper to be used for
    6. Demonstrate a basic ability to use clay
      1. Use several clay tiles together for mosaic picture
      2. Combine tiles with weaving or table top
      3. Make an environment of several figures set in a scene
      4. Boxes, vases, or sculpture–slab built
    7. Demonstrate an ability to use surface design and plan designs for different dye techniques
      1. Disperse dye on silk scarves, yardage, or ties
      2. Heat transfer dye for soft sculpture or wall hangings or quilt
      3. Design tee-shirts
    8. Demonstrate an ability to do fiber projects for the following

  
  • ART 197 - Photography Assistant Basics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Students will learn about the expectations and demands of photo assisting commercial/portrait photographers through daily work at in studios and location shoots. Students will learn how to set up and break down photography equipment needed in daily photography shoots. Students will also learn how to set up tethered shooting using capture one software and Adobe Lightroom. Students will also learn about props and studio set design setup.  
    Prerequisite: ART 186  , ART 225  ,
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to: 

    1. Demonstrate the daily organization duties of a Photo Assistant. 
      1. Discuss the basic organization of photographer’s equipment. 
      2. Describe how to organize the photographer’s camera bag. 
      3. Explain how to set up the photographers work area. 
      4. Discuss transportation of the photographer’s gear to the studio set.
    2. Perform the Pre-Shoot preparations that need to be made for the photographer. 
      1. Demonstrate set up of studio lights. 
      2. Describe the set up of the laptop computer for tethered shooting. 
      3. Describe the best way to secure cabled to the ground using gaffer’s tape. 
    3. Distinguish how to keep all photography gear in working order. 
      1. Discuss how to charge and rotate camera batteries. 
      2. Name the best way to clean the camera image sensor. 
      3. Explain what is the best way to change a modeling light on the flash head.  
      4. Describe what is the best way to clean lenses and caps to the lenses. 
    4. Demonstrate how to set up and take down studio lighting. 
      1. Discuss how to set up a mono light head. 
      2. Define the function of a boom light. 
      3. Describe how to use background paper on set. 
      4. Demonstrate how to set up a Softbox and Octobox. 
      5. Identify an studio silk and how to set it up. 
    5. Evaluate communication skills that will be needed on set as a photo assistant. 
      1. Discuss why a great assistant is seen and not heard. 
      2. Identify the order of whom the assistant should communicate with on set. 
      3. Discuss why you should communicate any concerns with the shot with the photographer first before the client.             
      4. Discuss the importance of being anticipating the photographer’s needs on the set.  
    6. Demonstrate the Photo Assistants role in maintaining the computer and quality of focus and image quality. 
      1. Discuss the use of the capture one software to capture a digital image using the computer to trigger the camera. 
      2. Demonstrate how to set up the camera for tethered capture. 
      3. Identify how to check focus using the Capture One software. 
      4. Identify the IPTC info and how to fill it in for each digital file.  
    7. Classify the lighting set up used on set and file them in Job Worksheet. 
      1. Identify Job Worksheets. 
      2. Discuss filing lighting diagrams. 
      3. Explain importance of recording information on files shot for the client. 
    8. Demonstrate the ability to work with set designers, art directors, prop stylists. 
      1. Identify when the prop stylists need help moving products. 
      2. Discuss how to help set designer set up a wall and flooring on set. 
      3. Demonstrate how to work with art directors to display images on screen for   lay outs and cover over shots. 
    9. Evaluate different invoices and client booking software that is used by Photo Assistants. 
      1. Demonstrate how to use invoicing software. 
      2. Discuss how to use booking software to schedule clients. 
      3. Identify the clients needs for adding meta date and file info for their archive archive images. 

                 

                  

     

  
  • ART 203 - Art History I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 45
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This survey course is designed to explore the visual arts from painting, sculpture, architecture and crafts starting with prehistoric times through the Gothic Period. The time periods include but are not limited to the Stone Age, Ancient Near East, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, South East Asia, China, Japan, Ancient Rome, Early African, Islamic Art and Gothic Art. Through lecture and class discussion, students will develop an understanding of cultural and societal values, historical time periods, artistic themes and stylistic traits relating to iconic works of art and in context with the time period in which the art was created.
    Competencies
    1. Recognize artistic characteristics in relation to historical and cultural contexts.
      1. Identify formal artistic elements and design principles
      2. Label art elements
      3. Define art themes and Iconography
    2. Differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
      1. Describe iconic works of art in the canon of art history
      2. Categorize iconic works of art in the canon of art history
      3. Identify iconic works by name, artist, stylistic traits and date 
    3. Interpret the short and long-term emphasis of art works from ancient civilizations
      1. Discuss the role of prehistoric to Gothic works of art produced during that time period            
      2. Identify the role of prehistoric to Gothic art works in relationship to current time periods
    4. Analyze the function, formal elements and meaning of art objects in relation to ethnic groups and/or cultural or historic events
      1. Recognize artistic time periods in regard to formal artistic elements, design principles and art elements
      2. Interpret artistic themes
      3. Examine artistic roles
      4. Identify Iconography 
    5. Assess the meaning, function or purpose of the artwork from prehistoric to Gothic time periods
      1. Review key artistic characteristics and historical content in select artworks
      2. Evaluate art elements and design principles of selected artworks
      3. Determine artistic value in relation to cultural, historical or societal influences in selected works of art. 
    6. Produce written research relying on credible sources
      1. Compose a research paper with academic paper elements.
      2. Communicate an understanding of artwork as a  reflection of cultural, historical,political and societal factors
      3. Apply methods of interpreting artwork in context with cultural, historical, political and societal factors 

  
  • ART 204 - Art History II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 45
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course explores the visual arts of western civilization from painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and photography of the Renaissance period through the present day.  The periods include but are not limited to Baroque, Impressionism, Cubism, Expressionism, up to present day works. Cultivates a meaningful recognition of different styles, concepts and concerns through an analysis of selected paintings, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, metal work, and other mediums. Emphasizes the thematic issues prevalent in various time periods and diverse cultural, historical, societal and political areas. Examines interpretation, concepts, theories, and comparison of styles and techniques through readings, visual presentations, lecture and discussion.
    Competencies
    1. Recognize artistic characteristics in relation to historical and cultural contexts.
      1. Identify formal artistic elements and design principles
      2. Label art elements
      3. Define art themes and Iconography
    2. Differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
      1. Describe iconic works of art in the canon of art history
      2. Categorize iconic works of art in the canon of art history
      3. Identify iconic works by name, artist, stylistic traits and date
    3. Interpret the short and long-term emphasis of art works from various civilizations
      1. Discuss the role of Renaissance (to Expressionism, etc) to Contemporary, (Modern and current,etc.) works of art or other styles produced during those particular time periods
      2. Identify the role of Renaissance (to Expressionism, etc) works of art in relationship to Contemporary (Modern and current, etc.) works and/or cultural or historic events
    4. Analyze the function, formal elements and meaning of art objects in relation to ethnic groups and/or cultural or historic events
      1. Recognize artistic time periods in regard to formal artistic elements, design principles and art elements
      2. Interpret artistic themes
      3. Examine artistic roles
      4. Identify Iconography 
    5. Assess the meaning, function or purpose of the artwork from the Renaissance to Contemporary and Modern Art
      1. Review key artistic characteristics and historical content in select artworks
      2. Evaluate art elements and design principles of selected artworks
      3. Determine artistic value in relation to cultural, historical or societal influences in selected works of art. 
    6. Produce written research relying on credible sources
      1. Compose a research paper with academic paper elements
      2. Communicate an understanding of artwork as a reflection of cultural, historical, political and societal factors
      3. Apply methods of interpreting artwork in context with cultural, historical, political and societal factors

  
  • ART 225 - Photoshop for Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course teaches students how to work with Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Lightroom, the industry-standard photo image software programs. This class is an in depth look at the technical aspects of color management, images light and dark adjustments, and other techniques for preparing the image for output to print or be used on the internet by using the digital darkroom.
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Critque the purpose of the tools, palettes, and menus that are used in processing and manipulating photographs in Photoshop.
      1. Understand the relationship between pixels, image resolution, image quality, and image size in a Photoshop document.
      2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of the Photoshop RAW, TIFF, and JPEG file formats, and know how to save in each of these formats.
      3. Know how to read a histogram and understand its relationship to the digital image.
      4. Demonstrate how to isolate areas of an image using selection tools.
      5. Modify an image using non-destructive layers.
    2. Demonstrate how to adjust an image in camera raw mode.
      1. Use the tools to set a white balance.
      2. Adjust the image overall brightness and contrast.
      3. Explain how to adjust an image using curves.
      4. Edit spots and other distracting defects out the digital image.
      5. Describe how to size and straighten an image
      6. Adjust and change colors in the digital image
    3. Evaluate the proper procedure to crop and resize images.
      1. Crop scanned photos for maximum image detail.
      2. Crop digital camera photos for maximum image detail.
      3. Discuss the procedure for resizing digital images for minimum image detail loss.
    4. Perform how to download digital negatives/RAW photos.
      1. Understand the various options available for downloading images from a digital camera to your computer.
      2. Understand and be able to explain the advantages and disadvantages of working with the Digital RAW file format in Photoshop.
      3. Develop a strategy for archiving and retrieving digital negatives.
    5. Design the Foundations of layers in a digital image.
      1. Demonstrate a professional method for working with layers in the digital image.
      2. Discuss Layer styles.
      3. Explain an understanding of the layers panel.
      4. Discuss using masks to make composite images
    6. Assess what tools need to be used to make Tonal Adjustments.
      1. Discuss the value of Hue, Saturation and Lightness in an image.
      2. Explain and demonstrate how to correct color casts using Photoshop’s built-in automated color correction tool.
      3. Explain and demonstrate a professional method for correcting inaccurate flesh tones.
      4. Discuss the advantages of editing in 16-bit mode.
    7. Demonstrate how to use Lightroom to import digital images.
      1. Explain how to import images to Lightroom.
      2. Discuss working/building catalogs in Lightroom.
      3. Identify how to use folders in Lightroom.
    8. Perform how to make basic tonal adjustments in Lightroom
      1. Explain the basic adjustment process in Lightroom for digital images.
      2. Demonstrate how to crop and straighten images in Lightroom.
      3. Identify how to set a neutral tone in Lightroom.
      4. Discuss how to take spot out of a digital image in Lightroom.
      5. Demonstrate how to open an image in Photoshop.
    9. Evaluate how to size and export images from Lightroom
      1. Identify the tools needed to size a digital image in Lightroom.
      2. Discuss how to export an image from Lightroom to the desktop of a computer.
      3. Demonstrate how to use tools in Lightroom to name a digital image before exporting it.
      4. Explain the different options that can be used in the export process.

  
  • ART 226 - Alternative Photo Processes

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    For students who have mastered basic photographic principles and process. This class will be a guide that demonstrates a variety of alternative processes, encompassing both traditional and nontraditional techniques. Topics include Litho Printing, EIR Film, HIE Film, Spray Developing, Fotodye, Tone Zone, Sunprinting and Photograms.
    Prerequisite: ART 184 , ART 186  
    Competencies
    1. Create photographs by tuning their visual communication senses
      1. Describe some of the differences between the photographic image and visual perception
      2. Define “pre-visualization”.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the informational and psychological impact of the photographic medium on the viewer
      4. Explain the terms “composition and visual selection.”
      5. Define the meaning of the terms relating to composition and visual selection
      6. Describe “subject emphasis.”
      7. Define the nature of “figure-ground relationship” and “negative space”.
      8. Describe what is meant by “clarity, simplicity, complexity, balance symmetry and asymmetrical balance.”
      9. Discuss “style” as it relates to photos
      10. Explain the balance between “concept and craft.”
      11. Be able to explain and put into practice the items under “controlled photography.”
      12. Demonstrate in their pictures that they are practicing “photographic seeing.”
      13. Explain what is meant by “learning by example.”
      14. Present his/her work for critique and evaluate criticism
    2. Control tonal values by careful metering and development practices
      1. Demonstrate how to measure luminance with a reflected light meter
      2. Demonstrate how to achieve the correct Exposure Index
      3. Explain how to “calibrate” your system
      4. Tell what “field testing” is
      5. Describe how tone control can be applied to negative color films
      6. Describe how tone control can be applied to positive color films
      7. Demonstrate how to plot your own characteristic curves
      8. Define dark and light tones
      9. Explain normal contrast 
    3. Experiment with special photographic techniques
      1. Use a Skylight or UV filter to protect the lens
      2. Describe how to use infared color film
      3. Describe how to use black and white infared film
      4. Discuss the uses of ultra high-speed films and their applications
      5. Describe how to make multiple exposures on a frame of film
      6. Demonstrate the technique of vignetting
      7. Describe the techniques used in hand-coloring a black and white print
      8. Demonstrate exposure corrections to be made with certain filters, metering through a filter, how to put filter factors into use, and how to choose color contrast filters
      9. Demonstrate the use of a polarizing filter
      10. Demonstrate how to make a negative sandwich
      11. Make prints showing each of the following techniques: A black border mask, a white boarder mask, and a two enlarger mask
      12. Produce a roll of negative film using the coralizing technique
    4. Prepare a photograph for presentation
      1. Understand health warnings when using toners and tone prints properly
      2. Demonstrate proficiency in correct print mounting techniques, acccording to specifications of the instructor, including various methods available to the student
      3. Arrange a display of prints, paying attention to selection, arrangement and lighting
      4. Demonstrate how to properly build a portfolio, paying attention to selection, variety and continuity
    5. Produce a Lithograph Print
      1. Define the definition of a Lith Print
      2. Describe what a lith print consists of
      3. List what is involved in producing a lith print
      4. Explain how to compose a lith print 
    6. Produce an infrared EIR color print
      1. Define EIR
      2. Demonstrate how to expose EIR film
      3. List what is involved in producing and EIR print
      4. Explain how to compose an EIR print
    7. Produce an high-speed infrared black and white print
      1. Define HIE
      2. Demonstrate how to expose HIE film
      3. List what is involved in producing an HIE print
      4. Explain how to compose an HIE print
    8. Demonstrate spray developing
      1. Define spray developing
      2. Demonstrate how to produce a print using the spray developing technique
      3. Explain how to compose a print using the spray developing technique
    9. Produce a Fotodye print on any photographic emulsion
      1. Understand the definition of Fotodye
      2. Describe the qualities of a Fotodye print
      3. List what is involved in producing a Fotodye print
    10. Prepare a tone zone photograph for presentation
      1. Describe the qualities of a tone zone photograph
      2. Define tone zone
      3. List what is involved in producing a tone zone photograph for presentation
    11. Create a Sunprint on cyanotype paper
      1. Define sunprint
      2. Describe the qualities of a Sunprint
      3. List what is involved in producing a Sunprint
      4. Produce a Sunprint using the sun and tap water
    12. Create a Photogram on traditional photographic paper
      1. Define Photogram
      2. Explain what the qualities of a Photogram
      3. Produce a Photogram using non-photographic articles

  
  • ART 227 - Advanced Image Processing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course teaches students how to work with advanced features of Photoshop/Lightroom and Capture One software. This course builds on what was learned in Photoshop for Photographers ART 225  class. This class will delve deeper into the technical aspects of image developing and manipulation. 
    Prerequisite: ART 186  , ART 225  
    Competencies
     

    1. Demonstrates Blend Modes. 
      1. Understand two ways to blend in Photoshop. 
      2. Discuss retouching with blend modes. 
      3. Know blend modes for creativity. 
      4. Demonstrate contouring with blend modes. 
    2. Demonstrate how to use Color Grading. 
      1. Use Basic Color and Toning in Lightroom/Photoshop. 
      2. Adjust Toning with selective color in Photoshop. 
      3. Explain Color Lookup Tables in Photoshop. 
      4. Describe how to use curves for color adjustment. 
    3. Classify Digital Printing using Photoshop and Lightroom. 
      1. Discuss color management. 
      2. Identify workflow and proofing in Photoshop. 
      3. Discuss workflow and proofing in Lightroom 
      4. Discuss workflow and proofing in Capture One. 
    4. Evaluate Commercial and Lifestyle Retouching. 
      1. Identify the Client Brief. 
      2. Discuss RAW Processing and Color Grade 
      3. Create a File Setup and Mark up. 
      4. Identify Cleanup, Contouring, Shaping and Clipping, Background, and Isolation.
    5. Assess the purpose of the following Capture One tools/actions 
      1. Demonstrate a method for Global Image Adjustments. 
      2. Discuss Converting image to Black and White. 
      3. Explain an understanding of Sharpening and Noise Reduction. 
      4. Discuss using Creating and saving Style Presets.  
    6. Evaluate Selecting, Rating and Culling image techniques.
      1. Discuss basic selecting, rating and culling techniques. 
      2. Explain and demonstrate advanced selecting, rating and culling techniques.
      3. Demonstrate how to add metadata. 
    7. Demonstrate Capture One Image Management Basics.
      1. Explain how to organize images. 
      2. Discuss building catalogs. 
      3. Identify image file management automation. 
    8. Perform Basic Compositing Techniques 
      1. Explain the basic cropping, rotation, and straightening techniques.
      2. Demonstrate how to correct for perspective. 
      3. Identify what Tool behavior basics are.
    9. Demonstrate Tethered Shooting 
      1. Explain why a photographer needs to shoot Tethered. 
      2. Discuss how to Set Up you Tethered Capture of digital images. 
      3. Demonstrate how to Set Up you Tethered Hardware.
    10. Assess Exporting digital images from Capture One software
      1. Discuss Exporting with File > Export.
      2. Explain Exporting Strategies and Proofing Previews with Process Recipes.
      3. Understand How to Export for Social Media. 

     

                 

     

    INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: 

     

     

    Textbook(s): For each text used in this course, identify the minimum chapters to be covered in this course. 

     

    Study guide 

    Transparencies 

    Test banks 

    Computer hardware/software 

  
  • ART 228 - Fashion Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open

    This course is an advanced look at Fashion photography. This course is designed to assist the student in learning production of advanced Fashion techniques. This course builds on the skills learned in Portrait Photography II and will include various Fashion portrait assignments in the studio, outdoors and on location. A portfolio presentation is required upon completion.
    Prerequisite: ART 186 ART 225  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:  ART 292  
    Competencies

    1. Produce advanced professional Fashion photography styles.
      1. Create casual style portraits
      2. Create storytelling style portraits
      3. Create classic style portraits
      4. Create personal style portraits
    2. Evaluate different advanced lighting techniques used in Fashion photography.
      1. Construct Butterfly Lighting
      2. Demonstrate High Key Lighting
      3. Produce Short lighting
      4. Demonstrate Split Lighting
    3. Perform advanced location Fashion photography.
      1. Demonstrate location portraits
      2. Demonstrate environmental portrait
    4. Identify different studio lights used in Fashion photography.
      1. Identify Main Light
      2. Reproduce Fill Light
      3. Identify Kicker light
      4. Reproduce Hair light
    5. Evaluate advanced Fashion photography business practices.
      1. Identify pricing used in fashion photography
      2. Analyze marketing decisions
      3. Develop promotional material
      4. Create a professional presentation album
    6. Demonstrate ability to work with models
      1. Summarize speaking skills while working with models
      2. Demonstrate posing models
    7. Decide how to adjust and prepare digital images for delivery to clients.
      1. Demonstrate how to adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Show techniques using filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Describe how to edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, levels, masks, retouching.
      4. Summarize the ethics of altering images.
      5. Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of a number of kinds of printers and printer technologies.
    8. Create a composition and communicate a message.
      1. Examine the impact that framing and cropping have on an image.
      2. Show how to use contrast to enhance your images.
      3. Demonstrate how point of view can affect the interpretation of an image.
      4. Identify some of the “rules of thumb” employed by photographers involved in fashion photography portraiture and landscape including managing motion, balance, and tension.
      5. Access how to present your work to agencies and galleries.
      6. Classify how to compose photographs for specific audiences.
    9. Evaluate advanced digital images in both a printed and/or electronic format.
      1. Analyze/critique photographic work.
      2. Develop a portfolio of fashion photography digital images.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to print their photographs for display.
      4. Describe various options for displaying images.
      5. Display an image for presentation.

  
  • ART 283 - Commercial Photography II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Advanced commercial photography builds on the skills learned in Basic Commercial. The course studies studio and location commercial photography techniques with an emphasis on advertising photography. Studio operation procedures related to pricing, work flow, and scheduling are presented. A Portfolio is required from the student upon completion of the course.
    Prerequisite: ART 189  , ART 186  ,ART 225  , ART 192  , ART 292  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate advanced camera equipment and accessories used for commercial photography assignments.
      1. Demonstrate the selection of a camera’s advanced features and interchangeable lens capability.
      2. Evaluate the capabilities and limitations of their personal cameras.
      3. Make informed decisions about lens choices for particular assignments.
      4. Identify lighting devices for particular assignments.
      5. Identify peripheral devices for professionals (tripods, shutter release, etc.)
      6. Demonstrate appropriate software for the desired effect.
      7. Identify characteristics of camera shooting modes.
    2. Critique various qualities of light and be able to recognize, produce, and control various lighting conditions.
      1. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of lighting equipment.
      2. Differentiate and apply methodologies of lighting techniques and exposure.
      3. Demonstrate a high level of technical skill in photography of small products.
      4. Distinguish the differences between existing light, tungsten and strobe lighting.
      5. Relate lighting techniques to subject matter and apply accordingly.
    3. Give examples different flash units used in the studio for advanced commercial lighting.
      1. Identify studio main light.
      2. Identify studio fill light.
      3. Identify studio kicker light.
      4. Identify studio background light.
    4. Assess the advanced principles of art, design and composition.
      1. Demonstrate the multi-step process of workflow in Image capture.
      2. Identify the multi-step process of workflow as it relates to image editing.
      3. Identify the multi-step process of workflow as it relates to image output.
    5. Evaluate the “workflow” while working on advanced commercial photography assignments.
      1. Demonstrate simplicity/emphasis.
      2. Execute the rule of thirds.
      3. Demonstrate perspective or point of view.
      4. Identify leading lines.
    6. Critique Advanced On-Location Lighting
      1. Analyze/critique photographic work.
      2. Develop a portfolio of commercial photography digital images.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to print their photographs for display.
      4. Describe how to display an image for presentation.
      5. Create the ability to present final projects on the web.
      6. Create the ability to present final projects in book form.
    7. Evaluate advanced digital images in both a printed and/or electronic format.
      1. Describe the techniques for using advanced portable supplemental flash.
      2. Set up studio lights and demonstrate advanced on-location lighting using techniques.
    8. Prepare advanced digital images.
      1. Demonstrate effective speaking and listening skills with clients.
      2. Show advanced time, task, and resource management skills.
      3. Use advanced critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.
    9. Evaluate Workplace Readiness Skills
      1. Demonstrate how to adjust digital images using advanced software tools.
      2. Show techniques using filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Describe how to edit a digital image using High Definition resolution Imaging.

