Feb 24, 2024  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Early Childhood Education

  
  • ECE 133 - Child Health, Safety & Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on evidence-based concepts in the fields of health, safety and nutrition and their relationship to the growth and development of the young child ages birth to eight. Blends current theory with problem-solving, practical applications and assessments. Includes collaboration with families and assesses the role of culture, language and ability on health, safety and nutrition decisions in early childhood settings.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the importance of role modeling positive health actions by teachers, caregivers and adults.
      1. Explain the interrelationship between children?s health, safety practices and nutritional status.
      2. Describe adult behaviors that support the development of positive health habits in young children.
      3. Explore personal habits in the areas of health, safety and nutrition as they relate to role modeling for young children.
    2. Compare and contrast the health, safety and nutrition components of early care and education regulations, guidelines and NAEYC early childhood program standards.
      1. Identify standards associated with high-quality environments in relation to health, safety and nutrition.
      2. Explore current quality initiatives as they relate to health, safety and nutrition.
      3. Summarize the requirements of the Child and Adult Care Food Program.
      4. Plan menues appropriate for young children using the Child and Adult Care Food Program guidelines.
      5. Explain food safety and sanitation principles according to the Child and Adult Care Food Program and the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    3. Describe the use of evidence-based strategies of education, supervision and observation for maintaining a safe and healthy environment.
      1. Summarize the major health issues related to children in group care.
      2. Describe the use of observation as a tool for daily health screening and recognize signs of illness in young children.
      3. Identify common communicable diseases of young children and proper procedure for the control of infectious diseases.
      4. Describe chronic health related conditions in young children.
      5. List key areas of concern for safety in indoor and outdoor environments.
      6. Explain procedures for responding to documenting accidents and injuries in a child care setting.
      7. Identify the influences of culture, family and ability on health, safety and nutrition in the early childhood setting.
    4. Describe health, safety, and nutrition in relationship to growth and development of each child, birth through age eight.
      1. Describe US Dietary guidelines including recommendations for intake and activity for each group.
      2. Describe specific nutrient and energy needs of young children.
      3. List the strengths and weaknesses of each of each major class of nutrients.
    5. Locate/create developmentally appropriate health/safety/nutrition learning experiences for young children.
      1. List guidelines for planning developmentally appropriate health, safety and nutrition activities for children, including their relationship to child development.
      2. Identify informal health and safety learning opportunities within the context of a program schedule and routines.
      3. Identify strategies for collaborating and problem solving with families to meet the needs of each child. (Use of health records, daily notes, health observations, etc.)
      4. Explore resources for creating health, safety and nutrition learning experiences for young children.
    6. Obtain information regarding certification in pediatric/adult CPR/First Aid, standard precautions and mandatory child and adult abuse reporter training.

  
  • ECE 151 - Individualizing for Children

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    Introduction to effective practices that support the development and learning of young children with disabilities and other special needs. Focus is on evidence-based, individualized instructional methods and strategies used in teaching and facilitating the development of young children. This course involves field assignments.
    Prerequisite: None
    Competencies
    1. Assess evidence-based, developmentally and individually appropriate methods for fostering the social-emotional, cognitive, communication, adaptive and motor development of young children in various inclusive settings such as the home, the school, and the community

    1. Evaluate early childhood settings for effective, inclusive instructional practices

    2. Design examples of DEC Recommended Practices

    2. Apply developmental and intervention theory to make instructional decisions

    1. Develop activity plans for routines and activities that integrate intervention objectives and strategies into ongoing everyday natural routines and activities

    2. Match instructional techniques and settings to learning objectives for children

    3. Apply principles of inclusion to support the development of young children with varying needs and abilities

    1. Design learning environments that include accommodations and adaptations for young children with varying needs and abilities

    2. Generate options for differentiating instruction

    4. Demonstrate understanding of IEPs and IFSPs

    1. Identify learning objectives for infants, toddlers, and preschool age children

    2. Plan for and utilize data collection to support planning and instruction

    5. Illustrate knowledge of family-centered practices

    1. Interview a family about their experiences with a young child with special needs

    2. Demonstrate examples of family-centered practices

    6. Demonstrate professionalism

    1. Identify essential components of a team approach for working with young children and families

    2. List community resources to aid in teaming or making referrals for families

    3. Complete required background checks

    4. Obtain media releases

    5. Maintain confidentiality

  
  • ECE 152 - Learning with Digital Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    Covers understanding of media impact on learning practices, the use of media to enhance learning in early childhood, joint adult-child interactions with digital media that enhance learning. Students explore and evaluate the effectiveness of digital media for enhancing literacy, math and science learning and plan lessons incorporating digital media. This course involves field assignments.
    Prerequisite: None
    Competencies
    1. Examine the features of digital media that support learning in early childhood.

    1. Compare the values and risks of integrating technology into early childhood programs

    2. Summarize evidence related to the use of digital media to enhance children’s learning

    2. Assess components of joint adult-child interactions with digital media that enhance child’s learning

    1. Observe a variety of joint adult-child interactions around digital media

    2. Explain the effectiveness of observed interactions

    3. Critique the potential of digital media for promoting learning goals in literacy, mathematics, or science

    1. Identify features of digital media intended to promote children’s learning

    2. Evaluate select digital media through engagement and reflection

    3. Observe children’s use of digital media

    4. Assess teaching strategies to augment children’s learning from media

    1. Examine the integration of digital media into curriculum materials

    2. Select strategies for supporting children’s science talk while using digital media

    3. Practice strategies in a teaching situation

    5. Create a lesson sequence that integrates face-to-face science literacy activities with videos

    1. Develop a learning plan.

    2. Implement the plan with children

    3. Summarize the effectiveness of the plan

    6. Demonstrate professionalism

    1. Complete required background checks

    2. Obtain required media releases

    3. Maintain confidentiality

    4. Provide objective feedback for peers

  
  • ECE 158 - Early Childhood Curriculum I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on the development, implementation and assessment of appropriate environments and curricula for young children ages three through eight. Students prepare to utilize evidence-based, developmentally appropriate practices in a context of children’s family, culture, language and abilities. Emphasis is on understanding children’s developmental stages and developing appropriate learning opportunities, interactions and environments to support each child in the following areas: dramatic play, art, music and fine and gross motor play.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic environmental requirements in an early childhood setting.
      1. Develop a daily schedule appropriate for an early childhood program.
      2. Identify developmentally appropriate transitions to use when moving children from one activity to another.
      3. Describe the characteristics of a room arrangement that supports young children’s need for security, belonging, acceptance, exploration, learning, independence, and the development of relationships.
      4. Identify characteristics of an appropriate outdoor learning environment.
    2. Assess, plan, adapt, implement and evaluate evidence-based and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities in the areas of dramatic play, art, music and movement, and physical play for children of varying abilities.
      1. Identify stages in children’s development related to the creative arts, dramatic play, and large and fine motor skills.
      2. Describe how dramatic play, creative arts, and fine and large motor play support social, emotional, physical, cognitive and language development.
      3. Explore objective observation as a tool for child assessment that helps identify children’s strengths, challenges, interests and needs.
    3. Describe the importance of play for every young child.
      1. Discuss opportunities for learning through play and the provision of meaningful choices to children.
      2. Identify the values of creative art, dramatic play, music and movement, and physical play in the early childhood curriculum.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to effectively develop evidence-based and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for children of varying abilities.
      1. Explore a variety of approaches to curriculum planning.
      2. Begin the development of a concept web and curriculum plan focusing on creative art, music and movement, dramatic play, and fine and gross motor play.
      3. Collect a variety of age appropriate, non-biased learning activities for creative art, music and movement, dramatic play, and fine and gross motor play.
      4. Construct simple learning materials in the area of creative arts, music and movement, or physical play for use with young children.
      5. Describe the influence of early childhood theories on current practice.
    5. Evaluate evidence-based and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities and materials for children of varying abilities.
      1. Identify safety concerns when selecting activities and materials for young children.
      2. Describe activities for use with individual children, in small or large groups, and indoors or outdoors. 
      3. Select activities for effective promotion of anti-bias attitudes and behaviors.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to adapt learning opportunities and materials to meet the needs of children of varying abilities.
      1. Explain adaptations that can be made in the physical environment and daily schedule to support the inclusion of each child.
      2. Review adaptations that can be made in creative art, music and movement, dramatic play, fine and gross motor, and outdoor activities to support the inclusion of each child.
    7. Use self-reflection as a tool to improve teaching and interactions with each child.
      1. Examine characteristics of effective teachers and how they affect each child.
      2. Explore the components of an early childhood teacher’s role in support of children’s family, culture, language and ability diversity.
      3. Begin to develop a philosophy of supporting children in an early childhood environment.
    8. Explain the importance of family engagement in the child’s education.
      1. Identify benefits of partnering with families to support children.
      2. Describe behaviors that demonstrate a respectful, welcoming, collaborative approach with families.
      3. Explore strategies for getting to know families and appreciating family differences.
    9. Demonstrate professionalism.
      1. Function collaboratively with peers and instructors.
      2. Maintain a professional attitude and behavior as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
      3. Respect the needs, personalities, culture, language and ability of peers in the classroom.

  
  • ECE 159 - Early Childhood Curriculum II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on the development, implementation and assessment of appropriate environments and curricula for young children ages three through eight.Student’s prepare to utilize developmentally appropriate evidence-based  practices in a context of children’s family, culture, language and abilities. Emphasis is on understanding children’s developmental stages and developing appropriate learning opportunities, interactions and environments to support each child  in the following areas: emergent literacy, math, science, technology and social studies.
    Prerequisite: ECE 158  with a C or better, or Instructor Approval
    Corequisite: ECE 359  or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic environmental requirements in an early childhood classroom.
      1. Identify basic learning materials in each of the following areas: math, manipulatives, blocks, science/sensory/discovery, emergent literacy, social studies and technology.
      2. Describe characteristics of the effective display of materials and the contribution of the visual environmental to children’s learning.
      3. Identify materials to reflect cultural, language and ability diversity.
    2. Assess, plan, adapt, implement and evaluate evidence-based and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities in the areas of emergent literacy, math, blocks, science, technology, sensory and social studies for children of varying abilities.
      1. Identify children’s developmental stages in the areas of emergent literacy, math, social studies, science, technology, block play and manipulatives.
      2. Select appropriate, culturally sensitive tools for assessment of children’s learning and development related to emergent literacy, math, social studies, science, technology, block play and manipulatives.
      3. Link learning goals for children to selected activities and materials.
      4. Review a variety of objective observation tools for child assessment (i.e., anecdotal records, frequency counts, checklists, rating scales, participation charts, work samples and curriculum-linked assessments) that help identify children’s strengths, challenges, interests and needs and are appropriate for individual children’s developmental levels and experiences.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to develop evidence-based and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for children of varying abilities.
      1. Identify developmentally appropriate, non-biased materials and experiences that support children’s learning related to emergent literacy, math, science and sensory, technology, social studies, block play and manipulatives.
      2. Plan and demonstrate effective group learning activities across a variety of domains and content areas (language, literacy, math, social studies, and science).
      3. Develop a curriculum web based on children’s interests and meaningful learning activities.
      4. Construct simple learning materials to promote learning related to math, science, social studies, or emergent literacy for use with each child. 
    4. Demonstrate the ability to adapt learning opportunities and materials to meet the needs of children of varying abilities.
      1. Identify adaptations that can be made in the physical environment, schedule, and learning opportunities to support each child’s particular strengths, challenges, interests and needs.
      2. Develop curriculum plans that are appropriate for children ages three through eight in a fully inclusive early childhood setting.
    5. Use self-reflection as a tool to improve teaching and interactions with children.
      1. Identify personal strengths, skills, interests and challenges in planning integrated curriculum.
      2. Describe how personal beliefs, values and experiences influence each person’s philosophy of early childhood education.
    6. Explain the importance of culture and language in a child’s education and the importance of family engagement.
      1. Identify informal and formal opportunities to learn from families.
      2. Explore opportunities to include families in planning for children’s growth and development.
      3. Consider strategies for incorporating family and community backgrounds, cultures, and preferences in the early childhood setting.
    7. Apply professional skills.
      1. Demonstrate collaboration, problem-solving, commitment to the NAEYC Code of Ethics.
      2. Demonstrate dispositions of effective teachers including awareness of and sensitivity to differences in culture, language and ability.

  
  • ECE 170 - Child Growth & Development

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Reviews typical and atypical development of children from conception to adolescence in all developmental domains. Examines interactions between child, family and society within a variety of community and cultural contexts. Examines theories and evidence-based practices associated with understanding and supporting young children.
    Competencies
    1. Review the importance of theories and research in understanding child development.
      1. Compare and contrast the major theories of development.
      2. Identify the characteristics of effective research.
      3. Use theories to help explain children’s behavior.
    2. Describe prenatal development and the newborn period.
      1. Recognize chromosomal and genetic prenatal risks and the associated characteristics in children.
        1. Describe factors that influence development prior to birth and their consequences.
        2. Explain the consequences of problems at birth such as oxygen deprivation, cesarean birth, and low birth weight.
        3. Characterize some of the ways that heredity and environment interact to produce individual differences in development.
    3. Identify developmental milestones from conception to adolescence and understand that growth, development and learning are progressive.
      1. Describe and analyze developmental sequences and patterns for cognitive, language, social, emotional, physical and motor development.
      2. Recognize a range of typical and atypical skills and behaviors in each developmental domain.
      3. Explain the influences of family, culture, language, ability and community on children’s development.
    4. Explain experiences linked to children’s ages and individual strengths, interests and needs that support learning and development.
    5. Review the effects of early care and education on children’s development as documented in current research.
      1. Analyze the influence of a variety of factors (e.g. physical activity, media and technology, play) as well as cultural, linguistic and ability diversity on children’s health and development.
      2. Describe the potential consequences of chronic poverty on children’s development.
      3. Identify research-based strategies for promoting brain development.
      4. Analyze factors that influence school readiness and achievement. 
    6. Discuss evidenced-based strategies used to support families by identifying family structures, routines, preferences and unique positive aspects of each family.
      1. Recognize the emotional and psychological aspects of preparing for parenthood.
      2. Explain how attachment relationships develop, and strategies for supporting secure attachment.
      3. Describe basic caregiving styles and the impact of each on a child’s development.
      4. Explain how culture, language and ability diversity influence attachment, parenting practices, and children’s characteristics and behaviors.
      5. Identify how family structures are changing and the impact these changes have on children.
    7. Describe how exceptionalities influence children and families.
      1. Identify various exceptionalities and their implications.
      2. Analyze issues related to having a child born with special needs.
      3. Investigate the benefits of early intervention for children considered at-risk and how to support families in obtaining these services.
    8. Analyze development using observation and assessment techniques.
      1. Explain how assessment is used to determine the well-being of a newborn.
      2. Identify how the disappearance of infant reflexes is used to assess neurological development.
      3. Describe how observation and assessment can be used to identify possible typical and atypical development.
      4. Identify considerations for assessment of culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse children.

  
  • ECE 215 - Home, School & Comm Relations

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on current understanding of supporting children and families in relation to home, school and community contexts. Emphasis is on building respectful, culturally sensitive relationships with families, utilizing community resources and working with culturally, linguistically and ability diverse families.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the influence of family engagement on children’s well-being.
      1. Describe research findings related to the importance of family involvement and support
      2. Explore theoretical perspectives related to family systems and principles of family support
      3. Identify historical and recent trends in families that influence family engagement
    2. Explore strategies for creating respectful, reciprocal relationships with families
      1. Describe a welcoming environment for culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse families
      2. Apply effective, culturally responsive techniques for communicating withy families
      3. Summarize the components of effective relationships between home, program/school and the community
      4. Identify skills necessary for building collaborative relationships with diverse families and other professionals.
    3. Examine strategies for engaging families in children’s development and learning
      1. Compare and contrast family engagement and parent education
      2. Review family needs assessments as ways to identify family priorities, goals and concerns and map family resources and support.
      3. Describe opportunities to develop and support family members as leaders
    4. Identify diverse community resources addressing a variety of family strengths, needs, challenges and interests
      1. Describe how to support families in the process of seeking referrals for resources and services for the child or family
      2. List available community resources intended to support families and children.
      3. Identify supports for professionals working with culturally, linguistically, structurally, economically and ability diverse families.
    5. Identify diverse family and community characteristics.
      1. Compare and contrast diverse family structures and styles of communication
      2. Recognize the influence of neighborhoods, communities, language, culture and ability on family functioning and children’s development.
      3. Explore the impact of family experiences on family functioning
    6. Develop a philosophy of family engagement and support.
      1. Examine personal experiences, beliefs, biases and values that influence personal approaches to working with families.
      2. Identify areas of strength and challenge in working with families.
      3. Describe the responsibilities of programs in supporting families, encouraging family participation and offering opportunities for collaborative leadership.

  
  • ECE 221 - Infant/Toddler Care and Educ.

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on care, education and assessment of children from birth to 36 months. Prepares students to utilize developmentally appropriate evidence-based practices, including responsive caregiving, routines as curriculum, collaborative relationships with culturally, linguistically and ability diverse children and families, and a focus on the whole child in inclusive settings.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Competencies
    1. Describe the development of infants and toddlers with emphasis on the whole child, and understanding of individual needs based on culture, language and ability
      1. Identify the typical developmental progression of children from birth to three.
      2. Explain how development and learning varies according to the unique traits of each child.
      3. Review current research regarding infant brain development and how to support it.
      4. Acknowledge the importance of cultural sensitivity to foster relationships with children and families.
    2. Describe the role of adults in creating respectful, responsive, and collaborative partnerships with each child, family and other staff
      1. Define primary care and continuity of care.
      2. Explain how primary and care and continuity of care support infant attachment and foster relationships with families.
      3. Explain how to establish a goodness of fit between child and caregiver by responding to individual temperament types.
      4. Explain the social/emotional milestones of infancy and caregiver strategies that support infants at each stage of infancy.
      5. Describe how to utilize a responsive process to create nurturing relationships with children and families.
      6. Define the term protective urge and explain how to support the protective urges of families and educators.
    3. Plan appropriate environments including room arrangement, equipment, materials and adaptations for each child
      1. Identify the key considerations for creating appropriate environments for infants and toddlers.
      2. List the recommended ratios for infant and toddler environments according to Iowa licensing, NAEYC and PITC.
      3. Explain the benefits of small group sizes for infants and toddlers.
      4. Create a plan for an infant or toddler environment including appropriate furniture and materials to support development.
      5. Identify strategies for creating an environment respectful of culture, language, and ability levels for each infant and toddler.
    4. Identify guidance strategies which nurture self-regulation and a positive sense of self
      1. Identify appropriate socialization and guidance strategies for infants and toddlers.
      2. Determine which guidance strategies are appropriate for a child based on their stage of infancy while including consideration of culture, language and ability diversity.
      3. Recognize sources of different infant and toddler behaviors and describe strategies for reducing challenging behaviors and teaching appropriate behaviors.
    5. Explain strategies that support emerging communication skills, curiosity and creativity for each child
      1. Describe the importance of routines as a core component of the curriculum in an infant/toddler environment.
      2. Explain how to implement infant/toddler routines using best practice.
      3. Identify strategies to support learning through discovery.
      4. Describe verbal and non-verbal strategies that support infant’s emergent language skills.
      5. Plan and demonstrate learning opportunities that support each child’s development.
    6. Use informal and formal assessments as the basis for guided learning experiences
      1. Use assessment to plan individualized learning opportunities for infants and toddlers.
      2. Align child learning objectives with current standards in the field.
      3. Describe indicators that development may be delayed and communicate with families regarding concerns and resources available.
      4. Discuss serving infants with special needs through teaming, adaptations and accommodations, and the IFSP process.
    7. Use self-reflection as a tool to improve teaching and interactions
      1. Compare and contrast personal beliefs with evidence-based practices regarding infant/toddler care.
      2. Analyze how beliefs impact individual philosophy of infant/toddler care.
    8. Explain health and safety measures and legal requirements
      1. List the indicators of a safe and healthy environment for infants and toddlers.
      2. Utilize state regulations and other professional standards to make appropriate decisions regarding the health and safety of infants and toddlers.

  
  • ECE 242 - Child Life Theory

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    Introduction to Child Life theoretical foundations and principal intervention strategies used in Child Life Professional Practice.
    Prerequisite: Students must have at least 18 college credits to enroll this course.
    Competencies
    1. Develop understanding of the Official Documents of the Association of Child Life Professionals as a source of guiding principles for professional practice.

    1. Discuss the Code of Ethical Responsibility and how it impacts practice in the field.

    2. Identify Child Life Competencies and Standards of Clinical Practice

    3. Describe the Child Life Mission, Values and Vision Statements as it is reflected in the Child Life profession.

    4. Identify components of the Code of Professional Practice

    2. Evaluate knowledge and skills related to helping children and families cope with and understand hospitalization and other medical encounters.

    1. Review historical and current perspectives on the rationale for and techniques and outcomes of preparation.

    2. Discuss strategies for supporting the entire family (including siblings) through a child’s illness.

    3. Identify accepted preparation methods for healthcare encounters and life-changing events.

    4. Explain methods for effectively collaborating with other medical disciplines.

    5. Compare methods for working through moral and ethical challenges distinct to the medical field.

    3. Evaluate techniques of therapeutic play that is culturally, linguistically, ability and developmentally appropriate.

    1. Explore advantages to different elements of play, benefits of play and various therapeutic play modalities for the clinical setting.

    2. Design play experiences using a variety of strategies: directed, non-directed, medical, dramatic, and therapeutic play.

    4. Demonstrate understanding of Family-Centered Care in a variety of clinical settings.

    1. Explain the key principles of patient- and family-centered care including principles of respect and dignity.

    2. Practice two-way communication using family-friendly language.

    3. Identify strategies for supporting participation in care and collaboration in relationship to child life practice.

    5. Examine the elements of the scope of practice

    1. Describe the stressors and developmental and psychosocial treatment issues that affect the health care experience of a child and family.

    2. Discuss the spectrum of child life practice in direct and non-direct services in pediatric health care including a historical review of the profession and its development in the evolution of children’s healthcare.

    6. Assess implementation of procedural and event preparation
    for the medical setting including rationale and current techniques.

    1. Practice effective strategies for procedural preparation, support, and distraction strategies as ways to cope.

    2. Explore current pain prevention interventions, discussing  effectiveness and appropriateness.

    3. Discuss historical practices as well future options regarding procedural support.

    4. Identify effective ways to support patient’s families during procedures.

  
  • ECE 243 - Early Childhood Guidance

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on developmentally appropriate, evidence-based approaches and positive guidance strategies for supporting the development of each child. Emphasizes supportive interactions and developmentally appropriate environments. Uses assessment to analyze and guide behaviors. Studies impact of family, each child’s culture, language and ability on child guidance.
    Corequisite: ECE 343  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Identify multiple influences including family, culture, language and ability that impact each child’s social/emotional development and behavior.
      1. Describe the characteristics of various parenting/caregiving styles
      2. Describe the expected outcomes for children of each care-giving style
      3. Explain the guidance techniques adults use to influence children
      4. Analyze the role of culture in impacting parenting/caregiving style
    2. Explain the impact of positive relationships, collaboration, problem-solving and supportive interactions among teachers, children and families.
      1. Describe the principles of building relationships with children, families and colleagues.
      2. Identify strategies for building positive relationships with children, families and colleagues.
      3. Describe the relationship between a child’s social emotional behavior and challenging behavior.
      4. Explain the characteristics of effective communication with young children.
    3. Demonstrate effective approaches to creating a supportive early childhood environment
      1. Describe the relationship between environmental variables, children’s behaviors, and social emotional development.
      2. Identify strategies that can be used to design environment, schedules and routines.
      3. Explain how to adapt the early childhood setting for a child with behavioral challenges.
    4. Examine positive evidence-based guidance theories, strategies, assessments, and tools to help each child learn and practice appropriate and acceptable behaviors.
      1. Describe the principles of current guidance theories.
      2. Explain developmentally appropriate guidance strategies that foster social-emotional development.
      3. Identify appropriate behavioral expectations for children ages 3 ’ 8.
      4. Practice using assessment tools to track and describe each child’s skills and development.
    5. Examine the importance of intentionality when teaching social skills.
      1. Identify strategies for supporting the development of friendship skills, anger management, problem solving and empathy.
      2. Define emotional literacy and identify activities that build feeling vocabularies.
    6. Examine guidance challenges and strategies to support children.
      1. Identify methods that may be used to determine the function of challenging behavior.
      2. Describe strategies that may be used to prevent and replace challenging behavior.
      3. Explain ways to support the development of resiliency in children.
    7. Identify methods to construct appropriate guidance decisions in collaboration with professionals and families.
      1. Analyze personal beliefs regarding the guidance of young children.
      2. Explain ways to communicate with families about positive guidance and discipline strategies.
    8. Apply professional skills.
      1. Function collaboratively with peers and instructor.
      2. Ask questions when needed to clarify information or procedures.
      3. Practice prompt and consistent attendance.
      4. Maintain a professional attitude and behavior as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
      5. Respect the needs, personality, culture, language and ability of peers in the classroom.