  
  • ART 287 - Portrait Photography II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is an advanced look at portrait photography. This course is designed to assist the student in learning production of advanced portrait techniques. This course builds on the skills learned in Portrait Photography 1 and will include various portrait assignments in the studio, outdoors and on location. A portfolio presentation is required upon completion.
    Prerequisite: ART 186  , ART 225  , ART 192  , ART 292  
    Competencies
    1. Produce advanced professional portrait photography styles.
      1. Create casual style portraits
      2. Create storytelling style portraits
      3. Create classic style portraits
      4. Create personal style portraits
    2. Evaluate different advanced lighting techniques used in portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate Rembrandt lighting
      2. Construct Butterfly Lighting
      3. Demonstrate High Key Lighting
      4. Produce Short lighting
      5. Demonstrate Split Lighting
    3. Perform advanced location portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate family location portraits
      2. Demonstrate environmental executive portrait 
    4. Identify different studio lights used in portrait photography.
      1. Identify Main Light
      2. Reproduce Fill Light
      3. Identify Kicker light
      4. Reproduce Hair light
    5. Evaluate advanced portrait photography business practices.
      1. Identify pricing used in portrait photography
      2. Analyze marketing decisions
      3. Develop a promotional calendar
      4. Create a professional presentation album
    6. Demonstrate ability to work with models
      1. Summarize speaking skills while working with models
      2. Demonstrate posing models
    7. Decide how to adjust and prepare digital images for delivery to clients.
      1. Demonstrate how to adjust digital images using software tools.
      2. Show techniques using filters to readjust or sharpen images.
      3. Describe how to edit an image using software including: burning, dodging, levels, masks, retouching.
      4. Summarize the ethics of altering images.
      5. Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of a number of kinds of printers and printer technologies.
    8. Create a composition and communicate a message.
      1. Examine the impact that framing and cropping have on an image.
      2. Describe how to use the “rule of thirds”.
      3. Show how to use contrast to enhance your images.
      4. Demonstrate how point of view can affect the interpretation of an image.
      5. Identify some of the “rules of thumb” employed by photographers involved in portraiture and landscape including managing motion, balance, and tension.
      6. Access how to present your work to agencies and galleries.
      7. Classify how to compose photographs for specific audiences.
    9. Evaluate advanced digital images in both a printed and/or electronic format.
      1. Analyze/critique photographic work.
      2. Develop a portfolio of portrait photography digital images.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to print their photographs for display.
      4. Describe various options for displaying images.
      5. Display an image for presentation.

  
  • ART 289 - Photojournalism

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students will learn basic visual and technical aspects of photojournalism using a digital camera while photographing a series of general news, feature, performing arts, sports and community events. (This course uses digital cameras only.)
    Competencies
    1. Use the basic DSLR digital camera.
      1. Identify basic types of digital DSLR cameras.
      2. Discuss functions of adjustable digital DSLR cameras.
      3. List shutter settings on standard digital DSLR cameras.
    2. Use good metering techniques when photographing.
      1. Define what is meant by “TTL metering.”
      2. Describe the differences in metering patterns between averaging, restricted angle and spot meters.
      3. Demonstrate how an incident light meter and a reflected light meter are used to determine exposure.
      4. Determine the three most common patterns for measuring light.
    3. Use various types of ISO speeds for the correct job application.
      1. Explain the light sensitivity sensor for your digital camera.
      2. Explain the difference between ISO speeds and noise.
      3. Define and give verbal examples of the uses of slow, medium, and fast speeds.
      4. List how one would use the various speed settings on your digital camera in different situations.
      5. Demonstrate the use of ISO on a light meter and on a digital SLR camera.
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in photojournalistic composition.
      1. Show composition as the assembly of elements into a whole.
      2. Identify visual elements as distinct groupings of shapes, colors, and tones.
      3. Apply the rule of thirds as the most fundamental rule in photography.
    5. Demonstrate the technical and visual aspects of photojournalism by producing a news photograph.
      1. Describe what a news photograph consists of
      2. Define news photography.
      3. List what is involved in producing a news photograph.
    6. Demonstrate the technical and visual aspects of photojournalism by producing a feature photograph.
      1. Describe a feature photograph consists of.
      2. Define feature photography.
      3. List what is involved in producing a feature photograph.
      4. Explain how to compose a feature photograph.
    7. Demonstrate the technical and visual aspects of photojournalism by producing a portrait.
      1. Describe a portrait.
      2. Define a portrait.
      3. List what is involved in producing a portrait.
      4. Explain how to compose a portrait.
    8. Demonstrate the technical and visual aspects of photojournalism by producing a sports photograph.
      1. Describe a sports photograph.
      2. Define sports photograph.
      3. List what is involved in producing a sports photograph.
      4. Explain how to compose a sports photograph.
    9. Develop photojournalism ethics.
      1. Explain ethics in regard to photo use.
      2. Practice ethical editing.
      3. Demonstrate ethical cropping.
      4. Explain how photo manipulation may be unethical
      5. Describe proper conduct of a photojournalism.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ART 291 - Travel Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Advanced principles of imaging making and presentation will be explored with spirit and knowledge that is expected to engender an appreciation for photography, travel and the visual image. This is a story telling class where students will be challeneged to express a sense of place with their images. (This class uses film or digital DSLR style cameras).
    Prerequisite:  ART 186 , ART 225  
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Evaluate places that offer good photographic opportunities.
      1. Define locations that are “off the beaten path”.
      2. Explain where to photograph images of towns and cities.
      3. Identify unique, unusual, and specific interest points.
      4. Produce creative images of places.
    2. Assess how to prepare for travel photography.
      1. Cite the advantages of being familiar with equipment and accessories.
      2. Decide which camera to use for a given photographic opportunity.
      3. Recognize a photographic opportunity in good or bad weather.
      4. Explain how equipment should be packed.
      5. Analyze the image making opportunities from the beginning of a trip to the finish.
      6. Demonstrate the ability to work with all surroundings.
    3. Evaluate the ability to produce images within the camera while on location.
      1. Explain the difficulty in photographing wild animals away from protected areas.
      2. Analyze the purpose of using specified equipment to photograph in different situations.
      3. Explain the purpose of using a blind.
    4. Differentiate how photographers use various means to create artistic expressions.
      1. Relate creative expression in photography to historical locations.
      2. Demonstrate what works in terms of lighting, framing and perspective.
      3. Analyze an image that exists in your “mind’s eye”.
      4. Distinguish between what “makes or breaks” a photograph.
    5. Evaluate an interesting image.
      1. Recognize the process of creating a scene.
      2. Demonstrate a visually interesting photograph.
      3. Identify techniques in designing composition.
      4. Explore photography through the subjects level whenever possible.
      5. Identify and demonstrate the power points of close up composition.
      6. Recognize the quality, direction and intensity of light.
      7. Recognize the decisive moment of peak composition.
      8. Cite and demonstrate ways of using the Rule of Thirds.
    6. Demonstrate the balance between aperture size and shutter speed.
      1. Explain how shutter speed and aperture size are reciprocal in light exposures.
      2. Describe the settings of shutter speed and aperture as they relate to each other.
      3. Cite the advantages and disadvantages of a focal plane and leaf shutter.
      4. Describe the terms “stopping down” and “opening up”.
      5. Demonstrate the panning technique.
    7. Assess the uses of color and B & W photography in nature photography.
      1. Demonstrate the knowledge of choosing the right combination of lighting, exposure, and timing.
      2. Demonstrate the correct filtration for color images.
      3. Identify the correct combination of composition for action photography.
    8. Critque the different types of light in nature photography.
      1. Demonstrate how and when to use a flash in nature photography.
      2. Discuss the different types of flash possibility for nature photography.
      3. Describe what time of day the quality of light is at it’s best.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to prepare for a low-light outing.
    9. Examine compositional elements.
      1. Define the effects of composition.
      2. Describe the differences between good composition and poor composition.
      3. Define compositional concerns such as line, pattern, repetition, contrast and foreground/background relationship.
      4. Demonstrate ways that composition affects the content of the photograph.
      5. Compare the use of the camera controls and light to enhance composition.
    10. Evaluate the difference between landscape and cityscape in photography.
      1. List the two basic ways to photograph landscapes.
      2. Identify a landscape as a non-representational expression of color, shape and texture.
      3. Demonstrate how to photograph a landscape solely as a visual experience, unrelated to its  biological essence.
      4. Identify the impact of cityscape composition in photography.
      5. Select and complete a photographic composition which demonstrates cityscape photography.

  
  • ART 292 - Studio Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students learn to arrange and compose a photograph in a deliberate process using studio flash photography. Students learn to analyze the elements in a scene, arrange them and use artificial light for the desired effect. Projects test student imagination, creativity, technical skills and willingness to experiment with studio lighting while improving their photographic expertise. 
    Prerequisite:  ART 186  
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Create photographs by using different qualities of light.
      1. Analyze basic light direction in a published photograph and describe its direction and whether or not it is direct or diffuse light.
      2. Describe how shadows can add drama to an image, and alter the perception of volume in the subject.
      3. Define “specular highlights”.
      4. Define “side lighting”.
      5. Define “cross lighting”.
      6. Demonstrate how to determine a lighting ratio.
      7. Describe the difference in color between sunlight, tungsten and fluorescent lights.
      8. Demonstrate the setups for the following types of studio lighting: Rembrandt, side, and silhouette.
      9. Describe the functions of the following lights: main (key), fill, back (hair) and background.
    2. Create photographs using studio lighting and equipment.
      1. Define the “inverse square law.”
      2. Describe each of the various types of lighting instruments or tools available.
      3. Describe the various types of tools used in modifying light.
      4. Demonstrate how to use the various types of flash lighting.
      5. Demonstrate how to judge the various effects of lighting on the subject.
      6. Demonstrate expertise in using various types of lighting on the subject from a single light to multiple lights.
      7. Demonstrate how to set up a multiple lit photography studio from one light to five lights.
    3. Use color theory and color basics to produce pleasing digital images.
      1. Name the additive primary colors.
      2. Name the subtractive primary colors.
      3. Explain what is meant by “degrees Kelvin.”
      4. Describe what is meant by “color contamination by reflection form colored surfaces.”
      5. Tell what “color balance” is and how to correct it.
      6. Demonstrate the proper metering technique for light color tones.
      7. Discuss problems relating to color design principles.
    4. Demonstrate how to set up and take down studio lighting.
      1. Discuss how to set up a mono light head.
      2. Explain how to assemble a beauty dish.
      3. Define the function of a boom light.
      4. Describe how to use background paper on set.
      5. Demonstrate how to set up a softbox.
      6. Identify a octobox.
      7. Demonstrate an understanding of setting up a 4 light set up.
    5. Evaluate different lighting modifiers.
      1. Discuss the uses for softbox in portrait lighting.
      2. Identify the uses for a large octobox on set.
      3. Demonstrate how to use a reflector on a mono light.
      4. Discuss how to use a strip box.
    6. Assess high key lighting technique.
      1. Discuss the use of white paper background in high key lighting.
      2. Demonstrate how to use a 4 light set up in high key lighting.
      3. Identify how to light the background paper in high key lighting.
      4. Discuss the need for even lighting in high key lighting.
    7. Classify different flash units used in studio lighting.
      1. Identify studio main light.
      2. Discuss studio fill light.
      3. Explain studio kicker light.
      4. Identify studio background light.
    8. Demonstrate studio lighting for tabletop photography.
      1. Identify what a sweep is used for in tabletop photography.
      2. Discuss what light modifiers might be used in tabletop photography.
      3. Demonstrate how to shoot a high key tabletop lighting set up.
    9. Evaluate different lighting techniques used in studio portrait photography.
      1. Demonstrate Rembrandt Lighting technique.
      2. Discuss Butterfly lighting technique.
      3. Identify Short Lighting technique.
      4. Demonstrate how to use a hair light.

  
  • ART 294 - Architectural Photography

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is designed for students who want to further enhance their photographic knowledge and abilities in Architecture photography. It is an application of the skills learned in Digital Photography with an emphasis on professional jobs and assignments used in Architectural photography. Architecture students can prosper by learning to see light and how light alters the visual impact of architectural forms. This course will teach students to create successful images of exterior architecture, interior architectural design, as well as architectural models.
    Prerequisite: ART 186  , ART 225  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the History of Architectural Photography
      1. Review the early History of Architectural Photography.
      2. Paraphrase the Invention of Photography.
      3. Identify the differences between photography in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries.
      4. Recognize the Authenticity in Architectural Photos.
      5. Identify forms of Architectural Photography.
    2. Evaluate the Advantages and Disadvantages of Digital Cameras
      1. Examine the availability and resolution of Images.
      2. Compare the different lens qualities.
      3. Recall digital image processing.
      4. Distinguish the different types of digital cameras.
    3. Assess the Different Types of Lenses
      1. Identify the reproduction characteristics.
      2. Select the right focal length for interior/exterior architecture photography.
      3. Examine Tilt/Shift lenses.
      4. Compare plastic vs. glass lenses.
      5. Locate ideal camera/lens combination for architecture.
    4. Justify The Role of Architecture as a Photographic Subject
      1. Create perspective in the photographs you take.
      2. Classify converging verticals and how they affect your photographs.
      3. Reproduce camera standpoint for different situations.
      4. Demonstrate the effects of Focal Length.
      5. Identify Image Formats.
    5. Design the Ideal Compositions and Framing for Architectural Photography
      1. Define: What is Composition?
      2. Relate Composition and a subject’s surroundings.
      3. Reproduce selective framing.
    6. Perform Interior Architectural Photography
      1. Identify the important Interior subjects.
      2. Demonstrate the correct Perspective, Standpoint and Focal Length.
      3. Identify Image Formats.
      4. Demonstrate the Camera Settings and Lighting.
    7. Evaluate the Different Digital Image Formulas
      1. Examine: What is RAW?
      2. Distinguish the Differences Between JPEG and RAW.
      3. Analyze the Advantages and Disadvantages of Shooting in RAW Format.
    8. Generate Proper Panoramas
      1. Identify how to create a Planar Panorama.
      2. Show to create a Shift Panorama.
      3. Demonstrate Stitching Photographs together.
    9. Access HDR and DRI Images
      1. Create an HDR Image using Photoshop.
      2. Demonstrate DRI Processing in Photoshop.
      3. Evaluate HDR Effects Using a Single RAW Source Image.
      4. Identify Creative Tips and Tricks.

  
  • ART 929 - Individual Projects

    Credits: 2-6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6-18
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students will have the opportunity to further develop their photographic expertise in one or more of the following photography classifications: Architectural, Banquet, Postcards/Marketing Publications, Business Portraits, Fine Arts, Fashion, Furniture, Industrial, Illustrative, Photojournalism, Public Relations, Conventions/Special Events, Education or Weddings. Students meet with instructor for project review once a week until project is completed. This course is repeatable up to 6 credits.
    Prerequisite: ART 226 , ART 289 , ART 291 , and ART 292  
    Competencies
    1. Identify an appropriate topic
      1. Discuss skill levels that re appropriate types of projects
      2. Prepare a proposal
      3. Develop a list of objectives
      4. Identify how objectives will be achieved
      5. Identify expected outcomes
      6. List required resources
      7. Describe the final visual outcome
    2. Plan an appropriate project
      1. Estimate the costs involved in the project
      2. Estimate the time for each sub set of the project
      3. Research and determine necessary equipment
      4. Identify and research locations
      5. Develop a schedule for shooting assignments
      6. Develop a list of appropriate contacts
    3. Demonstrate how to prepare for identified photography classification project
      1. Cite the advantages of being familiar with appropriate equipment and accessories
      2. Decide which film or sensor to use for a given photographic opportunity
      3. Explain which, and how, equipment should be packed or maintained
      4. Analyze and describe the image making opportunities for the photography classification
    4. Identify appropriate images
      1. Recognize the process of creating a scene
      2. Predict a visually interesting photograph
      3. Identify techniques in designing composition
      4. Identify and demonstrate the power points of close up composition
      5. Recognize the quality, direction and intensity of light
      6. Recognize the decisive moment of peak composition
      7. Cite and demonstrate ways of using the Rule of Thirds
    5. Illustrate the balance between aperture size and shutter speed
      1. Demonstrate the controllers that show motion and depth of field in a photograph
      2. Judge the effects of variable equipment settings
      3. Analyze how lighting impacts the balance
      4. Plan a series of images that will be used for comparison
      5. Generate a series of images that will be analyzed
      6. Assess and select images that display desired effects
      7. Judge the affects of motion on images
      8. Develop a series of images that incorporate motion
      9. Analyze how motion affects the image
      10. Assess and select images that display desired effects and improve the project
    6. Judge the affects of lighting on images
      1. Develop a series of images that incorporate specialized lighting affects
      2. Analyze how the lighting affects the image
      3. Assess and select images that display desired effects and enhance the project
    7. Judge the affect of color on images
      1. Develop a series of images that use color variances and affects
      2. Assess how the affects of color impacts the images
      3. Conclude which images will add desired interest to the project
    8. Display the use of Line and Angle to enhance a project
      1. Develop a series of images that use line and angle affects
      2. Assess how the affects impact the images
      3. Judge which images will add desired interest to the project
    9. Evaluate the effect of equipment selection on image quality
      1. Develop a series of images using instructor identified film and digital equipment
      2. Assess how the selection of equipment affected the images
      3. Select which images will best fit the project
    10. Demonstrate the impact of design on the outcome of images
      1. Develop a series of images with various impacts on the design
      2. Assess how the design impacts the images
      3. Determine which images will display the desired outcomes
    11. Defend a portfolio of work as defined by the selected project
      1. Assemble a portfolio of images that demonstrate the desired visual outcomes
      2. Describe how the portfolio accomplishes the outcomes
      3. Judge the portfolio’s strengths and weaknesses
      4. Explain how each image adds to the portfolios value and makes it whole


Associate Degree Nursing

  
  • ADN 110 - Introduction to Professional Nursing

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. The course will focus on the introduction of professional nursing concepts.
    Competencies
    1. Identify behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Discuss characteristics of nursing as a profession.
      2. Recognize the role of the professional registered nurse.
      3. Identify the nurse-client relationship.
    2. Describe safe nursing practice.
      1. Discuss the scope of nursing practice.
      2. Identify legal and ethical aspects related to professional nursing practice.
    3. Describe communication techniques in nursing practice.
      1. Define professional communication.
      2. Identify the nurse’s role as a member of the healthcare team.
    4. Discuss culture.
      1. Identify cultural competence.
      2. Outline how culture relates to professionalism in nursing.
    5. Define nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Identify client populations.
      2. Discuss how client age influences professional nursing behaviors.
    6. Describe health promotion.
      1. Identify health promotion.
      2. Indicate how health promotion relates to professionalism in nursing.
    7. Identify the Nursing Process.
      1. Recognize the professional nurse’s responsibility related to the nursing process.
      2. Discuss the nurse’s responsibility in ensuring quality healthcare.

  
  • ADN 126 - Passport to ADN Nursing

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Assists preparation for a successful transition to the ADN program. Passport focuses on knowledge components, student expectations, study/time management skills, critical thinking and concept mapping with emphasis on application.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Standing Nursing program
    Competencies
    1. Analyze current personal PN knowledge and skills.
      1. Identify areas of strengths and weaknesses related to LPN/LVN knowledge and skills.
      2. Develop a comprehensive plan to address identified weaknesses.
    2. Utilize tools for transitioning success.
      1. Explore DMACC resources available to assist with success in the .ADN program.
      2. Identify personal survival behaviors and self-defeating behaviors.
      3. Describe habits that facilitate success of returning to college.
      4. Discuss a variety of tools which can facilitate transitional success.
      5. Create a personal study plan to facilitate transitional success.
    3. Apply the nursing process to concept mapping.
      1. Review the inter-relationships among the components of the nursing process.
      2. Review NAQNDA diagnostic statements.
      3. Discuss concept mapping as a tool for utilizing the nursing process.
      4. Apply the process of a concept mapped plan of care to a variety of client scenarios.
      5. Develop a concept map plan of care for a simulated client with complex medical problems.
    4. Explore the application of critical thinking in nursing.
      1. Examine definitions of critical thinking.
      2. Compare and contrast thinking skills that are related to critical thinking.
      3. Examine personal critical thinking ability.
      4. Explore the difference between problem solving within the LPN scope of practice and critical thinking within the RN scope of practice.
    5. Apply the steps of the nursing process to selected client care situations
      1. Develop a care plan for a selected client
    6. Recognize normal assessment findings
      1. Explain the relationship between the concept of health and assessment data collection
      2. Discuss developmental considerations
      3. Discuss the normal range of assessment findings
    7. Perform a systematic health assessment
      1. Discuss interview techniques
      2. Describe the components of the health history
      3. Differentiate the four basic assessment skills
      4. Identify appropriate equipment used during health screening and physical examination
      5. Explain the basic components of a general survey
      6. Perform a general survey on a selected client
      7. Perform a systematic health assessment on a selected client
    8. Demonstrate safety principles and related nursing skills at the LPN level of care
      1. Differentiate medical and surgical aseptic procedures
      2. Demonstrate safe administration of parenteral medications
      3. Adapt medication administration procedures to the specific needs of clients across the life span
      4. Accurately calculate drug dosages
      5. Demonstrate intravenous management skills
      6. Discuss nursing care of the post-operative client
      7. Perform procedures designed to drain the urinary bladder
      8. Discuss nursing interventions for the postpartum and newborn client

  
  • ADN 140 - Nursing Fundamentals

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. This course will focus on introductory nursing care. This course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, increasingly complex nursing concepts. This course will includes lab and practicum application.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 110   with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Apply behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Describe the professional nurse?s responsibility related to assessment.
      2. Demonstrate professional nursing behaviors related to assessment and infection control.
    2. Identify safe nursing practice.
      1. Demonstrate principles of safety and infection control.
      2. Discuss National Safety Goals.
    3. Practice communication techniques.
      1. Describe therapeutic communication.
      2. Demonstrate effective professional communication.
      3. Identify methods of documentation used in healthcare.
      4. Examine client’s ability to communicate.
    4. Utilize the influence of culture on nursing care decisions.
      1. Recognize the influence of culture on assessment findings.
      2. Identify how culture affects holistic assessment.
    5. Utilize knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Describe normal client assessment findings across the life span.
      2. Recognize alterations to assessments findings across the life span.
    6. Discuss knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Apply principles of holistic assessment.
      2. Discuss principles of health and wellness.
    7. Explain the nursing process.
      1. Discuss the steps of the nursing process.
      2. Utilize the nursing process in the care of clients.