  
  • ECE 268 - Early Childhood Field Exper

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 10
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Supervised practicum experience in selected early childhood settings serving children birth through eight. Includes integration of theory and developmentally appropriate evidence-based practice. Provides an understanding of working with culturally, linguistically and ability diverse young children and families. Emphasizes professional relationships and behavior, appropriate adult/child interactions, basic curriculum planning and program routines. Includes 150-hour practicum. Criminal background check is required.
    Prerequisite: ECE 103  , ECE 103  , ECE 170  , ECE 158  C or better, ECE 159  C or better, ECE 243  C or better, ECE 343  C or better, ECE 359  C or better ; 2.0 GPA ; Current CPR/First Aid, Universal Precautions and Mandatory Reporter Certification
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ECE 221  
    Competencies
    1. Examine what makes emergent curriculum models unique 
      1. Review the principles of an emergent curriculum model and compare differences between traditional models of instruction 
      2. Explain characteristics of an emergent curriculum looking at the unique aspects and how they relate back to children’s learning
      3. Identify the roles of the teacher, children, community and family units in the an emergent curriculum model 
    2. Assess a variety of developmentally appropriate, evidence-based strategies for working with culturally, linguistic and ability diverse young children 
      1. Create an anticipatory topic web focused on children’s interest 
      2. Collaborate with co-operating teachers to create teacher-directed and child-guided authentic activities that incorporate children’s diverse interests, strengths, needs and cultural background across content areas 
      3. Evaluate activities using both formal and informal assessment tools
    3. Create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments that support each child 
      1. Demonstrate strategies to help children maintain respect and safety for themselves, others and the community
      2. Maintain a supportive positive environment using familiar schedules, routines, transitions and classroom expectations
    4. Critique developmentally appropriate, evidence-based guidance interactions used with culturally, linguisticly and ability diverse young children 
      1. Demonstrate positive individualized guidance strategies to guide and support children’s behavior
      2. Use strategies to support the development of children’s healthy self-concept and self-esteem
      3. Review the impact of guidance strategies used
    5. Practice a variety of assessment techniques 
      1. Observe, assess and document the growth and development of individual children
      2. Use assessment information to plan for each child and groups of children
      3. Implement adaptations for individual children based on observation and assessment
    6. Practice self-reflection as a tool to improve teaching and interactions with each child and family 
      1. Encourage and accept ideas and suggestions from instructor, cooperating teachers and peers
      2. Document insights gained during emergent curriculum planning and teaching considering adaptations for future teaching experiences 
      3. Collaborate with co-operating teachers to report on the outcomes of child-guided activities to peers and families 
    7. Integrate dispositions of effective teachers 
      1. Build close, positive relationships with each child
      2. Respect and accommodate each child’s needs, personality, culture, language and ability
      3. Develop letters to the family discussing emergent curriculum focus activities and relevance to the development of the children 
      4. Communicate with families about children’s learning and development using a variety of methods including the use of emerging technology  
      5. Engage in collaborative relationship with peers, cooperating teachers and instructor
    8. Demonstrate professionalism 
      1. Practice confidentiality, dependability and accountability
      2. Display professional appearance, attitude and behavior as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct
      3. Demonstrate behavior in congruence with the philosophy, policies and procedures of the program

  
  • ECE 281 - Practicum

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 2
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Placement in a program for young children and/or families. Emphasis is on the development of competencies necessary for employment in a similar setting. Students complete a minimum of 90 hours in an early childhood setting.
    Prerequisite: Accepted into ECE program, 10 ECE credits, or instructor approval. Current CPR/First Aid, Universal Precautions, Mandatory Child Abuse Reporter Certification, Cleared Criminal Records Check
    Competencies
    1. Adapt to a community-based early childhood setting
      1. Review policies and procedures of an early childhood education program
      2. Practice effective communication with staff, children and parents
      3. Function as a cooperative and responsible team member
    2. Establish a safe and healthy learning environment
      1. Maintain learning centers that support children’s developing initiative and independence
      2. Monitor children daily for health related problems
      3. Recognize safety concerns and take action to correct any problems
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of universal precautions procedures
      5. Demonstrate appropriate feeding and diapering procedures for infants and toddlers
    3. Assess positive functioning of children in a group setting
      1. Demonstrate positive guidance techniques to support children’s appropriate behaviors
      2. Anticipate behavior problems and respond accordingly
      3. Use consistent limits which are developmentally and individually appropriate
      4. Use flexibility in guidance of each child
      5. Assist each child with labeling emotions and self-regulation
    4. Evaluate the physical and cognitive competence of each child
      1. Implement developmentally, individually and culturally appropriate meaningful activities for children
      2. Identify  appropriate materials and opportunities for  play 
      3. Conduct both large and small group activities under the direction of a mentor
    5. Assess positive self-concepts and individual strengths in children
      1. Apply strategies to promote the development of self-esteem
      2. Recognize and respond to the individual needs of each child
      3. Respond to the individual needs of children
    6. Fulfill supplemental responsibilities related to children’s programs
      1. Follow the daily schedule as planned
      2. Carry out normal daily routines as defined by program policies
      3. Observe and assess the growth and development of individual children
    7. Critique coordination between early childhood program and home
      1. Respectthe differences in lifestyles, economic levels and cultural values of children and families in the group
      2. Display courtesy and professional behavior toward all family members
      3. Incorporate elements of cultural diversity into the early childhood program
      4. Participate in parent engagement activities
    8. Demonstrate professionalism
      1. Report for work on time and prepared for the day
      2. Remain at work for the entire scheduled time
      3. Display a calm and poised attitude in all situations
      4. Notify supervisor of unavoidable absences
      5. Dress appropriately for the early childhood profession
      6. Maintain good personal hygiene
      7. Complete all required hours

  
  • ECE 290 - Early Childhood Program Admin

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course addresses the basic principles common to administering quality early childhood programs. Emphasis is on director’s roles and responsibilities, state and federal regulations, business procedures, staff development and hiring, policy development, fiscal and facility management, marketing, program evaluation, child care advocacy, family and community involvement. Designed for second-year students and persons interested in becoming a program administrator.
    Prerequisite: Accepted into the Early Childhood Education program and a minimum of 12 credits in ECE or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Describe the comprehensive role of the child care manager
      1. Identify administrative style and roles
      2. Define the importance of effective management systems
      3. Describe the purpose of NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct
      4. Understand Iowa licensing regulations on Director’s qualifications
      5. Provde examples of advocating for programs that meet children’s and family’s needs
    2. Identify community needs related to establishing an early childhood program
      1. Investigate community needs assessments
      2. Identify early childhood program models and auspices
      3. Create a mission, philosophy and goal statement for a quality early childhood program
      4. Develop a marketing plan
      5. Identify how family needs can be addressed in early care and education
    3. Organize program structures in quality early childhood programs
      1. Identify the organizational structures of early childhood programs
      2. Explain the role of a board of directors and develop strategies for working within this structure
      3. Explore staffing patterns for ECE programs
    4. Explain the State of Iowa licensing regulations
      1. Identify basic program policies and procedures as defined by Iowa Department of Human Services
      2. Apply knowledge of federal, state and local legislation, regulations and professional standards to ensure healthy, safe policies and practices for all
      3. Design an early childhood environment which supports each child’s cognitive, language, social-emotional and physical development, welcomes families, and supports effective, efficient staff practices
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of group size, children’s ages, available space, and staff-child ratios
      5. Define appropriate record keeping methods to maintain files on children, teachers and staff
      6. Demonstrate familiarity with criteria for selecting and evaluating developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula
      7. Explain the procedures for obtraining Quality Rating System and other accreditation options for early childhood programs
    5. Demonstrate understanding of financial management for child care programs
      1. Explore funding and support sources for start-up and maintenance of an early child care and education program
      2. Create a basic operating budget
      3. Explain preparation of financial and fiscal reports
      4. Review schedules for purchasing and maintenance of equipment and supplies for the program
      5. Explain the managing of the food service program including menue planning, purchasing, preparing and serving
    6. Design a system of personnel management
      1. Describe developing interpersonal relationships with child care staff
      2. Define professional licensing, accreditation and staff credentials in early childhood education
      3. Describe recruiting, interviewing and hiring processes required for staffing of early childhood programs
      4. Identify prupose of staff orientation, ongoing staff development, supervision and evaluations
    7. Identify aspects of the administrator’s role in advocating for children and families
      1. Identify effective community partnerships
      2. Demonstrate effective family engagement within early childhood programs
      3. Describe volunteer recruitment, orientation and activities within early childhood programs
      4. Explain the director’s role in building reciprocal relationships with families and community partners

  
  • ECE 343 - Early Childhood Guidance Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focuses on effective approaches and positive guidance strategies for supporting the development of all children. Students observe for and utilize strategies taught in ECE 243 . Includes 30-hour lab.  Criminal background check is required.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Corequisite: ECE 243  or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Use effective receptive and expressive communication skills
      1. Listens and communicates with respect, consideration and warmth to each child
      2. Practice using effective positive communication strategies with young children
      3. Accept, acknowledge and adapt communication strategies in response to cultural, linguistic and ability diversity
    2. Practice social emotional teaching strategies to support children.
      1. Support children in building feeling vocabularies to appropriately identify and express their own emotions and emotions of others.
      2. Use a variety of strategies to support the development of friendship skills
      3. Demonstrate teaching strategies to support children with controlling anger, handling disappointment, and calming themselves
      4. Practice taking an active role in problem solving steps and strategies with children
    3. Promote positive, supportive relationships in the guidance lab setting
      1. Use a variety of strategies for building relationships with children, including learning each child’s name
      2. Use a variety of strategies to encourage and support children’s play.
      3. Use descriptive, positive encouraging statements to support each child’s positive social behaviors, efforts and accomplishments
      4. Take opportunities to greet or welcome families.
    4. Analyze and demonstrate effective approaches to creating a supportive classroom environment
      1. Help children understand and follow classroom rules, schedules, routines and transitions
      2. Demonstrate room awareness and rotate throughout room to interact with and supervise children
      3. Begin to practice group management techniques
      4. Practice assessment techniques that provide informaion about children’s behavior and develoment
      5. Engage in a range of developmentally appropriate guidance strategies
      6. Reflect on work with children related to building relationships, guiding children and supporting children with the development of self-esteem
      7. Demonstrate basic health and safety practices
    5. Demonstrate professional behavior
      1. Practice confidentiality, dependability and accountability
      2. Display professional appearance, attitude and behavior as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct
      3. Demonstrate behavior in congruence with the philosophy, policies and procedures of the program
      4. Respond to children, families, peers and staff in ways that demonstrate sensitivity to cultural, linguistic and ability diversity
      5. Begin to take responsibility for classroom functioning as indicated by instructor and cooperating teacher

  
  • ECE 359 - ECE Curriculum II Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students practice the selection and use of assessment techniques, plan and set up age, individually and culturally appropriate learning centers, activities and group experiences for young children. Emphasis is on understanding children’s developmental stages, identifying and participating in appropriate learning opportunities, interactions and environments in the following areas: emergent literacy, math, science, technology, social studies, creative art, music and movement, dramatic play, fine and gross motor play and outdoor experiences. Includes 30-hour lab. Criminal background check is required.
    Prerequisite: ECE 158  with a C or better.
    Corequisite: ECE 159  or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate skills in meeting basic environmental requirements in an early childhood setting
      1. Demonstrate awareness of children’s activity and use positive interactions to keep children safe indoors and out.
      2. Support and enforce limits and rules identified by program staff.
      3. Plan, set up and adapt learning environment to encourage children’s engagement, interactions, and development.
      4. Select basic learning materials in each of the following areas: emergent literacy, math, science, technology, social studies, creative art, dramatic play, and fine motor play
      5. Identify, observe and evaluate interest areas and experiences that support learning goals for children of varying abilities
    2. Assess, plan, adapt and evaluate evidence-based developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for children that incorporate cultural, language and ability diversity
      1. Practice using a variety of cultural, linguistic, and ability sensitive assessment tools in the early childhood classroom to identify developmental ages and stages, interests, strengths and needs of children
      2. Plan, lead and assess learning opportunities across a variety of domains and content areas adapting for each child’s cultural, ability and linguistic diversity
      3. Plan and use evidence-based and developmentally appropriate transitions that move children smoothly from one area or activity to the next.
      4. Use positive teacher-child interactions to encourage children to explore, experiment and question.
    3. Use self-reflection as a tool to improve teaching and interactions with children
      1. Evaluate own skill in planning, leading and evaluating learning opportunities
      2. Describe impact of own actions, statements, and behavior on children and adults in the setting.
      3. Identify individual strengths, challenges and goals related to personal characteristics and teaching skills.
    4. Demonstrate the importance of family engagement in the child’s education
      1. Prepare written communications suitable for sharing with families reflecting cultural, linguistic and ability diversity
      2. Assist teachers in creating a welcoming and nurturing environment for families.
      3. Participate actively in family oriented activities when available
    5. Demonstrate professionalism
      1. Practice confidentiality, dependability and accountability
      2. Display professional appearance, attitude and behavior as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct
      3. Demonstrate behavior in congruence with the philosophy, policies and procedures of the program
      4. Demonstrate appropriate health and safety practices

  
  • ECE 930 - Administrative Practicum

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 1
    Course Type: Open
    Experience in a community-based setting designed to further competencies in early childhood program administration, management and leadership.
    Prerequisite: 12 credits in ECE or Current Child Development Associate (CDA) credential; or must be admitted to the ECE program. or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate skills and dispositions of effective early childhood program managers and leaders.
      1. Explore personal skills and interests related to program management and leadernship.
      2. Describe personal strengths and how they could be best used in managing and leading an early childhood program.
      3. Explore personal management and leadership challenges and options for growth.
    2. Review budgeting and financial matters of an early childhood program.
    3. Critique early childhood program regulations and related policies and procedures.
      1. Analyze effect of program policies and procedures on organizational climate, program quality or services to children and families.
      2. Evaluate implementation of policies and procedures in program setting.
    4. Practice methods of effective communication in an early childhood program.
      1. Plan, conduct or evaluate meetings or training sessions.
      2. Develop a variety of printed, electronic, or web-based communications or presentations.
      3. Engage in interactions with community partners.
    5. Design a leadership project intended to improve or enhance the program.
      1. In collaboration with program staff, identify project goals.
      2. Propose an action plan to address one project goal.
      3. Modify action plan based on feedback from program staff.
      4. Implement leadership project.
      5. Evaluate outcomes of the project.

  
  • ECE 932 - Internship

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 10
    Course Type: Open
    Students apply skills and knowledge related to children, families and the profession in a self-selected community-based setting. Students are encouraged to identify a placement that reflects their individual interests in the field. Emphasis on professional expectations and behavior, appropriate interactions, planning, implementation and assessment and exploring multiple facets of overall program operations. Includes 150-hour work experience.  Criminal background check is required.
    Prerequisite: ECE 103 , ECE 133 , ECE 170 ; a C or better in ECE 243 , ECE 343 , ECE 159  and ECE 359 ;  2.5 program GPA; or instructor permission. Current CPR/First Aid, Universal Precautions and Mandatory Child Abuse Reporter Certification. Internship application is required the semester prior to enrollment in the course.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ECE 215 , ECE 221  or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of child development and learning
      1. Communicate with children in respectful and developmentally appropriate ways.
      2. Identify and analyze learning and developmental characteristics of each child in planning, observations, interactions, assessment and reflection.
      3. Recognize multiple influences on children’s development and learning.
      4. Use knowledge of child development to create and maintain safe, healthy environments and experiences.
    2. Support family and community relationship-building
      1. Identify strategies for respectful communication with families and children from diverse cultures, languages or abilities.
      2. Create opportunities for families to be engaged with their children’s development and learning.
      3. Identify community agencies that provide opportunities for families, children, and programs.
      4. Recognize the contributions families make as the child’s first and most influential teacher.
      5. Examine personal awareness of and responses to family diversity, including family structure, socioeconomic status, cultural, language and ability diversity.
    3. Practice systematic observation, documentation and other assessment strategies in partnership with families and other professionals
      1. Describe and analyze assessment practices used within the program.
      2. Use observation & assessment to develop activities and experiences for individual children, groups of children, or families.
      3. Use observation and assessment to document learning.
      4. Identify efforts to work with families or other professionals in collection and use of assessment information.
      5. Use personal reflection strategies to promote positive outcomes for each child.
    4. Use developmentally appropriate approaches, strategies and tools to positively influence children’s development and learning
      1. Faciliate positive social interctions between peers, adults, and children and adults.
      2. Maintain a schedule, routines and environment that meet young children’s needs and support opportunities for play.
      3. Support the development of social skills and self-regulation through the use of positive guidance strategies.
      4. Provide opportunities for language and communication through interactions, opportunities for play, and engaging learning experiences.
      5. Use a variety of teaching strategies to support each child’s learning and development, including adaptations that reflect each child’s culture, language and abilities.
      6. Make use of available technology to support children’s learning.
    5. Design, implement and evaluate meaningful curriculum
      1. Develop and implement plans based on developmentally and individually appropriate goals for children’s learning.
      2. Plan a variety of opportunities for children to explore literacy, math, science, social studies, creative arts, movement, physical motor skills, and technology.
      3. Plan activities and experiences that are creative, appropriate and engaging for children.
      4. Plan experiences that encourage exploration, comparisons, analysis, reasoning, predicting, testing, evaluating.
      5. Set up all available aspects of the indoor and outdoor environment.
      6. Incorporate children’s culture, language, and abilities in planning and implementing experiences for individual children and the group.
    6. Conduct self as a member of the early childhood profession
      1. Identify effective practices related to the program model.
      2. Support policies and procedures of the program.
      3. Manage time and priorities effectively.
      4. Maintain a professional appearance, attitude and behaviors, including confidentiality and respect for diverse persons, as reflected in the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
      5. Ask questions when needed to clarify information or procedures.
      6. Identify and use available resources in completing assignments.
      7. Assess professional goals, strengths and needs.
      8. Use verbal and written communication that is clear, concise, and free of errors.
      9. Engage in continuous, collaborative learning through professional development opportunities.


Economics

  
  • ECN 120 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course is an introduction to macroeconomic concepts and principles. It covers resource allocation, supply and demand, national income, employment, price levels, fiscal and monetary policy, money and banking systems, and international finance. ECN120 is not a prerequisite for ECN 130 .
    Competencies
    1. Analyze  key economic concepts related to personal and societal decision-making.
      1. Define scarcity, choice, and incentives.
      2. Analyze the concepts of opportunity costs, efficiency, and growth through the Production Possibilities Frontier model.
      3. Explain marginal analysis by computing marginal costs and marginal benefits.
      4. Identify characteristics of a market economy.
    2. Construct supply and demand graphs to illustrate changes in price and non-price factors.
      1. Examine price and non-price influences on buyer and seller behaviors.
      2. Predict quantity movements and shifts in supply and demand by analyzing buyers’ and sellers’ interactions in the marketplace.
    3. Examine economic measures used to report aggregate activity.
      1. Examine and calculate US output (GDP) and national income using the expenditure approach.
      2. Analyze price indices to compare changes in price level over time.
      3. Categorize and calculate measures of unemployment in the United States.
      4. Explain factors that affect economic growth and productivity.
    4. Assess macroeconomic theories using the AD/AS model.
      1. Evaluate economic fluctuations using the AD/AS model.
      2. Compare and contrast major economic theories.
    5. Explain the role of money, banking, and the Federal Reserve System.
      1. Summarize the definition, function, and role of money.
      2. Define the role banks in the Federal Reserve System.
      3. Explain the Federal Reserve’s use of monetary tools to adjust the money supply.
    6. Compare monetary and fiscal policy.
      1. Explain the difference between expansionary and contractionary fiscal policy.
      2. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of implementing monetary and fiscal policies.
      3. Assess the macro economic effects of using monetary and fiscal policies.
      4. Analyze implications of government budgeting and cash flows in the macro economy.
    7. Analyze how global trade is affected by the flow of goods and services, capital flows, and currency exchange rates.
      1. Examine comparative advantage and its relation to international trade.
      2. Demonstrate how to calculate prices using currency exchange rates.
      3. Examine how exchange rates are connected to the trade balance and international capital flows.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ECN 130 - Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course is an introduction to microeconomic concepts and principles. It covers resource allocation, supply and demand, comparative advantage, government and market structure effects on individual and business interactions, elasticity, marginal analysis, perfect and imperfect competition, present value, and resource markets. ECN 120  is not a prerequisite for ECN130.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze key economic concepts related to personal and societal decision-making.
      1. Define scarcity, choice, and incentives.
      2. Analyze the concepts of opportunity costs, efficiency, and growth through the Production Possibilities Frontier model.
      3. Explain marginal analysis by computing marginal costs and marginal benefits.
      4. Identify characteristics of a market economy.
    2. Construct supply and demand graphs to illustrate changes in price and non-price factors.
      1. Examine price and non-price influences on buyer and seller behaviors.
      2. Predict quantity movements and shifts in supply and demand by analyzing buyers’ and sellers’ interactions in the marketplace.
      3. Explain the effect of price ceilings and price floors in the macro economy.
      4. Identify consumer and producer surplus.
    3. Evaluate buyer and seller relationships using elasticity concepts.
      1. Calculate price elasticities.
      2. Examine how elasticity is used to explain buyer and seller behaviors in the marketplace.
      3. Demonstrate the relationship between elasticity and total revenue.
    4. Analyze Theory of the Firm concepts including costs, revenues, and profit maximization.
      1. Utilize cost data to create cost curves.
      2. Develop short and long run cost curves to predict and explain firm behavior.
    5. Compare and contrast perfectly competitive and imperfect market structures.
      1. Explain price, output, and efficiency outcomes in perfectly competitive, monopoly, and monopolistic competition market structures.
      2. Identify how oligopolies affect price and output outcomes or economic profit of a firm.
      3. Analyze how oligopolies interact to create suboptimal outcomes or economic profit for the firm.
    6. Assess the role of government in a market economy.
      1. Identify positive and negative externalities.
      2. Examine various policies used to achieve socially optimum outcomes.
    7. Examine private and public goods and policy.
      1. Define private and public goods.
      2. Classify public and private goods by excludability and rivalry in consumption criteria.
    8. Assess the supply and demand model in relation to resource markets.
      1. Construct a labor market model.
      2. Explain capital markets.
      3. Relate the present value of money to capital markets.
    9. Evaluate the economics of international trade.
      1. Examine how the principle of comparative advantage determines flow of international trade.
      2. Compare and contrast the benefits and criticisms of free trade, tariffs, and quotas.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

Education

  
  • EDU 210 - Foundations of Education

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Examines American education from a historical, philosophical, and sociological perspective. Challenges and issues in education today will be discussed in the context of school organization, politics, funding, curriculum, professionalism, legal issues, and effective school and teacher characteristics.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the historical events and individuals that have influenced the development of American Education.
      1. Identify individuals from past centuries that have made significant contributions to education.
      2. Illustrate the differences between early American Education and the current education system.
      3. Discuss early educational laws and policies and how/if they are still impacting education today.
    2. Examine the professional aspects of teaching.
      1. Summarize the variety of roles a teacher has both at school and in the community.
      2. Describe ways a teacher can participate in professional development and the importance this has on quality instruction and teaching.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of effective school characteristics that focus on improved student outcomes.
      4. Explain ways to effectively collaborate with administrators, colleagues, parents, and community members.
      5. Summarize the requirements needed to become a teacher including entrance and exit exams, GPA, and practicum/student teaching experiences.
    3. Outline the governance, organization and support of the American Education system.
      1. Explain the organizational structure of the American public school.
      2. Discuss the support and funding provided to schools at a local, state, and federal level.
      3. Describe past and current trends in educational reform and how they impact teaching.
    4. Investigate the legal aspects of teaching in the political structure of the American School.
      1. Review significant educational laws and the role they have played in the development of American Education.
      2. Discuss the importance of a professional code of ethics as it relates to teachers and administrators.
      3. Compare the legal rights and responsibilities of teachers and students including their right to “due process.”
      4. Examine teacher’s legal restrictions and freedoms.
    5. Develop an appreciation for pedagogy as it relates to classroom management and instruction.
      1. Identify various instructional strategies used to achieve an optimal learning environment for all students.
      2. Compare various types of curriculum and effective ways to implement them.
      3. Describe ways educators differentiate instruction to accommodate student’s social, physical and cognitive differences.
      4. Discuss your current strengths in teaching as well as areas you want to grow in professionally.
      5. Compare various methods of assessing student achievement and the importance of using multiple methods to get the best overview of student learning.
    6. Summarize Educational Philosophies and the influence they have on teaching.
      1. Name and explain the schools of philosophy.
      2. Identify various educational philosophies and their influence on classroom instruction.
      3. Develop and articulate a personal philosophy of education.
    7. Explain the influence societal issues have on American Education.
      1. Develop an appreciation for the complicity and diversity of the American student population.
      2. Discuss the changing structure of the American Family and the impact it has on children and education.
      3. Express ways to create a classroom environment accepting to all students.
    8. Assess changes to the American Education system as well as your future involvement in this career field.
      1. Explore challenges facing today’s educator such as restructuring schools, funding, meeting diverse learning needs, curriculum changes and the utilization of new technology.
      2. Predict future educational innovations and their impact on students, administrators, teachers, parents and communities.
      3. Defend your decision to continue the pursuit of a career in teaching or your decision to choose a different career path.

  
  • EDU 213 - Intro to Education

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Presents a broad overview of the field of education, including foundations of American education, roles of teachers and students, history and philosophy and curriculum. Students will complete a 40-hour practicum at the elementary, middle or high school level. Recommended for students who plan to major in education.
    Competencies
    1. Gain an appreciation for the future of American education
      1. Explore challenges facing today’s educators such as restructuring the schools, financing public education, meeting diverse learning needs, modernizing the curriculum and utilization of new technology
      2. Examine the changing purpose of American education
      3. Examine educational innovations, their impact on students, administrators, teachers, parents and communities
    2. Define basic terms, and concepts that have influenced the development of the American school system
    3. Analyze the major events and factors influencing the development of the American school system
      1. Examine the development of modern American education from its roots in European civilization, with a focus on unique American characteristics
      2. Investigate the philosophical and sociological aspects of American education in relationship to American society
    4. Develop an appreciation for the complexity and diversity of the American student population
      1. Explore changing American family lifestyles and their impact on children and education
      2. Develop an awareness of multicultural and gender equity concerns/issues which affect learning
      3. Scrutinize current laws and legal responsibilities of teaching, including PL94-142 and the impact of such laws on exceptional learners
    5. Develop an appreciation for the variety of tasks involved in teaching
      1. Examine effective schools research and its impact on effective teaching practices
      2. Identify effective teaching practices utilized by teachers, including classroom management and discipline practices, from observing actual classroom situations
      3. Investigate professionalism in teaching, including professional affiliations, continuing education curriculum development, mentoring and peer coaching
      4. Value the need for teachers to be proficient in developing new technologies and innovations
    6. Examine the structure of the American schools, its organization and personnel
    7. Explore curriculum, including orientations, development and patterns found in pre-schools, elementary and secondary schools
    8. Show an understanding and appreciation of Effective Schools’ characteristics that focus on improved student outcomes
    9. Explore the legal aspects of teaching in the political structure of American schools
      1. Examine legislative implications for education
      2. Examine the teacher’s legal restrictions and freedoms
      3. Investigate the evolution of the rights and responsibilities of American students, including their right to “due process.”
    10. Develop a personal philosophy of education
      1. Explore ideas about teaching in relation to the major themes in American educational history
      2. Explore one’s own ideas about education in light of the dominant educational philosophies and theories
    11. Reach a clearer career decision about teaching and personal aspirations in the field

  
  • EDU 218 - Initial Field Experience

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Open
    Course will provide opportunities to enhance understanding of the teaching profession and assist with decisions to pursue a career in education. Time spent observing, assisting and teaching in a classroom with a licensed educator. Various opportunities for interacting with students, learning instructional strategies and collaborating with teachers. Students will gain a greater understanding of the daily expectations of a teacher.
    Prerequisite: EDU 210  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize ways to effectively create a positive classroom climate.
      1. Design, with input from the classroom teacher, expectations for your future classroom.
      2. Develop an activity/lesson that teaches tolerance and acceptance.
      3. Develop and share your plan for designing the physical structure of your future classroom. The plan should include but not be limited to seating, whole and small group learning areas, information/bulletin boards and technology centers.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of various methods for successful delivery of instruction.
      1. Explain three examples of differentiation you have observed in the classroom and the impact each had on student learning.
      2. Outline methods of instruction proven to be effective in engaging students in learning. Methods should include but not be limited to Project Based learning, Integrated Studies and Technology Integration.
      3. List examples of accommodations and modifications used to deliver instruction for students on an Individualized Education Plan.
      4. Discuss the benefits of teacher focused, dialogue focused and student focused instruction and provide an example of each.
    3. Identify effective methods of classroom management.
      1. Compare the expectations/responsibilities of administrators, teachers and students in establishing a safe and productive classroom environment.
      2. Explain strategies used to effectively manage a classroom including building positive relationships, establishing classroom routines, developing clear classroom expectations and the use of positive behaviors supports and token systems.
      3. Express the importance of following school district and building policies within an educational setting as it relates to classroom management.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the duties and responsibilities for teachers both in and out of the classroom.
      1. Outline additional duties outside the classroom covered by the teacher on a daily and weekly basis.
      2. Summarize one after school event and one volunteer event you have attended/participated in during the course and share how these experiences have better prepared you to become a teacher.
    5. Appraise current trends in education and their affect on classroom instruction.
      1. Assess the use of new forms of technology/innovation in the classroom and the impact it has on enhanced student learning.
      2. Plan a lesson/activity involving STEM for elementary students and share with your instructor and classroom teacher.
      3. Plan a lesson/activity involving the use of STEM in a cross- curricular way at the secondary level and share with your instructor and classroom teacher.
    6. Construct a portfolio that demonstrates your growth in understanding the teaching profession.
      1. Produce artifacts demonstrating your knowledge and skills for teaching as they relate to pre-service standards.
      2. Explain InTASC standards and the influence they have on preparing quality educators.
      3. Demonstrate your professional growth using written reflections over themes and pre-service standards to be included in your portfolio.
      4. Demonstrate your growth in the teaching professional by sharing your portfolio with your instructor and classroom teacher.

  
  • EDU 245 - Exceptional Learner

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A survey of exceptional learners in the classroom. History, philosophy, current issues, trends and mainstreaming will be discussed.
    Competencies
    1. Contrast the history of disabilities/giftedness with present perspectives
      1. Discuss treatment of disabilities/giftedness prior to 1990’s
      2. Explain present perspectives
    2. Explain current terminology and classification
      1. List terms used with disabilities/giftedness
      2. Interpret the AAMR (AAMD) definitions of both visible and non-visible disabilities/giftedness
      3. Distinguish main features of disabilities related to movement, communication, learning, and perception
    3. Explain assessment procedures for disabilities/giftedness
      1. Describe the theories of intelligence
      2. Discuss criticism of intelligence tests
    4. Identify biological causes of disabilities/giftedness
    5. Analyze psychosocial factors in disabilities/giftedness
      1. Discuss social class and race difference with regard to disabilities/giftedness
      2. Identify factors which influence disabilities/giftedness
    6. Identify factors which influence disabilities/giftedness
      1. Classify mild M.R. on basis of demographic, motivational, behavioral, learning, educational, speech and language, physical and health characteristics
      2. Classify moderate M.R. on basis of demographic, motivational, behavioral, learning, educational, speech and language, physical and health characteristics
      3. Classify severe and profound M.R. on demographic, motivational, behavioral, learning, educational, speech and language, physical and health characteristics
    7. Summarize programming for disabilities/giftedness across life span
      1. Recognize difference in programming for infants, children, young people and adults with special needs
      2. Identify appropriate life skills for each age group
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of resources (housing, social opportunities, etc.) in the community for individuals with environmental support needs 
    8. Interpret continuing concerns of the disabled/gifted
      1. Discuss family issues
      2. Explain individual rights of the disabled/gifted
      3. Describe legal issues surrounding the disabled/gifted
      4. Illustrate differences between institutionalization and deinstitutionalization and community based settings
    9. Predict future programming direction for special education

  
  • EDU 252 - Communication and Collaborative Partnerships

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is designed to introduce participants to PreK-12 classroom collaboration. This will include ways to structure and implement collaboration, develop effective co-educator partnerships, and implement successful integration of students with special needs into a general education classroom.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the effect of family systems, family dynamics, parent rights, advocacy, and multicultural issues on parent involvement as it relates to serving special education students.
      1. Examine the historical view of family systems.
      2. Illustrate how family dynamics plays a role in the involvement of parents in the IEP process.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of parental rights and advocacy guidelines, including but not limited to: Due Process, Americans with Disabilities Act, Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, Individualized Education Plans, and Individualized Family Service Plans.
    2. Analyze various forms of communication and their importance towards parental support and involvement.
      1. Describe various forms of effective communication.
      2. Differentiate the best form of communication to use in given educational scenarios. 
    3. Critique various types of services, networks, and organizations unique to individuals with disabilities.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of quality teacher resources: including but not limited to:Area Education Agencies, Transitional Support Services, and Vocational Rehabilitation.
      2. Compare the resources and support of community and state agencies for family and individuals with disabilities.
    4. Compare the roles of the special education teacher and the general education teacher in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum.
      1. Describe effective collaborative methods (such as consulting, coaching, and mentoring) between Special Education and General Education.
      2. Explain what accommodations and modifications look like for individuals with disabilities in the general education classroom/curriculum.
      3. Evaluate the effectiveness of accommodations and modifications as they relate to the successful integration for students with disabilities.
    5. Measure the effectiveness of using collaborative and consultative strategies while working with general education classroom teachers in an inclusive environment.
      1. Justify the use of consulting, co-teaching, coaching and mentoring as effective collaborative methods between Special Education and General Education teachers.
      2. Explain various strategies for collaborating with classroom teachers such as: Response to Intervention, team development, and common planning time.
      3. Summarize how to evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of collaborative methods of integration for students with disabilities.
    6. Assess effective methods for working with paraeducators and support personnel while meeting the needs of special education students.
      1. Distinguish the Special Education Teacher’s leadership role when working with paraprofessionals, volunteers and support personnel in regard to job responsibilities, delegation of tasks, and student confidentiality.
      2. Design a plan for effective communication between the special education teacher and paraprofessionals and support personnel.
    7. Develop an understanding of effective instructional programs used to improve an individual with disabilities social participation in all settings.
      1. Give examples of effective social participation activities for families.
      2. Generate a list of activities for social participation in the school setting.
      3. Identify opportunities for social participation within the community.

  
  • EDU 253 - Behavior Management and Social Interaction Skills

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course will introduce participants to effective methods of classroom management. The specific strategies discussed will address designing, implementing, and evaluating instructional techniques used to enhance a student’s social participation based on current research in the field of education.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of theoretical models of behavior management and their application in the classroom.
      1. Summarize various models of behavior management and their effectiveness in the classroom.
      2. Explain the history of these models.
      3. Predict appropriate behavioral theory models used in specific classroom scenarios when working with individuals with disabilities.
      4. Give reasons to support the use of non aversive techniques for controlling problem behaviors.
    2. Develop an understanding of laws and ethical practices related to providing effective behavioral management in the classroom.
      1. Outline laws that contributed to the implementation of positive behavioral approaches in the classroom.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of current standards and policies that influence the teaching practices of those working with individuals with disabilities.
    3. Analyze various methods of classroom management.
      1. Examine quality standards for effective classroom management and on-task student behavior.
      2. Identify classroom strategies that involve environmental and instructional interventions.
    4. Assess individual behavior management techniques used to achieve optimal behavioral and learning outcomes for students with exceptional learning needs.
      1. Outline effective behavior strategies, including but not limited to: Functional Behavioral Analysis, Antecedent-Behavior-Consequences, and Response to Intervention, as implemented into daily instructional plans.
      2. Compare the differences between these methods and how to implement them correctly for given situations.
      3. Describe how to evaluate and monitor effectiveness of specific strategies used with individuals and classrooms.
    5. Identify behavioral support plans and the techniques used for students at all levels and abilities.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of positive behavior support plans used with students containing various educational and behavioral goals.
      2. Explain the importance of effective collaboration between teachers and support personnel when implementing a positive behavior support plan.
    6. Summarize effective ways to evaluate and assess specific behavior management strategies for individuals as well as classrooms.
      1. Explain the effectiveness of self-evaluation and self monitoring strategies in changing behaviors.
      2. Examine various methods of data collection and progress monitoring of behavioral plans.

  
  • EDU 255 - Technology in the Classroom

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Designed to introduce students to various ways to support instruction through the use of technology. Focus will include best practices for integrating technology, digital tools and internet resources to facilitate and support teaching and learning in all content areas.
    Competencies
    1. Assess strategies for the successful implementation of technology in the classroom
      1. Define best practices for utilizing current digital tools in the classroom to improve learning outcomes.
      2. Explain the role of the teacher for the 21st-century classroom.
      3. Predict barriers to the successful use of technology and digital tools.
      4. Identify and use common technical terminology in discussions/dialogues with students.  
    2. Examine effective ways to create a classroom community that encourages Inquiry-based learning through the use of technology.
      1. Characterize problem-solving and active learning with inquiry-based tools.
      2. Illustrate the effective use of current digital tools as they promote student-focused learning.
    3. Interpret the use technology serves with evaluation and assessment of students.
      1. Describe ways to engage students in professional assessment and reflective learning through technology.
      2. Examine the importance of meeting standards with high quality in a digital learning environment.
      3. Give examples of formative and summative assessments created and implemented with the use of technology.
    4. Evaluate the importance of Digital Citizenship and the impact it has on learning.
      1. Identify Social, Legal, Ethical and Human issues related to Social Media.
      2. Evaluate current topics important in teaching students about digital citizenship.
    5. Outline ways to communicate and collaborate successfully using technology.
      1. Discuss ways to foster collaboration between students through technology focusing on websites and apps.
      2. Explain how technology is utilized to establish effective communication with parents, students, colleagues, administrators, and community.
      3. Locate effective ways to actively participate in local and global learning networks. 
    6. Examine how to use technology to engage all students in learning.
      1. Develop a lesson that will engage all students to use technology to gain knowledge and drive learning.
      2. Summarize how technology can be used to make adaptations in the classroom.
      3. Explain current practices for the use of Assistive Technology Resources to enhance student learning. (Text to Speech software and apps, writing with technology.) 

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

Engineering

  
  • EGR 100 - Engineering Orientation

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduction to the engineering disciplines and the engineering profession. Considerations in choosing an engineering curriculum. Information concerning college policies, procedures and resources. Opportunities to interact with engineering departments at a four-year institution.
    Competencies
    1. Function on multi-disciplinary teams
      1. Perform a service project
      2. Interact within a learning village/cohort
    2. Understand professional and ethical responsibility
      1. Identify professional organizations responsible for accreditation
      2. Demonstrate a knowledge of Code of Ethics of Engineers
      3. Demonstrate a knowledge of the Engineers’ Creed
    3. Demonstrate a knowledge of a variety of engineering disciplines
      1. Meet with academic advisors in different engineering departments
      2. Attend a career fair and meet with industry representatives
    4. Communicate effectively
      1. Write a resume
      2. Use behavioral based interviewing methodology
      3. Develop workplace competencies
    5. Recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
      1. Identify key engineering issues in the future
      2. Meet with an engineer and document the process used in solving a new problem.
    6. Develop a knowledge of contemporary issues
      1. Identify two current issues and define how an engineer would respond to these issues.
      2. Incorporate a contemporary issue into a service learning project

  
  • EGR 151 - Engineering Visual BASIC

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course provides students with a solid foundation in structured programming skills for the solution of engineering problems. Students will analyze problems, design solution algorithms, translate the algorithm to Visual BASIC computer code and present the solutions to the problems.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 61 OR
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MAT 130   OR MAT 211  
    Competencies
    1. Understand the basics of computer programming.
      1. Understand the types of programming languages.
      2. Understand the three basic control structures.
      3. Develop an algorithm to solve a problem.
      4. Express the algorithm in terms of pseudocode.
      5. Express the algorithm in flowchart form.
    2. Understand the sequential control structure.
      1. Understand and use the various VBA data types.
      2. Perform mathematical computations.
      3. Use the InputBox function to enter data into the program.
      4. Use the MsgBox function to display results from the program.
    3. Understand the selection (decision) control structure.
      1. Understand and use comparison operators.
      2. Use the IF statement.
      3. Use the IF/ELSE block IF statement
      4. Use the IF/ELSEIF/ELSE block IF statement.
      5. Understand and use logical operators.
    4. Understand the repetition (loop) control structure.
      1. Understand the use of pretest loops.
      2. Use the DO/EXITDO/loop.
      3. Use the FOR loop.
    5. Understand subprograms and functions.
      1. Use built-in functions
      2. Construct and use user-defined functions.
      3. Construct and use subroutines.
      4. Understand the use of a CALL statement.
      5. Understand and demonstrate the ability to pass parameters by value and by reference.
    6. Understand the use of sequential access files.
      1. Understand the structure of a sequential access file.
      2. Understand and demonstrate the use of an OPEN statement for file I/O operations.
      3. Use the INPUT statement to read information from a file.
      4. Use the PRINT or WRITE statement to send information to a file.
      5. Understand and demonstrate the use of the CLOSE statement for file I/O operations.
    7. Understand the use of arrays.
      1. Declare one-dimensional arrays and multidimensional arrays.
      2. Use array subscripts to access data stored in an array.
      3. Use FOR loops for computational and I/O operations involving arrays.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to pass arrays to functions and subroutines. 
    8. Understand the interaction between VBA and the EXCEL spreadsheet program.
      1. Understand the recording of macros.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to obtain values from an EXCEL spreadsheet.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to place values in an EXCEL spreadsheet.

  
  • EGR 152 - Engineering MATLAB

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course provides students with a solid foundation in structured programming skills for the solution of engineering problems. Students will analyze problems, design solution algorithms, translate the algorithm to MATLAB and Simulink computer code and present the solutions of the problems.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 61 OR
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MAT 130   OR MAT 211  
    Competencies
    1. Comprehend the basics of computer programming.
      1. Enumerate the types of programming languages.
      2. Sequence the three basic control structures.
      3. Define an algorithm to solve a problem.
      4. Reproduce the algorithm in terms of pseudocode.
      5. Illustrate the algorithm in flowchart form. 
    2. Apply the sequential control structure.
      1. Develop various MATLAB and Simulink data types.
      2. Demonstrate mathematical computations.
      3. Produce script files to manage data.
    3. Analyze the selection (decision) control structure.
      1. Diagram comparison operators.
      2. Illustrate the IF statement.
      3. Outline the IF/ELSE block IF statement.
      4. Show the IF/ELSE IF/ELSE block IF statement.
      5. Distinguish between logical operators.
    4. Analyze the repetition (loop) control structure.
      1. Assess the use of pretest loops.
      2. Construct the FOR loop.
      3. Establish a WHILE loop.
    5. Synthesize subprograms and functions.
      1. Recall built-in functions
      2. Invent user-defined, sub, and nested functions.
      3. Give examples of local and global variables.
      4. Differentiate between passing parameters by value or by reference.
    6. Evaluate the use of two-dimensional and three-dimensional plotting techniques.
      1. Compare and contrast plot, hold, and line commands.
      2. Generate figures with logarithmic axes, multiple plots on the same page, and multiple windows.
      3. Create mesh and surface (3D) plots.
    7. Evaluate the use of arrays.
      1. Structure one-dimensional arrays and multidimensional arrays.
      2. Adapt array subscripts to access data stored in an array.
      3. Incorporate arrays into functions and subroutines.
    8. Synthesize the use of symbolic math capabilities in MATLAB.
      1. Modify symbolic objects and compose expressions
      2. Formulate algebraic, differentiation, and integration problems symbolically.
      3. View solutions to ordinary differential equations (prior knowledge of such equations or methods for their solution not required).

  
  • EGR 155 - Engineering C/C++

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Learn to solve engineering problems by computer using the C/C++ language. Emphasis is placed on program logic, organization and numerical methods.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 61 OR
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MAT 130   OR MAT 211  
    Competencies
    1. Understand the Basics of Solving Engineering Problems using a Computer
      1. Understand the Purpose of Programming Languages
      2. Demonstrate the Compilation, Linking and Execution of a Program
      3. Understand Style and Structure of C/C++ Programs
      4. Use Arithmetic Expressions
      5. Use Functions in C/C++
    2. Understand and Use Data Structures
      1. Understand and Use int and long Data Types
      2. Understand and Use float and double Data Types
      3. Understand and Use char Data Types
      4. Understand and Use Structures and Pointers
    3. Understand Problem solving using C/C++.
      1. Understand Top-Down Design
      2. Understand Modular Code
    4. Understand Branching
      1. Understand and Use Logical Expressions
      2. Use the if statement
      3. Diagnose an Algorithm or Problem
    5. Understand Repetition and Loops
      1. Understand and Use the for Statement
      2. Understand and Construct the while Loop
      3. Understand and Construct the do while Loop
      4. Understand Nested Control Structures
    6. Understand Formatted I/O
      1. Construct Formatted Output
      2. Construct Formatted Input
      3. Understand Edit Descriptors
    7. Understand Procedures
      1. Define Procedures
      2. Understand Prototypes
      3. Invoke Procedures
      4. Understand How to Debug and Test a Program Design
      5. Identify Common Programming Errors
    8. Understand Arrays
      1. Declare and Reference Arrays
      2. Use Array Subscripts
      3. Use for Loops to Process Arrays
      4. Input and Output of Arrays
      5. Use Formats with Arrays
      6. Use Array Arguments
      7. Understand and Use the initialization
      8. Use Multidimensional Arrays
      9. Use Multidimensional Array Arguments
      10. Use Subprograms in a Large-Scale Program
      11. Understand and Use Global Data
    9. Understand Files I/O
      1. Understand Binary Files
      2. Understand Text Files
    10. Understand Strings in C/C++
      1. Understand and Use Character String Declaration
      2. Understand and Calculate Substrings
      3. Understand and Calculate Character Expressions
      4. Understand and Calculate String Length and Search Functions
    11. Investigate Numerical Methods
      1. Construct an Algorithm to Find Roots of Equations
      2. Construct an Algorithm to Sort Data
      3. Construct an Algorithm to Solve Systems of Linear Equations
      4. Construct an Algorithm to Solve a System of Differential Equations
      5. Use Numerical Methods Libraries 

  
  • EGR 161 - Engineering Computations

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course includes the organization, solution and presentation of engineering problems. Topics include S.I. units and selected engineering topics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 130  must be taken concurrently or prior to this course
    Competencies
    1. Understand the Engineering method
    2. Understand representation of Technical material
      1. Use proper graphing techniques
      2. Apply curve fitting to data
    3. Understand engineering estimations and approximations
      1. Understand and use significant figures
      2. Define accuracy
      3. Define precision
      4. Calculate approximations
    4. Understand dimensions, SI units and conversions
      1. Understand dimensional analysis
      2. Understand and use standard units
      3. Calculate conversions between different units
    5. Apply statistics
      1. Calculate frequency distributions
      2. Calculate measures of central tendency
      3. Calculate measures of variation
      4. Understand and use normal distributions
      5. Calculate linear regression
      6. Calculate correlation coefficients
    6. Understand basic mechanics
      1. Understand the difference between scalars and vectors
      2. Understand force and force systems
      3. Understand the principle of transmissibility
      4. Calculate the resolution of forces
      5. Understand and use moments and couples
      6. Construct free body diagrams
      7. Use equilibrium to solve problems in mechanics
      8. Understand and use 3D force systems
      9. Understand stress
      10. Understand strain
      11. Understand and use Hook’s Law
      12. Calculate design stress
    7. Understand basic material balance
      1. Understand conservation of mass
      2. Calculate solutions to problems involving rate processes
      3. Calculate solutions to problems involving batch processes
    8. Understand basic electrical theory
      1. Understand the basics of static electricity
      2. Understand the basics of electric current
      3. Understand electric potential
      4. Calcualte current and resistance ins imple circuits
      5. Calculate electric power
      6. Calculate terminal voltage
      7. Apply Kirchhoff’s Laws
    9. Understand the economy of engineering
      1. Identify sources of energy
      2. Identify types of energy
      3. Understand conservation of energy
      4. Understand principles of thermodynamics
    10. Understand the economy of engineering
      1. Calculate simple interest
      2. Calculate compound interest
      3. Calculate future and present value
      4. Construct cash flow diagrams
      5. Understand annuities
      6. Understand the analysis of alternatives 

  
  • EGR 166 - Engr Graphics/Concptl Design

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An integration of conceptual design, engineering graphics and computer-aided design. This course includes orthographic projection applied to three-dimensional geometry and engineering drawing, as well as instrument and free-hand application to an open-ended project that includes a formal engineering report.
    Prerequisite: MAT 130  must be taken concurrently with or prior to this course
    Competencies
    1. Summarize basic concepts of engineering graphics
      1. Investigate the concept of engineering graphics
      2. Investigate the concept of engineering design
      3. Investigate the concept of descriptive geometry
      4. Investigate the concept of computer graphics
      5. Investigate the concept of geometric modeling
      6. Investigate the concept of CAD
      7. Investigate the concept of CAE
    2. Use freehand and instrument drawing
      1. Describe basic freehand guidelines
      2. Define oblique, isometric and perspective drawings
      3. Demonstrate the use of standard drawing equipment
      4. Use standard construction techniques
    3. Analyze computer drawing
      1. Define CAD terms
      2. Identify computer peripherals used in producing computer graphics
      3. Compare and contrast computer and instrument drawing
      4. Use techniques in producing 2D and 3D drawings by computer
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of CAD through the use of AutoCAD
    4. Design multiview drawings
      1. Define standard 3D coordinate system
      2. Define standard orthographic Views
      3. Demonstrate the representation of oblique surfaces
      4. Demonstrate the representation of hidden features
      5. Define conventional practice
      6. Classify computer modeling techniques
    5. Design pictorials
      1. Define the concept of pictorials
      2. Compare and contrast axonometric, oblique and perspective drawings
      3. Develop exploded pictorials
      4. Define wireframe, wiremesh, hidden line and hidden surface representations
      5. Analyze the mathematics of 3D projection and transformations
    6. Analyze solid modeling
      1. Explain wireframe and wiremesh models – advantages and disadvantages
      2. Explain surface models – advantages and disadvantages
      3. Explain solid models – advantages and disadvantages
      4. Define and use constructive solid geometry
    7. Design sectional views
      1. Define and use full sections
      2. Define and use half sections
      3. Define and use offset sections
      4. Define and use aligned sections
      5. Define and use removed sections
      6. Define and use revolved sections
      7. Define and use broken-out sections
      8. Define and use auxiliary sections
      9. Define and use phantom sections
      10. Explain conventional practice
    8. Analyze dimensioning
      1. Explain proper dimensioning techniques
      2. Calculate tolerances
      3. Calculate standard files
      4. Define geometric functioning
    9. Use fasteners and their graphical representation
    10. Describe the design process and design information
      1. Define the design process
      2. Demonstrate the use of supporting sketches and drawings
    11. Use methods of analysis
      1. Define basic concepts of vector algebra
      2. Calculate representation of lines and planes
      3. Calculate views for true length and true shape
      4. Describe techniques for determining angles of inclinations
      5. Compare mathematical techniques and methods available through computer graphics