  
  • ADN 210 - Advanced Nursing Practice

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. The course will focus on demonstration of independent and collaborative nursing care. The course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, intermediate nursing concepts. This course will include lab application.
    Prerequisite: ADN 140   with a “C” or better and BIO 173  with a “C” or better and ENG 105  with a “C” or better
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 240    with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Apply behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Explore the professional standards of a nurse.
      2. Demonstrate professional nursing behaviors related to medication administration and intravenous therapy.
      3. Demonstrate professional nursing behaviors related to independent and collaborative nursing care.
    2. Apply safe nursing practice.
      1. Describe principles of safety for selected clients.
      2. Review the concept of safety when providing independent and collaborative nursing care.
      3. Demonstrate the role of the registered nurse in medication and intravenous therapy, including advanced dosage calculation.
    3. Utilize communication techniques.
      1. Apply professional communication within client care scenarios.
      2. Apply methods of documentation.
    4. Identify implications of culture on nursing care.
      1. Outline the concept of cultural competence.
      2. Discuss cultural competence within client care scenarios.
      3. Identify cultural issues related to therapeutic interventions when providing nursing care.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Explore individualized care for selected clients.
      2. Describe the concept of client care across the lifespan within client care scenarios.
    6. Utilize knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Apply health promotion within client care scenarios.
      2. Discuss appropriate health promotion activities based on client needs.
    7. Apply the nursing process.
      1. Recognize the inter-relationships among the components of the nursing process.
      2. Explain the nursing process within client care scenarios.

  
  • ADN 240 - Health and Illness Concepts I

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 9
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. This course will focus on application of independent and collaborative nursing care. The course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, intermediate to complex nursing concepts. Course includes a variety of settings. Course includes practicum application.
    Prerequisite: ADN 140   with a “C” or better and BIO 173  with a “C” or better and ENG 105  with a “C” or better
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 210    with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Employ behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Demonstrate the professional nurse’s responsibility related to nurse client relationship.
      2. Demonstrate the professional nursing behaviors related to roles.
    2. Practice safe nursing practice.
      1. Demonstrate the role of the registered nurse in medication and intravenous fluid management including advanced dosage calculation.
      2. Demonstrate principles of safe practice when implementing and documenting nursing interventions.
    3. Apply communication techniques.
      1. Employ effective communication to facilitate client care.
      2. Demonstrate individualized therapeutic communication within client care.
    4. Employ culturally competent nursing care.
      1. Apply cultural competence as a provider of client care.
      2. Demonstrate cultural competence within client care.
    5. Apply knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Demonstrate effective client care across the lifespan.
      2. Apply the nursing process to care of clients across the lifespan.
      3. Validate family roles and importance when providing nursing care.
    6. Model knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Identify client’s health promotion needs in a variety of healthcare settings.
      2. Demonstrate health promotion within client care.
    7. Apply the nursing process.
      1. Utilize the nursing process to provide nursing care in a variety of settings.
      2. Utilize standardized plans of care.

  
  • ADN 416 - Family Health Nursing

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides an in-depth study of family health nursing, including childbearing, parenting, and illnesses of children and adolescents. Concepts of acute and chronic illness, disability and dying are included.
    Prerequisite: PNN 605 , PNN 606 , PNN 351 , ENG 105 , SPC 122 BIO 732  or 187.
    Corequisite: ADN 611  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the history and emerging roles of family health care
    2. Apply the nursing process when caring for the childbearing family
      1. Examine the nursing care of the antepartal client
      2. Inter-relate physiological and psychological changes of pregnancy with prenatal nursing care
      3. Examine the influence of cultural/ethnic values and customs in nurse/family interactions
      4. Examine the management of high-risk pregnancy
      5. Examine nursing care for the intrapartal client as it relates to each stage of labor
      6. Explain pain management for the intrapartal client
      7. Discuss management of the client with an episiotomy or laceration
      8. Inter-relate physiological changes of a postpartum client with postpartum nursing care
      9. Inter-relate physiological changes of a newborn client with newborn nursing care
      10. Perform newborn assessment
      11. Promote parent-infant attachment behaviors
      12. Discuss the role transition experienced by new parents and other family members
      13. Perform postpartal assessment
      14. Provide holistic nursing care for the childbearing family
      15. Conduct relevant teaching to meet the needs of childbearing families
      16. Implement needed interventions based on changing client status
      17. Examine the management of high-risk pregnancy and reproductive issues
      18. Discuss delivery complications/special conditions
      19. Examine postpartum complications
      20. Discuss postpartum depression
    3. Examine the nursing role for supporting a family with infertility
    4. Examine the nursing role for supporting parenting of the well and ill child
      1. Discuss the reactions of a family with a child who has an acute illness, chronic illness or disability
      2. Examine the nursing role of supporting a family with a child who has an acute illness, chronic illness, or disability
    5. Apply the nursing process when caring for individuals and their families dealing with childhood illnesses or health disorders
      1. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various respiratory disorders
      2. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with a respiratory disorder
      3. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various gastrointestinal disorders
      4. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with gastrointestinal disorder
      5. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various musculoskeletal disorders
      6. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with a musculoskeletal disorder
      7. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various integumentary disorders
      8. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with an integumentary disorder
      9. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various genitourinary disorders
      10. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with genitourinary disorder
      11. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various cerebral disorders
      12. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with a cerebral disorder
      13. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various cardiovascular disorders
      14. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with a cardiovascular disorder
      15. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various hematological or immunological disorders
      16. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with a hematological or immunological disorder
      17. Compare and contrast the nursing care for individuals with various endocrine disorders
      18. Discuss the nursing care for a family of an individual with an endocrine disorder
      19. Support child and family during the child?s illness or health disorder
      20. Provide nursing care reflective of developmental level of child
      21. Implement individualized nursing care based on acute and chronic illnesses of the child
      22. Conduct relevant teaching to meet the needs of child and family
      23. Revise plan of care based on evaluation of client situation
    6. Apply the nursing process when caring for individuals and their families dealing with birth defects, chronic illness or disability, terminal illness or dying
      1. Discuss birth injuries, genetics, and anomalies of the newborn
      2. Compare prenatal and postnatal tests used to determine the presence of birth anomalies
      3. Explore the emotional impact on a family with the birth of a baby with a birth anomaly
      4. Explore community agencies and support groups for a family with a child who has a birth anomaly

  
  • ADN 420 - Health and Illness Concepts IIa

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. This course will focus on the integration of independent and collaborative nursing care. The course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, increasingly complex nursing concepts. The course includes complex care of clients with altered health status in a variety of settings. Course includes practicum application.
    Prerequisite: ADN 210   with a C or better,  ADN 240  with a C or better, PSY 121  with a C or better,  BIO 186  with a C or better, BIO 732  with a C or better,  SPC 101  with a C or better.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 450   with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Integrate behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Demonstrate behavior within the legal and ethical scope of a professional nurse.
      2. Examine professional nursing roles related to care of clients with altered health status.
    2. Integrate safe nursing practice.
      1. Assess client safety.
      2. Implement unique safety interventions as a component of nursing care.
      3. Examine safety interventions for clients with altered health status.
    3. Integrate communication techniques.
      1. Organize communication appropriate for client.
      2. Implement effective written and verbal communication to facilitate effective care for clients with altered health status.
    4. Demonstrate cultural competence.
      1. Analyze impact of culture on health care decisions.
      2. Implement nursing care that is culturally competent.
    5. Integrate knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Analyze health care concepts across the lifespan and determine how concepts are related.
      2. Structure nursing care to meet client needs in an age and developmentally appropriate manner.
    6. Integrate knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Organize appropriate health promotion education.
      2. Outline health promotion materials based on client’s developmental level and psychological abilities.
    7. Integrate the nursing process.
      1. Plan and implement an individualized plan of care.
      2. Evaluate the impact of nursing care for clients with altered health status.

  
  • ADN 450 - Health and Illness Concepts IIb

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. This course will focus on the integration of independent and collaborative nursing care. The course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, increasingly complex nursing concepts. The course includes complex physiological and psychosocial care in a variety of settings. Course includes practicum application.
    Prerequisite: PSY 121   with a C or better, BIO 186  with a C or better,  BIO 732  with a C or better and SPC 101  with a C or better.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 420   with a C or better
    Competencies
    1. Integrate behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Demonstrate behavior within the legal and ethical scope of a professional nurse.
      2. Examine professional nursing roles related to care of clients with physiologic and psychosocial illness
    2. Integrate safe nursing practice.
      1. Assess client safety.
      2. Implement unique safety interventions as a component of nursing care.
      3. Examine safety interventions for clients with physiologic and psychosocial needs.
    3. Integrate communication techniques.
      1. Identify communication appropriate for client.
      2. Implement effective written and verbal communication to facilitate effective care for clients with complex physiologic and psychosocial illness.
    4. Demonstrate cultural competence.
      1. Analyze impact of culture on health care decisions.
      2. Implement nursing care that is culturally competent.
    5. Integrate knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Analyze health care concepts across the lifespan and determine how concepts are related.
      2. Structure nursing care to meet client needs in an age and developmentally appropriate manner.
    6. Integrate knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Organize appropriate health promotion education.
      2. Outline health promotion materials based on client’s developmental level and psychological abilities.
    7. Integrate the nursing process.
      1. Plan and implement an individualized plan of care.
      2. Evaluate the impact of nursing care for clients with physiologic and psychosocial illness.

  
  • ADN 474 - Mental Health Nursing

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides an in-depth study of mental health nursing, including mental health needs, mental illness and addictive disorders. Communication and principles of group process are emphasized.
    Prerequisite: PNN 605 , PNN 606 , PNN 351 , ENG 105 , SPC 122 , BIO 732  or BIO 187.
    Corequisite: ADN 611  
    Competencies
    1. Describe how changes in societal attitudes have affected the treatment of the mentally ill
      1. Discuss the important developments in the evolution of mental health care
      2. Describe current issues in mental health care (including funding and resources).
      3. Explore the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in psychiatric mental health nursing
      4. Apply ANA standards for mental health nursing to the practice setting
      5. Discuss available resources (settings, programs, services) designed to meet various needs of clients and family
      6. Analyze the therapeutic purpose of activities, outpatient services, sheltered services, and residential settings
      7. Explore myths and stigma related to mental illness
      8. Analyze the effect of stereotyping on clients, families, and the public
      9. Identify strategies for managing conflict
    2. Describe the legal and ethical responsibilities involved in providing mental health care
      1. Compare and contrast admission and discharge procedures
      2. Describe the concept of least restrictive environment
      3. Discuss client’s rights in the mental health setting
      4. Discuss standards, nursing care, and ethical issues related to the use of seclusion and restraint
    3. Apply the principles of group process
      1. Describe basic concepts of groups
      2. Describe group behaviors and roles
      3. Conduct health teaching with a client/family group
      4. Participates effectively as a group member
      5. Discuss the dynamics of the therapeutic milieu
    4. Apply the nursing process to care for clients with mental health needs, mental illness, or addictive disorders
      1. Apply the nursing process in the care of the mental health client
      2. Describe the components of psychosocial assessment
      3. Discuss strategies to facilitate psychosocial assessments
      4. Discuss the actions, side effects, therapeutic dosages, and nursing implications for antipsychotic, antidepressant, mood-stabilizing medications
      5. Discuss medications used to manage side effects of psychotropic medications
      6. Discuss nursing interventions for clients receiving ECT
      7. Identify characteristics of mood disorders
      8. Describe the theories of etiology for mood disorders
      9. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with mood disorders
      10. Apply the nursing process to the care of suicidal clients
      11. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment for mood disorders
      12. Identify characteristics and risk factors for thought disorders
      13. Describe the aspects of a functional assessment
      14. Describe the theories of etiology for thought disorders
      15. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with thought disorders
      16. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment for thought disorders
      17. Identify characteristics of substance abuse
      18. Discuss the physiologic effects of alcohol abuse and withdrawal
      19. Describe the theories of etiology for substance abuse
      20. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with substance abuse
      21. Discuss the principles and concepts involved in substance abuse treatment
      22. Describe the concepts of codependency as it applies to family and friends
      23. Discuss potential warning signs of an impaired professional
      24. Discuss characteristics of violence and abuse
      25. Describe the theories of etiology for abuse and violence
      26. Explain procedures for examination, screening, and evidence collection
      27. Apply the nursing process to care of clients who have been abused or traumatized
      28. Discuss reactions that health care workers may experience when working with clients who have been abused
      29. Apply the crisis intervention framework to actual or hypothetical client situations
      30. Explore the relationships among stress, anxiety, and use of defense mechanisms
      31. Identify characteristics for each level of anxiety
      32. Describe the theories of etiology for anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders
      33. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with anxiety, somatoform, and dissaciative disorders
      34. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment for anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders
      35. Identify characteristics of each personality disorder
      36. Discuss theories of etiology for personality disorders
      37. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with personality disorders
      38. Explore the reaction of family, friends, and others to clients with personality disorders
      39. Discuss the effectiveness of various treatment modalities
      40. Identify characteristics of psychophysiologic disorders
      41. Describe the theories of etiology for clients with eating disorders
      42. Discuss family dynamics of clients with eating disorders
      43. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients with eating disorders
      44. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment for psychophysiologic disorders
      45. Discuss reactions of health care workers in response to clients with psycho-physiologic disorders
      46. Discuss mental health needs of children and adolescents
      47. Distinguish normal form pathologic behavior in children and adolescents
      48. Apply the nursing process to the care of children and adolescents with mental health needs
      49. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment for children and adolescents
      50. Complete psychosocial assessment in the mental health setting
      51. Develop a plan of care in the mental health setting
      52. Implement a plan of care in the mental health setting
      53. Evaluate a plan of care in the mental health setting
      54. Establish and maintain a therapeutic relationship
    5. Implement effective written and verbal communications to facilitate effective care in the promotion of mental health
      1. Differentiate between a social, intimate, and therapeutic relationship in the mental health setting
      2. Discuss therapeutic use of self in the phases of the nurse-client relationship
      3. Select advanced communication techniques which meet the needs of the client.
      4. Implement advanced therapeutic communication skills that meet the needs of the client/family
      5. Reports comprehensive client data according to established guidelines
      6. Establish collaborative relationships with members of the health care team
      7. Independently initiate an interaction with a client

  
  • ADN 520 - Complex Health Concepts

    Credits: 7
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 9
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. This course will focus on the synthesis of independent and collaborative nursing care. The course will build on previously delivered material and discuss new, increasingly complex nursing concepts. The course includes advanced physiological and psychosocial care in a variety of settings. Course includes practicum application.
    Prerequisite: ADN 420   with C or better, ADN 450  with C or better, and BIO 151  with C or better, HSC 240  with a C or better
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 550   with “C” or better and ENG 106  
    Competencies
    1. Synthesize behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Utilize clinical decision-making skills for clients with complex health problems.
      2. Demonstrate professional standards of moral, ethical and legal conduct in all healthcare settings.
      3. Recognize the unique role of nurses as members of the healthcare team.
    2. Analyze safe nursing practice.
      1. Recognize the physiologic and psychological effects of independent and collaborative nursing care.
      2. Apply concepts of safety when providing care to clients with advanced physiological and psychological needs.
    3. Formulate communication techniques.
      1. Integrate effective professional communication.
      2. Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication and collaboration for improving client health outcomes.
    4. Compare cultural competence of self and others.
      1. Organize culturally competent care for clients.
      2. Integrate the cultural beliefs, values, and healthcare practices of individuals and families into plans of care.
    5. Examine knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Identify holistic, client centered care that reflects changes in patient condition, lifespan variations in various healthcare settings.
      2. Individualize the nursing process to meet the needs of clients across the life span and in all settings.
    6. Evaluate knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Integrate health promotion activities in all nursing care.
      2. Evaluate the effectiveness of nursing care to promote health and prevent disease and injury across the lifespan and in all settings.
    7. Evaluate the nursing process.
      1. Organize individual nursing care utilizing the nursing process for clients with complex health needs.
      2. Prioritize individualized nursing care for clients with complex health needs.

  
  • ADN 550 - Professional Nursing Preceptor

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 9
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will include the concepts of professionalism, safe practice, communication, culture, care across the lifespan, health promotion, and nursing process. The course will focus on transition from nursing student to entry level professional nurse. The course will include clinical preceptorship/mentorship in a variety of settings.
    Prerequisite: ADN 420   with a C or better and ADN 450  with a C or better
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ADN 520   with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Appraise behaviors of a professional nurse.
      1. Reflect on personal and professional actions based on a set of shared core nursing values.
      2. Demonstrate transition to the role of the professional nurse within organizational systems.
    2. Appraise safe nursing practice.
      1. Integrate clinical decision making skills in the care of clients with complex health needs.
      2. Promote factors that create a culture of safety within the context of the healthcare team.
    3. Appraise communication techniques.
      1. Manage communication, including the use of informatics, with clients, individuals, families, communities and colleagues.
      2. Organize and succinctly and accurately convey comprehensive patient information to members of the healthcare team.
    4. Appraise cultural competence.
      1. Demonstrate and evaluate culturally competent nursing care.
      2. Apply theories and concepts based on social and cultural factors of the client.
    5. Appraise knowledge of nursing care across the lifespan.
      1. Compare and contrast the role of the nurse in meeting the needs of clients across the lifespan.
      2. Evaluate the effectiveness of age appropriate nursing care.
    6. Appraise knowledge of health promotion.
      1. Describe how health promotion interventions can be operationalized.
      2. Integrate theories and concepts of wellness based nursing care.
      3. Evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion and nursing care.
    7. Appraise the nursing process.
      1. Compare and contrast nursing process to nursing practice.
      2. Evaluate nursing process utilizing evidence based standards of care.

  
  • ADN 551 - Adult Health Nursing

    Credits: 7
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 9
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides an in-depth study of nursing care and therapeutic interventions for adults with complex health problems. The student applies management, collaboration and clinical decision-making skills.
    Prerequisite: ADN 611 , ADN 416 , ADN 474 , SOC 110  
    Competencies
    1. Apply the nursing process when caring for clients with complex health problems
      1. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with a metabolic/digestive disorder
      2. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with metabolic/digestive disorders
      3. Correlate client?s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of metabolic/digestive disorders
      4. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with a metabolic/digestive disorder
      5. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      6. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with a sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      7. Correlate client’s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      8. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with a sensory/cognition/perceptual disorder
      9. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with a perfusion disorder
      10. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with perfusion disorders
      11. Correlate client?s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology perfusion disorders
      12. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with perfusion disorders
      13. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with an oxygenation disorder
      14. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with oxygenation disorders
      15. Correlate client’s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of oxygenation disorders.
      16. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with oxygenation disorders
      17. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with a burn injury
      18. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with a burn injury
      19. Correlate client’s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of burns
      20. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with a burn injury
      21. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with immunosuppressive disorders
      22. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with immunosuppressive disorders
      23. Correlate client’s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of immunosuppressive disorders
      24. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with immunosuppressive disorders
      25. Examine concepts of health promotion/maintenance/illness prevention for a client with a client with a renal disorder
      26. Analyze pathophysiology for a client with a renal disorder
      27. Correlate client’s signs and symptoms to pathophysiology of renal disorders
      28. Assess the results of diagnostic tests for a client with renal disorders
      29. Assess clients comprehensively
      30. Formulate a nursing plan of care based on knowledge of the interrelationships among assessment findings, client’s medical condition, and prescribed treatments and medications
      31. Utilize comprehensive data to determine client problems
      32. Identify relationships between and among client needs
      33. Implement the nursing plan of care
      34. Evaluate effectiveness of nursing plan of care
      35. Revise nursing plan of care as necessary
      36. Incorporate client teaching into nursing plan of care
      37. Assess client’s prior knowledge
      38. Actively involve client/family in identifying learning needs
      39. Provide ongoing comprehensive teaching to clients
      40. Document thoroughly and accurately client’s condition and progress towards expected outcomes
    2. Collaborate with the multidisciplinary team to provide continuity of health care
      1. Describe collaborative care for a client with metabolic/digestive disorders
      2. Describe collaborative care for a client with sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      3. Describe collaborative care for a client with perfusion disorders
      4. Describe collaborative care for a client with oxygenation disorders
      5. Describe collaborative care for a client with a burn
      6. Describe collaborative care for a client with immunosuppressive disorders
      7. Describe collaborative care for a client with renal disorders
      8. Collaborate with other members of health care team in order to achieve desired client outcomes
    3. Implement therapeutic interventions for clients with complex health care problems
      1. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with a metabolic/digestive disorder
      2. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with metabolic/digestive disorders
      3. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      4. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      5. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with perfusion disorders
      6. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with perfusion disorders
      7. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with oxygenation disorders
      8. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with oxygenation disorders
      9. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with burns
      10. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with burns
      11. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with immunosuppressive disorders
      12. Implement appropriate nursing management for the client with immunosuppressive disorders
      13. Summarize actions, side effects and nursing implications of pharmaceutical agents commonly administered to a client with renal disorders
      14. Implement appropriate nursing management for a client with renal disorders
      15. Administer medications safely and monitors client response to drug therapy
      16. Verbalize possible interactions and adverse effect when multiple drugs are given concurrently
      17. Accurately calculate IV infusions and medicated drips
      18. Demonstrate increasing proficiency with advanced nursing skills
    4. Demonstrate clinical decision making skills for clients with complex health problems
      1. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with metabolic/digestive disorders
      2. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with sensory/cognition/perceptual disorders
      3. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with perfusion disorders
      4. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with oxygenation disorders
      5. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with burns
      6. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with immunosuppressive disorders
      7. Evaluate expected outcomes and discharge care for the client with renal disorders
      8. Apply nursing knowledge in clinical decision-making
      9. Incorporate knowledge of medical condition (complications/risks), diagnostic results, and pharmacologic agents into clinical decision-making
      10. Use critical thinking to analyze relationships in the clinical area
    5. Demonstrate management skills in the delivery of care for individuals and groups
      1. Manage care for a group of clients including assessments, med administration, treatments and procedures, and documentation on the client’s medical record
      2. Competently supervise a team of peers
      3. Effectively prioritize nursing care for multiple clients
      4. Delegate appropriately
      5. Recognize clients and situations requiring immediate attention
      6. Assume more active role in ensuring prescribed plan of care is implemented by self and others
      7. Make certain that delegated cares and treatments are completed
      8. Ensure diagnostic, laboratory tests are completed and results appropriately acted on
      9. Monitor physician orders and implement as necessary
      10. Evaluate self and peers

  
  • ADN 611 - Professional Nursing Practice

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduces the role of the professional registered nurse, including comprehensive planning, client care management, collaborative relationships and performance of complex skills.
    Prerequisite: PNN 605 , PNN 606 , PNN 351 , ENG 105 , SPC 122 , BIO 732  or BIO 187
    Competencies
    1. Explore the roles of the registered nurse in the health care delivery system
      1. Investigate the various roles of the registered nurse
      2. Compare and contrast the roles of the registered nurse in various health care settings
      3. Contrast roles and practice settings of RN and LPN
      4. Describe strategies for implementation of various models of patient care
      5. Analyze the advantages/disadvantages of various models of patient care
    2. Develop a comprehensive care plan for individuals, families, or groups
      1. Describe the 5 steps of the nursing process
      2. Discuss the role of the RN in care plan development
      3. Evaluate the effectiveness of plans of care for clients with complex needs
      4. Modify plans of care based on reassessment and goals/outcome achievement
      5. Apply principles of teaching/learning in designing a discharge teaching plan
      6. Apply the 5 steps of the nursing process within the role of the RN
    3. Discuss the principles involved in the management of care for clients
      1. Differentiate levels of management
      2. Discuss leadership vs. management
      3. Explore the supervisory process
    4. Demonstrate complex skills to facilitate care of clients across the life span
      1. Demonstrate initiation of intravenous therapy
      2. Employ guidelines for the safe administration of intermittent and continuous IV medications
      3. Calculate drug dosages correctly
      4. Considering the RN role, describe assessment techniques for pain management
      5. Correctly manage and monitor the client receiving pharmacological therapy for pain
      6. Identify guidelines in the care of clients receiving blood
      7. Demonstrate an understanding of administering blood and blood components according to established guidelines
      8. Discuss different components of blood products and administration considerations
      9. Determine monitoring and follow-up teaching related to bone marrow aspiration and phlebotomy procedures
      10. Identify guidelines in the care of clients receiving total parenteral nutrition or intralipids
      11. Employ appropriate interventions when caring for clients receiving long-term or repeated access to the vascular system
      12. Discuss insertion of tubes into the stomach for the purpose of decompression or feeding
      13. Identify guidelines in the care of clients receiving enteral nutrition
      14. Determine monitoring and follow-up teaching related to diagnostic procedures of the neurological system
      15. Implement nursing intervention guidelines for the client requiring cervical stabilization
      16. Employ procedures which support ventilation of clients who have compromised respiratory systems
    5. Integrate technology to facilitate delivery of care of clients with complex health problems
      1. Promote comfort via IV narcotic infusion
      2. Discuss the RN role in care of clients requiring ventilation support
      3. Identify guidelines in the care of clients receiving conscious sedation
    6. Discuss the collaborative relationships necessary for continuity of care
      1. Discuss discharge planning and referrals based on client needs and available resources

  
  • ADN 821 - Nursing Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Emphasizes the transition from nursing student to entry-level professional nurse. Clinical preceptorship occurs in a variety of healthcare settings.
    Prerequisite: ADN 551  
    Competencies
    1. Participate in clinical preceptorship to assist in transition from nursing student to entry level nurse
      1. Define clinical preceptorship
      2. Discuss the roles of the student, preceptor, and faculty liaison in preceptorship and community-based experience
      3. Develop personal/professional learning objectives for the preceptor experience
      4. Develop plan of action to achieve learning objectives
      5. Communicate effectively with clients, preceptor, faculty liaison, and other members of the health team
      6. Collaborate with the interdisciplinary team to coordinate client teaching and discharge planning
      7. Evaluate progress toward meeting personal learning objectives and practicum objectives
      8. Document perceptions (journaling) as an on-going process and analyze responses to experiences encountered during the preceptor and community-based experience
      9. Communicate effectively with clients, preceptor/mentor, and other members of the health care team
      10. Manage client care assignments effectively
      11. Participate in a comprehensive plan of care
      12. Administer medications with sound judgment
      13. Perform skills efficiently
      14. Provide competent care
      15. Evaluate client’s response to nursing care and revise as necessary
      16. Actively seek out learning experiences
      17. Meet all personal learning objectives
    2. Explore the individual nurse’s role in supporting nursing as a profession
      1. Examine participation in nursing organizations as a professional responsibility
      2. Compare and contrast the nursing organizations that the professional nurse may join
      3. Identify the roles that nursing organizations have in professional practice
      4. Examine current issues affecting nursing practice
      5. Identify the steps in the research process
      6. Compare differences between conducting research and research utilization
      7. Explore the utilization of nursing research to guide nursing practice
      8. Describe the components of a nursing research article
      9. Discuss the steps involved in performing a critique of a nursing research article
      10. Discuss the function of the National Institute of Nursing Research
    3. Demonstrate self assessment as a basis for continued educational or professional development
      1. Analyze the four domain concepts of a nursing philosophy
      2. Value the development of a personal philosophy of nursing
      3. Develop a personal philosophy of nursing incorporating the four domain concepts
      4. Describe issues related to the professionalization of nursing
      5. Explore mechanisms/systems that establish standards for nursing practice
      6. Discuss legal responsibilities of professional practice
      7. Discuss methods of preparation to ensure success on the NCLEX-RN
      8. Examine HESI results as a mechanism to improve success on the NCLEX-RN
      9. Discuss the continuing education requirement in nursing practice
      10. Identify educational preparation for advanced practice nursing
      11. Explore the issues of entry into practice and differentiated practice
      12. Analyze the concepts of Career Ladder and Clinical Ladder as a mechanism for professional development
    4. Apply the nursing process to the care of clients in acute care and community-based settings
      1. Utilize the nursing process when managing small groups of clients, reflecting theory, competent clinical skills, and standards of practice
      2. Determine actual and potential risks and implement measures to ensure client safety
      3. Discuss principles of community-based nursing
      4. Analyze advantages and disadvantages of community-based nursing
      5. Compare and contrast the roles of the nurse in community-based and acute care settings
      6. Discuss the image of the professional nurse in the community-based setting
      7. Discuss career opportunities for the ADN in the community-based setting
      8. Discuss planning and implementation of community-based nursing experience
      9. Evaluate nursing experience in the community-based setting
      10. Assess the client/family in the acute care and community-based settings
      11. Participate in a comprehensive plan of care
      12. Implement nursing interventions
      13. Evaluate client’s response to nursing care


Auto Tech CAP (Chrysler)

  
  • ATC 320 - Technical Internship I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The technician will work in a participating dealership. The work will be full-time approximately 40 hours per week. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework. A task list will be issued to each dealer.
    Prerequisite: AUT 114 , AUT 615  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: AUT 404 AUT 524  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Show regular attendance
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate positive working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Develop safe working habits
      2. Measure components with precision measuring devices
      3. Select hand tools
      4. Maintain hand tools
      5. Inspect suspension components
      6. Replace suspension components
      7. Repair suspension components
      8. Inspect steering components
      9. Replace steering components
      10. Repair steering components
      11. Balance tire/wheel assemblies
      12. Inspect brake components
      13. Replace brake components
      14. Repair brake components
      15. Machine brake components
      16. Measure electrical circuits
      17. Repair electrical circuits
      18. Use electrical service information
      19. Work with service manager
      20. Observe parts manager operations
      21. Follow service advisor duties
      22. Look up warranty guidelines
      23. Perform pre-delivery inspections/service of new vehicles
      24. Inspect used vehicles
      25. Perform minor service/maintenance procedures
      26. Identify engine displacements

  
  • ATC 328 - Chrysler Elec Systems Repair

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the diagnosis, repair and service of electrical and electronic components and accessories used on current Chrysler vehicles.
    Prerequisite: ATC 312, MAT 772  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate automotive batteries
      1. Demonstrate battery inspection
      2. Demonstrate battery test procedures
      3. Show battery service procedures
    2. Evaluate automotive charging systems
      1. Demonstrate charging system inspection
      2. Demonstrate charging system test procedures
      3. Show charging system service
    3. Evaluate starting systems
      1. Demonstrate starting system inspection
      2. Demonstrate starting system test procedures
      3. Show starting system service
    4. Perform ignition system tests
      1. Demonstrate primary ignition system test procedures
      2. Demonstrate secondary ignition system test procedures
      3. Draw ignition system wiring diagrams
      4. Demonstrate ignition system operation by tracing a wiring diagram
    5. Explain wiper/washer system operation
      1. Draw wiring diagrams of wiper/washer systems
      2. Demonstrate system operation using wiper/washer system wiring diagrams
    6. Analyze cruise control systems
      1. Draw wiring diagrams of cruise control systems
      2. Explain system operation using a cruise control wiring diagram
      3. Demonstrate tests of cruise control components
    7. Repair power window systems
      1. Test wiring harness
      2. Test components
      3. Repair wire harness
      4. Replace components
      5. Evaluate system operation
    8. Repair power door lock systems
      1. Describe keyless entry operation
      2. Discuss power door lock operation
      3. Test components
      4. Replace components
      5. Evaluate system operation
      6. Program keyless entry system with scan tool
    9. Assess automotive instrumentation
      1. Describe gauge operation
      2. Draw wiring diagrams
      3. Measure input signals
      4. Measure output signals
      5. Evaluate accuracy of instruments
    10. Evaluate audio system operation
      1. Discuss operation
      2. Diagram wiring
      3. Test components

  
  • ATC 330 - Technical Internship II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a participating dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: AUT 114 , AUT 615 , AUT 404 , AUT 524  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Attend regularly
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Revel initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Service and repair steering and suspension components
      2. Service and repair brake components
      3. Diagnose the following electrical systems
      4. Repair/service the following electrical systems

  
  • ATC 335 - Service/Repair Chrysler Engine

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Principles and operations of Chrysler engines. Service procedures and engine component repair or replacement will be emphasized. Diagnosis of engine problems will also be covered.
    Prerequisite: ATC 317
    Competencies
    1. Develop safe working habits
      1. Use proper eye protection
      2. Select proper tools to work in a safe manner
      3. Demonstrate a concern for the safety of fellow workers
    2. Explain the fundamentals of Basic Gas Engine Design
      1. Describe sequence of 4 stroke cycle
      2. Determine valve position on each stroke of 4 stroke cycle
      3. Determine piston position on each stroke of 4 stroke cycle
      4. Determine ignition system performance on each stroke of 4 stroke cycle
      5. Determine fuel system performance of each stroke of 4 stroke cycle
      6. Explain efficiency of engine performance as it pertains to thermal and mechanical conditions
    3. Explain Engine Identification and Component Nomenclature
      1. Identify Chrysler engines
      2. Locate Service Information
      3. Identify engine components
      4. Discuss personal and vehicle safety repair procedures
    4. Service cooling system
      1. Inspect water pump
      2. Perform cooling system pressure test
      3. Test thermostat
      4. Inspect radiator, radiator cap, and radiator hoses
      5. Evaluate coolant
      6. Troubleshoot cooling fan, fan clutch, and shrouds
    5. Service engine lubrication system
      1. Perform engine oil pressure test
      2. Diagnose the cause of excessive oil consumption
      3. Explain engine oil classifications and categories
    6. Evaluate engine performance
      1. Perform engine vacuum test
      2. Conduct cylinder power balance test
      3. Analyze engine fluid leaks
      4. Perform engine compression test
      5. Diagnose engine noises
      6. Evaluate engine performance during a road test
      7. Perform cylinder leakage test
    7. Analyze engines during disassembly
      1. Describe oil consumption causes
      2. Identify coolant leak locations
      3. Locate engine noises
      4. Diagnose low oil pressure concerns
      5. Locate oil leaks
      6. Determine low compression causes
    8. Explain valve train reconditioning techniques
      1. Identify valve train designs
      2. Identify valve train component nomenclature
      3. Disassemble valve train components
      4. Evaluate valve train component wear patterns
      5. Measure valve train wear
      6. Check for cracks in cylinder heads or block area using magnetic and dye crack detection
      7. Check for warpage of cylinder heads and block area
      8. Knurl valve guides
      9. Ream valve guides to 0/size
      10. Machine valve seats
      11. Reface valves
      12. Check valve spring tension
      13. Measure and correct valve spring assembled height
      14. Use manufacturers specifications and recommended repair techniques
      15. Check camshaft
      16. Check valve lifters
      17. Discuss rocker arm ratio
      18. Check valve timing of engine
      19. Determine need for timing gear and belt replacement
    9. Recondition engine block assembly
      1. Clean engine components
      2. Perform all necessary measurements
      3. Inspect components for wear
      4. Determine necessary operations to restore engine to manufacturer’s recommendations
      5. Perform pre-determined operations
      6. Reassemble engine block following all service manual special procedures
    10. Replace cylinder head assemblies
      1. Clean all mounting surfaces and components
      2. Check surfaces for sealing quality
      3. Torque cylinder heads using manufacturer’s recommended procedures
      4. Reassemble valve trains
      5. Use manufacturer’s specifications and installation recommendations
    11. Replace engine
      1. Remove engine assembly
      2. Reseal engine
      3. Reinstall engine
    12. Perform engine start-up after valve train repair
      1. Set static timing of engine to manufacturers specifications
      2. Reconnect all fuel and electrical accessories
      3. Refill cooling system
      4. Adjust valve train clearances
      5. Start engine and adjust ignition timing
      6. Adjust engine idle speed if required

  
  • ATC 336 - Chrysler Fuel Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course designed to acquaint the student with basic fuel system principles. Instruction will be offered in the theory, service, repair and adjustment of automotive fuel systems.
    Prerequisite: ATC 328  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss engine fuel requirements as it relates to the combustion process
    2. Identify fuel system components and their locations
    3. Explain gasoline composition and blends
      1. Define volatility
      2. Describe alcohol fuels
      3. Explain octane ratings
      4. Discuss fuel system additives
    4. Evaluate gasoline
      1. Test Ried Vapor Pressure
      2. Calculate percentage of alcohol
      3. Check for water and other contaminants
      4. Determine specific gravity
    5. Explain carburetor operation
      1. Explain carburetor circuits
      2. Explain vacuum
    6. Analyze fuel system
      1. Identify fuel system type
      2. Locate system specifications
      3. Discuss system operation
      4. Test fuel system components
    7. Service fuel systems
      1. Perform a pressure test on a fuel-injected vehicle
      2. Rebuild a throttle body
      3. Remove selected fuel components
      4. Reinstall selected fuel components
      5. Remove air induction components
      6. Reinstall air induction components
      7. Remove selected exhaust components
      8. Reinstall exhaust components
      9. Perform on car adjustments
    8. Demonstrate knowledge of engine emissions
      1. Discuss emission laws
      2. Identify harmful and non-harmful emissions
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of emission control systems
      1. Discuss service procedures on emission control systems
      2. Diagnose the service requirements of the following systems
      3. Explain exhaust catalyst systems
    10. Demonstrate safe work habits with pressurized fuel systems
    11. Diagnose fuel injection system faults

  
  • ATC 340 - Technical Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Chrysler Program. 
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Show regular attendance
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Access computer codes
      3. Service computer sensors
      4. Performance test fuel induction systems
      5. Perform fuel induction diagnostic checks
      6. Repair fuel induction systems
      7. Test engine performance with appropriate test equipment
      8. Perform engine tune-up
      9. Maintain emission control devices
      10. Service valve train components
      11. Inspect lower engine components
      12. Repair lower engine components
      13. Replace lower engine components
      14. Replace on-care microprocessors
      15. Remove engine
      16. Replace engine
      17. Reseal engine
      18. Check engine vacuum
      19. Test engine compression
      20. Check and repair engine oil leaks
      21. Adjust ignition timing
      22. Performance test refrigerant systems
      23. Service refrigerant systems
      24. Remove and replace refrigerant system components
      25. Performance test heater systems
      26. Service heater systems
      27. Remove and replace heater system components

  
  • ATC 346 - Chrysler Engine Performance

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Diagnosis and service of microprocessor-controlled fuel and injection systems. Oscilloscopes, engine analyzers, digital meters and other high-technology instruments will be used.
    Prerequisite: ATC 335 , ATC 336  
    Competencies
    1. Apply appropriate service information
      1. Locate specifications in service manual
      2. Practice related service bulletin searches
      3. Use system component locator
      4. Identify appropriate diagnostic information
      5. Look up proper service/replacement procedures
    2. Follow system diagnostic charts
    3. Analyze computer controlled fuel systems
    4. Perform an on-board diagnostic system check
    5. Make necessary repairs/adjustments to the power train control system
    6. Evaluate ignition systems
      1. Test crankshaft and camshaft sensors
      2. Analyze ignition coils
      3. Examine primary circuit control
      4. Check spark plug wires
      5. Evaluate spark plug condition
    7. Assess emission control devices
      1. Evaluate PCV systems
      2. Analyze heated air intake systems
      3. Examine secondary AIR devices
      4. Analyze EGR operation
      5. Check evaporative emission control devices
    8. Operate a tune up oscilloscope
      1. Set up scope for appropriate tests
      2. Perform a cylinder balance test
      3. Check input sensor wave patterns
    9. Evaluate fuel related problems and secondary ignition patterns
    10. Use a scan tool
      1. Retrieve analyze data list parameters
      2. Examine trouble code information
      3. Record a snapshot
      4. Interpret snapshot data
      5. Cycle control module outputs on and off
      6. Reprogram a power train control module
    11. Perform a tune up sequence
      1. Check charging system
      2. Rate starting system
      3. Service fuel system
      4. Evaluate ignition system
      5. Make necessary adjustments
      6. Test appropriate emission control devices

  
  • ATC 347 - Chrysler Heating & AC

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Theory and operation of Chrysler air conditioning systems leading to the diagnosis, service and repair of current models of Chrysler vehicles.
    Prerequisite: ATC 312, 317
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of refrigeration principles
      1. Explain laws governing heat and temperature
      2. Discuss the history of air conditioning
      3. Identify the refrigeration circuit
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of laws concerning CFCs and HFCs
      1. Describe the effects of the Montreal Protocol
      2. Explain the Federal Clean Air Act
      3. Compare various refrigerants used by automotive manufacturers
      4. Complete a test for CFC recovery
      5. Understand the SAE standards that apply to air conditioning
      6. Operate refrigerant recovery and recycling equipment according to federal laws
    3. Charge an air conditioning system
      1. Evacuate an air conditioning system
      2. Recharge an air conditioning system
      3. Partial charge an air conditioning system
      4. Add oil to an air conditioning system
      5. Flush a refrigerant system
    4. Diagnose refrigerant system performance
      1. Inspect air conditioning system components
      2. Performance test air conditioning systems
      3. Repair refrigerant system
      4. Leak test refrigerant system
      5. Diagnose refrigerant system using pressure gauges, touch, visual inspections, and cycle time.
    5. Service refrigerant system compressors
      1. Evaluate compressor seals and gaskets
      2. Readjust compressor clutch components
      3. Repair compressor clutch components
      4. Adjust drive belts and pulleys
      5. Replace compressor shaft seal assemblies
      6. Pressure test compressors
    6. Diagnose air conditioning system controls
      1. Troubleshoot air conditioning system/heater vacuum circuits
      2. Diagnose air conditioning/heater system electrical controls
      3. Explain the operation of an automatic temperature control system
      4. Discuss the automatic temperature control system self/functional test
    7. Demonstrate safe work habits
      1. Use proper eye protection
      2. Select proper tools to work in a safe manner
      3. Demonstrate a concern for the safety of fellow workers
    8. Service cooling system
      1. Pressure test a cooling system
      2. Evaluate coolant condition and level
      3. Test cooling system components
    9. Repair insufficient heater operation
      1. Explain heater operation
      2. Test heater performance
      3. Inspect heater controls and components
      4. Flush heater core
      5. Replace heater components

  
  • ATC 350 - Technical Internship IV

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a participating dealership. Tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: ATC 340  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Show regular attendance
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude toward work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Replace timing belt or chain
      3. Replace cylinder head/gasket
      4. Diagnose and repair engine oil leaks
      5. Repair drivability complaints
      6. Repair no start complaints
      7. Test EGR operation
      8. Test catalytic converter operation
      9. Inspect and test PCV system
      10. Test evaporative emission system operation
      11. Repair DTC related drivability concerns
      12. Test fuel system pressure
      13. Test and replace power train control input sensors
      14. Test and replace power train control output devices
      15. Replace fuel pump and filter

  
  • ATC 353 - Chrysler Power Train Systems

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides instruction in the operation of Chrysler drive trains, including automatic transmissions, transaxles, manual transmissions, multiwheel drive systems, differentials and their electronic controls. Proper diagnosis, service and repair procedures of these systems are studied and practiced.
    Prerequisite: AUT 242  
    Competencies
    1. Recondition a Chrysler automatic transmission/transaxle.
      1. Remove an automatic transmission/transaxle.
      2. Disassemble a transmission.
      3. Inspect all components.
      4. Determine first the hard parts can be reused.
      5. Rebuild clutch assemblies, servos, pumps, and gear trains.
      6. Air test clutch packs.
      7. Locate adjustment specifications for the transmission.
      8. Perform adjustments as outlined in the shop manual.
      9. Demonstrate proper use of special tools.
      10. Assemble the transmission to manufacuter’s specifications.
      11. Reinstall the transmission.
      12. Flush transmission oil cooler.
    2. Maintain Chrysler automatic transmissions/transaxles.
      1. Check fluid level and condition.
      2. Service filter and fluid.
      3. Perform recommended adjustments.
    3. Repair Chrysler automatic transmission/transaxle concerns.
      1. Perform hydraulic pressure tests and air pressure checks.
      2. Apply knowledge of transmission circuits and components during diagnostic routines.
      3. Interpret automatic transmission power flow.
      4. Conduct a road test.
      5. Analyze the information that has been gathered.
      6. Examine how vacuum modulators and throttle pressure work to boost line pressure.
      7. Explain the transmission electronic control system.
      8. Test transmission related inputs.
      9. Test transmission related outputs.
      10. Diagnose transmission drivability concerns.
    4. Maintain Chrysler manual transmissions/transaxles.
      1. Check fluid level and condition.
      2. Servie fluid.
      3. Perform recommended andjustments.
    5. Repair Chyrsler manual transmission/transaxle concerns.
      1. Peform noise diagnosis.
      2. Apply knowledge of transmission operation during diagnostic routines.
      3. Interpret manual transmission power flow.
      4. Conduct a road test.
      5. Analyze the information that has been gathered.
      6. Examine how clutch operation affects transmission operation.
      7. Exaplin the manual transmission cotnrol system.
      8. Disassemble and repair a manual transmission.
      9. Disassemble and repair a manual transaxle.
      10. Diagnose transmission drivability concerns.
    6. Servie a clutch system.
      1. Identify the major components of a clutch system.
      2. Explain the operation of a clutch system.
      3. Diagnose clutch operating problems.
      4. Disassemble a clutch system.
      5. Perform on car repair and replacement of clutch system components.
      6. Inspect and repair clutch actuation components and systems.
      7. Adjust clutch systems following recommended procedures.
    7. Service a differential and axle.
      1. Identify the major components of a differential.
      2. Explain the operation of a locking type differential.
      3. Diagnose differential operating problems.
      4. Disassemble a drive axle.
      5. Perform pinion depth, pinion bearing preload, pinion-to-ring backlash, ring gear backface run out, companion flange run out, and side bearing preload checks.
      6. Interpret the gear tooth contact pattern.
      7. Adjust differential following recommended procedure.
    8. Service four-wheel drive components.
      1. Identify different types of transfer cases and their application.
      2. Rebuild a transfer case according to specifications.
      3. Identify transfer case internal components.
      4. Explain front wheel hub operation.
      5. Perform front drive axle general inspection.
      6. Explain the operation of AWD systems.
    9. Diagnose driveline vibration.
      1. Define the terms that relate to vibration.
      2. Demonstrate effective road test procedures.
      3. Measure the frequency of a vibration using recommended tools.
      4. Identify the possible causes of any given vibration.
      5. Match the speed of rotating components to the frequency of a vibration.
      6. Measure drive shaft run out and drive line angle using the proper tools.
      7. Balance a driveline.