  
  • EGR 180 - Statics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course includes the vector and scalar analysis of coplanar and non-coplanar force systems, equilibrium concepts, friction, centroids, moments and products of inertia. Mohr’s circle, radius of gyration, internal forces, shear and bending moment diagram.
    Prerequisite: PHY 213 .
    Corequisite: MAT 217  must be taken concurrently with or prior to this course
    Competencies
    1. Summarize General Principles of Statics
      1. Compare and Contrast Vectors and Scalars
      2. Define Force
    2. Define Concurrent Force Systems
      1. Explain the Principle of Transmissibility
      2. Calculate the Resultant of Two Concurrent Forces
      3. Calculate the Resultant of Three or more Concurrent Forces
      4. Resolve a force into components
      5. Calculate the Resultants by rectangular components of a force
    3. Understand Statics of Particles
      1. Construct Free Body Diagrams
      2. Define Equilibrium Conditions of a particle
    4. Analyze the effects of forces and moments on Rigid Bodies
      1. Define Moments
      2. Define Couples
      3. Calculate the Resolution of a force into a force and couple
      4. Calculate Resultants
    5. Calculate Distributed Forces
      1. Calculate the Center of mass and gravity
      2. Calculate the Centroids of volumes, areas and lines
      3. Calculate the Centroids of composite bodies
      4. Understand Theorems of Pappus and Guldinus
      5. Calculate the Distributed loads on a beam
      6. Calculate the Forces on submerged surfaces
    6. Understand Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies
      1. Construct Free body diagrams
      2. Calculate Equilibrium in 2D
      3. Calculate Equilibrium in 3D
    7. Understand Trusses, Frames and Machines
      1. Calculate equilibrium conditions for Plane Trusses
      2. Calculate equilibrium conditions for Space Trusses
      3. Calculate equilibrium conditions for Frames and Machines
    8. Understand Internal Forces in Structural Members
      1. Calculate Axial Force and Torque in Bars and Shafts
      2. Calculate Axial Force, Shear force and Bending Moments in Beams
      3. Construct Shear force and Bending Moment Diagrams
      4. Analyze Flexible Cables
    9. Understand Friction
      1. Understand Coulomb Friction
      2. Understand Dry Friction
      3. Understand Rolling Resistance
    10. Calculate Moments of Inertia
      1. Calculate Second Moment of Plane Areas
      2. Calculate Principle Second Moments
      3. Calculate Moments of Inertia
      4. Calculate Principle Moments of Inertia
    11. Use Virtual Work to solve equilibrium problems
      1. Define Work and Virtual Work
      2. Understand Principle of Virtual Work and Equilibrium
      3. Understand Principle of Potential Energy and Equilibrium
      4. Calculate Stability of Equilibrium


Engineering Technology

  
  • EGT 400 - PLTW Intro to Engr Design

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Adjunct
    This course uses a design development process while enriching technical and engineering problem-solving skills; students create and analyze models using specialized computer software (AutoCAD Inventor).
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: One year of H.S. algebra
    Competencies
    1. Examine engineering and history of engineering
      1. Demonstrate the understanding of evolution of technology and be able to label and identify engineering achievements through history
      2. Apply the design concept of form and function and show its use in a product design
      3. present and identify the chronilogical development and accelerating rate of change that innovations in tools and materials have brought about over time as it relates to a given consumer product.
      4. Analyze the history of measurement tools and identify two innovations that have led to imporoved functionality of that tool
      5. Verbally demonstrate the range of services provided by a professional organization using appropriate technology
      6. Identify career opportunites in design engeneering and explain their job functions
      7. List the educational requirements for each profession of an engineering field
    2. Understand design
      1. List the seven steps of the design process and explain the activities that occur during each phase
      2. Demonstrate their use in the principles and elements of the design process incorporating them in design solutions
      3. Display examples of the application of the principles and elements of design utilized in products, print, media, and art forms through a presentation
      4. Apply the value of working as a team and understand the beinfits of collaborating through group design projects
      5. Demonstrate and apply the steps of design process to solve a variety of design problems
      6. Research the principles and elements of design and demonstrate their use in the design process incorporating them in design and solution
      7. Identify and label the use of principles and elements of design in various products, print, media and art forms.
      8. Display examples of the application of the principles and elements of design utilized in products, print media and art forms through a power point demonstration
    3. Develop a student portfolio
      1. Demonstrate understanding of proper elements of a fully developed portfolio
      2. Identify and list ethical issues surrounding portfolio artifacts
      3. Design a resource guide
      4. Develop a portfolio to organize and display evidence of their work
    4. Demonstrate the use of sketching and visualization
      1. Integrate proper sketching techniques and styles in the creation of sketches
      2. Demonstrate the ability to produce two-dimensional geometric figures
      3. Select and produce the appropriate pictorial style to best communicate solutions in the design process
      4. Formulate pictoral sketches to develop ideas, solve problems, and understand relationships during the design process
      5. Augment pictorial sketches with shading to improve communication
      6. Evaluate and select the necessary views to graphically communicate design solutions
      7. Develop properly annotated sketches to accurately convey data in a design solution
    5. Understand and use geometric relationships
      1. Identify and label major geometric shapes (isosceles triangle, right triangle, scalene triange, rectangles, squares, rhombus, trapezoid, pentagon, hexagon, and octagon)
      2. Identify and label the following geometric contraints in given three-dimensional models: horizontal, vertical, parallel, perpendicular, tangent, concentric, collinear, coincident and equal
      3. Apply the right hand rule to identify the X, Y and Z axes of the cartesian coordinate system
      4. Recognize the difference between vertical and lateral thinking, categorizr and select a solution to a problem, and communicate their idea through written and verbal formats.
      5. Demonstrate understanding of the different graphical methods of data representation
      6. Using a compass, ruler and triangle, consruct various geometric shapes
      7. Using a compass, ruler and triangle, consruct various types of angles
      8. Define terminology associated with aarcs and circles
      9. Demonstrate understanding of the different physical modeling techniques
      10. Evaluate a problem using mathematical formula
      11. Interpret a sketch and generate a model using a computer and a CAD software package
      12. Define geometric constraints
      13. Identify and label the following geometric constraints in given three-dimensional models horizontal, vertical, parallel, perpendicular, tangent, concentric, collinear, coincident and equal
      14. Apply the right hand rule to identify the X, Y, and Z axes of the cartesian coordinate system
      15. Apply a combination of absolute, relative, and polor coordinates to construct a three-dimensional model
      16. Define the origin planes in the cartesian coordinate system.
      17. Identify the origin and planar orientations of each side of a three dimensional model
    6. Demonstrate ubderstanding of (conceptual, graphical, physical, mathematical, computer) modeling
      1. Recognize the differences between vertical and lateral thinking
      2. Categorize and select a solution to a problem
      3. Communicate an idea through written and verbal formats
      4. Identify and describe the different graphical methods of data representation
      5. Demonstrate understanding by selecting the appropriate graphical format to a problem
      6. Analyze and develop graphical representation of given data
      7. Demonstrate understanding of the different physical modeling techniques
      8. Present a model with correct proportions
      9. Select the appropriate modeling materials to complete and construct a three-dimensional model
      10. Evaluate a problem using one or more of the following mathematical formulas: Are, surface area, volume, weight, density
      11. Analyze a solution to a problem using the correct format of analysis
      12. Interpret a sketch and generate a model using a computer and a CAD sofware package
      13. Explain the difference between parametric and adaptive designs and be able to specify their uses
      14. Produce a two-dimensional drawing using a current engineering software package
      15. Apply geometric and dimensional constraints to a sketch
      16. Demonstrate the ability to generate a three-dimensional model
      17. Understand and demonstrate the use of work features and how they are applied while constructing a solid model
      18. Demonstrate understanding of the use and need of work planes, axes, and points in development of a computer model
    7. Analyze assembly modeling
      1. Explore and demonstrate assmbly modeling skills to solve a variety of design problems
      2. Demonstrate understanding by applying the baase component effectively in the assembly enviroment
      3. Place and create components in the assembly modeling enviroment correctly
      4. Create circular and rectangular patterns of components within an assembly model
      5. Replace components with modified external parts
      6. Perform part manipulation during the creation of an assembly model
      7. Demonstrate understanding by using assembly modeling skills to solve variety of design problems
      8. Apply assembly consraints to successfully consruct a multi-part object
      9. Utilize part libraries effectively during the assembly modeling process
      10. Employ sub-assemblies during the productions of assemblies
      11. Explore, understand, and apply adaptive design concepts during the development of sketches, features, parts, and assemblies
      12. Understand and apply drive constraints to simulate the motion of parts in assemblies
      13. Understand, and apply adaptive design concepts during the development of sketches, features, parts, and assemblies
    8. Analyze modeling and verification
      1. Demonstrate understanding on how to extract mass properties data from their solid models
      2. Evaluate the accuracy of mass properties calculations
      3. Demonstrate how analysis data can be used to update parametric models
      4. List and explain the various mass property calculations, such as, volume, density, mass, surface area, centroid, moment of inertia, productsa of inertia, radii of gyration, principal axes, and principal moments, and how they are used to evaluate a paramet
      5. Interpret and use the correct tolerancing techniques when dimensioning solid models
      6. Solve tolerance problems, including limits and fits
      7. Demonstrate the differences between clearence fit, interference fit, and allowance
    9. Demonstrate an awareness of model documentation
      1. Select the appropriate sheet size and title block for creating a drawing layout
      2. Translate a three-dimensional drawing or model into corresponding orthographic drawing views
      3. Describe the purpose, and/or application, of the following drawing views: isometric view, section view, auxiliary view, and detail view/
      4. Generate an isometric view from orthographical drawing views
      5. Determine the correct application for the various section views required to illustrate an objects internal detail
      6. Demonstrate understanding of the purpose and application of hatch marks and a cutting plane line, as used in a section view
      7. Create a detail view that corresponds to the appropriate orthographic drawing view
      8. Create an auxiliary view to show the detail on an inclined surface of a drawing object
    10. Apply dimensioning standards and annotation
      1. List the common dimensioning standards
      2. Identify and demonstrate the use of common dimensioning systems
      3. Apply appropriate annotations on sketches and drawings
      4. Formulate general and proprietary specifications to further communicate information relating to product design
    11. Recognize use of professional presentations
      1. Demonstrate understanding in the following communication techniques: voice variation, eye contact, posture, attire, practice and preperation, and projecting confidence
      2. Apply various forms of visual aids and when to use time in a presentation
      3. List and identify the elements of various forms of written documentation
    12. Identify attributes of production
      1. Demonstrate understanding of the decision making the process in designing a product
      2. Evaluate and apply the correct machine process
      3. Distinguish the differences between CNC, FMS, and CIM
      4. Assess the need for a company to minimize material handling by procurement of materials in a timely fashion by using the JIT process
      5. Calculate data on a project which has been statistically analyzed, to ensure product quality
      6. Identify and assess the need to evaluate the areas of manpower and facility requirements
      7. Research and identify the need to protect a product for shipping
    13. Understand marketing techniques
      1. Define explain, and demonstrate an understanding of common vocabulary words used in association with product cost analysis
      2. Formulate a product cost analysis for a given product
      3. Demonstrate understanding of packaging design requirements
      4. Design a package for a given product

  
  • EGT 410 - PLTW Principles of Engineering

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Adjunct
    This course explores technology systems and manufacturing processes using the methodology of project-based engineering problem-solving. Learning activities explore a variety of engineering disciplines and address the social and political consequences of technological change.
    Prerequisite: 1 year of H.S. algebra or EGT 400 .
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: H.S. algebra
    Competencies
    1. Define types of engineering
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of engeneering and identify ten engineering achievements through history
      2. Identify and list five historical engineering role models, including minorities and women
      3. Identify three problems for engineers to solve in the future
      4. Define attributes associatted with being a successful engineer
      5. Demonstrate that an engineering team must work together to solve problems, with each team member having individual and collective responsibilities through group projects
      6. Understand the role of out-sourcing in the engineering process, and how effective communication is essential
      7. Understand how gender-bias and other forms of sterotyping and discrimination can adversely affect communications within an engineering team
    2. Understand engineering careers
      1. Demonstrate the difference between engineering disciplines and job functions
      2. Provide examples of the professional and legal responsibilities associated with being an engineer
      3. Become familiar with an area of engineering by preparing for and conducting an interview with an engineer in that field of engineering
      4. Research and discover the educational requirements to become an engineer
    3. Use communication and documentation
      1. Compose sketches and use proper sketching techniques in the solution of design problems
      2. Select the appropriate styles for a professional presentation of a design problem to a group
      3. Use proper proportioning while producing annotated sketches
      4. Composes a written technical report about the research they conduct about a career in the engineering
      5. Formulate an organized outline for a technical paper
      6. Select an sppropriate type of table, chart, or graph to accurately communicate collected data for written work or presentations
      7. Design and deliver a professional presentation utilizing appropriate support materials about research they have conducted
      8. Create and assemble support materials to appropriately demonstrate concepts used in their presenations
    4. Understand the design process
      1. Compose and diagram the product development lifecycle of an invention of their choice and report finding to the class
      2. Trace the history of an invention and evaluate its effects on society and the enviroment
      3. Examine the evolution of an invention to observe and report on how the design process is applied to continuously and improve the product
    5. Apply the use of engineering systems (mechanism, thermodynamics, fluid systems, electrical systems, control systems)
      1. Identify and explain the function of the essential components of mechanical system on display they create
      2. Create a display of mechanical system from a household item they disassemble
      3. Apply simple machines to create mechanical systems in the solution of a design problem
      4. Mathematically explin the mechanical advantage gained and explain the function of the six different types of simple machines in a presentation on the SMET device
      5. Conduct an energy analysis on a section of their home and calculate the head loss through walls and windows
      6. Research and evaluate systems undergoing thermodynamic cycles for efficiencey and present findings to the group
      7. Verbally describe/demonstrate the concept and function of a heat engine of choice incorporating the first and second laws of thermodynmics
      8. Evaluate and select specific fluid power sources for different functions
      9. Create a flow diagram schematic sketch and compare it to an actual fluid power circuit during a presentation to the class
      10. Mathematically calculate and explain the work being done by a specific fluid power device as part of an oral presentation
      11. Safely demonstrate proper setup and adjustment of a fluid power system
      12. Create schematic drawings to facilitate experimental meausrements of electrical circuits
      13. Apply ohm’s and watt’s ;aws in designing safe electrical circuits
      14. Appraise community needs and evaluate the impact supplying electrical generation has on their communities
      15. Estimate current consumption by a circuit and be able to compare estimates to accurate measurements they perform
      16. Design, diagram and implement a program to control a device they construct to perform a sorting operation
      17. Select and apply concepts of mechanical, electrical, and control systems in solving design problems
      18. Formulate a plan for evaluating the functioning of their sorting devices and to make appropriate changes in design, circuity or programming
      19. Demonstrate an oral defense of their solution to the design problem in a professional manner
    6. Examine static and strength of matericals
      1. Mathematically analyze a simple truss to determine types and magnitude of forces supported in the truss
      2. Design, construct and test a model bridge to support the greates amount of weight per gram of bridge mass
      3. Verbally illustrate and present a mathematical analysis of a truss design as part of their bridge design
      4. Demonstrate understanding of safety factors in the design process
      5. Explain the difference between the area of a cross section of an object and the second moment of the area (moment of inertia) and predict the relative strength of one shape vs. another
      6. Analyze a shape through ths use of engeneering technology for its usability and functionality
      7. Demonstrate the effects that stress has on a material and explain how the material will react
    7. Understand materials and materials testing in engineering
      1. Identify and differentiate the five basic categories of solid engineering materials
      2. Comapre and contrast the physical properties of organic, metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites
      3. Trace the production of raw material to finished product and present findings
      4. Identify practical applications of each material category to engineered products and processes
      5. Collect, analyze and test samples of the four basic materials
      6. Document and present laboratory data related to studies of material classifications
      7. Identify and document the properties of materials
      8. Design an experiment to identify an unknown material
      9. Formulate conclusions through analysis of recorded laboratory test data for presentations in the form of charts, graphs, written, verbal and multi media formats
      10. Analyze word problems about forces acting on materials
      11. Define and state examples of the major categories of production processes
      12. Analyze a component of a product and show the processes used in its creation
      13. Interpret a drawing and produce a part
      14. Describe the production processes used to create products from a category of materials and demonstrate one of the processes
      15. State the difference between mass and weight
      16. Utilize a variety of precision measurement tools to measure appropriate dimensions, mass and weight
      17. Demonstrate understanding by explaining why companies have a need for quality control and describe what customers and companies refer to when the term “quality” is used
      18. Calculate the mean, median, mode and standard deviation for a set of data and apply that information to an understanding to an understanding of quality assurance
      19. Explain the difference between process and product control
      20. Distinguish between the characterstics of quality in a final product and the control of quality in each step of a process
      21. Demonstrate understanding how control charts are used in industry and be able to predict whether a process is “out of control” or not by using a control chart
      22. Describe and safely conduct destructive and non-destructive material testing and will be able to use the data collected through these to compute and document mechanical properties
      23. Analyze a product that breaks and be able to explain how the material failed
    8. Describe engineering for reliability
      1. Diagram a system and identify the critical components
      2. Mathematically estimate chance of failure of a system given information on certain components
      3. List the causes of failure and be able to propse solutions
      4. Prepare and defend a position on an ethical engineering dilemma through research
      5. Research the engineering, legal, social and ethical issues related to a final design developed in a case study
      6. Analyze an engineering failure for verbal presentations - which identifies; causes, damage done, design failures, and other areas where the failure has impacted the enviroment or society
      7. Provide a written explanation of a research analysis of an engeneering failure
    9. Provide a case study to dynamics/kinematics
      1. Explain the difference between distance traveled and displacement
      2. Design and build a device for the purpose of conducting experiments of accleration, displacement and velocity
      3. Explain how velocity and accleration are calculated
      4. Calculate range and initial acceleration from data they record from experiments
      5. Provide an explanation of a ballistic device, including drawings and a summarization of data recorded from experiments
      6. Analyze test data and utilize the results to make decisions

  
  • EGT 420 - PLTW-Digital Electronics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Adjunct
    This course teaches applied logic through work with electronic circuitry, which students also construct and test for functionality.
    Competencies
    1. Understand the fundamentals of electronics.
      1. Identify hazards in the lab and know locations of the safety equipment and how to use it.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of the causes and the dangers from electric shock and explain methods to prevent it.
      3. Understand that the process of designing and electronic circuit takes into account many facotrs, including envrionmental concerns, and will be familiar with precautionary measures.
      4. Explain the relationshjip of quantum energy required to strip away electrons from atoms to being classified as an insulator or conductor.
      5. Label the parts of the atom.
      6. Define and explain the difference between direct and laternating currents.
      7. Apply Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws to closed loops.
      8. Re-write any number using conventional prefix.
      9. Illustrate the material makeup of resistors and how they are used in circuit design.
      10. Describe and label the symbols associated with resistors.
      11. Correctly setup lab equipment to measure resistor values in order to compare measured and rated values.
      12. Calculate the tolerance levels of various resistors to determine if the measured value is within specifications.
      13. Draw and label the parts of a simple circuit.
      14. Build and test a variety of series and parallel circuits, using simulation software, and protoboards, to prove the accuracy of Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws.
      15. Correctly select and utilize electrical meters to determine voltage, resistance and current in simple circuits.
      16. Calculate the resistance, current and voltage in a circuit using Ohm’s Law.
      17. Describe the component parts of a capacitor and describe how a capacitor holds a static charge.
      18. Use and understand the units of measurement for capacitors.
      19. Calculate the value of capacitors mathematically and through the use of instrumentation.
      20. List the different types of capacitors and their voltage polarity requirements.
      21. Draw a digital waveform and identify the anatomy of the waveform.
      22. Differentiate between digital and analog signals when given the waveforms.
      23. Wire and test a free-running clock circuits using a 555 timer.
      24. Calculate the ouput frequency of a clock circuits using observations and the oscilloscope.
    2. Apply number systems.
      1. Demonstrate the understanding of numerical place value.
      2. Use mathematical symbols to represent different bases and will communicate concepts using different number systems.
      3. Demonstrate the relationship of binary and hexadecimal to bits and bytes of information used in computers.
      4. Convert values from one number system to another.
    3. Understand digital gates.
      1. Use schematics and symbolic Algebra to represent digital gates in the creation of solutions to design problems.
      2. Identify the names, symbol and function and create the truth table, and Boolean Expression for the basic logic gates through research and experimentation.
      3. Apply logic to design, and create, using gates some solutions to a problem
    4. Apply the use of Boolean Algebra including logic simplifications and functions.
      1. Recognize and describe the relationship between the Boolean expression, logic diagram, and truth table.
      2. Create boolean Expressions, logic circuit diagrams or truth tables from information provided in the solution of design problems.
      3. Appropriately sselect the sum-of-products or the product-of-sums form of a Boolean Expression to sue in the solution of a problem.
      4. Apply the rules of Boolean Algebra to logic diagrams and truth tables to minimize the circuit size necessary to solve a design problem.
      5. Use DeMorgan’s Theorem to simplify a negated expression and to convert a SOP to a POS and visa versa in order to save resources in the production of circuits.
      6. Formulate and employ a Karnaugh Map to reduce Boolean expressions and logic circuits to their simplest forms.
      7. Create circuits to solve a problem using NAND and NOR gates to replicate all logic functions.
      8. Apply the understanding of the workings of NOR and NAND gates to make comparisons with standard combinational logic solutions to determine amount of resource reduction.
    5. Apply the use of circuit design.
      1. Restate and simplify a digital design problem as part of the systematic approach to solving a problem.
      2. Design, construct, build, troubleshoot, and evaluate a solution to a design problem.
      3. Present a professional oral report presenting a solution and evaluation of a design problem of their choice.
      4. Discover the code to create numbers on a seven segment display by experimentaiton.
      5. Design a circuit to control a seven segment display with a decimal to BCD encoder and a display driver.
      6. Control the flow of data by utilizing Multiplexers and De-multiplexers.
      7. Design and implement combinational logic circuits using reprogrammable logic devices.
      8. Create PLD logic files that define combinational circuit designs using Boolean Expressions.
      9. Understand and use logic compiler software to create JEDEC files for programming PLDs.
    6. Recognize the use of adding as it relates to electronics.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of binary addition and subtraction by designing circuits to produce correct answers.
      2. Create and prove the truth table for both half and full adders.
      3. Design, construct and test adder circuits using both discrete gates and MSI gates.
    7. Use flip-flops in circuits.
      1. Construct and test simple latches and flip-flops from discrete gates.
      2. Interpret, design, draw and evaluate circuits using the logic symbols for latches and flip-flops.
      3. Interpret waveform diagrams from circuits they construct and compare them with combinational waveforms.
      4. Compare and contrast operation of synchronous with asynchronous flip-flop circuits they construct.
      5. Create and interpret timing diagrams and truth tables for J-K Flip-Flops.
      6. Understand the different types of triggers used by latches and flip-flops and select the appropriate one for the circuits they design.
      7. Analyze timing diagrams that reflect triggering to identify distinguishing characteristics.
      8. Conduct experiments with clock pulse width to determine the effect on the accuracy of data transmission.
      9. Assemble circuits and compile inforamtion about the various applications of flip-flops.
    8. Demonstrate the use of shift registers and counters.
      1. Conduct experiments to determine the basic principles of how shift registers work.
      2. Evaluate the use of shift registers in product design and the speeds at which those products run.
      3. Create a circuit using discrete flip-flops to discover the operation and characteristics of asynchronous Mod counters using discrete gates to solve a problem.
      4. Design, simulate, build and test Mod counters using discrete gates in the solution to a design problem.
      5. Design, simulate, buld and test asynchronous Mod counters using an integrated counter chip (MSI).
      6. Design, simulate, buld and test synchronous Mod counters using discrete gates to solve a problem.
      7. Design, simulate, buld and test synchronous Mod counters using an integrated counter chip in the solution to a design problem.
    9. Demonstrate an awareness of families and specifications.
      1. Interpret the graphs, charts and written materials contained in a data sheet and apply it to a design problem.
      2. Correctly setup and use an oscilloscope to observe and measure propagation delay in a digital circuit.
      3. Define, calcualte, and measure noise margin, drive capabilities, fan-out and propagation delay.
      4. List safety precautions for handling CMOS chips.
    10. Identify attributes of microprocessors.
      1. Formulate a flow chart to correctly apply basic programming concepts in the planning of a project.
      2. Design and create a program, using correct syntax, to evaluate data and make decisions based on information gathered from the environment using external digital and analog sensors.
      3. Create an interface to allow them to inspect, evaluate and manage program parameters in the microprocessor during the operation of a program.
      4. Design and create a program in correct syntax allowing a microprocessor to evaluate external data in order to operate motors and other devices to control the external environment.
      5. Appropriately select, size, and implement interface devices to control external devices.
      6. Design and create programming to control the position of stepper motors.