  
  • ATC 354 - Chrysler Manual Drivetrains

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides an understanding of the principles of operation in manual drivetrains, including manual transmissions, transaxles, front and rear differentials, driveshafts and transfer cases. Proper diagnosis, service and repair procedures of these systems are studied and practiced.
    Prerequisite: ATC 340  
    Competencies
    1. Recondition a manual transmission
      1. Disassemble a transmission
      2. Examine parts for serviceability
      3. Locate adjustment specifications for the transmission
      4. Perform adjustments as described in service information
      5. Use special tools as required
      6. Explain the operation of a manual transmission
      7. Assemble the transmission to manufacturer’s specifications
    2. Access clutch system operation
      1. Discuss the theory of operation of clutch systems
      2. Diagnose clutch concerns
      3. Remove a clutch assembly
      4. Examine parts to determine needed service
      5. Reinstall the clutch assembly
    3. Service a drive shaft universal joint
      1. Name parts of the rear-wheel driveline
      2. Service a single cardan universal joint
    4. Service a constant velocity joint
      1. Remove CV joint
      2. Disassemble CV joint
      3. Clean CV joint
      4. Lubricate CV joint
      5. Reinstall CV joint
      6. Replace CV joint boot
    5. Service a differential and axle
      1. Identify the major components of a differential
      2. Explain the operation of a locking type differential
      3. Diagnose differential operating problems
      4. Disassemble a drive axle
      5. Perform pinion depth, pinion bearing preload, pinion-to-ring backlash, ring gear backface run out, companion flange run out, and side bearing preload checks
      6. Interpret the gear tooth contact pattern
      7. Adjust differential following recommended procedure
    6. Service four-wheel drive components
      1. Identify different types of transfer cases and their application
      2. Rebuild a transfer case according to specifications
      3. Identify transfer case internal components
      4. Explain front wheel hub operation
      5. Perform front drive axle general inspection
      6. Explain the operation of AWD systems
    7. Diagnose driveline vibration
      1. Define the terms that relate to vibration
      2. Demonstrate effective road test procedures
      3. Measure the frequency of a vibration using recommended tools
      4. Identify the possible causes of any given vibration
      5. Match the speed of rotating components to the frequency of a vibration
      6. Measure drive shaft run out and drive line angle using the proper tools
      7. System balance a driveline

  
  • ATC 355 - Chrysler Automatic Drivetrains

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides an understanding of the principles of operation in automatic transmission and transaxles including electronic controls. Proper diagnosis, service and repair procedures of these systems are studied and practiced.
    Prerequisite: ATC 317, ATC 346  
    Competencies
    1. Relate the operation of an automatic transaxle gear train
      1. Discuss power flow
      2. Inspect planetary gear sets
      3. Demonstrate the steps in the repair of clutch pack assemblies
      4. Explain electronic shift transmission/transaxle operation
    2. Associate the operation of a torque converter with its components
      1. Perform lock-up converter tests
      2. Inspect converters
      3. Test converter end play
    3. Examine the operation of transmission valves
      1. Discuss hydraulic circuits
      2. Relate electronic controls to hydraulic circuits
      3. Perform pressure tests
      4. Repair governors (if applicable)
      5. Adjust throttle valve cable (if applicable)
      6. Replace vacuum modulators (if applicable)
    4. Recondition an automatic transmission/transaxle
      1. Remove an automatic transmission/transaxle
      2. Disassemble a transmission
      3. Inspect all components
      4. Determine if the hard parts can be reused
      5. Rebuild clutch assemblies, servos, pumps, and gear trains
      6. Air test clutch packs
      7. Locate adjustment specifications for the transmission
      8. Perform adjustments as outlined in the Shop manual
      9. Demonstrate proper use of special tools
      10. Assemble the transmission to manufacturer’s specifications
      11. Reinstall the transmission
      12. Flush transmission oil cooler
    5. Maintain automatic transmissions/transaxles
      1. Check fluid level and condition
      2. Service filter and fluid
      3. Perform recommended adjustments
    6. Repair automatic transmission/transaxle concerns
      1. Perform hydraulic pressure tests and air pressure checks
      2. Apply knowledge of transmission circuits and components during diagnostic routines
      3. Interpret automatic transmission powerflow
      4. Conduct a road test
      5. Analyze the information that has been gathered
      6. Describe how vacuum modulators and throttle pressure work to boost line pressure
      7. Explain the transmission electronic control system
      8. Test transmission related inputs
      9. Test transmission related outputs
      10. Diagnose transmission drivability concerns

  
  • ATC 356 - Advanced Chrysler Systems

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in techniques and procedures required to diagnose and service current vehicles. New systems developed by Chrysler will be included.
    Prerequisite: AUT 842  
    Competencies
    1. Locate air bag service information
      1. List air bag components
      2. Locate air bag components on a vehicle
      3. Examine operational theory
      4. Locate diagnosis procedures
      5. List/diagnose trouble codes
    2. Examine airbag system faults
      1. Retrieve DTC’s
      2. Test air bag components
      3. Replace air bag components
      4. Assess air bag system operation
    3. Practice ABS/TCS Diagnosis
      1. Describe ABS/TCS operation
      2. Retrieve DTC’s
      3. Test system components
      4. Replace ABS/TCS components
      5. Assess ABE/TCS operation
    4. Examine body electrical systems
      1. Explain Chrysler collision detection data system operation
      2. Describe vehicle control module operation
      3. Analyze operation of body controller systems and subsystems
    5. Assess drivability concerns on newly implemented powertrain control systems (OBD II, OBD III, speed control etc.).
      1. Explain system operation
      2. Practice system diagnosis/service procedures
      3. Examine new repair techniques
    6. Evaluate exhaust gas on Chrysler vehicles
      1. Demonstrate gas analyzer set up and calibration
      2. Practice gas test procedures
      3. Analyze test results using emissions specifications
    7. Evaluate vehicle data communication systems
      1. Identify system
      2. Locate system components
      3. Describe system operation
      4. Analyze system operation
    8. Demonstrate engine control system tests
    9. Produce scan data for all subsystems on Chrysler computer controlled engines

  
  • ATC 360 - Technical Internship V

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a participating dealership. Tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: ATC 350  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Show regular attendance
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude toward work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Road test vehicles for drivetrain related concerns
      3. Check operation of torque converter
      4. Remove a manual transmission
      5. Replace a manual transmission
      6. Disassemble a manual transmission
      7. Inspect a manual transmission
      8. Clean a manual transmission
      9. Repair a manual transmission
      10. Reassemble a manual transmission
      11. Remove an automatic transmission
      12. Replace an automatic transmission
      13. Disassemble an automatic transmission
      14. Inspect an automatic transmission
      15. Clean an automatic transmission
      16. Repair an automatic transmission
      17. Reassemble an automatic transmission
      18. Remove a transfer case
      19. Replace a transfer case
      20. Repair a differential/final drive
      21. Service a transmission
      22. Service a differential/final drive
      23. Perform a 4 wheel alignment
      24. Diagnose drivability concerns related to the power train control system


Ford ASSET

  
  • ATF 280 - Ford Steering/Susp/Brakes

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the theory of operational service procedures used in the maintenance and repair of Ford Motor Company’s base steering, suspension and brake systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to ASSET program
    Competencies
    1. Identify Ford steering systems
      1. Examine steering system design.
      2. Label steering system parts.
      3. Check steering components according to manufacturer’s specifications.
    2. Troubleshoot Ford steering systems
      1. Diagnose wander, drift, pull and repair
      2. Diagnose hard steering, bump steering, memory steering.
      3. Diagnose torque steer, and return problems
      4. Demonstrate proper use of Ford P/S analyzer
    3. Examine Ford suspension systems
      1. Label suspension parts.
      2. Discuss system operation
      3. List operation principles
    4. Troubleshoot Ford suspension systems.
      1. Check ball joints
      2. Inspect vehicle ride height.
      3. Service shocks and struts.
    5. Service tire and wheel assemblies.
      1. Compute lateral runout.
      2. Check radial runout.
      3. Diagnose tire wear pattern; determine repairs.
    6. Summarize steering angles.
      1. Explain caster.
      2. Describe camber.
      3. Describe to-in, toe-out.
      4. Point out correct specifications from service manual.
      5. Adjust angles.
      6. Explain the relationship between steering angles.
    7. Explain Ford brake system principles.
      1. Identify components.
      2. Outline operation of brake systems.
      3. Relate hydraulic principles.
      4. Repair brake system problems.
    8. Analyze Ford parking brake system.
      1. Identify components.
      2. Check operation of components.
      3. Service system.
    9. Maintain Ford brake system components.
      1. Replace brake pads.
      2. Install rear shoes.
      3. Troubleshoot brake system malfunctions.
      4. Replace brake line components.
    10. Rebuild brake system components.
      1. Measure rotors.
      2. Turn rotors using Ford approved method and equipment.
      3. True brake drums.
      4. Rebuild calipers.
      5. Rebuild wheel cylinders.
    11. Diagnose brake control valve problems.
      1. Inspect metering valve.
      2. Operate the differential valve.
      3. Check the proportioning valve.

  
  • ATF 290 - Adv. Ford Steering/Susp/Brake

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the theory and operation of advanced Ford Motor Company steering, suspension and brake systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Education (ASSET) Program, ATF 280  and ATF 328  
    Competencies
    1. Examine Ford electronic steering.
      1. Explain EVO (Electronic variable orifice).
      2. Explain VAPS I, II (Variable assist power steering I and II).
      3. Discuss repair procedures
      4. Diagnose electronic steering problems
    2. Identify Ford electronic suspensions.
      1. Explain load leveling suspension.
      2. Discuss 4WAS systems.
      3. Explain electronic ride control.
      4. Diagnose electronic suspension problems
    3. Examine Ford ABS (antilock Brake systems).
      1. Identify components
      2. Explain operation
      3. Troubleshoot operational problems
    4. Examine Ford stability control.
      1. Identify components.
      2. Discuss operation strategies.
      3. Discuss repair procedures.

  
  • ATF 312 - Ford Automotive Electrical

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of the electrical systems used in Ford Motor Company vehicles. The instruction will include fundamentals of electricity, series and parallel circuits, schematics, wire repair, diodes, transistors, microprocessors and digital displays.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training
    Competencies
    1. Explain the units of electrical measurement.
      1. Define ohms.
      2. Describe amps.
      3. Define volts.
      4. Discuss voltage drop.
    2. Construct basic circuits.
      1. Assemble a series circuit.
      2. Create a parallel circuit.
      3. Build a series - parallel circuit.
    3. Demonstrate electrical measurements.
      1. Show the proper way to measure voltage.
      2. Relate the proper way to measure amperage.
      3. Explain the proper way to measure resistance.
      4. Identify an open circuit.
      5. Recognize a short circuit.
    4. Identify electrical system components.
      1. List the components that make up a circuit.
      2. Define the operation of these components.
      3. Identify conductors.
      4. Describe control devices.
      5. Identify fuses, fusible links, circuit breakers.
    5. Use Ford electrical service information.
      1. Identify the different types of service information.
      2. Demonstrate the procedures for the effect use of service information.
      3. Use service information in the repair of a problem.
    6. Analyze batteries.
      1. Discuss battery construction.
      2. Explain and perform proper care.
      3. Perform state of charge and capacity test.
      4. Discuss and demonstrate proper charging technique.
      5. Demonstrate use of Ford Mandated Battery Tester (Micro 950).
    7. Analyze Ford starting system.
      1. Identify system components.
      2. Perform starter draw test.
      3. Inspect starter relays and solenoids
      4. Troubleshoot system problems
    8. Analyze Ford charging system
      1. Identify (alternator) generator components
      2. Explain the rectification process.
      3. Demonstrate alternator testing procedures
      4. Examine PCM controlled voltage regulation
    9. Use Ford systematic approach to electrical diagnosis
      1. Verify the complaint - Opens, Shorts, Draws
      2. Identify symptoms
      3. Define the problem
      4. Isolate the problem
    10. Demonstrate Ford mandated wiring and connector repair
      1. Fix wiring with solder.
      2. Repair wiring with crimp connectors.
      3. Replace terminals in hard shell connectors.
      4. Change hard shell connectors

  
  • ATF 317 - Ford Shop Fund & Minor Svc

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of dealership organizational structure as it relates to the technician. Use of service manuals, electronic troubleshooting manuals and service bulletins are practiced. Also provides entry-level automotive task competencies.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate proper shop safety procedures
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate personal safety working habits.
      3. Practice tool and equipment safety use.
      4. Investigate government agencies.
      5. Follow manufactures warnings and government regulations.
      6. Define hazardous material.
      7. Complete S/P2 training and certification.
    2. Outline Ford dealership organizational structure
      1. Identify key elements of dealership
      2. Examine the responsibility of each element.
      3. Diagram your dealership structure.
    3. Assess Ford Motor Co. Service Publications.
      1. Show the proper application of service manuals, owner and electronic.
      2. Examine technical service bulletins.
      3. Use OASIS (On line automotive service information system) for information retrieval. (TSB’s, FSA, warranty history)
      4. Interpret vehicle identification number (VIN).
    4. Examine automotive fasteners
      1. Identify characteristics of fasteners
      2. Demonstrate thread repair.
      3. Examine torqueing methods.
      4. Examine clamping force
      5. Practice broken bolt removal.
    5. Demonstrate minor service procedures.
      1. Change oil and filter.
      2. Lubricate chassis service point.
      3. Service belts and pulleys
      4. Check fluid levels (P/S, Transmission, Brake, Coolant, washer, etc.).
      5. Service cooling system.
      6. Check exhaust system
      7. Service C/V and universal joints.
      8. Complete wheel bearing services
      9. Inspect front drive axles.
      10. Change transmission/transaxle fluid and filter where applicable.
      11. Check and refill diesel Exhaust Fliud (DEF).
      12. Service rear differential.
    6. Perform pre-delivery inspection, new & used car, as per Ford specifications.
      1. Describe how the pre-delivery service record is arranged.
      2. Illustrate the organization of pre-delivery service manual.
      3. Explain the importance of overall appearance prior to final delivery.
      4. Review inspection procedures.
      5. Determine the extent of repairs.
    7. Perform tire and wheel service.
      1. Identify tire design and construction.
      2. Interpret tire sizes.
      3. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary action.
      4. Repair tire using internal patch.
      5. Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations.
      6. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel for standard wheel and wheel equipped with tire pressure monitor sensor.
      7. Perform static and dynamic balance of tire and wheel assembly.
      8. Reinstall wheels and torque lug nuts.
    8. Use automotive tools and equipment.
      1. Inventory personal hand tools.
      2. Complete a project using common hand tools.
      3. Use common shop tools and equipment.
      4. Exercise proper use of basic hand tools.
      5. Demonstrate safe power tool usage.
      6. Elevate a car on a hoist.
      7. Raise a car with a floor jack.
      8. Properly support a car on jack stands.
    9. Perform mechanical measurements.
      1. Examine different measuring systems.
      2. Interpret common conversions.
      3. Use a straight edge and feeler gauge to make a measurement.
      4. Perform measurements using a dial caliper.
      5. Use an outside micrometer to make measurements.
      6. Make measurements using a split-ball gauge.
      7. Make measurements using a telescoping gauge.
      8. Perform measurements using a dial indicator.
      9. Measure rotating bearing preload torque.
      10. Measure shaft end play, determine necessary action.
      11. Generate measurements using other precision measuring tools.
      12. Examine automotive systems.
    10. Describe engine systems.
      1. Discuss transmissions and axles.
      2. Examine chassis systems.
      3. Identify vehicle safety systems.
      4. Examine comfort systems.

  
  • ATF 320 - Technical Internship I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate acceptable employee attendance habits.
      1. Display regular attendance.
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality.
    2. Provide the dealership with a responsible and productive employee.
      1. Present a positive attitude towards work.
      2. Demonstrate ability to learn.
      3. Display employee dependability
      4. Show quality workmanship.
      5. Reveal initiative.
      6. Display positive social interaction skills.
    3. Complete weekly internship reports for return to ASSET instructor.
      1. Log daily work.
      2. Indicate your diagnosis.
      3. Mail work reports to instructor
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Analyze concern prior to repair.
      2. Checks OASIS (on line automotive service information system).
      3. Reference TSB’s as a part of routine service procedure.
      4. Use EVTM’s (electrical and vacuum troubleshooting manuals).
      5. Develop safe working habits.
      6. Fill out task sheets.

  
  • ATF 326 - Ford Automotive Climate Ctrl

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Theory and operation of Ford Motor Company air conditioning, heating and air distribution systems leading to the diagnosis, service and repair of current models of vehicles.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET) and ATF 328  or AUT 652  
    Competencies
    1. Outline climate control theory
      1. Explain human body comfort.
      2. Discuss heat.
      3. Define pressure.
      4. Analyze the principles of heat transfer.
      5. Describe refrigerants
    2. Service the climate control system safely
      1. Use personal safety procedures in servicing climate control system.
      2. Explain safe chemical procedures.
      3. Practice the safe use of chemicals in the servicing of the climate control system.
    3. Identify Ford climate control system components.
      1. Label A/C compressors.
      2. Describe the A/C condenser.
      3. List pressure and control devices.
      4. Describe the A/C evaporator.
      5. Explain storage devices.
    4. Summarize TXV (thermal expansion valve system)
      1. Explain the thermal de-icing switch.
      2. Review TXV operation.
      3. Define the receiver/drier.
      4. Discuss the effects of system malfunctions.
    5. Summarize the fixed orifice tube cycling clutch system.
      1. Inspect the compressor clutch.
      2. Study the orifice tube
      3. Describe the accumulator/drier.
      4. Discuss the effects of system malfunctions.
    6. Service Ford climate control systems.
      1. Check for refrigerant leaks
      2. Recover refrigerant.
      3. Recycle refrigerant
      4. Inspect system oil content.
      5. Adjust system oil amount
      6. Evacuate A/C system.
      7. Repair compressor clutch.
      8. Replace compressor shaft seal.
      9. Service the heater core.
      10. Determine the source of unusual noises in climate control system.
      11. Test system for contamination of refrigerants
      12. Examine filtering procedures.
      13. Service lines and fittings.
      14. Service metering devices.
    7. Explain Ford air distribution system
      1. Identify the controls.
      2. Describe the vacuum system
      3. Review the electrical system.
    8. Diagnose Ford manual climate control system
      1. Demonstrate system performance check
      2. Use pressure gauges to test.
      3. Examine the electrical system for problems
      4. Troubleshoot the vacuum system.
      5. Inspect drains.
      6. Identify odors.
    9. Explain Ford ATC (automatic temperature control) operation.
      1. Check inputs.
      2. Analyze processor operation.
      3. Review output operation.
    10. Troubleshoot Ford ATC systems.
      1. Administrator system performance checks
      2. Service the electrical system.
      3. Check the vacuum system.
      4. Employ self-test procedures

  
  • ATF 328 - Ford Electronic Systems Diag

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the operation and diagnosis/repair of electronic components and systems used on current Ford Motor Company vehicles.
    Required: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET).
    Prerequisite: ATF 312  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze inputs and outputs of Ford Electronic Systems.
      1. Describe what input is.
      2. Label input components.
      3. Describe what an output is
      4. Label output components.
    2. Study sensor and actuator operation.
      1. Describe types and operation of sensors. (HALL, VRS, Thermistor, etc..)
      2. Describe types and operation of actuators. (Bulb, Motor, Solenoid, etc.)
    3. Analyze operation of Ford electronic control modules.
      1. Describe operation of an electronic module.
      2. Describe what system each module controls.
      3. Explain different types of memory
      4. Explain digital signal processing.
    4. Evaluate electronically controlled system.
      1. Extract trouble codes from modules. (BCM, RCM, DDM, DSM, ICM, etc.)
      2. View PIDS for proper operation of systems.
      3. Perform Output state control on actuators.
      4. Diagnose Malfunctions in Electronic systems.
    5. Evaluate Ford Network Communication.
      1. Describe CAN bus operation.
      2. Describe HSCAN, MSCAN, LIN operation.
      3. Diagnose multiplex system.
      4. Repair system
    6. Assess Ford Infotainment systems.
      1. Differentiate between systems. (SYNC, MY TOUCH etc.)
      2. Describe APIM operation.
      3. Troubleshoot interference complaints.
      4. Service speakers.
    7. Use Ford diagnostic equipment.
      1. Demonstrate IDS operation
      2. Demonstrate FDRS operation.
      3. Demonstrate VMS operation.

  
  • ATF 330 - Technical Internship II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate acceptable employee attendance habits.
      1. Display regular attendance.
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality.
    2. Provide the dealership with a responsible and productive employee.
      1. Present a positive attitude towards work.
      2. Demonstrate ability to learn.
      3. Display employee dependability.
      4. Demonstrate quality workmanship.
      5. Show initiative.
      6. Display positive social interaction skills.
    3. Complete the internship weekly reports for return to the ASSET instructor.
      1. Log daily work.
      2. Indicate your diagnosis.
      3. Mail work reports.
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Analyzes concern prior to repair.
      2. Checks OASIS (on line service information system).
      3. Reference TSB?s as a part of routine service procedure.
      4. Use EVTM?s (electrical and vacuum troubleshooting manuals).
      5. Demonstrate safe working habits.
      6. Fill out task sheets.

  
  • ATF 333 - Ford Engine Diagnosis/Repair

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Principles and operation of Ford Motor Company engines. Service procedures and engine component diagnostics, repair and/or replacement will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET) and ATF 317  or AUT 114  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze internal combustion engine operation
      1. Explain how power is developed.
      2. Discuss the procedure for harnessing the power.
      3. Relate the control of combustion.
      4. Demonstrate the four-stroke cycle.
      5. Identify the engine operating systems.
      6. Examine Ford design characteristics.
    2. Relate the compression system
      1. Identify the components of the compression system
      2. Outline the operation of components
      3. Explain the correlation of the compression system
    3. Outline Ford valve trains
      1. Describe valve construction
      2. Identify overhead valve components
      3. Explain the overhead cam engine
      4. Label the parts of valve lifters
    4. Inspect the lubrication system
      1.   Identify system components.
      2. Discuss system operation
      3. Test pressures.
      4. Determine pump condition.
      5. Test oil pressure temperature devices.
    5. Troubleshoot Ford engine systems.
      1. Check compression
      2. Demonstrate vacuum testing
      3. Display leak down test procedures.
      4. Use the borescope.
      5. Administer cylinder balance test.
      6. Identify engine related noises.
      7. Identify fluid leaks and appropriate action.
      8. Determine excess fluid consumption.
    6. Disassemble Ford engines
      1. Disassemble the top end of the engine.
      2. Remove front of engine
      3. Take apart bottom end of engine
    7. Service Ford cylinder heads
      1. Clean cylinder head
      2. Inspect cylinder head.
      3. Inspect guides
      4. Determine valve and seat condition.
      5. Inspect valve spring condition.
      6. Inspect valve stems.
      7. Assemble head components.
    8. Measure engine for wear
      1. Measure cylinder taper
      2. Gauge cylinder out of round
      3. Appraise ring groove wear
      4. Measure the crankshaft diameter.
      5. Measure valve clearances.
      6. Determine valve train wear.
      7. Measure camshaft dimensions.
    9. Evaluate engine cracks
      1. Test for cracks with pressure
      2. Inspect for cracks with magnaflux
      3. Locate with dye penetrant
    10. Identify Ford engines
      1. Discuss Ford modular engines
      2. Examine other Ford engine designs
    11. Evaluate block reconditioning procedures
      1. Discuss align boring
      2. Examine surface finishes
      3. Deglaze cylinder walls.
      4. Inspect auxiliary shafts.
    12. Examine crankshafts
      1. Analyze crankshaft failures
      2. Identify crankshaft materials
      3. Discuss undersize diameters
    13. Inspect pistons
      1. Assemble pistons and rods.
      2. Discuss piston failures
      3. Determine piston condition.
      4. Install piston rings.
    14. Examine engine bearings
      1. Discuss oil wedge theory
      2. Explore bearing properties
      3. Analyze bearing failures
      4. Inspect for damage.
    15. Explain sealing the engine
      1. Explore gasket properties
      2. Discuss gasket materials
      3. Study gasket failure
    16. Assemble Ford engines
      1. Replace components on the block assembly
      2. Torque components to specification
      3. Adjust necessary components (valves, etc.)
      4. Set cam timing to engine specifications
      5. Install component covers.
      6. Install cylinder heads.
      7. Install crankshaft components.

  
  • ATF 336 - Ford Fuel Systems & Injection

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to the different types of fuels and theory of basic fuel delivery systems including diagnosis, repair and/or replacement of components in Ford electronic engine control systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET) and ATF 328  or AUT 652 .
    Corequisite: ATF 337  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize safe fuel handling procedures.
      1. Review fire hazards
      2. Discuss proper fuel storage
      3. Explain pressure relief methods
    2. Outline proper Ford servicing techniques
      1. Illustrate fuel line repair
      2. Discuss fuel pump removal
      3. Repair fuel injection system components
    3. Examine Ford fuels and fuel systems
      1. Diagnose fuel supply systems
      2. Service fuel supply systems
      3. Outline fuel evaporative systems
    4. Explain gasoline
      1. Identify ingredients.
      2. Discuss octane.
      3. Relate to combustion
    5. Investigate alternate fuels
      1. Discuss alcohol
      2. Identify propane
      3. Identify Natural Gas
      4. Discuss Biodiesel
    6. Explain Ford gasoline fuel injection systems
      1. Identify types of fuel injection systems
      2. Label components of the fuel injection system
    7. Diagnose Ford fuel injection systems
      1. Perform fuel pressure test
      2. Run system self test
      3. Diagnose drive-ability concerns related to fuel.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the Ford Electronic Engine Control System (EEC).
      1. Describe the proper diagnostic procedures.
      2. Discuss emission related components.
      3. Relate fuel evaporative components.
      4. Explain EEC input (sensor) components.
      5. Identify output (actuator) components.
      6. Outline EEC system electrical.
      7. Identify general functions of the ECA.
      8. Define OBD II system operation
    9. Review Ford air intake components.
      1. Discuss air filters.
      2. Explain inlet tubing
      3. Describe Resonance type intake systems

  
  • ATF 337 - Ford Driveability & Emissions

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Diagnosis and service of microprocessor-controlled fuel and ignition systems. Computer-based scantools, digital meters and other high-technology instruments will be used.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET) and ATF 328  or AUT 652 .
    Corequisite: ATF 336  
    Competencies
    1. Explain Ford air supply systems.
      1. Label air cleaner components
      2. Discuss intake air temperature control systems
      3. Define the different types and designs of intake manifolds
      4. Describe turbo/superchargers.
      5. Service air supply systems
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of vacuum diagnosis.
      1. Discuss the fundamentals of vacuum systems
      2. Explain vacuum schematics and devices.
      3. Outline the operating sequence
      4. Outline performance testing procedures
    3. Explain Ford emission controls
      1. Discuss air pollution
      2. Explain positive crankcase ventilation systems
      3. Identify the components of the evaporative system.
      4. Review engine design characteristics
      5. Describe the (EGR) exhaust gas recirculation system.
      6. Outline the thermactor system.
      7. Explain exhaust catalyst operation.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of ignition system services
      1. Discuss secondary ignition components
      2. Review spark plug design and application
      3. Identify proper test procedures
      4. List steps for oscilloscope usage
      5. Diagnose ignition related concerns.
    5. Outline proper tune up procedures
      1. Demonstrate proper plug wire removal
      2. Discuss plug gapping
      3. Describe timing procedures
      4. Demonstrate proper coil-on-plug (COP) service.
    6. Explain four gas analyzers
      1. Discuss CO, CO2, HC, 02
      2. Describe relationship between gases
      3. Identify effects on engine operation
    7. Use Ford high tech diagnostic equipment
      1. Operate IDS
      2. Discuss use of IDS
    8. Explain Ford systematic approach for troubleshooting Electronic Engine Controls
      1. Label steps for road testing.
      2. List proper sequence for testing.
      3. Identify steps for a visual inspection.
      4. Outline the proper methods for code retrieval.
      5. Outline code retrieval steps.
      6. Review safety precautions
    9. Examine Ford advanced engine performance strategies
      1. Review the PCM.
      2. Outline fuel control system strategies.
      3. Identify ignition system strategies.
      4. Define EGR system strategies.
      5. Describe idle speed control system strategies.
      6. List thermactor air system strategies.
      7. State canister purge system strategies

  
  • ATF 340 - Technical Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate acceptable employee attendance habits.
      1. Attend regularly.
      2. Illustrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership with a responsible and productive employee.
      1. Present a positive attitude towards work.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn.
      3. Display employee dependability
      4. Show quality workmanship
      5. Reveal initiative
      6. Display social interaction skills.
    3. Complete the internship weekly reports for return to the ASSET Instructor.
      1. Log daily work
      2. Indicate your diagnosis
      3. Mail work reports.
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Analyze concern prior to repair.
      2. Checks OASIS (on line automotive service information system).
      3. Reference TSB?s as a part of routine service procedure.
      4. Use EVTM?s (electrical and vacuum troubleshooting manuals).
      5. Demonstrate safe working habits.
      6. Fill out task sheets.

  
  • ATF 344 - Ford Driveline & 4x4 Diag/Rpr

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will study rear axle and differential design and operation, driveshaft construction, transfer case design and operation. Students will also perform diagnosis and repair operation of each.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Outline the purpose of the front wheel drive axles.
      1. Discuss the construction of FWD axles.
      2. Inspect drive axle problems for diagnosis.
      3. Service FWD axles.
      4. Adjust FWD axle components to manufacturer’s specs.
    2. Investigate drive shaft construction and operation.
      1. Examine the construction of the rear wheel drive shaft.
      2. Analyze the operation of the rear wheel drive shaft.
      3. Identify drive shaft problems.
      4. Service drive shafts. 
    3. Investigate Ford differentials for the purpose of construction and operation.
      1. Identify the purpose of the differential (standard and limited slip).
      2. Diagnose differential problems, standard and limited slip.
      3. Service differentials.
      4. Inspect drive axles for condition.
    4. Examine Ford transfer cases from the standpoint of construction and operation.
      1. Identify the different types of transfer cases.
      2. Relate the intention of the transfer case.
      3. Illustrate the operation of the transfer case.
      4. Diagnose transfer case problems.
      5. Service/replace a transfer case.
    5. Investigate manual transmissions.
      1. Discuss purpose of clutch
      2. Review clutch linkage
      3. Describe operation of manual transmission
      4. Discuss power flow of transmission and transaxle

  
  • ATF 346 - Ford Transmission & Transaxle

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is the study of Ford automatic transmissions and transaxles including design, operation, diagnosis and repair.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Summarize hydraulic fundamentals.
      1. Explain the science of hydraulics.
      2. Review the purpose of hydraulic pumps.
      3. Identify hydraulic control values and their purposes.
      4. Interpret an explanation of pressure regulation
    2. Summarize an explanation of transmission clutches
      1. Outline the construction of a clutch.
      2. Identify the components of a clutch.
      3. Explain the operation of a transmission clutch
    3. Outline the operation of a planetary set
      1. Explain the construction of a planetary.
      2. Investigate the different types of planetaries.
      3. Identify the components of planetaries.
      4. Examine auto transmission planetary
      5. Explain power flow.
    4. Explain the operation of a torque converter
      1. Illustrate power transfer of a torque converter.
      2. Discuss the construction of a torque converter.
      3. Compare types of torque converters.
      4. Identify components of a torque converter.
      5. Discuss flex plate design.
    5. Disassemble a Ford automatic transmission (6R60, 4R70W, 5R55S).
      1. Measure operating clearances of a transmission.
      2. Service transmission clutches.
      3. Inspect for damaged components.
      4. Identify components of an auto transmission.
      5. Service electronic controls.
      6. Inspect case for wear.
      7. Service oil pump.
    6. Reassemble a Ford automatic transmission (6R60, 4R70W, 5R55S).
      1. Adjust linkages.
      2. Reseal transmission components.
      3. Install transmission drive train.
      4. Operate transmission.
      5. Install torque converter.
    7. Disassemble a Ford automatic transaxle (6F50, 4F27E, 4F50N).
      1. Identify components of an auto transaxle.
      2. Measure operating clearances of transaxle.
      3. Inspect for damaged components.
      4. Service transaxle clutches.
      5. Inspect electronic controls.
      6. Inspect case for wear.
      7. Evaluate valve body condition.
    8. Assemble a Ford automatic transaxle (6F50, 4F27E, 4F5ON).
      1. Reseal transaxle components.
      2. Install transaxle drive train.
      3. Adjust linkages.
      4. Operate transaxle.
      5. Install torque converter.
    9. Diagnose Ford automatic transmission and transaxle problems
      1. Test pressures in transmission.
      2. Check hydraulic components using air pressure.
      3. Utilize clutch band application chart.
      4. Employ diagnostic charts.
      5. Check torque converter operation.
      6. Determine fluid loss concerns.
      7. Perform Stall test.
      8. Analyze noise and vibration concerns.
      9. Perform Scan tool testing.
      10. Test cooler operation.

  
  • ATF 350 - Technical Internship IV

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate acceptable employee attendance habits.
      1. Display regular attendance.
      2. Illustrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership with a responsible and productive employee
      1. Present a positive attitude towards work.
      2. Demonstrate ability to learn.
      3. Display employee dependability
      4. Show quality workmanship
      5. Reveal initiative.
      6. Display social interaction skills
    3. Complete the internship weekly reports for return to the ASSET Instructor.
      1. Log daily work
      2. Indicate your diagnosis
      3. Mail work reports
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Analyze concern prior to repair
      2. Checks OASIS (on line automotive service information system).
      3. Reference TSB’s as a part of routine service procedure
      4. Use EVTM’s (electrical and vacuum troubleshooting manuals).
      5. Demonstrate safe working habits
      6. Fill out task sheets

  
  • ATF 352 - Ford Systems/Technology Update

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Update on emerging and new technologies released by Ford Motor Company and the industry during the course of the ASSET program.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET) and ATF 340  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize Ford steering systems.
      1. Review current system operation.
      2. List changes made to system.
      3. Discuss diagnostic changes.
    2. Investigate Ford suspension systems.
      1. Relate current systems with previous.
      2. List changes in systems.
      3. Explain diagnostic changes.
    3. Summarize Ford brake systems.
      1. Compare current systems with previous.
      2. List changes to ABS systems.
      3. Discuss diagnostic changes.
      4. Review new components.
    4. Outline changes in Ford engine designs.
      1. Identify new components.
      2. Discuss new materials.
      3. Review new service procedures.
    5. Distinguish between current and Ford older A/C systems.
      1. Explain operation changes.
      2. List new components.
      3. Discuss diagnosis changes.
      4. Discuss Hybrid A/C systems.
    6. Outline changes in Ford drive train components.
      1. Identify new or changed components.
      2. Investigate changes in service procedures.
      3. Service new components.
      4. Exam Hybrid systems.
    7. Assess changes to Ford electrical and electronic systems.
      1. Compare current with older systems.
      2. List component changes.
      3. Discuss operation changes.
      4. Describe diagnostic changes.
      5. Discuss Hybrid pocedures.
    8. Assess Ford new models.
      1. Discuss new technologies.
      2. Review new test procedures.
      3. Identify new power trains.
      4. Explain new designs.

  
  • ATF 362 - Ford Diesel Engine Technology

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The study of diesel engine construction, operation, diagnosis and repair in Ford vehicles. This will include oil, fuel, intake and exhaust systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Student Service Ed Training (ASSET)
    Competencies
    1. Identify differences between diesel and gasoline construction.
      1. Identify differences in cylinder head construction.
      2. Examine differences in block designs.
      3. Describe the difference in combusion chamber design. (IDI vs DI)
    2. Idenfity the operation of the fuel supply system.
      1. Explain low pressure fuel components.
      2. Examine fuel conditioner module operation.
      3. Describe the purpose of secondary fuel filter.
    3. Analyze the high pressure fuel system.
      1. Discuss fuel injector operation in HEUI systems.
      2. Discuss piezoelectric fuel injectors in common rail systems.
      3. Examine high pressure fuel pump operation.
    4. Analyze intake system.
      1. Examine diesel intake design.
      2. Explain inter-cooling.
      3. Examine turbo operation in the intake system.
      4. Discuss sequential turbo operation.
      5. Exam dual boost turbo operation.
      6. Discuss glow plug operation.
    5. Identify exhaust system components.
      1. Discuss operation of variable geometry turbo.
      2. Identify EGR system components.
      3. Discuss operation of after treatment components.
      4. Describe back pressure control.
    6. Analyze engine control systems.
      1. Describe FICM operation.
      2. Describe PCM/ECM operation.
      3. Identify inputs and outputs.
      4. Perform diesel electronic system diagnosis.
    7. Identify unique diesel fluid characteristics.
      1. Explain diesle fuel characteristics. (Cectaine, etc.)
      2. Discuss bio-diesel.
      3. Identify coolant requirements.
      4. Discuss diesel motor oil and qualities.
    8. Diagnose a diesel engine.
      1. Discuss diesel engine mechanical diagnosis.
      2. Determine needed repairs.


Auto Tech ASEP (GM)

  
  • ATG 312 - GM Specialized Electronics Tr

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of the electrical and electronics systems used in General Motors vehicles. The instruction includes fundamentals of electricity, series and parallel circuits, schematics, wire repair, diodes, transistors and microprocessors.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program (ASEP)
    Competencies
     

    1. Describe basic principles of electricity.
      1. Define voltage.
      2. Describe amperage.
      3. Discuss resistance.
      4. Describe theories of current flow.
      5. State principles of current production by magnetic induction.
    2. Evaluate circuits.
      1. Calculate voltage drops.
      2. Figure resistance.
      3. Calculate current.
    3. Construct basic circuits.
      1. Assemble a series circuit.
      2. Create a parallel circuit.
      3. Build a series-parallel circuit.
      4. Figure wattage.
    4. Perform electrical measurements with a DVOM.
      1. Demonstrate voltmeter use.
      2. Measure current with an ammeter.
      3. Check resistance with an ohmmeter.
    5. Interpret service manuals.
      1. Identify electrical symbols.
      2. Use wiring diagrams to determine needed repairs.
    6. Diagnose vehicle electrical problems.
      1. Find shorts to ground.
      2. Locate open circuits.
      3. Identify high resistance connections.
      4. Identify types of failed wiring. 
    7. Repair wiring problems.
      1. Replace electrical terminals and connectors. 
      2. Demonstrate soldering procedures.
      3. Peform wiring repair.
      4. Repair data bus wiring. 
    8. Evaluate semiconductors.
      1. Explain diode operation.
      2. List diode applications.
      3. Discuss transistor operation.
      4. Identify transistor application.
      5. Measure semiconductor circuits.
    9. Discuss microprocessor operation.
      1. List types of memory.
      2. Explain digital signals.
      3. Describe multiple processor communication.
      4. Recognize analog inputs and digital inputs.
      5. Summarize types of outputs.

  
  • ATG 320 - GM Brake Systems

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the theory of operation and service procedures used in the maintenance and repair of General Motors brake systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program (ASEP)
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate safe personal working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturer and government warnings and regulations and repair procedures.
      5. Acknowledge liability involved with brake repair.
    2. Explain principles involved with brake system operation.
      1. Analyze vehicle braking requirements.
      2. Discuss math and science principals involved in stopping a vehicle.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of friction principles.
      4. Describe hydraulic theory and how it applies to base brake systems.
      5. Describe relationship between atmospheric pressure and vacuum.
    3. Examine base brake sub-system.
      1. Discuss master cylinder operation.
      2. Discuss brake booster operation (vacuum and hydraulic).
      3. Discuss drum brake systems design and operation.
      4. Discuss disc brake system design and operation.
      5. Examine brake balance control systems.
      6. Identify components of the brake warning light system.
      7. Discuss the purpose and operation of ABS.
    4. Hydraulic System Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic principles (Pascal?s Law).
      2. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable); determine necessary action.
      3. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action.
      4. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder.
      5. Inspect, remove, and install hydraulic brake system components.
      6. Fabricate and install brake lines.
      7. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level.
      8. Bleed and/or flush brake system.
      9. Test brake fluid for contamination; determine necessary action.
    5. Drum Brake Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Remove, clean, inspect, and measure brake drum diameter; determine necessary action.
      3. Refinish brake drum and measure final drum diameter; compare with specifications.
      4. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips, levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and backing support plates; lubricate and reassemble.
      5. Inspect wheel cylinders for leaks and proper operation; remove and replace as needed.
      6. Pre-adjust brake shoes and parking brake; install brake drums or drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings; perform final checks and adjustments.
    6. Disc Brake Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging, or pulsation concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Remove and clean caliper assembly; inspect for leaks and damage/wear to caliper housing; determine necessary action.
      3. Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides/pins for proper operation, wear, and damage; determine necessary action.
      4. Remove, inspect, and replace pads and retaining hardware; determine necessary action.
      5. Lubricate and reinstall caliper, pads, and related hardware; seat pads and inspect for leaks.
      6. Clean and inspect rotor; measure rotor thickness, thickness variation, and lateral runout; determine necessary action.
      7. Remove and reinstall rotor.
      8. Refinish rotor on vehicle; measure final rotor thickness and compare with specifications.
      9. Refinish rotor off vehicle; measure final rotor thickness and compare with specifications.
      10. Retract and re-adjust caliper piston on an integrated parking brake system.
      11. Check brake pad wear indicator; determine necessary action.
      12. Describe importance of operating vehicle to burnish/break-in replacement brake pads according to manufacturer?s recommendations.
    7. Power-Assist Units Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Check vacuum supply (manifold or auxiliary pump) to vacuum-type power booster.
      2. Inspect vacuum-type power booster unit for leaks; inspect the check-valve for proper operation; determine necessary action.
      3. Inspect and test hydraulically-assisted power brake system for leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action.
    8. Miscellaneous (Wheel Bearings, Parking Brakes, Electrical, Etc.) Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings; replace seals; install hub and adjust bearings.
      3. Check parking brake cables and components for wear, binding, and corrosion; clean, lubricate, adjust or replace as needed.
      4. Check parking brake operation and parking brake indicator light system operation; determine necessary action.
      5. Check operation of brake stop light system.
      6. Replace wheel bearing and race.
      7. Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly.
      8. Inspect and replace wheel studs.
    9. Electronic Brake, Traction and Stability Control Systems Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Identify and inspect electronic brake control system components; determine necessary action.
      2. Identify traction control/vehicle stability control system components.
      3. Diagnose electronic brake control system electronic control(s) and components by retrieving diagnostic trouble codes, and/or using recommended test equipment; determine necessary action.
      4. Bleed the electronic brake control system hydraulic circuits.
      5. Test, diagnose, and service electronic brake control system speed sensors (digital and analog), toothed ring (tone wheel), and circuits using a graphing multi-meter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) (includes output signal, resistance, shorts to voltage/ground, and frequency data).
      6. Diagnose electronic brake control system braking concerns caused by vehicle modifications (tire size, curb height, final drive ratio, etc.).