  
  • EGT 450 - PLTW-Computer Integrated Manuf

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course enhances computer modeling skills by applying principles of robotics and manufacturing automation to the creation of models of three-dimensional designs.
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Define the Fundamentals of computer modeling.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to store, retrieve copy, and output drawing files depending upon system setup.
      2. Utilize instructor identified 2D computer sketching functions.      
      3. Incorporate various coordinate systems in the construction of 2D geometrical shapes.
      4. Calculate the x and y coordinates given a radius and angle and show work.                     
    2. Demonstrate the ability to construct objects.
      1. Produce 2D sketches using available sketching features.
      2. Apply editing techniques to produce an accurate sketch.
      3. Show, understand, and apply sketch constraints.
      4. Analyze drawings with appropriate inquiry functions.   
    3. Construct Parts Modeling
      1. Define sketched objects with dimensions and geometric constraints.
      2. Apply necessary sketched features to generate a solid model.
      3. Demonstrate the application and modifying of placed features.
    4. Create Drawing Views
      1. Develop multi-view drawings such as top, front, right side, isometric, section and auxiliary views from the solid model.           
      2. Demonstrate the proper application of annotations and reference dimensions while conforming to established drafting standards.
      3. Update model and drawing views using revision specification sheets provided by the instructor.
    5. Demonstrate effective Assembly Modeling
      1. Create assembly models through the integration of individual parts and sub-assemblies.
      2. Generate an assembly drawing, which include Views, Balloons, and Bill Of  Materials (BOM).                          
    6. Demonstrate and implement rapid prototyping
      1. Recognize the wide array of industry-wide prototyping methods in use and list three.
      2. Identify the need for rapid-prototyping.
      3. Prepare a prototype model from a drawing data base.                   
    7.  Explain the history of programmable machines                       
      1.  Provide a brief history of Computer Controlled Machines charting the growth of NC and how it has been implemented into Private Industry.
      2.  List how the application of CNC machines has impacted manufacturing.                            
      3.  List the advantages and disadvantages of CNC Machining.                    
      4.  Chart the evolution of machine tools, controllers, and software used in programmable machines.
      5.  Provide an understanding of career opportunities and educational requirements within the field of programmable machines.                           
    8. Understand the characteristics of CNC
      1. Identify the axis relative to various CNC machines.
      2. Contrast open and closed loop control systems.
      3. Identify the types of drive systems used in CNC machines.
      4. Use the CNC control program to indicate the machine position and then contrast that position to the relative position of the part origin (PRZ).
      5. Identify by listing the function of the major components of a CNC machine tool.
      6. Examine and apply various work holding devices commonly used for CNC machining.
      7. Identify various types of tool changers used in CNC machine tools on paper.
      8. Define the three primary axes used in CNC machining and explore the remaining axes used in advanced machining.
      9. List the importance of cutting tool materials and how they affect the speed and feed rates used by machine tools.
      10. Examine and label different types of tool holding devices used in CNC machine tools.
      11. Select appropriate cutting tools to efficiently, safely and accurately cut parts using a CNC machine.                        
    9. Demonstrate effective CNC Programming
      1. Understand the difference between reference and position points through demonstration.
      2. Demonstrate that CNC machine movements are identified by axes.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge that the axis system is a worldwide standard for machine movement.
      4. Plot points using absolute, relative (incremental) and polar coordinates.
      5. Identify and label significant points on geometric shapes (ex. Center point, end point).
      6. Identify and label the optimum location for the Program Reference Zero (PRZ) point.
      7. Identify and list the three categories of machine movement: straight line, curved line, and non-regular shape.
      8. Complete a preliminary planning sheet to identify necessary work holding devices, cutting tools, reference points, machining sequences and safe operation.
      9. Define the term “Alphanumeric Coding”, “G codes”, and “M code.”    
      10. Identify the three sections of a program; Initial Commands, Program Body, and Program End.
      11. Write a basic NC part program using necessary G and M codes including remarks that describe the function of each code.
      12. List the advantages and disadvantages of shop floor programming as well as off line programming.
      13. Create a simple NC part program using a text editor and a CAM package.
      14. Employ a CAD/CAM/CNC software solution to create a part.
      15. Analyze, identify and correct errors found in NC part program files.
      16. Use simulation software to graphically verify NC program operation.
      17. Perform a “Dry Run” to verify the machine setup and program operation.
    10. Safely conduct CNC operations                                   
      1. Safely setup, maintain and operate a CNC machine center using appropriate documentation and procedures.
      2. Analyze part geometry to select appropriate cutting tools and fixturing devices needed to create the part using a CNC machine.
      3. Setup and edit the tool library of a CNC control program providing offset values and tool geometry.
      4. Calculate and verify appropriate spindle speeds and feed rates specific to each cutting tool utilized in an NC part program.
      5. Safely and accurately fixture a part in a CNC machine and set the program reference zero (PRZ).
      6. Verify NC part programs using a simulation software before machining the part on a CNC device.
      7. List and demonstrate all possible methods of disabling a CNC machine in the event of an emergency.
      8. Follow and complete a safety checklist prior to running an NC part program on a CNC machine.
      9. Perform a Dry Run to verify the machine setup and program operation.
      10. Operate a CNC machine to cut a part to specifications.                        
    11. Perform Precision Measurement
      1. Measure a part using standard and metric systems.
      2. Convert measurements between metric and standard inch systems.
      3. Identify and label the dimensional tolerances and limits in technical drawings.
      4. Make precision measurements to the degree of accuracy required by plan specification using appropriate instruments.
      5. Show comparison instruments can be used to check dimensions, compare shapes, indicate centers and check parallel surfaces through an assignment.
      6.  Describe advanced and automated measurement systems that are applied in industry. (ex. Coordinate Measuring Systems, Digital Probes and Optical scanners)
      7.  Describe the importance of precision measurement in SPC and quality control.
    12. Effectively use CAM Software
      1. Define the acronym CAM and explain what the purpose of a CAM package is.
      2. Operate the user interface of a CAM package and access help using appropriate documentation and help screens.
      3. Perform basic file operations using a CAM package such as saving, opening, printing and editing part program files.
      4. Demonstrate an ability to import and export CAD files using a CAM package.
      5. Setup a CAM package by editing the material and tool libraries, defining stock sizes, selecting the appropriate post processor and defining the units of measure to be used.
      6. Define and apply the fundamental and advanced milling and turning procedures used in CAM packages.
      7. Generate and edit tool paths by applying appropriate machining processes to geometry imported from a CAD program.
    13. Define Robotics
      1. List the chronological development of automation leading to robotics.  
      2. List the career opportunities in the robotics career fields.                   
      3. Demonstrate the development of robotics from Science Fiction.          
      4. Identify and list a minimum of four dangerous and repetitive jobs that robots are used for.               
      5. Formulate a definition of a robot.
      6. Classify different types of Robots.
      7. Describe the positive impact robots have on manufacturing.
      8. Provide examples about the social implications of robots.        
      9. Identify and compare the four classifications of robots.
      10. Investigate and explain a classification of robot
      11. Design and build a working model of a robot.
      12. Identify and report specifications and work envelopes of robots.     
    14. Apply the knowledge of Mechanical Components
      1. Identify and sketch the mechanical components to a robot.
      2. Design and develop an end effector.
      3. Demonstrate the way end effectors are specific to a process.
      4. Describe various drive systems used in robotics and analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each.    
    15. Apply the knowledge of Control Systems
      1. Label the basic components of robot controllers.
      2. Explain and list control techniques and computer simulations.
      3. Using sensors design and build a feed system.
    16. Apply the knowledge of Programming Methods
      1. Program a robot to perform several tasks.
      2. Program a robot to solve a materials handling problem.
      3. Recognize and describe the need for end of arm tooling and how this tooling affects the robots operation.
    17. Apply the knowledge of Industrial Robot Applications
      1. List several necessities for specialty tooling applications in robotics.
      2. Prepare and document a presentation on end of arm tooling.
      3. Analyze and generate the solution to a robotic manufacturing problem.
    18. Provide a Rationale for CIM Manufacturing
      1. Demonstrate understanding of how the individual components of a flexible manufacturing system are interrelated.  
      2. Document the benefits and problems associated with CIM technology and how they affect the manufacturing process.                   
      3. List some basic characteristics of a manufacturing operation that lend themselves to computer integrated manufacturing.
      4. Identify and label some of the typical components and sub systems that make up an automated machining, assembly and process-type manufacturing operation.   
    19. Identify Types of CIM Systems
      1. List the three categories of CIM manufacturing systems.
      2. Compare and contrast the benefits and drawbacks of the three categories of CIM manufacturing systems.
      3. Explain the working relationship between the CNC mill and the robot.
      4. Identify and label the components of a FMS.    
    20. Define the Components of SIM Systems
      1. Identify the relationship between a CNC milling machine interface and a jointed arm robot interface through a communication handshaking process.
      2. Evaluate the individual components used in selected CIM systems.
      3. Analyze and select components for a CIM system for a specific industrial application.
      4. Demonstrate understanding of the various applications of a Programmable Logic Controller as related to its use in a CIM system.
      5. Demonstrate the difference between a PLC and a computer with interface.   
    21. Effectively use CIM Systems Applications
      1. Demonstrate understanding of the necessary safety precautions associated with a fully automated  CIM system.
      2. Recognize and explain the significance of teamwork and communication when they combine the designs of the individual groups into a complete miniature FMS.
      3. Demonstrate how their individual components work together to form a complete CIM system.
      4. Assemble and test their individual component designs by integrating them into a complete miniature FMS built from course materials.

  
  • EGT 460 - PLTW-Civil Engr/Architecture

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Adjunct
    This course introduces students to the interdependent fields of Civil Engineering and Architecture and teaches project planning, site planning and building design, using specialized computer software.
    Prerequisite: EGT 400  is recommended but not required
    Competencies
    1. Understand the fundamentals of civil engineering and architecture - Civil Engineering and Architecture Overview
      1. Explain the similarities and differences of civil engineering and architecture.
      2. Describe the various individuals and agencies and their roles during the design and development of civil engineering or architectural project.
      3. Define the postsecondary and career opportunities in the field of Civil Engineering and Architecture.
    2. Understand Project Design - Overview of Project Design/Project Documentation
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of current common practices utilized in Civil Engineering and Architecture and apply them to develop a viable solution to their project.
      2. Identify the criteria and constraints, and gather information to promote viable decisions regarding the development of their solution.
      3. Illustrate the ability to work individually or in pairs to produce a solution to a project.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of how software is used as a tool to aid in the solution and then the communication of a project.
      5. Explain ideas for designing a development project using various drawing methods, sketches, graphics, or other media collected and documented.
      6. Adapt ideas, notes, and presentations based on personal review and feedback from others and document them.
      7. Describe in daily journals the advantages and disadvantages of various information-gathering, communications, and design processes in the development of the project.
      8. Draw two- and three-dimensional sketches and graphics using manual and computer-assisted processes.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of Project Planning - Site Information/Development Options
      1. Illustrate how to work effectively (productively) as a team
      2. Describe their ideas and information to each other
      3. Determine the viability of their project ideas
      4. Research zoning ordinances and regulations to determine the necessary procedures to finish the project
      5. Describe their team?s design idea and explain why they believe it will be viable
      6. Understand the relationship of structures and land and the responsibility of designers to handle resources in an ethical manner
      7. Define the next steps to be taken and how they will proceed in developing their project
    4. Demonstrate understanding of Project Planning - Description of Property/Space Allocation Planning/Site Plan Layout/Site Grading/Public Ingress-Egress/Utilities/Landscaping/Water Supply & Wastewater Management
      1. Develop essential questions and conclusions provided in related activities.
      2. Conduct a survey of their personal residence and identify their observations about the locations of the electrical, water, and sewage access points and setbacks
      3. Apply concepts learned to team project
      4. Design and understand a contour map
      5. Create a bubble diagram of a specified site
      6. Apply principles of reading a contour map and creating a bubble diagram to their team project
      7. Evaluate the pros and cons of local, state, and federal regulations on site development
      8. Write about their point of view and record it in their journal
      9. Apply what they have learned to their team project
      10. Interpret topographical data and design to create and document the vertical and horizontal transit lines and station points necessary to layout a road with proper alignment
      11. Apply appropriate codes and parameters to design a suitable and assessable parking lot for a retail establishment
      12. Investigate answers to questions identified in the preface
      13. Perform simple experiments to determine the content and characteristics of a soil sample and use the results in the creation of an appropriate grading plan
      14. Calculate the amount of water a rainstorm will drop on a parking lot design and use that information in the design and sizing of a drainage system
      15. Develop a cut and fill plan for the proposed foundation using a site plan with contours
      16. Discuss findings of their research on a specific utility by completing an information handout sheet
      17. Explain information to their peers using schematic symbols
      18. Determine mathematically utility needs of a project and size the utility supple lines correctly
      19. Analyze and determine the selection and placement of plantings to ensure the proper use of resources and determine if landscaping adds aesthetic appeal
      20. Apply what they have learned to their team project and landscape the site of the related structure or structures
      21. Determine the source of water for their site
      22. Determine the water pressure for their site
      23. Find an appropriate method of managing wastewater for their site
      24. Perform preliminary design calculations and layouts of the selected wastewater management system
    5. Demonstrate understanding of architecture - Architectural Styles/Floor Plans/Energy Systems/Elevations/Sections & Details/Schedules/ Mechanical, Electrical, Protective Systems
      1. Apply their knowledge of architectural styles gained from Activity 1.1 Architectural Styles to the design of the structures for their team’s project
      2. Apply their knowledge of floor plans to the structures for their team’s project
      3. Design and construct an appropriate energy system for the team’s project
      4. Determine the heat loss or gain of the energy systems used in their team projects
      5. Compare and contrast the various elevation views and communicate their understanding of how elevations are used in the design of structure
      6. Illustrate the exterior and interior elevations of their team’s project
      7. Compare and contrast sections and details and explain their purposed in a set of architectural plans
      8. Illustrate the sections and details of their team’s project
      9. Create the necessary schedules for their team’s project
      10. Research and teach team members about mechanical, electrical and protection systems
      11. Determine the mechanical, electrical, and protection systems necessary for their team’s project
      12. Create the diagrams for the mechanical, electrical, and protection systems for their team’s project
    6. Understand Structural Engineering - Introduction to StructuralEngineering/Foundations/Columns & Beams/Roof Systems
      1. Define the work of a structural engineer
      2. Determine the live and dead loads of a structure using load tables and appropriate mathematics
      3. Identify the regions of the United States that are susceptible to seismic loads
      4. Investigate the different types of loads acting on a structure and write a brief description with a diagram in their journals
      5. Identify roofing materials, types of roof systems, rafters, and trusses and calculate the load for roof members
      6. Determine the architectural style that will support the roof system design chosen for their team project
      7. Determine the strength of columns and beams for a structure
      8. Calculate floor members according to loads and modify section details to show the sizing of supporting materials for their team’s project
      9. Investigate the various foundation types, render sketches of each one, and describe their use
      10. Prepare a foundation detail for their team’s project 
    7. Deliver Presentations and Conduct Reviews - Critiques and Reviews/Final Presentations
      1. Produce a presentation of their project and include the appropriate drawings, rendering, models, documentation, and the rationale for choosing their proposal for the project development
      2. Deliver oral presentations regarding the design and development of a team project

  
  • EGT 900 - Field Studies in Architecture and Engineering

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to experience the fields of architecture and engineering both inside and outside of a typical classroom setting. Students will explore the job responsibilities of architects and engineers. Students will investigate, develop, and demonstrate professional leadership strategies, the fundamentals of the design process, project scheduling, construction technologies, and technical aspects of the related industries in this professional setting.
    Competencies
    1. Critique effective professional skills and leadership strategies within industry environments.
      1. Analyze the importance of “first impressions” and the professional image as it relates to attire, speech style, vocabulary, eye contact, and body language.
      2. Discuss the merits of the saying, “You don’t get a second chance to make a first impression”.
      3. Summarize the pros and cons of the saying, “Perception is reality”.
      4. Discuss how these issues can affect client relations, profit, and job security.
    2. Analyze professionalism and ethics as they relate specifically to issues in architecture and engineering.
      1. Examine the copyright law as it relates to architecture.
      2. Discuss contemporary issues relating to the protection of intellectual property.
      3. Demonstrate several written client and consultant communication styles including agreement to a proposed change, disagreement with a requested change to the contract, and termination of a consultant or employee.
    3. Model critical thinking concepts as used in the context of a professional architecture or engineering environment.
    4. Simulate professional communication strategies.
      1. Explore communication and collaboration strategies used in architecture and engineering during the team project.
      2. Demonstrate professional speaking during the presentation of your projects to your class.
      3. Utilize professional written communication skills in all your written assignments.
    5. Analyze the creative process as it is juxtaposed with the analytical work within the confines of a single project.
    6. Compare and contrast job responsibilities of an architect and the various engineers working on a single project.
      1. Identify job responsibilities of professionals related to architecture and engineering including those who provide support to the industry.
      2. Summarize challenges architecture and engineering professionals face in the industry.
    7. Relate how the Americans with Disabilities Act impacts architecture and engineering design.
    8. Analyze the fundamentals of engineering.
      1. Explain the importance, the impact, and the intent of the International Building Code.
      2. Examine general construction techniques and principles.
    9. Analyze your own time and productivity, on your class assignments, using industry standards.
      1. Measure how these metrics are used to calculate profits for the company.
      2. Discuss how your productivity could be improved for better profitability.
    10. Create a personal electronic portfolio.
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in CAD (Computer Aided Drafting), BIM (Building Information Modeling), or another 3D Modeling application by designing a small project.
      2. Develop construction documents for this project, using standard building techniques and principles, thorough enough for a third-party to be able to construct the project.
      3. Present your completed project to your class and guest critics (e.g., an Architectural Jury).
    11. Examine litigious aspects related to the practice of architecture and engineering.
    12. Evaluate educational opportunities, targeted to professional career areas, and effective industry related training opportunities.
      1. Discuss the meaning of an “accredited” architecture or engineering program.
      2. Create a business plan to attend college and achieve your chosen profession.
      3. Write a list of any courses you will need to take while still in high school to accomplish the entry requirements for each of your chosen schools.
      4. Calculate your total cost of attending each of your chosen schools over the term of your enrollment.
      5. Research college funding programs: guaranteed government student loans, secondary student loans, parental student loans, grants, scholarships, and any other way to fund your college career.
    13. Analyze project planning principles including the investigation of profit multipliers, scheduling, and Gantt charts.
      1. Explain project planning elements that are part of the “critical path”.
      2. Demonstrate project planning principles in completed projects.
      3. Demonstrate a project schedule, using a Gantt chart, for your design project, including the critical path.
    14. Analyze the design process and the meaning of “aesthetic”.
      1. Explain and the meaning of “aesthetic”.
      2. Summarize the design process.
    15. Evaluate construction documents, their purpose and administration within the context of architecture and engineering projects.
      1. Analyze an existing set of construction documents.
      2. Find assigned elements noted and coordinated within the document set.

  
  • IND 168 - Explore Bus and Ind Careers

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Provides help in choosing a career goal in business and industry. Emphasis will be placed on how to access labor market information, interests, abilities and values, explore options and make decisions that will lead to career
    satisfaction and success.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate Careers

    1. Examine, through research and experiential exercises, pathways in selected careers
    2. Explore ethical concerns, attitudes, beliefs, and abilities as they relate to career choices
    3. Develop a plan to achieve major career goals
    4. Summarize career experiences from industry professionals

    2. Assess skills needed to succeed in the workplace

    1. Classify tools for transition into the workplace
    2. Identify various job search methods 


Electronics

  
  • ELT 093 - Concepts Electronics/Computers

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    This course is designed for students who need additional practice and technical skills to succeed in electronics and computer networking programs. Skills that will be developed include learning how to approach problems and manipulating formulas to solve problems. College preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Corequisite: ELT 108  
    Competencies
    1. Recognize the uniqueness of college electronics and computers courses.
      1. Differentiate between high school and college courses.
      2. Differentiate between electronics and computers and other courses.
      3. Recognize the need to take responsibility for one’s own learning.
      4. Identify help resources for electronics and computers courses.
    2. Identify individual styles of learning.
      1. Analyze personal learning preference.
      2. Recognize characteristics of basic learning styles.
      3. Identify strategies to apply learning styles to electronics and computers classes.
    3. Manage time more efficiently and effectively.
      1. Discuss study time management.
      2. Plan a study schedule.
      3. Read text and try problems prior to class.
      4. Recognize the necessity of using the text’s answer key.
      5. Mark problems to be asked in class/tutoring session/office hours.
    4. Develop skills needed to be successful in the technical classroom.
      1. Come prepared for class.
      2. Recognize the need for taking notes.
      3. Discuss active versus passive learning.
      4. Practice asking questions in a technical class.
    5. Apply test-taking skills.
      1. Prepare a study plan for tests.
      2. Preview tests.
      3. Rework problems.
      4. Analyze test errors.
      5. Examine the causes of test anxiety.
      6. Practice strategies for overcoming test anxiety.

  
  • ELT 106 - Basic Math for Electronics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Mathematics related to basic electronics. Course includes basic algebra, right triangle trigonometry, scientific notation, with applications to DC and AC circuitry.
    Competencies
    1. Perform basic arithmetic operations
      1. Define and give an example of the following types of numbers
      2. Perform basic arithmetic operations using whole numbers, longhand and with a calculator
      3. Explain the rules for adding and subtracting fractions and then use these rules to solve problems
      4. Define a factor as “Part of a Product”. For example, the factors of the expression “2ab” are: 2, a, and b
      5. Define a prime factor as “A part of a product that contains no other factors other than +1 or -1 and plus or minus itself”.
      6. Factor a whole number into its prime factors (powers may be used…..for example, the prime factors of 18 are: 32, 2).
      7. Define the Lowest Common Denominator (LCD) as “The product of all prime factors of all denominators to their highest power”.
      8. Find the LCD for any given group of denominators
      9. Explain the rules to multiply and divide fractions and then use these rules to solve problems
      10. Explain what can be done to a fraction without changing its value
      11. Use cancellation of common factors to simplify fractions and reduce them to their lowest terms
      12. Convert from one unit of measure to another using standard conversions and the “Cancellation Factor Method” (canceling the units of measurement themselves to insure the result is dimensionally correct before working with the numbers)
      13. Change a mixed number to an improper fraction
      14. Perform basic arithmetic functions using decimal numbers longhand
      15. Convert fractions to decimal form
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of advanced arithmetic operations to solve electric/electronic problems
      1. Define an integer
      2. List the names of the positions in a decimal number between “millions and millionths”.
      3. Identify the “signs of equality and inequality”.
      4. Perform basic arithmetic functions using signed numbers long hand
      5. Define what the reciprocal of a number is and illustrate how to take the reciprocal of any number
      6. Identify the base and the exponent of an exponential number
      7. Calculate the value of a number to a given power
      8. Identify the radical sign, radicand, and index of a radical number
      9. Convert from exponential form to radical form and visa versa
      10. Find the principal nth root of a number using approximation (trial and error).
      11. Find the principal nth root of a number by converting radical form to exponential form and then using the exponential key on a calculator (“Yx” key or equivalent).
      12. Perform operations involving the number “zero”.
      13. Convert the following
      14. Find a number which is a given percent of another number (base).
      15. Find the percent one number is of the other number
      16. Calculate the percent efficiency of a device/system
    3. Relate Significant Figures/Digits and Scientific Notation to Numbers and Electrical/Electronic Calculations
    4. Define the following:
      1. Approximate number
      2. Exact number
      3. Significant digits
      4. Accuracy of a decimal number
      5. Precision of a decimal number
    5. Determine the number of significant digits of a decimal numbers
      1. All nonzero digits
      2. Zeros between nonzero digits
      3. Zeros used only as placeholders to locate the decimal point
      4. Trailing zeros after the decimal point
      5. Zeros before the decimal point
    6. Round off decimal numbers to a desired accuracy or precision
    7. Perform conversions between numbers in decimal form and powers of ten
    8. List the standard electronics engineering prefix notations from “tera” to “pico” by name, abbreviated symbols, and equivalent power of ten (refer to appendix B).
    9. Convert a number from one prefix form to another prefix form
    10. Write numbers in scientific notation (standard form).
    11. Convert decimal numbers to scientific notation and visa versa
    12. Perform basic arithmetic functions using numbers in scientific notation form
    13. Demonstrate an understanding of how to solve problems in electricity/electronics using Algebra
      1. Explain why the use of letters are sometimes preferable to the use of numbers (main purpose of algebra).
      2. Identify the letters that are typically used to represent known numbers/constants and the letters typically used to represent unknown numbers/variables
      3. Explain what a negative number means
      4. Illustrate positive and negative numbers relative to “0” using a vertical line graph
      5. List the signs and symbols used in algebra (refer to the appendix).
      6. State the following definitions word for word
      7. Identify the terms of given algebraic expressions
      8. Identify the factors within each term of given algebraic expressions
      9. Show how factors within each term may be cancelled if common to the numerator and denominator, but show that terms of an algebraic expression cannot be cancelled
      10. Translate word statements into algebraic expressions using algebraic symbols
      11. Translate algebraic symbols into word statements
      12. Solve an algebraic expression by substituting numbers for letters
      13. Define the absolute value of a number and give some examples
      14. State the rules for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing positive and negative (signed) numbers. Then solve these types of problems by applying the rules
      15. Define “similar terms” and show how only similar terms can be added
    14. Demonstrate an understanding of how to solve electrical/electronic equations for any unknown parameter
      1. Define an equation
      2. Explain how to transpose a term from one side of an equation to the other
      3. List the four rules for transposing a quantity from one side of the equation to the other side
      4. Show how to take the reciprocal of both sides of an equation
      5. Show how fractions within an equation may be eliminated by multiplying both sides of the equation by the LCD of both sides of the equation
      6. Solve problems given as word statements by using algebra
      7. Show how the “symbols of grouping (parenthesis, brackets, braces)” are used in algebraic equations
      8. Show how to eliminate symbols of grouping in an algebraic expression by using the distributive law: a(b+c) = ab+ac
      9. Show how to “factor out” a common factor (or factors) using the distributive law
      10. Show how to use factoring to isolate a variable which is originally contained in more than one term of an algebraic equation. (solve the equation for this variable).
      11. Multiply/divide quantities containing numbers, letters, and exponents
      12. Check the solution of an algebraic equation by substituting real numbers for the letters
      13. Use subscripts to distinguish one quantity from another
      14. Define the following and illustrate with examples
      15. Solve algebraically given equations for any unknown
    15. Demonstrate an understanding of the evaluation of problems involving angles, similar triangles and the Phythagorean Theorem
      1. Describe how an angle is formed
      2. Define the following and illustrate with examples
      3. Use a protractor to draw or measure angles
      4. Generate an angle in standard position and label the initial side, vertex, and terminal side
      5. Generate a positive or negative angle
      6. Identify the quadrant the terminal side of an angle is in when the angle is drawn in standard position
      7. Explain how a degree is subdivided into minutes and seconds
      8. Find the complement or supplement of a given angle
      9. Define the radian relative to angular measurement and degree
      10. Convert degrees to radians and visa versa
      11. State the following rule: “The sum of the three angles of any triangle is always 180 degrees”.
      12. Illustrate examples of similar triangles
      13. Explain how proportions are used to solve similar triangles
      14. Solve for missing parts of similar triangles
      15. Draw a right triangle in standard position and label “a” for the altitude, “b” for the base, and “c” for the hypotenuse
      16. State the “Pythagorean Theorem” in word form and equation form
      17. Solve the Pythagorean Theorem for each side (a & b) of a right triangle and for the hypotenuse (c).
      18. Solve for missing parts of a right triangle using the Pythagorean Theorem (do NOT use trigonometric functions at this time).
    16. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of alternative numbering systems in telecommunications
      1. Understand the binary numbering system
      2. Understand the octal numbering system
      3. Understand the hexadecimal numbering system
    17. Solve problems involving logarithms
      1. Convert from exponential form to logarithmic form and visa versa
      2. Solve simple logarithmic equations
      3. List the equations involving the “Laws of Logarithms” for products, quotients, powers, and roots
      4. Discuss the difference between common and natural logarithms
      5. Use scientific notation to write a number in the standard for N x 10P (where “p” is called the “characteristic”). Use Log Tables (Appendix G) to find the mantissa of N. Combine the characteristic and mantissa to form the common log of the original numbe
      6. Use a calculator to find the common logarithm of a number
      7. Find a number when given its common logarithm (using antilogarithms).
      8. Perform arithmetic computations using the “Laws of Logarithms” and common logs
      9. Solve exponential equations by taking the logarithms of both sides of the equation and using standard algebraic techniques
      10. Find the natural log of a number using a calculator
      11. Find the value of a number when given its natural log value
      12. Use the exponential growth and decay equations to solve related problems
    18. Demonstrate an understanding of solving electrical/electronic circuit problems involving decibels
      1. Define decibels related to logarithms
      2. List some common applications of decibels
      3. Describe the relationship between ratios and decibels
      4. Give the equation for the “bel” in terms of a power ratio
      5. Give the equation for the “decibel” in terms of a power ratio
      6. Explain how power reference levels are used in decibel expressions (“dbm”, “6 mw”).
      7. Explain the following
      8. List the equations for expressing voltage and current ratios in decibels (assuming the input and output impedances are equal).
      9. Explain dBV and write the equation for it
      10. Describe how decibels are used to find antenna power gain
      11. Solve miscellaneous problems involving the use of decibels