  
  • ATG 322 - GM Steering & Suspension

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the theory of operation and service procedures used in the maintenance and repair of General Motors steering and suspension systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate safe personal working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturer and government warnings and regulations and repair procedures.
    2. Discuss Characteristics of Vehicle Handling.
    3. Demonstrate an Understanding of Suspension Systems.
      1. Identify front suspension system design and nomenclature.
      2. Identify rear suspension system design and nomenclature.
      3. Explain the importance of correct curb height.
      4. Discuss design and operation of shock absorbers.
      5. Determine diagnostic procedure used to evaluate shock absorber serviceability.
      6. Discuss Electronic Level and Ride Control Systems.
    4. Suspension Systems Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Research applicable vehicle and service information, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.
      2. Identify and interpret suspension and steering system concerns; determine necessary action.
      3. Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action.
      4. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action.
      5. Inspect, remove and install front suspension system components using correct tools and procedures.
      6. Inspect, remove and install rear suspension system components using correct tools and procedures.
      7. Diagnose ELC system concerns; determine necessary action.
    5. Steering System Design and Operation.
      1. Identify types of steering systems.
      2. Identify steering linkage component nomenclature.
      3. Discuss power steering hydraulic theory.
      4. Determine power steering systems component nomenclature.
      5. Examine electronic steering systems.
    6. Steering System Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose steering column noises, looseness, and binding concerns (including tilt mechanisms); determine necessary action.
      2. Diagnose power steering gear (rack and pinion/non-rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and noise concerns; determine necessary action.
      3. Evaluate steering system linkage; determine necessary action.
      4. Evaluate power steering system operation; determine necessary action.
      5. Flush, fill, and bleed power steering system.
    7. Discuss Suspension and Steering System Alignment Angles.
      1. Explain operation and purpose of caster angle.
      2. Explain operation and purpose of camber angle.
      3. Explain operation and purpose of steering axis inclination angle.
      4. Explain operation and purpose of the turning radius angle.
      5. Explain operation and purpose of toe angle.
      6. Differentiate between alignment types.
      7. Discuss typical alignment adjustment procedures.
      8. Discuss alignment related handling concerns.
      9. Discuss non-alignment related handling concerns.
    8. Wheel Alignment Diagnosis, Adjustment, and Repair.
      1. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer, memory steer, torque steer, and steering return concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Perform pre-alignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height; perform necessary action.
      3. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on alignment machine; perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear wheel caster, camber and toe as required; center steering wheel.
      4. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action.
      5. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine necessary action.
      6. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action.
      7. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action.
      8. Check front and/or rear cradle (sub-frame) alignment; determine necessary action.
      9. Reset steering angle sensor.
    9. Discuss Noise, Harshness, and Vibrations (NVH).
      1. Explain terms related to NVH.
      2. Diagnose NVH concerns.
    10. Wheels and Tires Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect tire condition; identify tire wear patterns; check for correct tire size and application (load and speed ratings) and adjust air pressure; determine necessary action.
      2. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and noise; determine necessary action.
      3. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange, and hub runout; determine necessary action.
      4. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action.

  
  • ATG 326 - GM Auto AC Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Theory of operation of General Motors air conditioning systems leading to the diagnosis, service and repair of current models of GM vehicles.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program (ASEP), ATG 312  and AUT 114  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate safe work habits.
      1. Use proper eye protection.
      2. Select proper tools to work in a safe manner.
      3. Demonstrate a concern for the safety of fellow workers.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of refrigeration principles.
      1. Explain laws governing heat and temperature.
      2. Discuss the history of air conditioning.
      3. Identify the refrigeration circuit.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of laws concerning CFCs and HFCs.
      1. Describe the effects of the Montral Protocol.
      2. Explain the Federal Clean Air Act.
      3. Compare various refrigerants used by automotive manufacturers.
      4. Complete a test for CFC recovery.
      5. Understand the SAE standards that apply to air conditioning.
      6. Operate refrigerant recovery and recycling equipment according to Federal laws.
    4. Air Conditioning System Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Identify and interpret heating and air conditioning problems; determine necessary action.
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.
      3. Performance test A/C system; determine necessary action.
      4. Identify abnormal operating noises in the A/C system; determine necessary action.
      5. Identify refrigerant type; select and connect proper gauge set; record temperature and pressure readings.
      6. Leak test A/C system; determine necessary action.
      7. Inspect condition of refrigerant oil removed from A/C system; determine necessary action.
      8. Determine recommended oil and oil capacity for system application.
      9. Using a scan tool, observe and record related HVAC data and trouble codes.
    5. Refrigerant System Component Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect and replace A/C compressor drive belts, pulleys, and tensioners; determine necessary action.
      2. Inspect, test, service or replace A/C compressor clutch components and/or assembly; check compressor clutch air gap; adjust as needed.
      3. Remove, inspect, and reinstall A/C compressor and mountings; determine recommended oil quantity.
      4. Identify hybrid vehicle A/C system electrical circuits and service/safety precautions.
      5. Determine need for an additional A/C system filter; perform necessary action.
      6. Remove and inspect A/C system mufflers, hoses, lines, fittings, O-rings, seals, and service valves; perform necessary action.
      7. Inspect A/C condenser for airflow restrictions; perform necessary action.
      8. Remove, inspect, and reinstall receiver/drier or accumulator/drier; determine recommended oil quantity.
      9. Remove, inspect, and install expansion valve or orifice (expansion) tube.
      10. Inspect evaporator housing water drain; perform necessary action.
      11. Diagnose A/C system conditions that cause the protection devices (pressure, thermal, and PCM) to interrupt system operation; determine necessary action.
      12. Determine procedure to Remove and reinstall evaporator; determine required oil quantity.
      13. Remove, inspect, and reinstall condenser; determine required oil quantity.
    6. Heating, Ventilation, and Engine Cooling Systems Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect engine cooling and heater systems hoses; perform necessary action.
      2. Inspect and test heater control valve(s); perform necessary action.
      3. Diagnose temperature control problems in the heater/ventilation system; determine PCM) to interrupt system operation; determine necessary action.
      4. Determine procedure to remove, inspect, and reinstall heater core.
      5. Check operation of electrical and mechanical cooling fans.
    7. Operating Systems and Related Controls Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect and test A/C-heater blower motors, resistors, switches, relays, wiring, and protection devices; perform necessary action
      2. Diagnose A/C compressor clutch control systems; determine necessary action.
      3. Diagnose malfunctions in the vacuum, mechanical, and electrical components and controls of the heating, ventilation, and A/C (HVAC) system; determine necessary action.
      4. Inspect and test A/C-heater control panel assembly; determine necessary action.
      5. Inspect and test A/C-heater control cables, motors, and linkages; perform necessary action.
      6. Inspect A/C-heater ducts, doors, hoses, cabin filters, and outlets; perform necessary action.
      7. Identify the source of A/C system odors.
      8. Check operation of automatic or semi-automatic heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) control systems; determine necessary action.
    8. Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and Handling.
      1. Perform correct use and maintenance of refrigerant handling equipment according to equipment manufacturer’s standards
      2. Identify and recover A/C system refrigerant.
      3. Recycle, label and store refrigerant.
      4. Evacuate and charge A/C system; add refrigerant oil as required.

  
  • ATG 327 - Minor Svc/Repair/GM Engines

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Course will provide instruction in the theory and operation of the General Motors four-stroke cycle engines. Emphasis will be placed on both design and proper disassembly/reassembly procedures.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program, AUT 114  
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate personal safety working habits.
      3. Practice tool and equipment safety use.
      4. Follow manufacture’s repair procedures.
      5. Follow manufacture’s warnings and government regulations.
    2. Explain the fundamentals of basic engine design and operation.
      1. Describe basic engine operation.
      2. Describe the basic laws of physics involved with engine operation.
      3. Classify engines according to the number of cycles, the number of cylinders, cylinder arrangement, and valve-train type.
      4. Define the four-stroke cycle theory.
      5. Describe the different cylinder arrangements and the advantages of each.
      6. Describe the different valvetrains used in modern engines.
      7. Define engine measurement terms such as bore and stroke, displacement, compression ratio, engine efficiency, horsepower and torque, horsepower losses, mechanical efficiency, and thermal efficiency.
      8. Describe the basic operation of alternative engine designs, including diesel, Miller-cycle, and stratified charge.
      9. Identify engine using vehicle identification number.
      10. Acquire pertinent service information for specific repair procedures.
      11. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service precautions.
    3. Diagnose and repair cylinder head and valve train.
      1. Remove cylinder head; inspect gasket condition; install cylinder head and gasket; tighten according to manufacturer?s specifications and procedures.
      2. Clean and visually inspect a cylinder head for cracks; check gasket surface areas for warpage and surface finish; check passage condition.
      3. Inspect valve springs for squareness and free height comparison; determine necessary action.
      4. Inspect valve guides for wear; check valve stem-to-guide clearance; determine necessary action.
      5. Inspect valves and valve seats; determine necessary action.
      6. Check valve fact-to-seat contact and valve seat concentricity (runout); determine necessary action.
      7. Check valve spring assembled height and valve stem height; determine necessary action.
      8. Inspect pushrods, rocker arms, rocker arm pivots and shafts for wear, bending, cracks, looseness, and blocked oil passages (orifices); determine necessary action.
      9. Inspect valve lifters; determine necessary action.
      10. Adjust valves (mechanical or hydraulic lifters).
      11. Inspect camshaft drives (including gear wear and backlash, sprocket and chain wear); determine necessary action.
      12. Inspect and replace camshaft and drive belt/chain; includes checking drive gear wear and backlash, end play, sprocket and chain wear, overhead cam drive sprocket(s), drive belt(s), belt tension, tensioners, camshaft reluctor ring/tone-wheel, and valve timing components; verify correct camshaft timing.
      13. Inspect and/or measure camshaft for runout, journal wear and lobe wear.
      14. Inspect camshaft bearing surface for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine necessary action.
      15. Establish camshaft(s) timing and cam sensor indexing according to manufacturer’s specifications and procedures.
    4. Diagnose and repair engine block assembly.
      1. Disassemble engine block; clean and prepare components for inspection and reassembly.
      2. Inspect engine block for visible cracks, passage condition, core and gallery plug condition, and surface warpage; determine necessary action.
      3. Inspect and measure cylinder walls/sleeves for damage, wear and ridges; determine necessary action.
      4. Deglaze and clean cylinder walls.
      5. Inspect and measure camshaft bearings for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine necessary action.
      6. Inspect crankshaft for straightness, journal damage, keyway damage, thrust flange and sealing surface condition, and visual surface cracks; check oil passage condition; measure end play and journal wear; check crankshaft position sensor reluctor ring (where applicable); determine necessary action.
      7. Inspect main and connecting rod bearings for damage and wear; determine necessary action.
      8. Identify piston and bearing wear patterns that indicate connecting rod alignment and main bearing bore problems; determine necessary action.
      9. Inspect and measure piston skirts and ring lands; determine necessary action.
      10. Determine piston-to-bore clearance.
      11. Remove and replace piston pin.
      12. Inspect, measure, and install piston rings.
      13. Inspect auxiliary (balance, intermediate, idler, counterbalance or silencer) shaft(s); inspect shaft(s) and support bearings for damage and wear; determine necessary action; reinstall and time.
      14. Inspect or replace crankshaft vibration damper (harmonic balancer).
      15. Assemble engine block assembly.
      16. Install engine covers using gaskets, seals and sealers as required.

  
  • ATG 328 - Diagnosis/Repair-GM Elect Sys

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the diagnosis, repair and service of electrical and electronic components and accessories used on current GM vehicles.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program, MAT 772 AUT 114  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ATG 312  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze batteries.
      1. Practice battery safety.
      2. Outline battery construction.
      3. Discuss maintenance-free batteries.
      4. Explain battery operation.
    2. Evaluate batteries.
      1. Test battery state of charge.
      2. Demonstrate battery load testing.
      3. Perform slow and fast battery charge.
      4. Service a battery in a vehicle.
      5. Show the procedure for jump starting a vehicle.
      6. Replace a battery.
      7. Measure parasitic current drain.
    3. Analyze starting systems.
      1. Describe starting system operation.
      2. Identify starting system components.
      3. Discuss different motor control systems.
    4. Evaluate starting systems.
      1. Demonstrate starting system inspection.
      2. Demonstrate starting system test procedures
      3. Show starting system service.
    5. Analyze charging systems.
      1. Explain voltage rectification.
      2. Discuss voltage regulation.
      3. Describe three phase current generation.
    6. Evaluate charging systems.
      1. Test alternator internal components.
      2. Perform charging system voltage drop tests.
      3. Check charging rate on a vehicle.
    7. Interpret electrical service information.
      1. Read wiring diagrams.
      2. Use component locator charts.
      3. Identify terminal and connector cavities.
    8. Service chassis electrical systems.
      1. Interpret wiring diagrams.
      2. Diagnose the cause of improper lighting circuit operation.
      3. Troubleshoot blower circuits.
      4. Identify cooling fan problems.
      5. Test power accessory circuits.
      6. Locate instrumentation malfunctions.
      7. Diagnose wiper/washer malfunctions.
      8. Replace defective electrical components 
      9. Repair wiring problems.
      10. Install circuit protection devices.
      11. Test switches.
      12. Diagnose defective relays.
      13. Test cruise control system components. 

  
  • ATG 329 - Technical Internship I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The technician will work in a participating dealership. The work will be full-time, approximately 40 hours per week. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework. A task list will be issued to each dealer.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program, MAT 772 AUT 114 ATG 322  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ATG 312  ,ATG 320  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Show regular attendance.
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality.
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work.
      2. Apply yourself when working.
      3. Show employee dependability.
      4. Display quality work.
      5. Exhibit good judgment.
      6. Present ability to learn.
      7. Reveal initiative.
      8. Illustrate positive working relations with others.
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports.
      1. Log daily work.
      2. Return work reports to lead ASEP instructor by mail or in person.
    4. Complete of the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Develop safe working habits.
      2. Measure components with precision measuring devices.
      3. Select hand tools.
      4. Maintain hand tools.
      5. Inspect suspension components.
      6. Replace suspension components.
      7. Repair suspension components.
      8. Inspect steering components.
      9. Replace steering components.
      10. Repair steering components.
      11. Balance tire/wheel assemblies.
      12. Inspect brake components.
      13. Replace brake components.
      14. Repair brake components.
      15. Machine brake components.
      16. Measure electrical circuits.
      17. Repair electrical circuits.
      18. Read electrical schematics.
      19. Work with service manager.
      20. Observe parts manager operations.
      21. Follow service advisor duties.
      22. Look up warranty guidelines.
      23. Predeliver new cars.
      24. Inspect used cars.
      25. Perform minor service.
      26. Identify engine displacements.

  
  • ATG 330 - Technical Internship II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a participating dealership. The tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: ATG 329 , ATG 328  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Attend regularly.
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality.
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Revel initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete and return to the Lead ASEP Instructor a minimum of 80% of the internship weekly work reports.
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to lead ASEP instructor by mail or in person.
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Test refrigerant systems
      3. Recover refrigerant
      4. Evacuate refrigerant system
      5. Recharge refrigerant
      6. Remove refrigerant components
      7. Replace refrigerant components
      8. Service refrigerant system
      9. Repair blower motor circuit
      10. Repair compressor circuits
      11. Test starting systems
      12. Service starting systems
      13. Repair starting systems
      14. Test charging systems
      15. Maintain charging systems
      16. Repair charging systems
      17. Service windshield wiper/washer systems
      18. Service power window components
      19. Service power door lock components

  
  • ATG 333 - Major Service Proc/GM Engines

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to provide instruction in proper diagnosis of GM engine malfunctions and repair or replacement of defective components and assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on in-vehicle engine service and repair as well as engine removal and reinstallation operations performed in GM dealer­ships.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program and ATG 327  
    Competencies
    1. Practice safe working habits.
      1. Use proper eye protection.
      2. Select proper tools to work in a safe manner.
      3. Demonstrate a concern for the safety of fellow workers.
    2. Evaluate engine performance.
      1. Evaluate engine performance during a road test.
      2. Perform cylinder power balance test; determine necessary action.
      3. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests; determine necessary action.
      4. Perform cylinder cracking compression tests; determine necessary action.
      5. Perform cylinder leakage test; determine necessary action.
      6. Perform cylinder running compression test; determine necessary action.
      7. Analyze engine fluid leaks.
      8. Diagnose abnormal engine noises or vibration concerns; determine necessary actions.
      9. Diagnose the cause of excessive oil consumption, coolant consumption, unusual exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine necessary action.
    3. Service cooling system.
      1. Discuss types of coolant.
      2. Identify causes of engine overheating.
      3. Inspect, replace, and adjust drive belts, tensioners, and pulleys; check pulley and belt alignment.
      4. Inspect and test coolant; drain and recover coolant; flush and refill cooling system with recommended coolant; bleed as required.
      5. Perform cooling system pressure and dye tests to identify leaks; Inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, heater core and radiator hoses; determine necessary action.
      6. Inspect, remove, and replace water pump.
      7. Remove and replace radiator.
      8. Remove, inspect and replace thermostat and gasket/seal.
      9. Inspect and test cooling fans (electrical and mechanical), fan clutch, and fan shrouds and air dams.
      10. Inspect, test, and replace coolant temperature and pressure switches and sensors.
    4. Service engine lubrication system.
      1. Explain engine oil classifications and categories.
      2. Perform engine oil pressure test; determine necessary action.
      3. Inspect, test, and replace oil temperature and pressure switches and sensors.
    5. Engine assembly removal and reinstallation.
      1. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks; determine necessary action.
      2. Remove and reinstall engine assembly in and OBD II or newer vehicle; reconnect all attaching components and restore vehicle to running condition.
      3. Perform predetermined operations; clean engine components, inspect components for wear, and perform any necessary measurements; determine any necessary operations to restore engine to manufacturer’s recommendations.
      4. Verify operation of the instrument panel warning indicators.
    6. Perform in-vehicle service.
      1. Inspect and replace camshaft and drive belt/chain; includes checking drive gear wear and backlash, end play, sprocket and chain wear, overhead cam drive sprocket(s), drive belt(s), belt tension, tensioners, camshaft reluctor ring/tone-wheel, and valve timing components; verify correct camshaft timing.
      2. Replace valve stem seals on an assembled engine; inspect valve spring retainers, locks/keepers, and valve lock/keeper grooves; determine necessary action.
      3. Adjust valves (mechanical or hydraulic lifters).

  
  • ATG 336 - GM Fuel Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course designed to acquaint the student with basic fuel system principles. Instruction will be offered in the theory, service, repair and adjustment of automotive fuel systems.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program and ATG 328  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss engine requirements for proper combustion.
      1. Identify the four stroke cycle.
      2. Examine fuel requirements.
      3. Describe ignition characteristics.
    2. Describe the basic characteristics of gasoline.
      1. Identify safety issues for fule handling.
      2. Discuss principles of distillation.
      3. Analyze gasoline composition.
      4. Identify gasoline additives.
      5. Discuss gasoline ratings.
    3. Test gasoline.
      1. Demonstrate safe handling procedures for gasoline.
      2. Measure alcohol content.
      3. Check Reid vapor pressure.
      4. Test for contamination.
      5. Measure specific gravity.
    4. Identify fuel delivery systems.
      1. Discuss fuel tank construction.
      2. Explain electric fuel pump operation.
      3. Identify fuel line composition.
      4. Explain fuel filter operation.
    5. Perform fuel delivery component service.
      1. Remove, inspect, and reinstall a fuel tank.
      2. Test fuel pump pressure and volume.
      3. Replace a fuel pump.
      4. Disconnect fuel fittings using appropriate tools.
      5. Replace a fuel filter.
    6. Explain electronic fuel injection operation.
      1. Identify internal combustion engine fuel requirements.
      2. Discuss fuel injection modes of operation.
      3. Describe fuel injector operations.
      4. Explain pressure regulator operation.
      5. Identify fuel injection related inputs.
      6. Discuss types of idle speed control.
      7. Explain throttle body operation.
    7. Service electronic fuel injection components.
      1. Demonstrate fuel injector cleaning.
      2. Inspect and test fuel injectors.
      3. Inspect and test fuel pressure regulators.
      4. Remove and reinstall a fuel rail assembly.
      5. Isolate a fuel rail with shutoff valves.
      6. Remove, inspect, and reinstall a throttle body.
      7. Remove, inspect, and reinstall air induction components.
      8. Check for vacuum leaks.
      9. Perform an idle speed control functional test.
      10. Use a scan tool to view data and command outputs.
    8. Discuss exhaust and evaporative emissions.
      1. Define hydrocarbon emissions.
      2. Examine carbon monoxide emissions.
      3. Discuss oxides of nitrogen emissions.
      4. Examine carbon dioxide emissions.
      5. Discuss oxygen emissions.
      6. Describe state and federal emission laws.
    9. Identify emission control devices.
      1. Discuss catalytic converter operation.
      2. Describe positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) systems.
      3. Explain the principles of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR).
      4. Examine evaporative emission control.
      5. Define secondary air injection.
    10. Service emission control systems.
      1. Test catalytic converter efficiency and exhaust system integrity.
      2. Measure exhaust back-pressure.
      3. Perform a PCV functional test.
      4. Inspect and test EGR systems.
      5. Inspect and test evaporative emission components for leaks and operation.
      6. Inspect and test secondary air injection system operation.
      7. Determine necessary repairs.

  
  • ATG 337 - GM Engine Performance

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Diagnosis and service of microprocessor-controlled fuel and ignition systems. Oscilloscopes, engine analyzers, digital meters and other high-technology instruments will be used.
    Prerequisite: ATG 336 , ATG 327  and ATG 328  
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate safe personal working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturers repair procedures.
      5. Follow manufacturer and government warnings and regulations.
    2. Evaluate General Engine Performance Diagnosis
      1. Identify and interpret engine performance concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.
      3. Describe Electronic Engine Control Terminology and Standards.
      4. Explain The Function and Operation of Onboard Engine Computers.
      5. Discuss Electronic Engine Control Components (Sensors) and Their Operation.
    3. Examine Computerized Engine Control Diagnosis and Repair
      1. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status, and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable.
      2. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step (troubleshooting) diagnosis.
      3. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine necessary action.
      4. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair verification.
      5. Diagnose the causes of emissions or drivability concerns with stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret scan tool data.
      6. Diagnose emissions or drivability concerns without stored diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action.
      7. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors, powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using a graphing multi-meter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform necessary action.
      8. Diagnose drivability and emissions problems resulting from malfunctions of interrelated systems (cruise control, security alarms, suspension controls, traction controls, A/C, automatic transmissions, non-OEM installed accessories, or similar systems); determine necessary action.
    4. Evaluate Ignition Systems.
      1. Diagnose (troubleshoot) ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard starting, engine misfire, poor drivability, spark knock, power loss, poor mileage, and emissions concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Inspect and test crankshaft and camshaft position sensor(s); perform necessary action.
      3. Inspect, test, and/or replace ignition control module, powertrain/engine control module; reprogram as necessary.
      4. Remove and replace spark plugs; inspect secondary ignition components for wear and damage.
    5. Examine Emissions Control Systems
      1. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) related to the emissions control systems; determine necessary action.
      2. Interpret scan tool data related to the emissions control systems; determine necessary action.
    6. Diagnosis and Repair Emissions Control Systems
      1. Diagnose emissions and drivability concerns caused by the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system; determine necessary action.
      2. Diagnose emissions and drivability concerns caused by the evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action.
      3. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems; perform necessary action.
      4. Inspect, test, service, and replace components of the EGR system including tubing, exhaust passages, vacuum/pressure controls, filters, and hoses; perform necessary action.
      5. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action.
      6. Inspect and test catalytic converter efficiency.
      7. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions control system; perform necessary action.
    7. Diagnosis and Repair Fuel, Air Induction, and Exhaust Systems.
      1. Diagnose (troubleshoot) hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor drivability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine necessary action.
      2. Repair hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor drivability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine necessary action.
    8. Analyze exhaust gases.
      1. Perform four gas analyzer set up calibration.
      2. Demonstrate exhaust analysis test procedures.
      3. Interpret test results using emission level specifications

  
  • ATG 340 - Technical Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a sponsoring dealership. Tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: ATG 330  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ATG 344 , ATG 345  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Show regular attendance.
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality.
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form.
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work.
      2. Apply yourself when working.
      3. Show employee dependability.
      4. Display quality work.
      5. Exhibit good judgment.
      6. Present ability to learn.
      7. Revel initiative.
      8. Illustrate working relations with others.
    3. Complete and return to the Lead ASEP Instructor a minimum of 80% of the internship weekly work reports.
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to lead ASEP instructor by mail or in person.
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks.
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Access computer codes
      3. Service computer sensors
      4. Repair fuel induction systems
      5. Perform fuel induction diagnostic checks
      6. Performance test fuel induction systems
      7. Analyze engine performance with oscilloscope
      8. Perform engine tune-up
      9. Maintain emission control devices
      10. Service valve train components
      11. Inspect lower engine components
      12. Repair lower engine components
      13. Replace lower engine components
      14. Replace on-car microprocessors
      15. Remove engine
      16. Replace engine
      17. Reseal engine
      18. Check engine vacuum
      19. Test engine compression
      20. Verify oil pressure
      21. Adjust timing
      22. Remove oil pump
      23. Replace oil pump

  
  • ATG 344 - GM Manual Drivetrains

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides an understanding of the principles of operation in manual powertrains, including manual transmissions and transaxles, front and rear differentials, driveshafts and transfer cases. Proper diagnosis, service and repair procedures of these systems are studied and practiced.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program, and AUT 114  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate safe work habits.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate safe personal working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturer’s repair procedures.
      5. Follow manufacturer and government warnings and regulations.
    2. General Drivetrain Diagnosis - Manual Drivetrain and Axle Diagnosis.
      1. Identify and interpret drive train concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, fluid type, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.
      3. Check fluid condition; check for leaks; determine necessary action.
      4. Drain and refill manual transmission/transaxle and final drive unit.
    3. Clutch Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Diagnose clutch noise, binding, slippage, pulsation, and chatter; determine necessary action.
      2. Inspect clutch pedal linkage, cables, automatic adjuster mechanisms, brackets, bushings, pivots, and springs; perform necessary action.
      3. Inspect and replace clutch pressure plate assembly, clutch disc, release (throw-out) bearing and linkage, and pilot bearing/bushing (as applicable).
      4. Bleed clutch hydraulic system.
      5. Check and adjust clutch master cylinder fluid level; check for leaks.
      6. Inspect flywheel and ring gear for wear and cracks; determine necessary action.
      7. Measure flywheel runout and crankshaft end play; determine necessary action.
    4. Manual Transmission/Transaxle Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect, adjust, and reinstall shift linkages, brackets, bushings, cables, pivots, and levers.
      2. Describe the operational characteristics of an electronically-controlled manual transmission/transaxle.
      3. Diagnose noise concerns through the application of transmission/transaxle power flow principles.
      4. Diagnose hard shifting and jumping out of gear concerns; determine necessary action.
      5. Diagnose transaxle final drive assembly noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
      6. Disassemble, inspect clean, and reassemble internal transmission/transaxle components.
      7. Inspect transmission/transaxle case, extension housing, case mating surfaces, bores, bushings, and vents; determine necessary actions.
      8. Inspect and replace gaskets, seals, and sealants; inspect sealing surfaces.
      9. Measure endplay or preload on transmission/transaxle shafts; determine necessary action.
      10. Inspect and re-install synchronizer hub, sleeves, keys (inserts), springs, and blocker rings.
    5. Constant Velocity Shaft/Drive Shaft and Universal Joint Service.
      1. Identify types of constant velocity (CV) joints and explain their operation.
      2. Identify types of universal joints and explain their operation
      3. Diagnose constant-velocity (CV) joint noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
      4. Diagnose universal joint noise and vibration concerns; perform necessary action.
      5. Inspect, service, and replace shaft center support bearings.
      6. Inspect, service, and replace shafts, yokes, boots, and universal/CV joints.
      7. Check shaft balance and phasing; measure shaft runout; measure and adjust driveline angles.
    6. Drive Axle and Differential operation.
      1. Identify the components of a differential and explain their operation.
      2. Define the different types of axle designs.
      3. Explain differential operation.
      4. Determine the operation of limited-slip and locking differentials.
    7. Drive Axle and Differential Diagnosis And Repair.
      1. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Inspect and replace companion flange and pinion seal; measure companion flange runout.
      3. Inspect ring gear and measure runout; determine necessary action.
      4. Remove, inspect, and reinstall drive pinion and ring gear, spacers, sleeves, and bearings.
      5. Measure and adjust drive pinion depth.
      6. Measure and adjust drive pinion bearing preload.
      7. Measure and adjust side bearing preload and ring and pinion gear total backlash and backlash variation on a differential carrier assembly (threaded cup or shim types).
      8. Check ring and pinion tooth contact patterns; perform necessary action.
      9. Disassemble, inspect, measure, and adjust or replace differential pinion gears (spiders), shaft, side gears, side bearings, thrust washers, and case.
      10. Reassemble and reinstall differential case assembly; measure runout; determine necessary action.
      11. Diagnose limited slip differential noise, slippage, and chatter concerns; determine necessary action.
      12. Measure limited slip differential rotating torque; determine necessary action.
      13. Inspect and replace drive axle wheel studs.
      14. Remove and replace drive axle shafts.
      15. Inspect and replace drive axle shaft seals, bearings, and retainers.
      16. Measure drive axle flange runout and shaft end play; determine necessary action.
      17. Diagnose drive axle shafts, bearings, and seals for noise, vibration, and fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.
    8. Four-wheel Drive/All-wheel Drive System Operation.
      1. Identify and explain the operation of four-wheel drive systems.
      2. Name the major components of conventional four-wheel-drive systems.
      3. Discuss the purpose and operation of 4WD locking/unlocking mechanisms.
      4. Name the components of a transfer case.
      5. Explain the difference between four-wheel-drive (4WD) and all-wheel-drive (AWD).
      6. Explain the operation of viscous clutches used in all-wheel-drive systems.
    9. Four-wheel Drive/All-wheel Drive Component Diagnosis and Repair.
      1. Inspect, adjust, and repair shifting controls (mechanical, electrical, and vacuum), bushings, mounts, levers, and brackets.
      2. Inspect front-wheel bearings and locking hubs; perform necessary action(s).
      3. Check for leaks at drive assembly seals; check vents; check lube level.
      4. Identify concerns related to variations in tire circumference and/or final drive ratios.
      5. Diagnose noise, vibration, and unusual steering concerns; determine necessary action.
      6. Diagnose, test, adjust, and replace electrical/electronic components of four-wheel drive systems.
      7. Disassemble, service, and reassemble transfer case and components.

  
  • ATG 345 - GM Automatic Drivetrains

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provide an understanding of the principles of operation in automatic transmissions and transaxles including electronic controls. Proper diagnosis, service, and repair procedures of these systems are studied and practiced.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program, and AUT 114 .
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate personal safety working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturer’s repair procedures.
      5. Follow manufacture and government warnings and regulations.
    2. Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Design and Operation.
      1. Describe basic automatic transmission operation.
      2. Describe the basic laws of physics involved with an automatic transmission operation.
      3. Classify automatic transmissions according to the power train configuration.
      4. Identify the major components in a torque converter and explain their purpose.
      5. Describe the design and operation of the hydraulic controls used in modern transmissions.
      6. Identify the major apply components in an automatic transmission.
      7. Identify the components in a basic planetary gear set and describe their operation.
      8. Describe the purpose and operation of common friction and reaction members.
    3. General Drivetrain Diagnosis-Automatic Transmission/Transaxle.
      1. Identify and interpret transmission/transaxle concern, differentiate between engine performance and transmission/transaxle concerns; determine necessary action.
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information fluid type, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.
      3. Diagnose fluid loss and condition concerns; determine necessary action.
      4. Check fluid level in a transmission or a transaxle equipped with a dip-stick.
      5. Check fluid level in a transmission or a transaxle not equipped with a dip-stick.
      6. Perform pressure tests (including transmissions/transaxles equipped with electronic pressure control); determine necessary action.
      7. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
      8. Perform stall test; determine necessary action.
      9. Perform lock-up converter system tests; determine necessary action.
      10. Diagnose electronic transmission/transaxle control systems using appropriate test equipment and service information.
      11. Diagnose pressure concerns in a transmission using hydraulic principles (Pascal’s Law).
    4. In-Vehicle Transmission/Transaxle Maintenance and Repair.
      1. Inspect, adjust, and replace external manual valve shift linkage, transmission range sensor/switch, and park/neutral position switch.
      2. Inspect for leakage; replace external seals, gaskets, and bushings.
      3. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, or replace electrical/electronic components and circuits including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays, terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses.
      4. Inspect, replace and align powertrain mounts.
    5. Off-Vehicle Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Repair.
      1. Remove and reinstall transmission/transaxle and torque converter; inspect engine core plugs, rear crankshaft seal, dowel pins, dowel pin holes, and mating surfaces
      2. Inspect, leak test, and flush or replace transmission/transaxle oil cooler, lines, and fittings.
      3. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts, converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and crankshaft pilot bore.
      4. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle.
      5. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces, bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls, screens, spacers, and gaskets).
      6. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs, and retainers; determine necessary action.
      7. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
      8. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine necessary action.
      9. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings.
      10. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves, and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
      11. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action.
      12. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine necessary action.
      13. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces; determine necessary action.
      14. Diagnose and inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings, and bushings; perform necessary action.
      15. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive components.
      16. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls, springs, retainers, seals, and friction and pressure plates, bands and drums; determine necessary action.
      17. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action.
      18. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies.
      19. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs, cages, retainers; determine necessary action.
      20. Assemble transmission/transaxle.
      21. Describe the operational characteristics of a continuously variable transmission (CVT).
      22. Describe the operational characteristics of a hybrid vehicle drive train.

  
  • ATG 350 - Technical Internship IV

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 18
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience at a participating dealership. Tasks will be consistent with the technician’s ability and previous coursework.
    Prerequisite: ATG 340  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits by scoring a minimum of 8 points on attendance and punctuality criteria as noted on “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Show regular attendance
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide the dealership a responsible and productive employee by scoring a minimum of 16 points on the “Employer’s Evaluation of Coop Student” form
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude toward work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Revel initiative
      8. Illustrate working relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Mail work reports
    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks
      1. Demonstrate safe working habits
      2. Road test an automatic transmission
      3. Check operation of torque converter
      4. Remove a transmission
      5. Replace a transmission
      6. Disassemble a transmission
      7. Inspect a transmission
      8. Clean a transmission
      9. Repair a transmission
      10. Reassemble a transmission
      11. Remove an automatic transmission
      12. Replace an automatic transmission
      13. Disassemble an automatic transmission
      14. Inspect an automatic transmission
      15. Clean an automatic transmission
      16. Repair an automatic transmission
      17. Reassemble a transmission
      18. Service a differential/final drive
      19. Remove a transfer case
      20. Replace a transfer case

  
  • ATG 354 - Advanced GM Motors Systems

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in techniques and procedures required to diagnose and service current vehicles. New systems developed by GM will be included.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Automotive Service Educational Program
    Competencies
    1. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Apply work area safety skills.
      2. Demonstrate safe personal working habits.
      3. Practice safe tool and equipment usage.
      4. Follow manufacturer’s repair procedures.
      5. Follow manufacturer and government warnings and regulations.
    2. Examine data communication systems.
      1. Identify communication protocols used.
      2. Examine module to module communication.
      3. Check for and diagnose module communication errors (including CAN/BUS systems) using a scan tool.
      4. Identify electronic modules, security systems, radios, and other accessories that require re-initialization or code entry after reconnecting vehicle battery.
      5. Describe the process for software transfers, software updates, or flash reprogramming on electronic modules.
      6. Repair CAN/BUS wiring harness.
    3. Service restraint systems.
      1. Locate system operational theory in a service manual.
      2. Identify inflatable restraint system components.
      3. Locate inflatable restraint system components on a vehicle.
      4. Examine inflatable restraint operational theory.
      5. Identify inflatable restraint trouble codes.
      6. Diagnose failures using trouble code information.
      7. Interpret information and data as it relates to diagnosis.
      8. Perform clearing of trouble codes.
      9. Disable inflator modules by zone location.
      10. Examine seatbelt pre-tensioner operation.
    4. Analyze body control systems.
      1. Discuss controlled systems.
      2. Identify component location and functions.
      3. Use diagnostic tools and procedures to diagnose (troubleshoot) body electronic system circuits; determine necessary action.
      4. Interpret information and data as it relates to diagnosis.
      5. Diagnose body control system and sub-system failures.
    5. Examine entertainment systems.
      1. Discuss fundamental radio principles.
      2. Identify audio system components.
      3. Examine operation of various audio systems.
      4. Diagnose (troubleshoot) radio static and weak, intermittent, or no radio reception; determine necessary action.
      5. Examine video system operation.
    6. Analyze security systems.
      1. Examine engine related anti-theft systems.
      2. Perform security system-related no-start diagnosis.
      3. Discuss content theft security systems.
      4. Diagnose content theft security system concerns.
    7. Examine emerging technology.
      1. Discuss hybrid vehicle technology.
      2. Identify high-voltage circuits of electric or hybrid electric vehicle and related safety precautions.
      3. Describe safe working practices and protective equipment for enabling and disabling high voltage systems.
      4. Analyze high voltage systems.
      5. Explain the procedure to depower high voltage systems
      6. Discuss the procedures to be followed to perform service of hybrid/high voltage vehicles
      7. Examine fuel cell technology.
    8. Examine vehicle related Noise, Vibration, and Harshness
      1. Discuss vibration terminology
      2. Explore vibration theory.
      3. Use vibration diagnostic tools.
    9. Perform Noise, Vibration, and Harshness engine diagnostic procedures.
      1. Diagnose engine firing frequency vibrations.
      2. Diagnose accessory related vibrations.
      3. Diagnose abnormal engine vibrations. 
    10. Perform Noise, Vibration, and Harshness Driveline diagnostic procedures.
      1. Diagnose constant-velocity (CV) joint noise and vibration concerns; determine needed action.
      2. Diagnose universal joint noise and vibration concerns; perform needed action.
      3. Check shaft balance and phasing; measure shaft runout; measure and adjust driveline angles.
      4. Diagnose drive axle shafts, bearings, and seals for noise; vibration; and fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.
    11. Perform Noise, Vibration, and Harshness Tire and Wheel diagnostic procedures.
      1. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and noise; determine needed action.
      2. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange, and hub runout; determine needed action.


Automotive Technology

  
  • AUT 111 - Intro to Auto Tech I

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course starts with an introduction to occupations with a directed focus on automotive repair technology and related industries. Students use specialized equipment, service information and service bulletins. The course will develop student knowledge and skills in entry level tasks required when working in a repair related occupation.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the Automotive Repair Industry.
      1. Investigate the evolution of the automobile.
      2. Identify automotive service related positions.
      3. Discuss how to prepare for a career in the automotive industry.
      4. Discuss the level of training and experience needed as a service technician.
      5. Explore the eight areas of ASE certification.
      6. Examine the process in becoming ASE certified.
      7. Investigate automotive related job trends using current BLS statistics.
    2. Examine environmental and hazardous materials.
      1. Investigate government agencies.
      2. Follow manufacturer’s warnings and government regulations.
      3. Define hazardous material.
      4. Complete S/P2 training and certification.
      5. Locate and demonstrate knowledge of material safety data sheets (MSDS).
    3. Perform proper shop safety procedures.
      1. Identify general shop safety rules and procedures.
      2. Utilize safe procedures for handling of tools and equipment.
      3. Identify and use proper placement of floor jacks and jack stands.
      4. Identify and use proper procedures for safe lift operation.
      5. Utilize proper ventilation procedures for working within the lab/shop area.
      6. Identify marked safety areas.
      7. Identify the location and the types of fire extinguishers and other fire safety equipment; demonstrate knowledge of the procedures for using fire extinguishers and other fire safety equipment.
      8. Identify the location and use of eye wash stations.
      9. Identify the location of the posted evacuation routes.
      10. Comply with the required use of safety glasses, ear protection, gloves, and shoes during lab/shop activities.
      11. Identify and wear appropriate clothing for lab/shop activities.
      12. Secure hair and jewelry for lab/shop activities.
    4. Explain various safety precautions related to vehicle service.
      1. Demonstrate awareness of the safety aspects of supplemental restraint systems (SRS), electronic brake control systems, and hybrid vehicle high voltage circuits.
      2. Demonstrate awareness of the safety aspects of high voltage circuits (such as high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, ignition systems, injection systems, etc.).
    5. Use automotive tools and equipment.
      1. Identify tools and their usage in automotive applications.
      2. Identify standard and metric designation.
      3. Demonstrate safe handling and use of appropriate tools.
      4. Demonstrate proper cleaning, storage, and maintenance of tools and equipment.
      5. Inventory personal hand tools.
      6. Complete a project using common hand tools.
      7. Elevate a car on a hoist.
      8. Raise a car with a floor jack.
      9. Support a car on jack stands.
    6. Analyze automotive service information.
      1. Using an owner’s manual, locate vehicle specific information.
      2. Utilize vehicle specific information using manufacturer’s service information.
      3. Locate vehicle specific information using generic service information.
      4. Analyze vehicle specific information using electronic service information.
      5. Locate service bulletins by vehicle application.
      6. Identify industry standard labor times using labor estimating guides.
      7. Locate and interpret vehicle service decals, warning labels, and component identification numbers.
      8. Interpret vehicle identification numbers (VIN).
    7. Assess Fasteners.
      1. Identify fasteners.
      2. Examine clamping force.
      3. Examine torquing methods.
      4. Interpret torque patterns and increments.
      5. Demonstrate proper thread repair in aluminum and steel.
      6. Perform common fastener and thread repair, to include: remove broken bolt, restore internal and external threads, and repair internal threads with thread insert.
    8. Perform mechanical measurements.
      1. Examine different measuring systems.
      2. Interpret common conversions.
      3. Use a straight edge and feeler gauge to make a measurement.
      4. Perform measurements using a dial caliper.
      5. Use an outside micrometer to make measurements.
      6. Make measurements using a split-ball gauge.
      7. Make measurements using a telescoping gauge.
      8. Perform measurements using a dial indicator.
      9. Measure rotating bearing preload torque.
      10. Measure shaft end play, determine necessary action.
      11. Generate measurements using other precision measuring tools.
    9. Evaluate dealership/repair facility organizational structure.
      1. Identify key personnel of dealership/repair facility.
      2. Investigate the responsibility of each element.
      3. Diagram the organizational structure of dealership/repair facility.
    10. Analyze the steps in preparing a vehicle for service.
      1. Identify information needed and the service requested on a repair order.
      2. Identify purpose and demonstrate proper use of fender covers, mats.
      3. Demonstrate use of the three C’s (concern, cause, and correction).
      4. Review vehicle service history.
      5. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause, and correction.
      6. Ensure vehicle is prepared to return to customer per school/company policy (floor mats, steering wheel cover, etc.).
    11. Analyze manufacturer’s warranties.
      1. Compare warranty procedures from model year to model year.
      2. Examine procedures for completing warranty forms.
      3. Determine warranty claim validity.
    12. Analyze the vehicle delivery process.
      1. Discuss customer expectations and satisfaction.
      2. Explain the importance of overall vehicle appearance prior to delivery.
      3. Perform new and pre-owned vehicle inspections.
      4. Discuss wind noise and water leak repair.
    13. Examine Tire and Wheel Service.
      1. Inspect tire condition; identify tire wear patterns; check for correct size and application (load and speed ratings) and adjust air pressure; determine necessary action.
      2. Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations.
      3. Install wheel and torque lug nuts to manufacturer specifications.
      4. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire assembly (static and dynamic).
      5. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire pressure monitoring system sensor.
      6. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary action.
      7. Repair tire using internal patch.
      8. Identify and test tire pressure monitoring systems (indirect and direct) for operation; verify operation of instrument panel lamps.
      9. Demonstrate knowledge of steps required to remove and replace sensors in a tire pressure monitoring system.

 

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