  
  • ELT 108 - Math-Electronics & Computers

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to the mathematical skills needed by electronics/computer technicians.
    Competencies
    1. Perform basic Arithmetic
      1. Perform Arithmetic operations
      2. Multiply and divide fractions
      3. Add fractions
    2. Perform calculations to solve for and/or use decimals and percentages
    3. Understand powers and roots
    4. Understand systems of measurements
      1. Utilize scientific and engineering notation
      2. Understand and make conversions using the Metric System (SI).
      3. Understand and make conversions using the U.S. Customary System
    5. Perform basic Algebra
      1. Make computations using signed numbers
      2. Understand Algebraic terms
      3. Apply rules for Exponents
      4. Multiply and divide terms
      5. Solve first-degree equations
      6. Practice equation solving methods
    6. Multiple and factor polynomials
      1. Multiple polynomials
      2. Derive monomial factors
      3. Use multiple methods to derive binomial factors
      4. Solve second-degree equations
    7. Apply formulas to Electronics and technology-specific problems
      1. Manipulate literal equations and solve using formulas
      2. Understand mathematical problem solving techniques
    8. Graph mathematical relationships related to electronics
      1. Understand the rectangular coordinate system
      2. Graph linear functions
      3. Identify and graph nonlinear functions
    9. Understand complex numbers and phasors
      1. Describe the j operator
      2. Construct complex numbers
      3. Manipulate complex phasors in rectangular and polar forms
      4. Perform operations with complex phasors
    10. Solve linear systems
      1. Use graphical techniques to solve two linear equations
      2. Use Algebraic techniques to solve two linear equations
    11. Understand Trigonometry of the right triangle
      1. Convert Angle measurements between degrees and radians
      2. Apply the Pythagorean Theorem
      3. Understand similar polygons and triangle
      4. Apply trigonometric ratios for sine, cosine, and tangent
    12. Understand exponents and logarithms
      1. Solve fractional exponents
      2. Solve exponential functions
      3. Solve problems involving common or natural logarithms
    13. Understand basic statistical terminology
      1. Computer mean, median and mode
      2. Compute standard deviation
      3. Generate histograms and depictions of the normal curve

  
  • ELT 123 - Programmable Controllers

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers PLC operation and programming techniques to include relay logic, timers, counters, sequencers, discrete I/O, analog I/O, networking, remote I/O, workstations, advanced programming techniques and interfacing with personal computers.
    Competencies
    1. Identify and describe the operation of the major components of a programmable controller.
      1. Identify the programming hardware.
      2. Identify the control hardware.
    2. Use hand held programmers to access and modify programs and control operations of programmable controllers.
      1. Create, modify, and store programs with the HHT.
      2. Monitor operations with the HHT.
      3. Modify operating parameters with the HHT.
    3. Use computers to access and modify programs and control operations of programmable controllers.
      1. Create, modify, and store programs with the computer.
      2. Monitor operations with the computer.
      3. Modify operating parameters with the computer.
    4. Write and program into various programmable controllers basic control programs.
      1. Utilize ladder programming in a PLC.
      2. Utilize discrete I/O instructions in a ladder program.
      3. Program branching and latching circuits in a PLC.
    5. Program special functions on various programmable controllers.
      1. Program counters.
      2. Program sequencers.
      3. Program timers.
    6. Specify and identify discrete I/O interfaces.
      1. Identify the types of dc inputs and outputs.
      2. Identify the types of ac inputs and outputs.
      3. Determine the hardware configuration of I/O for various applications.
    7. Develop, program, and debug programs typical of industrial control applications.
      1. Outline the flow of control for an application.
      2. Enter the program using either a hand held programmer or computer.
      3. Test and edit programs.
    8. Utilize analog I/O devices.
      1. Select appropriate analog I/O devices.
      2. Incorporate program code for analog I/O.
      3. Use signal conditioning for analog I/O.
    9. Utilize remove I/O devices.
      1. Setup and configure remote I/O.
      2. Incorporate program code for remote I/O.
    10. Utilize non-standard I/O.
      1. Identify various types of non-standard I/O.
      2. Interface non-standard I/O devices.
      3. Incorporate program code for non-standard I/O.
    11. Utilize workstations.
      1. Identify various types of workstations.
      2. Setup and configure a workstation.
      3. Incorporate program code for workstations.
    12. Utilize advanced programming techniques.
      1. Use such functions as comparisons, shift registers, and mathematical calculations.
      2. Use custom control software with programmable controllers.
      3. Incorporate functions of data acquisition and management.
    13. Utilize network systems.
      1. Identify different types of networks.
      2. Understand different transmission standards.
      3. Setup and configure a network.

  
  • ELT 125 - Advanced PLC

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed for the student who is already proficient with ladder logic and loading programs into PLCs. The course will introduce the student to both hardware and software operator control panels, analog sensor interfacing, analog programming and exchange of data over networks. A hands-on lab component will give the student the opportunity to install, program and troubleshoot networked PLC hardware.
    Prerequisite: ELT 123  
    Competencies
     

    1. Discuss the features of analog sensors
      1. Define standard voltage and current interfaces
      2. Identify proper analog sensor and interface to use
      3. Observe interface analog sensors using 0-10 volts and 4-20mA to a PLC
    2. Evaluate the features of analog outputs and transducers
      1. Describe standard voltage and current interfaces
      2. Determine proper analog output interface and transducer to use
      3. Simulate analog outputs using 0-10 volts, 4-20mA, and PWM to a PLC
    3. Summarize the programming of PLC’s to use analog inputs for control and data acquisition
      1. Scale inputs
      2. Compare instructions
      3. Implement math instructions
      4. Define PID instructions
    4. Apply the programming of PLC’s to use analog and discreet outputs for control
      1. Scale outputs
      2. Compare instructions to control discreet outputs
      3. Explain math, timer, compare instructions to control and analog outputs
      4. Interpret PID instructions analog outputs
    5. Examine the features of hardware operator interfaces
      1. Model how to multiplex inputs and outputs
      2. Interface a BCD thumb wheel switch to a PLC
      3. Interface a BCD seven segment display to a PLC
    6. Build networking of PLCs using DH485 protocol
      1. Explain basics of network cabling
      2. Identify common network hardware
      3. Use of RSLinks to setup the network
      4. Set up a setup a DH485 network
      5. Describe the message instruction to exchange information between PLCs
      6. Use a operators switch on one PLC to control operation on another PLC
      7. Read out the parts count contained in a remote PLC on the local PLC
    7. Build a Panel View application using Panel Builder software
      1. Discuss the features of Panel View type operator interfaces
      2. Download an application to the Panel View
      3. Control a PLC and read data from the PLC on the Panel View
    8. Create network using Ethernet
      1. Describe the basics of network cabling
      2. Identify how to install network card
      3. Explain how Windows 9x and Windows XP use networking
      4. Identify the use of common network hardware
      5. List the common hardware and network protocols
      6. Set up a peer-to-peer network
    9. Build a RS View application using RS View software
      1. Discuss the features of RSView operator interfaces on a workstation
      2. Set up a tagname server to exchange RS View data with the PLC
      3. Control a PLC and read data from the PLC on the RSView application
    10. Build an application using visual Basic software
      1. Discuss the features of Visual Basic data interfaces on a workstation
      2. Set up a tagname server to exchange ODB data with the PLC
      3. Control a PLC and read data from the PLC on the Visual Basic application

  
  • ELT 126 - Industrial Electronics

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The devices and circuits used in thyristor control of machines are presented. Course includes phase control of DC motors, triac control of AC motors and various speed control circuits.
    Prerequisite: ELT 131  
    Competencies
    1. Describe the principles of operation, advantages of, and typical uses of most electric motors
      1. Discuss: split phase, capacitor start, shunt, series, compound DC, brushless and stepping motors
      2. Discuss: 3 phase, synchronous and wound rotor motors
    2. Describe the circuitry used to generate 3 phase control for variable frequency drives
    3. Measure practical parameters of electric motors
      1. Measure and use Kt
      2. Measure and use Kemf.
    4. Predict electrical motor performance given measured motor parameters
    5. Demonstrate a knowledge of UJT, SCR and TRIAC circuits
    6. Explain full and half-step control of a stepping motor

  
  • ELT 131 - Motor Controls

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to industrial motor controls. During this course, students will use ladder diagrams and control devices to implement practical control systems.
    Competencies
    1. Acquire safety awareness.
      1. Determine the correct fire extinguisher for class A, B or C fire.
      2. Determine the proper use of trade hand tools.
      3. Describe power tools and their use in the trade.
      4. Lockout/tag out procedures’
      5. 1.5 Describe safety precautions when working with HV wiring.
      6. 1.6 Wire circuits with power off.
      7. Run neutral only to loads or coils to protect students and circuit breakers.
    2. Identification and description of NEMA symbols.
      1. Use NEMA symbols in all circuits developed.
      2. Relate the symbols to the physical devices commonly used in motor control. 
    3. Understand motor control with aid of ladder/line diagrams.
      1. Fabricate two and three wire control circuits.
      2. Proper notation, descriptions, notation of ladder diagrams.
      3. Relate the three basic sections of a ladder diagram.
      4. Implement memory/latching circuits.
      5. Implement relay logic (AND/OR/NAND/NOR) circuits.
      6. Use interlocking and sequence control.
      7. Select proper parameters in solenoid applications.
      8. Describe shading coil induction motor, solenoids, contactors and coils.
      9. Describe arch suppression.
      10. Describe the advantages of joystick control.
    4. Design circuits using timers to facilitate applications.
      1. Draw timing charts.
      2. Use pneumatic timers.
      3. Use synchronous timers.
    5. Explain motor types, operation, and related topics.
      1. Induction and brush type.
      2. 5.2 Describe how the rotary magnetic field is developed.
      3. Describe the shunt, series and compound motors.
      4. Forward and reverse operation of three phase, single phase and brush type motors.
      5. Reduced current starting.
    6. Analyze power distribution systems and fundamentals.
      1. Delta.
      2. Wye.
      3. Discuss over current protection.
    7. Analyze the following types of electrical components specifications.
      1. Switchboards.
      2. Panelboards.
      3. M.C. Centers.
      4. Busways.
      5. NEMA enclosures.
      6. Electrical load requirements for machinery and organizations.
      7. Alternative conventions: IEC vs. NEMA.
    8. Design and implement practical lab exercises.
      1. Momentary control of control relays from one then two locations.
      2. Fwd-rev control w/interlocking.
      3. Jogging.
      4. Garage door problems.
      5. Electronic keys.
      6. Photocell applications.
      7. Traffic lights.
      8. A three floor elevator.
      9. Compelling sequence.
      10. Reciprocating table.
      11. Use a timer to implement 8.5.
      12. Use a timer to implement 8.7.
      13. Turn a light on for 3 sec. And off for 2 sec.
      14. Construct and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to fwd-rev control a 480 volt 3 phase motor.

  
  • ELT 143 - Mechanisms

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This introductory course covers linear and angular displacement, velocities, and accelerations of linkages, gear trains, and belt and friction drives. Topics include vectors, simple and complex machines, and toggle and intermittent motion mechanisms.
    Competencies
    1. Rank kinematics in relation to physics, kinetics and statics
    2. Analyze four bar as well as other mechanisms
      1. Describe and differentiate between a crank, lever arm, rocker arm, bell crank, constrained and locked kinematic chains
      2. Determine the limits of travel of a four link mechanism
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in vectorial and graphical vectorial math
      1. Resolve vectors into components that might not be perpendicular
      2. Perform vectorial subtraction using the concurrent method of subtraction.
      3. Solve graphic vectorial equations
    4. Analyze angular and lineal displacements, velocities and accelerations
    5. Analyze gear train, belt and pulley, and cam problems
    6. Discuss epicyclic gears, reverted gears, coupling methods, and intermittent-motion drives
    7. Discuss assorted clutches, brakes, couplers, constant velocity drives, harmonic drives, ratchets and geneva mechanisms
    8. Analyze gear train, spring, pulley, hoist and joint mechanisms
      1. Calculate and measure torque and angular velocity ratios for simple, internal, reverted, planetary, helical, bevel and differential gearing arrangements
      2. Calculate and measure rack and pinion, worm and wheel, block and screw arrangement parameters
    9. Assemble mechanisms
      1. Gear trains
      2. Spring mechanisms
      3. Pulley and hoist mechanisms
      4. Joint mechanisms
      5. Practice proper techniques for handling and assembling gears, bearing plate 1 assemblies, shafts, collars
    10. Relate gear terms: diametral pitch, pitch diameter and pitch
      1. Use mechanical terms; pitch circle, center distance, pinion, pitch radii, involute gear, root radius and lands
      2. Use mechanical terms; addendum, dedendum, whole depth, working depth, chordal thickness, circular thickness, pressure angle, module, fellows stub tooth and compound gear trains
    11. Analyze mechanical devices
      1. Construct and take measurements on spring mechanisms, toothed belts, disk drives, rotary cams, universal joints, and crossed helical gears
      2. Construct and take measurements on inertial configurations, pulley blocks, chain drives and differential or chain hoists

  
  • ELT 146 - Mechanisms Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The principles of drives and linkages discussed in ELT 143 are evaluated using precision components. Major principles evaluated are speed ratios, torque, power, and efficiency. Lab projects are applications of principles of process control and robotics interfacing mechanical motion and energy requirements with programmable control concepts.
    Corequisite: ELT 143  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze gear train, spring, pulley, hoist and joint mechanisms.
      1. Calculate and measure torque and angular velocity ratios for simple, internal, reverted, planetary, helical, bevel and differential gearing arrangements.
      2. Calculate and measure rack and pinion, worm and wheel, block and screw arrangement parameters.
    2. Assemble mechanisms:
      1. Gear trains.
      2. Spring mechanisms.
      3. Pulley and hoist mechanisms.
      4. Joint mechanisms.
      5. Practice proper techniques for handling and assembling gears, bearing plate assemblies, shafts, collars.
    3. Relate gar terms: Diametrical pitch, pitch diameter and pitch.
      1. Use mechanical terms: Pitch circle, center distance, pinion, pitch radii, involute gear, root radius and lands.
      2. Use mechanical terms: Addendum, dedendum, whole depth, working depth, chordal thickness, circular thickness, pressure angle, module, Fellows stub tooth and compound gear trains.
    4. Analyze mechanical devices.
      1. Construct and take measurements on spring mechanisms, toothed belts, disk drives, rotary cams, universal joints, and crossed helical gears.
      2. Construct and take measurements on inertial configurations, pulley blocks, chain drives and differential or chain hoists.
    5. Build and perfect an approved mechanical project.

  
  • ELT 147 - NEC Residential

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The basic principles of the NEC for layout and construction for residential wiring systems. Apply code rules to house wiring installations. Discuss security systems, fire and smoke detectors, low-voltage and remote controls.
    Competencies
    1. Understand basic safety rules for wiring electrical systems. How communication is conveyed on the job site. Discuss how to use the latest addition of the electrical code.
      1. Explain the importance of safety on the workplace.
    2. Understand outlets and review electrical symbols.
      1. Explain the electrical outlet symbols used in plans for residential applications.
      2. Discuss the types of outlets, boxes, fixtures, and switches used.
      3. Explain the methods of mounting various electrical devices.
      4. Understand how to position boxes, receptables, to the different types of wall surfaces.
      5. Explain the difference between “force” and “pressure”.
      6. Describe how to determine the number of wires permitted in different sized boxes.
      7. Focus on lighting branch circuits and small appliance branch circuits.
    3. Examine wiring methods. Define conductor sizes and types, wire connections, voltage drops and calculate neutral sizing for services.
      1. Define the terms associated with rating conductors, sizing wires, and flexible cords.
      2. Explain overcurrent protection for conductors and the loading effects on branch circuits.
      3. Explain aluminum conductors and possible fire hazards associated with them.
      4. Understand the code rules for all types of cables, and different raceways.
      5. Illustrate the sizing of neutrals.
      6. Define the markings of terminals of wiring devices and connectors.
      7. Study the ground fault circuit, arc fault circuit interrupters, and transient voltage surge suppressors.
    4. Differentiate lighting branch circuits for different rooms in the residence such as front bedroom, master bedroom, bathrooms, and hallway.
      1. Draw a cable layout and a wiring diagram based on information given on residence plans, the speculations, and code requirements.
      2. Explain the factors that influence the grouping of outlets into circuits.
      3. Estimate loads for the outlets of a circuit.
      4. Select the proper wall box for a particular installation.
      5. List requirements for installation of fixtures in clothes closets.
      6. Understand where arc fault circuit interrupters are required for bedrooms.
      7. Explain code requirements for installing ceiling fans.
      8. Estimate a connected load fro a room based on the number of fixtures and outlets included in the circuit supplying the room.
      9. Determine the connections for three way switches.
      10. Explain equipment grounding requirements for bathroom installations.
      11. Explain code requirements for receptacles in bathrooms installations.
      12. Explain code requirements for receptacles outlets in hallway installations.
      13. List fundamentals of proper lighting for bathrooms.
      14. Differentiate lighting branch circuits and small appliance circuits for kitchens.
      15. Explain the code requirements for small appliance circuits in kitchens.
      16. Discuss split circuit receptacles.
      17. Discuss multi-wire circuits.
      18. Differentiate lighting branch circuit for the living room.
    5. Dryer outlet and lighting circuit for laundry, bathrooms, rear entry hall, and attic.
      1. Understand code requirements for receptacles installed in bathrooms.
      2. Make the proper wiring and grounding connections for large appliances, based on type of wiring methods.
      3. Explain load calculations for electric dryers.
      4. Understand how to connect clothes dryers with cord and plug connections.
      5. Understand the code requirements for receptacle outlets in the laundry area.
      6. Discuss the code rules pertaining to wiring methods in attics.
      7. Explain circuits for waste disposer and dishwasher.
      8. Determine the maximum power demand of a dishwasher.
      9. Discuss the proper way to connect grounding to the appliances.
      10. Describe disconnecting means for kitchen appliances.
      11. Explain the operation and the switching sequence of the heat/vent/light.
      12. List the various methods of controlling exhaust fans.

  
  • ELT 148 - NEC Residential Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Utilize the basic principles of the NEC for layout and residential electrical wiring systems. Apply code rules, using hands-on approach for residential electrical installations from simplistic to complicated circuit wiring.
    Competencies
    1. Understand basic safety rules for wiring electrical systems by identifying the major categories of electrical safety.
      1. Identify the three major categories of electrical safety.
      2. Identify safety rules pertaining to personnel safety.
      3. Identify safety rules pertaining to equipment safety.
      4. Identify safety rules pertaining to workplace safety.
    2. Understanding the use of a multimeter and the different functions and types of meters (analog or digital).
      1. Describe the operations of the multimeter.
      2. Properly connect the multimeter using the ammeter section.
      3. Properly connect the multimeter using the ohmmeter section.
      4. Properly connect the multimeter using the voltmeter section.
    3. Illustrate conductor stripping, splicing, and taping techniques.
      1. Strip electrical conductors and cables using wire striping techniques and tools.
      2. Splice electrical conductors using the western union, pigtail, and tee/tap splicing techniques.
      3. Secure electrical conductors together using several taping techniques and various wire size connectors.
    4. Installation of single-pole switched light circuit, with feed at the switch.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source entering at the switch.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source at the switch.
    5. Installation of single-pole switch light circuit, with feed at the light.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for alighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source entering at the light.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source at the light.
    6. Installation of single-pole switched light circuit and continuously energized circuit.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source entering at the switch and the duplex receptacle is continuously energized.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source at the switch and the duplex receptacle is continuously energized.
    7. Installation of single-pole switched light circuit and two split duplex receptacles.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source entering at the switch and two split duplex receptacles with half of each receptacle controlled by a switch.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at one location, with the source at the switch and two split duplex receptacles with half of each receptacle controlled by a switch.
    8. Installation of three-way switched light circuit, with feed at the switch.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at two locations, with the source entering at the switch on the left hand panel.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at two locations, with the source entering at the switch on the left hand panel.
    9. Installation of three-way switched light circuit, with feed at the light.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at two locations, with the source entering at the light, utilizing both connection options.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at two locations, with the source entering at the light, utilizing both connection options.
    10. Installation of four-way switched light circuit, with feed at the switch.
      1. Calculate correct size of boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed for a lighting circuit that is controlled at three locations, with the source entering at the three-way switch located on the right hand panel.
      3. Properly install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at three locations, with the source entering at the three-way switch located on the right hand panel.
      4. Install the wiring and connect the devices required for lighting circuit that is controlled at three locations, with the source entering at the three-way switch on the right hand panel.
    11. Installation of combination circuits.
      1. Perform calculations for selecting the correct size boxes.
      2. Properly mount the boxes needed and wire the experiments.

  
  • ELT 172 - NEC Commercial/Industrial

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The basic principles of the NEC for layout and construction of commercial wiring and industrial wiring systems. Apply basics of wiring into the planning of typical commercial and industrial installations. Configure how load requirements are converted into branch circuits then into feeders, and into main electrical services.
    Competencies
    1. Understand commercial and industrial building plans and specifications
      1. Explain the basic safety rules for working on electrical systems
      2. Discuss the project requirements from contract documents
      3. Demonstrate the application of building plans and specifications
      4. Show how to locate specific information on building plans
    2. Understand electrical drawings
      1. Explain how to read and interpret electrical symbols used in construction drawings
      2. Identify the electrical installation requirements using plans to a commercial building
      3. Identify the electrical installation requirements using plans to an industrial plant 
    3. Focus on calculating the electrical load
      1. Determine the minimum lighting load for a given area
      2. Determine the minimum receptacle loading for a given area
      3. Determine the minimum equipment loading
      4. Figuring the unbalanced load.
    4. Examine branch circuits
      1. Determine the required number of branch circuits for a set of loads
      2. Determine the correct rating for branch circuit protective devices
      3. Determine the preferred type of wire for a branch circuit
      4. Determine the required minimum size conductor for a branch circuit
    5. Analyze and understanding the different types of switches and receptacles
      1. Identify and select switches and receptacles with the proper ratings
      2. Demonstrate how to install different types of receptacles properly
      3. Demonstrate how to install different types of switches properly
      4. Understand the correct way to select raceway and the different types
      5. Discuss the requirements for raceway installation
      6. Determine the proper size of boxes to be installed
      7. Select proper size box that depends on the wire fill
      8. Select proper size box that depends on the raceways entering the box
    6. Define the terminology and code requirements for motor and appliance circuits
      1. Describe the word appliance used by the code
      2. Explain the appropriate method for installing electrical circuits to appliances
      3. Understand appropriate grounding for appliances
      4. Determine branch circuit ratings for appliances and motors
      5. Determine conductor sizes for appliances and motors
      6. Determine overcurrent protection for appliances and motors
      7. Understand the terms Type 1 and Type 2 protection using thermostats 
    7. Calculating feeders
      1. Calculating feeder loading
      2. Determine the minimum overcurrent protection rating
      3. Determine the minimum conductor size
      4. Determine the correction and adjustment factors
      5. Calculate voltage drops
      6. Calculate the reduction of neutral as required
      7. Determine minimum raceway size
      8. Selection and installation of panelboard
      9. Explain the correct way to select the panelboard
      10. Identification of circuits in a panelboard.
      11. Calculate the correct feeder size for panelboard
      12. Determine the correct overcurrent protection for a panelboard
    8. Wiring and installation of luminairs (fixtures), and lamps
      1. Understand technical terms associated with lamp selection
      2. Define lamps by their designations
      3. Properly select and install luminairs (fixtures)
      4. Calculating the lighting watts per square foot for a given space

  
  • ELT 173 - NEC Commercial/Industrial Lab

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Utilize the basic principles of the NEC for layout of commercial and industrial wiring systems. Apply code rules, using a hands-on approach for commercial and industrial electrical installations from simplistic to complicated wiring.
    Competencies
    1. Understand basic safety rules for wiring electrical systems
      1. Cite examples of hazardous situations
      2. Explain basic safety rules
      3. Identify safety rules pertaining to protective clothing and equipment safety
      4. Follow procedures designed to aid an injured worker
    2. Understanding the use of construction tools for installations used by electricians
      1. List basic safety rules for tools
      2. Identify the types of bending tools
      3. Identify the types of pulling equipment
      4. Explain the operating functions of various electrical testing devices
    3. Demonstrate skills needed to install electrical circuits using electrical prints, specifications, and codes
      1. Describe several types of electrical drawings
      2. Explain the purpose of building codes
    4. Perform basic wiring methods
      1. Size wireways to satisfy code requirements
      2. Properly identify and install fittings, connectors, and supports
      3. Properly select and install the correct wiring methods based on the code requirements
      4. Properly calculate and install wireway size
    5. Calculation and installation of conductors
      1. Review code rules regarding conductors
      2. Properly select different types of conductors
      3. Properly install conductors based on circuit loads
      4. Designate the installation conduit, based on percentage fill of conduit requirements
    6. Installation of boxes and conduit bodies
      1. Properly calculate and install correct size boxes
      2. Properly identify and install various types of conduit bodies
      3. Perform box fill calculations using the code
      4. Properly calculate box sizes for straight and angular pulls
    7. Installation of electrical service and distribution
      1. Explain the terminologies between electrical service and electrical distribution
      2. Properly find service drop clearance using the code
      3. Properly identify and install various supply voltages available
      4. Calculate and install receptacle circuit loads required by the code requirements
    8. Calculation and installation of transformers
      1. Identify the basic components and construction of transformers
      2. Identify the various types of transformers
      3. Properly identify and install various voltage transformers
      4. Properly calculate and install overcurrent devices for transformer primary and secondary
      5. Analyze and troubleshoot practical transformer problems
    9. Installation of branch circuits and feeders
      1. Describe various types of branch circuits
      2. Define the functions of feeder circuit conductors
      3. Define the functions of branch circuit conductors
      4. Calculate and install lighting circuit loads required by the code requirements
      5. Calculate and determine branch circuit over current protection required by the code
      6. Calculate and determine feeder size conductors required by the code

  
  • ELT 178 - Electrical Grounding

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The understanding of grounding and eliminating the misconceptions when dealing with NEC requirements for installation.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the purpose of grounding using Article 250 in the NEC®.
      1. Understand the sequence of Article 250 in the NEC®.
      2. Identify the terms used in Article 250 in the NEC®.
      3. Explain why electrical circuits are grounded.
      4. Explain the meaning of effective grounding.
      5. Explain the relationship of voltage and current to electric shock.
      6. Explain the resistance of the human body.
      7. Understand the importance of bonding enclosures to ground.
    2. Illustrate the characteristics of various faults.
      1. Explain the difference between a direct short and a ground fault.
      2. Discuss the various stresses on electrical equipment cased by electrical faults.
    3. Develop and illustrate the characteristics and requirements of the grounding electrode system.
      1. Explain the purpose of a grounding electrode.
      2. Understand the requirements for concrete incased electrode.
      3. Discuss the ground rod and how resistance is measured.
      4. Explain the purpose of bonding two or more electrodes together when installed for a single building.
      5. Explain the connections when more than one service is installed to the same building.
      6. Explain the characteristics and requirements of the grounding electrode conductor.
    4. Illustrate the characteristics and requirements of circuits and system grounding.
      1. Define term grounded conductor.
      2. Explain the differences of systems grounded and circuit grounded.
      3. Explain the term voltage to ground.
      4. Identify which systems and circuits shall be grounded.
      5. Identify which systems are permitted to be grounded.
      6. Explain and interpret the installation requirements of impedance-grounded systems.
    5. Illustrate the characteristics of the grounded conductor.
      1. Distinguish the difference grounded and not grounded.
      2. Discuss voltage to ground.
      3. Explain the difference between AC and DC ground requirements.
      4. Identify the high-leg of a delta system.
      5. Explain the requirements of isolated systems.
      6. Discuss impedance grounding requirements for AC systems.
    6. Develop and illustrate the characteristics and requirements of main bonding jumpers.
      1. Describe the location of the main bounding jumper.
      2. Discuss how main bonding jumpers are installed.
      3. Calculate main bonding jumper using table 250.66 in the NEC®.
      4. Calculate the size of the main bonding jumper using the same material.
      5. Calculate the size of the main bonding jumper using different material.
      6. Calculate the size of the main bonding jumper when installed in parallel.
    7. Develop and illustrate the characteristics of equipment grounding.
      1. Define what an equipment grounding conductor is.
      2. Identify fault that occur when installing equipment ground.
      3. Explain using raceways and enclosures for correct equipment ground.
      4. Discuss the identification of various equipment grounding.
      5. Discuss various materials used permitted for equipment ground.
      6. Calculate equipment grounding using table 250.122 (for single raceway) in the NEC®.
      7. Calculate the size of the equipment ground when installed in parallel.
      8. Calculate the size of the equipment ground when the circuit is protected by instantaneous breaker.
    8. Develop and illustrate the characteristics of equipment and enclosure bonding.
      1. Discuss the term bonding.
      2. Explain continuity of the equipment grounding path.
      3. Explain bonding requirements on the supply side of service disconnect.
      4. Explain bonding requirements on the load side of service equipment.
    9. Develop and illustrate the characteristics and requirements ground fault protective equipment.
      1. Identify when ground fault protection of equipment is required at service.
      2. Identify when ground fault protection is needed on feeders.
      3. Explain the operation of the ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI).

  
  • ELT 181 - Adv Math for Electronics Tech

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is a continuation of concepts covered in MATH FOR ELECTRONICS & COMPUTERS. Topical emphasis includes applications involving trigonometry of vectors and oblique triangles and logarithms.
    Competencies
    1. Understand trigonometry of Vectors
      1. Add Vectors and Phasors
      2. Solve for Components of a Vector
      3. Apply the Law of Sines
      4. Apply the Law of Cosines
    2. Solve applications of Logarithms
      1. Solve Exponential Equations involving logarithmic functions
      2. Solve RC and RL Circuits
    3. Understand Power and Gain
      1. Understand decibels as a unit-measure
      2. Compute Power and Gain in applications
      3. Computer Antenna Gain
      4. Understand Bode Plots
    4. Understand and Design Filters
      1. Understand and Design low-pass filters
      2. Understand and design high-pass filters
      3. Understand and design band pass filters
      4. Understand and design band-reject filters

  
  • ELT 217 - Advanced Motor Controls

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Additional topics in industrial motor controls. Course includes wiring of AC & DC motors, power distribution, solid-state controls, proximity controls and frequency drives.
    Prerequisite: ELT 303 , ELT 131  
    Competencies
    1. Electrical circuit layout, and symbols fundamentals review
      1. Discuss the common symbols used in motor control diagrams
      2. Analyze and illustrate symbols in various wiring diagrams
      3. Analyze and illustrate wiring elementary diagrams
      4. Discuss and illustrate various control devices
      5. Analyze and illustrate differences between contactors, motor starters, and relays
      6. Describe the operation of the common timing relays
    2. Identify and illustrate the construction, wiring, and installation of AC and DC industrial motors
      1. Discuss the construction of three phase motors
      2. Discuss the construction of single-phase motors
      3. Determine the proper internal wiring for capacitor motors
      4. Discuss the various types of DC motors
      5. Analyze and illustrate the reversing of motors using manual starters
      6. Analyze and illustrate the reversing of motors using magnetic starters
      7. Discuss and illustrate the reversing of motors using motor drives
      8. Discuss and illustrate techniques for troubleshooting reversing circuits 
    3. Discuss and analyze electrical power distribution systems
      1. Discuss the various levels of distribution systems
      2. Discuss the generator phase connections.
      3. Discuss the transformer theory of operation
      4. Discuss the various three phase transformer distribution systems
      5. Discuss the installation of transformers
      6. Discuss the layout and sections of the substation
      7. Discuss the layout and operation of switchboards
      8. Discuss the layout and operation of panelboards
      9. Discuss the layout and operation of motor control centers
      10. Discuss the layout and operation of feeders and busways
      11. Analyze and illustrate proper grounding techniques
      12. Discuss and illustrate troubleshooting fuses and circuit breakers
    4. Analyze and illustrate understanding of solid state control devices
      1. Discuss semiconductor theory
      2. Discuss semiconductor doping theory
      3. Analyze semiconductor devices
      4. Discuss and illustrate the troubleshooting techniques of solid state devices
    5. Analyze construction and illustrate the operation of electromechanical and solid-state relays
      1. Describe the basic construction and operation of various electromechanical relays
      2. Describe the basic construction and operation of various general purpose relays
      3. Describe the basic construction and operation of various machine control relays
      4. Describe the basic construction and operation of various solid state relays
      5. Discuss and illustrate various relay troubleshooting techniques
    6. Analyze and illustrate proper installation and application of photoelectric and proximity controls
      1. Discuss the various types of photoelectric switches
      2. Discuss the various scanning techniques
      3. Describe the different applications when installing photo switches
      4. Discuss the various types of proximity switches
      5. Describe the different applications when installing proximity switches
      6. Discuss and illustrate photoelectric switch troubleshooting techniques
      7. Discuss and illustrate proximity switch troubleshooting techniques
    7. Identify and illustrate the basic construction and operation of programmable logic controllers
      1. Discuss the construction and sections of the programmable controller
      2. Discuss the basic language used in PLC programming
      3. Discuss the basics PLC communication networks
      4. Discuss the basic PLC applications
      5. Discuss and illustrate various troubleshooting techniques used with PLC
      6. Discuss and illustrate troubleshooting the PLC
    8. Analyze the operation methods for reduced voltage starting
      1. Discuss the operation of reduced voltage starting
      2. Discuss the load torque and starting requirements
      3. Analyze and illustrate DC motor reduced voltage starting
      4. Analyze and illustrate reduced voltage starting and squirrel-cage motors
      5. Discuss and illustrate various reduced voltage starting troubleshooting techniques
    9. Analyze and illustrate accelerating and decelerating methods
      1. Discuss motor braking techniques
      2. Analyze and illustrate the operation dynamic braking
      3. Analyze and calculate speed control and the load requirements for AC and DC motors
      4. Discuss and illustrate various speed control circuits
    10. Identify and illustrate AC frequency motor drive set up
      1. Discuss and illustrate motor stopping methods using frequency drive
      2. Discuss and illustrate various types of acceleration and deceleration techniques using frequency drive
    11. Analyze and illustrate troubleshooting techniques used for components and control devices
      1. Analyze and illustrate testing procedures on industrial switches
      2. Analyze and illustrate testing procedures on electric motors
      3. Analyze and illustrate procedures for locating circuits in panelboards
      4. Analyze and illustrate testing procedures on capacitors

  
  • ELT 303 - Principles of Electricity

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    For beginners: theory, controlling electricity, voltage, amps, resistance, wattage, series and parallel circuits, DC & AC, batteries, electric lighting, generators and motors.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the fundamental concepts of electricity and electrical units
      1. Identify the structure of matter in an atom
      2. State the law of charges
      3. Identify different types of atoms and its structure
      4. Describe how electron force is applied to create current
    2. Distinguish the characteristics of conductors and insulators
      1. Discuss the theory of voltage, current, resistance, and power
      2. Define a basic circuit
      3. Mathematical relationship of power, voltage, current, and resistance using Ohm’s Law
      4. List the factors of resistance
      5. Determine the value of various color coded resistors
    3. Develop and illustrate the characteristics and relationships of a series resistive circuit
      1. Calculate the current flow in a series resistive circuit
      2. Calculate different voltage drops in a series resistive circuit
      3. Determine total resistance in a series resistive circuit
      4. Calculate the power in a series resistive circuit
    4. Develop and illustrate the characteristics and relationships of a parallel resistive circuit
      1. Calculate the current flow in a parallel resistive circuit
      2. Calculate voltage in a parallel resistive circuit
      3. Determine total resistance in a parallel resistive circuit
      4. Calculate the power in a parallel resistive circuit
    5. Develop an understanding of resistive combination circuits
      1. Distinguish a parallel branch from a series circuit
      2. Arrange and calculate series and parallel circuits into an equivalent circuit
      3. Calculate voltage, current, resistance, and power by using Ohm?s Law
      4. Explain Kirchhoff’s voltage law
      5. Explain Kirchhoff’s current law 
    6. Develop an understanding of electromagnetic induction
      1. Explain the construction of an AC alternator (generator).
      2. Discuss the four basic parts of an AC alternator (generator).
      3. Discuss the operation of an AC alternator (generator).
      4. Explain instantaneous, peak and effective voltage
      5. Discuss phase relationship
      6. Discuss inductive devices and other components
    7. Describe the fundamental concepts of capacitance and capacitors
      1. Explain the definition of capacitance
      2. Explain the construction of a capacitor
      3. Discuss the difference between AC generators and DC generators
      4. Discuss the operation of a capacitor 
    8. Develop a working knowledge of hazardous situations and safety precautions
      1. Cite examples of hazardous situations
      2. Identify hazards associated with electricity
      3. Explain basic safety rules
      4. Describe safety equipment and personal protective equipment
      5. Discuss the basic procedures to aid an injured worker
      6. Recognize the basic tools used and the safety rules for using the tools
      7. Explain the functions of various electrical testing devices
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of electrical prints, specifications, and codes
      1. Explain elementary drawings and detail drawings
      2. Identify the common electrical symbols
      3. Explain the importance of building codes
      4. Define the purpose, intent, and arrangement of the NEC
    10. Demonstrate the understanding of wiring methods and specific applications
      1. Recognize and understand commercial wiring methods and installation rules
      2. Size wireways to code requirements
      3. Demonstrate and identify fittings, connectors, supports, and other hardware to particular wiring methods
      4. Calculate wire sizing
      5. Identify different types of enclosures and their uses
      6. Explain how enclosures are grounded
      7. Identify various types of conduit bodies
      8. Calculate box fill.
      9. Identify the types, ratings and characteristics of electrical protective devices
    11. Develop a basic understanding of service and distribution methods
      1. Describe two basic types of service and terminology
      2. Identify the required working clearances at the service equipment
      3. Define the purpose and uses of transformers
      4. Identify the components of a transformer
      5. Explain the different types of transformers and how they work
      6. Perform transformer calculations
    12. Develop and understanding of grounding
      1. State important grounding concepts
      2. Discuss the different characteristics grounded and un-grounded systems
      3. Identify the requirements for a service grounding system
      4. Explain the operation and the purpose of a grounded fault circuit interrupter
    13. Develop an understanding of branch circuits and feeders
      1. Describe various types of branch circuits
      2. Define the functions of a feeder and the functions of a branch circuit conductor
      3. Size branch circuits and overcurrent protection required by code
      4. Use the code to size feeder conductors
    14. Demonstrate and understand motors
      1. Explain the concepts of motors
      2. Calculate motor starting currents
      3. Use the code to design motor branch circuits with overload protection

  
  • ELT 307 - Digital Circuits

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An analysis of those circuits that form basic building blocks for a digital system, including logical gates such as OR, NOR, AND and NAND, storage registers and counters.
    Corequisite: ELT 308  
    Competencies
    1. Perform conversions between digital number systems
      1. Convert numbers from a binary to decimal system
      2. Perform decimal to binary conversions
      3. Transform octal numbers to binary ones
      4. Change binary numbers to octal ones
      5. Perform Hexadecimal to binary conversions
      6. Execute conversion of decimal numbers to hexadecimal numbers
      7. Convert hexadecimal numbers to octal numbers
      8. Perform octal to hexadecimal conversions
    2. Interpret BCD codes
    3. Perform binary to BCD code conversions
    4. Draw timing diagrams
    5. Read timing diagrams
    6. Evaluate timing diagrams
      1. Explain timing diagrams
      2. Analyze timing diagrams
    7. Explain the operation of basic login gates
      1. Describe logic circuits algebraically
      2. Identify gates by their symbols
    8. Evaluate logic circuit outputs
    9. Draw truth tables
    10. Read truth tables
    11. Describe combinations of gates with Boolean algebra
    12. Simplify logic circuits using Boolean algebra and Karnaugh mapping
    13. Apply Boolean’s and DeMorgan’s Theorems
    14. Convert gates with all NAND and all NOR gates
    15. Perform arithmetic operations with digital IC’s
      1. Perform binary arithmetic
      2. Perform hexadecimal arithmetic
      3. Perform BCD arthimetic
    16. Apply counter and register theory to circuit applications
      1. Evaluate asynchronous counters
      2. Evaluate synchronous counters
      3. Evaluate shift registers
      4. Design circuits with counters and registers
    17. Identify the characteristics of various digital circuit families
      1. Investigate TTL series characteristics
      2. Investigate MOS series characteristics
    18. Apply MSI logic circuit theory to circuit applications
      1. Evaluate decoders, encoders, and display drivers
      2. Design with encoders, decoders, and display drivers

  
  • ELT 308 - Digital Circuits Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Laboratory evaluation of small-scale integrated circuits and medium-scale integrated circuits. In addition to basic and/or gates, it includes decoders, encoders, counters and multiplexors.
    Corequisite: ELT 307  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the basic usage of the test equipment for digital circuits
    2. Use digital logic probes, pulsers, and oscilloscope properly
    3. Learn how to properly and safely hookup circuits and equipment
    4. Evaluate the applications of various test equipment
    5. Construct various logic gate circuits
    6. Evaluate the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Troubleshoot various logic gate circuits
      2. Analyze the characteristics of various logic gate circuits
    7. Evaluate combinational logic circuits
      1. Design combinational logical circuits
      2. Construct combinational logic circuits
      3. Troubleshoot combinational logic circuits
    8. Evaluate flip-flop and latch circuits
      1. Construct flip-flop and latch circuits
      2. Troubleshoot flip-flop and latch circuits
      3. Design and build counters using flip-flops
    9. Evaluate various LSI digital circuits
      1. Construct encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits using LSI circuits
      2. Troubleshoot encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits
      3. Design complex circuits involving encoder, decoder, and multiplexer circuits
    10. Evaluate the I/O characteristics of various digital logic families
      1. Test the logic 0 and logic 1 levels of various digital logic families
      2. Test the fanout of various digital logic families
      3. Evaluate active-high, active-low, and tri-state inputs and outputs of various digital logic families

  
  • ELT 324 - Digital Electronics Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Laboratory Evaluation of small-scale integrated circuits and medium scale integrated circuits. In addition to basic AND/OR gates, it includes decoders, encoders, counters, multiplexers, and microprocessors.
    Corequisite: ELT 325  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the basic usage of the test equipment for digital circuits
      1. Use digital logic probes, pulsers, and oscilloscope.
      2. Hookup circuits and test equipment.
    2. Compare the applications of various test equipment
    3. Analyze the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Construct various logic gate circuits
      2. Troubleshoot various logic gate circuits.
      3. Demonstrate the characteristics of various logic gate circuits.
    4. Summarize combinational logic circuits.
      1. Construct combinational logic circuits.
      2. Troubleshoot combinational logic circuits.
    5. Evaluate flip-flop and latch circuits.
      1. Construct flip-flop and latch circuits.
      2. Troubleshoot flip-flop and latch circuits.
      3. Design and build counters using flip-flops.
    6. Contrast various LSI digital circuits.
      1. Construct encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits using LSI circuits.
      2. Troubleshoot encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits.
      3. Design complex circuits involving encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits. 
    7. Evaluate the I/O characteristics of various digital logic families.
      1. Test the logic 0 and logic 1 levels of various digital logic families.
      2. Test the fanout of various digital logic families.
      3. Compare active-high, active-low, and tri-state inputs and outputs of various digital logic families.
    8. Analyze interfacing devices
      1. Interface analog to digital devices.
      2. Construct circuits with digital to analog devices.
      3. Construct circuits with other periphal devices. 
    9. Compare memory devices
      1. Test the operation of various memory devices.
      2. Interface memory devices
    10. Examine microprocessors
      1. Identify the sections within a microprocessor.
      2. Describe the operation of each section.
      3. Demonstrate the operation of an assembly language program.

  
  • ELT 325 - Digital Electronics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An analysis of those circuits that form basic building blocks for a digital system, including logical gates, such as OR, NOR, AND and NAND, storage registers, counters and microprocessors.
    Corequisite: ELT 324   
    Competencies
    1. Distinguish BCD and ASCII codes
    2. Evaluate timing diagrams
      1. Draw timing diagrams
      2. Read timing diagrams
    3. Evaluate the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Describe logic circuits algebraically
      2. Identify gates by their symbols
      3. Calculate logic circuit outputs
    4. Analyze Truth Tables
      1. Draw truth tables
      2. Read truth tables
    5. Simplify logic circuits using Boolean algebra and Demorgan’s Theorem
      1. Describe combinations of gates with Boolean algebra
      2. Apply Boolean Theorems
      3. Apply DeMorgan’s Theorems
    6. Perform arithmetic operations with digital IC?s
      1. Perform binary arithmetic
    7. Evaluate counter and register theory
      1. Explain asynchronous counters
      2. Explain synchronous counters
      3. Describe shift registers
      4. Design circuits with counters and registers
    8. Compare the characteristics of various digital circuit families
      1. Investigate TTL series characteristics
      2. Investigate MOS series characteristics
    9. Assess MSI logic circuit theory
      1. Evaluate decoders, encoders, and display drivers
      2. Design with encoders, decoders, and display drivers
    10. Evaluate interfacing concepts
      1. Describe the operation and limitations of several types of digital to analog converters
      2. Read DAC manufacturer’s spec sheet
      3. Describe how a computer utilizes the ADC
    11. Evaluate memory devices
      1. Use the terminology associated with memory systems
      2. Describe the difference between read/write and read-only memory
      3. Discuss the difference between volatile and non-volatile memory
      4. Outline the steps that occur when the CPU reads from or writes to memory
      5. Distinguish among the various types of ROMS
    12. Evaluate basic microprocessor operations
      1. Describe the function and operation of each of the basic elements of any computer
      2. Explain the Fetch and execute operations
      3. Explain busses and their signals
      4. Cite the major functions performed by the microcomputer

  
  • ELT 368 - DC & AC Fundamentals

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introductory course in DC and AC fundamentals. Subject matter includes Ohm’s law, series and parallel circuits and measuring instruments.
    Competencies
    1. Explain circuit components
      1. Discuss the characteristics and appearance of resistors
      2. Discuss the characteristics and appearance of capacitors
      3. Discuss the characteristics and appearance of inductors
      4. Discuss the characteristics and appearance of transformers
      5. Discuss the characteristics and appearance of semiconductor devices
      6. Discuss basic electronic instruments
      7. List the names and abbreviations of electrical units
      8. Use scientific notation in expressing quantities
      9. Use metric prefixes
    2. Explain basic electrical quantities
      1. Describe the structure of atoms and their place in electronics
      2. Explain electrical charge
      3. Discuss voltage
      4. Discuss current
      5. Discuss resistance
      6. Analyze electric circuits
      7. Recite the procedures for making basic circuit measurements
    3. Explain Ohm’s law and power
      1. Recite Ohm’s law
      2. Discuss the application of Ohm’s law
      3. Recite the formula for power
      4. Solve for power in an electric circuit
      5. Discuss the power ratings of resistors
    4. Explain series circuits
      1. Identify series circuits
      2. Explain current in series circuits
      3. Calculate total series resistance
      4. Apply Ohm’s law in series circuits
      5. Explain voltage sources in series
      6. Use Kirchoff’s voltage law in series circuits
      7. Explain voltage dividers
      8. Calculate power in series circuits
      9. Define circuit ground
      10. Explain the troubleshooting procedures used in series circuits
    5. Explain parallel circuits
      1. Identify parallel circuits
      2. Explain voltage in parallel circuits
      3. Use Kirchoff’s current law in parallel circuits
      4. Calculate total parallel resistance
      5. Use Ohm’s law in parallel circuits
      6. Explain the current divider principle
      7. Calculate power in a parallel circuit
      8. Relate parallel circuit applications
      9. Explain the troubleshooting procedures used in parallel circuits
    6. Explain series-parallel circuits
      1. Identify series-parallel relationships
      2. Analyze series-parallel circuits
      3. Explain loaded voltage dividers
      4. Discuss the loading effect of a voltmeter
      5. Explain the Wheatstone bridge
      6. Use the superposition method in circuits with more than one voltage source
      7. Explain Thevenin’s theorem
      8. Explain the troubleshooting procedures used in series-parallel circuits
    7. Explain magnetism
      1. Discuss the magnetic field
      2. Discuss electromagnetism
      3. List electromagnetic devices
      4. Discuss magnetic hysteresis
      5. Describe electromagnetic induction
      6. Review applications of electromagnetic induction
    8. Explain alternating current and voltage
      1. Explain the sine wave
      2. Discuss the voltage and current values of a sine wave
      3. Discuss sine wave voltage sources
      4. Relate the angular relationships of a sine wave
      5. Give the sine wave equation
      6. Discuss phasors
      7. Relate the use of Ohm’s law and Kirchoff’s laws in ac circuits
      8. Discuss superimposed dc and ac voltages
      9. Discuss nonsinusoidal waveforms
      10. Relate the basic principles of the oscilloscope and its uses in ac measurements
    9. Explain capacitors
      1. Discuss the basic construction
      2. Define capacitance
      3. Discuss the unit of capacitance
      4. Explain how a capacitor stores energy
      5. Discuss voltage rating of capacitors
      6. Discuss temperature coefficient of capacitors
      7. Discuss leakage in capacitors
      8. Relate the physical characteristics of a capacitor
      9. Summarize the types of capacitors
      10. Discuss series capacitors
      11. Discuss parallel capacitors
      12. Explain capacitors in dc circuits
      13. Explain capacitors in ac circuits
      14. Relate capacitor applications
      15. Explain the procedures for testing capacitors
    10. Explain inductors
      1. Discuss self-inductance
      2. Give the unit of inductance
      3. Discuss the physical characteristics of inductors
      4. List the various types of inductors
      5. Explain series inductors
      6. Explain parallel inductors
      7. Explain inductors in dc circuits
      8. Explain inductors in ac circuits
      9. Relate inductor applications
      10. Explain the procedures for testing inductors
    11. Explain transformers
      1. Discuss the basic transformer
      2. Explain step-up transformers
      3. Explain step-down transformers
      4. Discuss loading the secondary
      5. Explain reflected load in a transformer
      6. Discuss matching the load resistance to the source resistance
      7. Relate the use of the transformer for isolation
      8. Discuss nonidezl transformer characteristics
      9. Discuss variations of the basic transformer
    12. Explain the frequency response of RL circuits
      1. Explain the sinusoidal response of RC circuits
      2. Summarize impedance and phase angle of a series RC circuit
      3. Analyze series RC circuits
      4. Calculate impedance and phase angle of a parallel RC circuit
      5. Analyze parallel RC circuits
      6. Analyze series-parallel RC circuits
      7. Discuss power in RC circuits
      8. Relate basic applications of RC circuits
      9. Discuss troubleshooting procedures in RC circuits
    13. Explain the frequency response of RL circuits
      1. Explain the sinusoidal response of RL circuits
      2. Summarize impedance and phase angle of a series RL circuit
      3. Analyze series RL circuits
      4. Calculate impedance and phase angle of a parallel RL circuit
      5. Analyze parallel RL circuits.
      6. Analyze series-parallel RL circuits
      7. Discuss power in RL circuits
      8. Relate basic applications of RL circuits
      9. Discuss troubleshooting procedures in RL circuits
    14. Explain RCL circuits and resonance
      1. Explain impedance and phase angle of series RCL circuits
      2. Analyze series RCL circuits
      3. Discuss series resonance
      4. Discuss series resonant filters
      5. Analyze parallel RCL circuits
      6. Discuss parallel resonance
      7. Discuss parallel resonant filters
      8. Relate system applications of resonant circuits

  
  • ELT 369 - DC & AC Fundamentals Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This laboratory will enable the student to analyze basic L-C-R circuitry. Basic test equipment usage will also be presented.
    Prerequisite: ELT 368  must be taken concurrently with or prior to this course
    Competencies
    1. Use metric prefixes and scientific notation
      1. Convert standard form numbers to scientific and engineering notation
      2. Measure quantities using a metric prefix
      3. Identify several electronic components
    2. Use laboratory meters and power supplies
      1. Read analog meter scales including multiple and complex scales
      2. Operate the power supply at the lab station
      3. Explain the functions of the controls for the multimeter at the lab station
      4. Use the multimeter to make a voltage measurement
    3. Use laboratory equipment to measure and evaluate the resistance of resistors
      1. Determine the listed value of a resistor using the resistor color code
      2. Use a DMM (or VOM) to measure the values of resistors
      3. Determine the percent difference between the measured and listed values of resistors
      4. Measure the resistance of a potentiometer and explain its operation
    4. Make voltage measurements
      1. Connect a circuit from a schematic diagram
      2. Use voltages measured in respect to ground to compute the voltage drop across a resistor
      3. Explain the meaning of circuit ground and subscripts used in voltage definitions
    5. Use Ohm’s law
      1. Measure the current-voltage curve for a resistor
      2. Construct a graph for the current-voltage of a resistor
      3. Determine the resistance of a resistor from a current-voltage graph
    6. Calculate power in dc circuits
      1. Determine the power in a variable resistor at various settings of resistance
      2. Plot data for power as a function of resistance and from the plot, determine when maximum power is delivered to the variable resistor
    7. Connect and evaluate series circuits
      1. Use Ohm’s law to find the current and voltages in a series circuit
      2. Apply Kirchoff’s voltage law to a series circuit
    8. Connect and evaluate a voltage divider
      1. Apply the voltage divider rule to series resistive circuits
      2. Design a voltage divider to meet a specific voltage output
      3. Confirm by measurements the voltage divider circuit you designed
      4. Determine the range of voltages available when a variable resistor is used in a voltage divider
    9. Connect and evaluate parallel circuits
      1. Demonstrate that the total resistance in a parallel circuit decreases as resistors are added
      2. Compute and measure resistance and currents in parallel circuits
      3. Explain how to troubleshoot parallel circuits
    10. Connect and evaluate series-parallel combination circuits
      1. Use the concept of equivalent circuits to simplify series-parallel circuit analysis
      2. Compute the currents and voltages in a series-parallel combination circuit and verify the computations with circuit measurements
    11. Use the superposition theorem
      1. Apply the superposition theorem to linear circuits with more than one voltage source
      2. Construct a circuit with two voltage sources, solve for the currents and voltages throughout the circuit, and verify the computations with measurement
    12. Use Thevenin’s theorem
      1. Change a linear network containing several resistors into an equivalent Thevenin circuit
      2. Prove the equivalency of the network in 12.1 by comparing the effects of various load resistors
    13. Use a Wheatstone bridge
      1. Calculate the equivalent Thevenin circuit for a Wheatstone bridge circuit
      2. Verify that the Thevenin circuit determine in 13.1 enables you to compute the response to a load for the original circuit
      3. Balance a Wheatstone bridge and draw the Thevenin circuit for the balanced bridge
    14. Use an oscilloscope
      1. Draw the four functional blocks of an oscilloscope and describe the major controls within each block
      2. Use an oscilloscope to measure ac and dc voltages
    15. Make sine wave measurements with an oscilloscope
      1. Measure the period and frequency of a sine wave using an oscilloscope
      2. Measure across ungrounded components using the difference function of an oscilloscope
    16. Use capacitors in basic circuits
      1. Compare total capacitance, charge, and voltage drop for capacitors connected in series and in parallel
      2. Test capacitors with an ohmmeter and a voltmeter
    17. Measure capacitive reactance
      1. Measure the capacitive reactance of a capacitor at a specified frequency
      2. Compare the reactance of capacitors connected in series and parallel 
    18. Use inductors in basic circuits
      1. Describe the effect of Lenz’s law in a circuit
      2. Measure the time constant of an LR circuit and test the effect of series and parallel inductances on the time constant
    19. Measure inductive reactance
      1. Measure the inductive reactance of an inductor at a specified frequency
      2. Compare the reactance of inductors connected in series and parallel
    20. Connect and evaluate series RC circuits
      1. Compute the capacitive reactance of a capacitor from voltage measurements in a series RC circuit
      2. Draw the impedance and voltage phasor diagrams for a series RC circuit
      3. Explain how frequency affects the impedance and voltage phasors in a series RC circuit
    21. Connect and evaluate parallel RC circuits
      1. Measure the current phasors for a parallel RC circuit
      2. Explain how the current phasors and phase angle are affected by a change in frequency for parallel RC circuits
    22. Connect and evaluate series RL circuits
      1. Compute the inductive reactance of an inductor from voltage measurements in a series RL circuit
      2. Draw the impedance and voltage phasor diagrams for the series RL circuit
      3. Measure the phase angle in a series circuit using either of two methods
    23. Connect and evaluate parallel RL circuits
      1. Determine the current phasor diagram for a parallel RL circuit
      2. Measure the phase angle between the current and voltage for a parallel RL circuit
      3. Explain how an actual circuit differs from the ideal model of a circuit
    24. Connect and evaluate series resonant circuits
      1. Compute the resonant frequency, Q, and bandwidth of a series resonant circuit
      2. Measure the parameters listed in 24.1
      3. Explain the factors affecting the selectivity of a series resonant circuit
    25. Connect and evaluate a parallel resonant circuit
      1. Compute the resonant frequency, Q, and bandwidth of a parallel resonant circuit
      2. Measure the frequency response of a parallel resonant circuit
      3. Use the frequency response curve to determine the bandwidth of a parallel resonant circuit

  
  • ELT 383 - Electronic Circuit Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An analytical introduction to direct current fundamentals essential in all phases of electricity and electronics. Topics covered include Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s law, Thevenin-Norton and Superposition theorems, impedance, resonance, series and parallel circuits, resistors, capacitors, inductors, batteries, and meters.
    Corequisite: ELT 384  
    Competencies
    1. Understand the physics of electricity.
      1. Explain the structure of the atom
      2. Describe the motion of electrons in a closed circuit.
      3. Explain the differences between AC and DC current
    2. Evaluate various types of resistors and their parameters
    3. Read resistor color codes
    4. Identify types of variable resistors
    5. Calculate series and parallel combinations
    6. Utilize Ohm’s Law
      1. Evaluate the current, voltage, resistance relationships
      2. Identify the parameters of current, voltage, and resistance.
      3. Convert between various units of measure
      4. Evaluate power in electric circuits
    7. Analyze series circuits
      1. Calculate total resistance, current and power in series circuits
      2. Evaluate current flow and polarity in series circuits
      3. Evaluate series aiding and series opposing voltages.
      4. Analyze the effects of opens and shorts of series circuits
    8. Analyze parallel circuits
      1. Calculate total resistance, current, and power in parallel circuits.
      2. Evaluate current flow and polarity in parallel circuits.
      3. Analyze the effects of opens and shorts of parallel circuits
      4. Evaluate conductances in parallel
    9. Analyze series-parallel circuits
      1. Calculate total resistance, current, and power in series-parallel circuits
      2. Evaluate current flow and polarity in series-parallel circuits
      3. Analyze the effects of opens and shorts of series-parallel circuits.
    10. Utilize voltage and current dividers
      1. Calculate component voltages using voltage division.
      2. Calculate component current using current division
    11. Identify the components of a moving-coil meter
    12. Evaluate the operation of various meters
      1. Calibrate current, voltage, and resistance meters
      2. Evaluate the loading effects of meters
    13. Define Kirchoff’s laws
    14. Analyze circuits using Kirchoff’s laws.
      1. Analyze series circuits using Kirchoff’s voltage law
      2. Analyze parallel circuits using Kirchoff’s current law
    15. Analyze circuits using network theorems
      1. Calculate Thevenin equivalent circuits
      2. Analyze circuits using superposition
    16. Evaluate the parameters of insulators and conductors.
      1. Determine type, gage, and resistance of a conductor.
      2. Calculate temperature effects of resistance of conductors
    17. Identify types and functions of switches.
    18. Evaluate various types of batteries.
      1. Identify the various types of cells for examination.
      2. Identify the components of a cell.
      3. Evaluate series and parallel combinations of cells
      4. Evaluate internal resistance of cells.
      5. Calculate load matching of a supply.
    19. Define electromagnetic induction.
    20. Analyze alternating current and voltage.
      1. Explain the generation of alternating current and voltage
      2. Provide an explanation of the sine wave
      3. Voltage and current values for a sine wave
      4. Calculate frequency, period and wavelength of a sine wave
      5. Determine phase angle
    21. Analyze inductance
      1. Explain self inductance
      2. Provide an explanation of mutual inductance.
      3. Calculate series and parallel inductances
      4. Evaluate mutual inductance.
      5. Calculate transformer parameters
    22. Analyze inductive reactance
      1. Indicate the effect of XL on AC current and voltage
      2. Calculate inductive reactance in series and parallel
      3. Evaluate inductive reactance using Ohm’s law.
    23. Examine inductive circuits
      1. Examine the phase relationship of V and I in inductive circuits
      2. Calculate total impedance of series and parallel R-L circuits.
      3. Determine the Q of an inductor.
      4. Calculate power relationships in inductive circuits.
    24. Examine Capacitance
      1. Define how charge is stored in a capacitor
      2. Identify charge and discharge curves of a capacitor.
      3. Calculate total capacitance series and parallel capacitors.
    25. Examine capacitive reactance
      1. Indicate the effect of capacitance of AC voltage and current
      2. Calculate capacitive reactance
      3. Determine series and parallel capacitive reactances
      4. Evaluate capacitive reactance using Ohm’s law
    26. Evaluate capacitive circuits
      1. Describe the phase relationship of voltage and current in capacitive circuits
      2. Calculate the total impedance of series and parallel R-C circuits.
      3. Utilize capacitive voltage dividers
      4. Calculate power relationships in capacitive circuits 
    27. Analyze R/C and R/L time constants
      1. Calculate R-C and R-L time constants
      2. Plot R-C and R-L time constant curves
      3. Describe the effects of long and short time constants 
    28. Utilize complex numbers in solving AC circuits
      1. Define a complex number
      2. Indicate impedance in complex form.
      3. Perform polar to rectangular and rectangular to polar conversions.
      4. Evaluate AC circuits using complex numbers and Ohm’s law
    29. Examine Resonance and parallel resonance.
      1. Explain series resonant frequency.
      2. Calculate the resonate circuits
      3. Determine bandwidth of resonant circuits.
      4. Determine the Q factor of resonant circuits
    30. Examine filter circuits, low pass, band pass and band stop filters.
      1. Identify high pass circuits
      2. Calculate the critical frequency of filter circuits
      3. Indicate the output waveforms of filter circuits.

  
  • ELT 384 - Electronic Circuit Analysis Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic experiments in circuit analysis including familiarization with basic test instruments, series and parallel circuits (using resistors, batteries, and power supplies), and applications of electrical laws and theorems.
    Corequisite: ELT 383  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the basic usage of the test equipment
    2. Properly use electronic test equipment
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to properly and safely hookup circuits and test equipment
    4. Evaluate the applications of various test equipment
    5. Construct basic series-parallel circuits
    6. Use breadboards to build various types of circuits
    7. Measure current, voltage, and resistance in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits
    8. Analyze basic series parallel circuits
    9. Evaluate the differences between the theoretical and actual operation of circuits
    10. Analyze resistive and reactive networks
      1. Calculate resistor values using color codes and measurements
      2. Determine values for unknown resistances, capacitances, and inductances
      3. Size resistors for power levels
      4. Evaluate Wheatstone bridge configurations
    11. Analyze basic meter technology
    12. Design and build various meter functions
    13. Take measurements with various types of meters
    14. Evaluate meter loading effects
    15. Analyze current and voltage
      1. Evaluate the effects of opens and shorts in circuits
      2. Evaluate voltage at different references
    16. Measure phase relationships in the following
      1. Resistive
      2. Inductive circuits 
    17. Verify time constant relationships in AC circuits
      1. Measure time constant of R-C circuits
      2. Measure time constant of R-L circuits
    18. Measure time constant of R-C and RL circuits
    19. Verify Transformer operation
    20. Measure primary and secondary voltage
    21. Calculate voltage and turns ratio.
    22. Measure input to output phase relationships

  
  • ELT 387 - Electric Circuit Analysis II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Deals with principles and electrical properties of semiconductor diodes, transistors, integrated circuits and integrated circuit amplifiers, complete with mathematical analysis of equivalent circuits and their evaluation.
    Prerequisite: ELT 383  , ELT 384  
    Corequisite: ELT 388  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the fundamentals of solid state physics
      1. Identify the parts of the atomic structure
      2. Describe ionization and covalent bonding
      3. Describe the operation of a P-N junction
    2. Analyze various diode rectifier circuits
      1. Examine the operation of various diode rectifier circuits
      2. Calculate various parameters of diode rectifier circuits
    3. Design diode rectifier circuits
    4. Analyze various applications of diodes and circuits
      1. Examine the operations of various circuits such as limiters, clampers, doublers, tripplers, and quadruplers
      2. Analyze the operation of various special diodes such as light emitting, zener, varacter, and photo diodes
    5. Design circuits using various special diodes
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the analysis of transistor characteristics, construction, packaging and operation using data sheets
      1. Use a data book to identify transistor operating parameters
      2. Describe the construction and operation of bipolar transistors
      3. Describe the various operating parameters of bipolar transistors
    7. Analyze transistor operating point and load line and their effect on transistor operation
      1. Explain transistor DC biasing and how it affects transistor operation
      2. Calculate operating parameters of a bipolar transistor
      3. Describe the operations of saturation, active, and cutoff regions of a load line
    8. Analyze various transistor biasing methods
      1. Draw the schematic of the various DC biasing methods
      2. Calculate the operating parameters of various DC biasing methods
    9. Design applications using various DC biasing methods
    10. Analyze various transistor amplifier configurations and their operation
      1. Identify the basic amplifier circuits
      2. Calculate the various parameters of the basic amplifier circuits
    11. Design amplifier applications
    12. Analyze and design various operational amplifier circuits
      1. Examine the operation of an operational amplifier
      2. Calculate the parameters of various operational amplifier circuits
    13. Design applications using operational amplifiers
    14. Analyze and design various filter circuits
      1. Describe the basic types of filters and their responses
      2. Describe the operation of an active filter circuit using operational amplifiers
      3. Calculate the parameters of various active filters
    15. Design active filter circuits.
    16. Analyze and design various voltage regulator circuits
      1. Describe the operation of various voltage regulators
      2. Calculate the operating parameters of various voltage regulator applications
    17. Design circuits using voltage regulators

  
  • ELT 388 - Elec Circuit Analysis II Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An analysis of solid-state circuitry. Course includes both transistor and integrated circuit experiments. Linear amplifiers and active filters are evaluated. Students will attend a minimum of three industrial tours, which may take place outside of regular class time.
    Prerequisite: ELT 383 , ELT 384  
    Corequisite: ELT 387  
    Competencies
    1. Build and analyze various diode circuits
      1. Determine the conditions of diodes using a DMM
      2. Correctly wire diode rectifier, clipper, clamper, voltage doubler and zener regulator circuits
      3. Identify the associated waveforms for diode rectifier, clipper, clamper, voltage doubler, and zener regulatory circuits
      4. Demonstrate the operation of diode rectifier, clipper, clamper, voltage doubler, and zener regulator circuits
    2. Build and analyze various bipolar transistor circuits
      1. Demonstrate base, emitter, and voltage divider, and collector feedback biasing of a transistor
      2. Demonstrate the operation of equivalent FET amplifiers
      3. Demonstrate effects of temperature in transistor stability
      4. Identify the input and output waveforms of common emitter, common base, common collector class A and class B push pull amplifiers
      5. Demonstrate factors that control an amplifier’s low frequency response
      6. Identify and analyze the difference between single ended and complimentary push pull amplifiers
    3. Build and analyze various operational amplifier circuits
      1. Determine by experimentation and op amp’s slew rate and common mode rejection ratio
      2. Correctly wire inverting and noninverting op amps, differentiators, and integrators
      3. Demonstrate the operation and waveforms of inverting and noninverting op amps, differentiators and integrators
      4. Construct op amp 2nd order Butterworth low pass and high pass filters
      5. Demonstrate the operation and waveforms of op amp 2nd order Butterworth low pass and high pass filters
      6. Construct op amp band pass and band stop filters
      7. Demonstrate the operation and waveforms of op amp band pass and band stop filters
    4. Define and discuss oscillators
      1. Build various op amp oscillator configurations
      2. Analyze various op amp oscillator configurations
    5. Describe op amp based summing amplifires
      1. Build op amp based summing amplifier circuits
      2. Build op amp based scaling amplifiers
    6. Explain the IC voltage regulator circuits
      1. Demonstrate the operation and waveforms of IC voltage regulator circuits
      2. Analyze the operation and waveforms of IC voltage regulator circuits 

  
  • ELT 393 - Fabrication Techniques

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Construction and repair techniques use in modern electronics. Students will design and fabricate electronic circuits using PCB design and milling techniques. Soldering and desoldering of surface mount and thru-hole technologies will be covered with modern soldering techniques.
    Prerequisite: ELT 383   or ELT 325  
    Competencies
    1. Comprehend the difference between schematics and packaging choices.
      1. Understand schematic symbols and associate with multiple package diagrams.
      2. Choose the proper package for the appropriate application requirements.
      3. Create a schematic diagram from a circuit board
    2. Using Schematic and PCB design software
      1. Create the title block that will be used for all drawings
      2. Use schematic capture software to draw a schematic diagram
      3. Demonstrate how to create a custom symbol library.
      4. Associate package layouts to schematic symbols
      5. Transfer and troubleshoot schematic to PCB layouts
      6. Manipulate PCB layouts using auto placement and auto routing tools.
      7. Create 3D circuit board layouts for project proposals
      8. Generate industry standard Gerber and N/C export files for automated circuit board manufacturing.
    3. Be able to build prototype circuits and finished PCBs.
    4. Produce a single/double sided circuit board:
      1. Import files and set up automated milling equipment.
      2. Demonstrate automated milling proficiency
      3. Investigate and solve milling errors.
    5. Desolder and solder surface mount pc board electronic components.
      1. Remove and resolder teacher designated ICs from a printed circuit board using soldering wick without damage.
      2. Remove and resolder teacher disignated ICs from a printed circuit board using continouos vacuum without damage.
    6. Distinguish the elements of a project proposal, and complete/present a final project.
    7. Describe different fabrication techniques for making printed circuit boards.
      1. Layout.
      2. Function of multi-layer boards
      3. Steps involved in board production
      4. Economics of mass production
    8. Use appropriate safety standards for :
      1. Handheld tools
      2. Automated milling equipment and cleaning chemicals
      3. Personal safety equipment
      4. Handling of semiconductors
      5. ESD prevention

  
  • ELT 470 - Bus Imaging & Security Applic.

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides students opportunities to analyze imaging systems, which include video monitoring, copying and printing and to analyze security systems as fire alarm and intruder alarms. Equipment includes laser printers, copiers, fax machines, scanners, monitors, cameras, LCD displays and such related accessories as document feeders and sorters.
    Prerequisite: ELT 728  , PHY 160  .
    Corequisite: ELT 471  
    Competencies
    1. Explain basic security system composition
      1. Identify structural considerations
      2. Review how the NEC regulates security system installations
      3. Use control panels
      4. Discuss common aspects of programming
      5. Identify sensors
    2. Compare the functions of sensors
      1. State types of indoor and outdoor sensors
      2. Name types of occupancy detectors
      3. Explain other environmental sensors, including smoke and fire, CO2, gas detection, flooding and leakage alarms
      4. List the functions of access sensors and access control
    3. Evaluate miscellaneous security devices
      1. Describe the operation of pool monitors
      2. Summarize applications of lighting
      3. Name types of stand alone alarms
      4. Determine need for wireless intruder alarms
      5. Explain methods of personal security
    4. Summarize how monitoring functions work with security systems
      1. Explain call and access control
      2. Describe the usage of nurse call
      3. Explain the operations of 24 hour central stations
    5. Analyze closed circuit television (CCTV) systems
      1. Identify the components of CCTV
      2. Draw CCTV wiring diagrams
      3. Describe the functionality of video recording devices
    6. Explain basic electronics relating to business imaging devices
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in reading and using point to point wiring diagrams
      2. Describe photo sensors behavior
      3. Show photo interrupter operation
      4. Explain activation and deactivation of electrical and electro mechanical devices
    7. Demonstrate basic mechanical knowledge and care relating to business imaging devices
      1. Describe spring clutch operation
      2. Explain spring clutch cleaning
      3. Illustrate one-way clutch and gear operation
      4. Outline one-way clutch and gear cleaning
    8. Evaluate paper feeding mechanisms
      1. Explain properties of paper which affect imaging
      2. Explain friction feed systems
      3. Describe the operation of corner separators
      4. Compare spring slip clutched and torque limiters
    9. Relate the basics of optics
      1. Relate the process of light transfer of an image through mirrors and lens to a drum surface
      2. Calculate focal distances to magnify or reduce an image
      3. Describe the creation of digital laser images
    10. Demonstrate familiarity with the drum and latent image developing
      1. Describe organic photo conductors and how they work
      2. Explain drum charging
      3. Explain exposure image development
      4. Describe the process of image transfer
      5. Discuss drum cleaning
    11. Analyze the process of fusing
      1. Describe heat and pressure fusing of toner to paper
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of silicone rubber rollers and teflon coated rollers
      3. Explain how halogen lamps are used for heating
      4. Discuss the process of separating paper from rollers
    12. Describe the characteristics of digital copier machines
      1. Machine configuration
      2. Paper path
      3. Mechanical component layout
      4. Electrical component descriptions
      5. Digital copy process
      6. Board structure
      7. Service program modes
      8. Troubleshooting of digital copiers
      9. Understanding error codes

  
  • ELT 471 - Bus Imaging & Security App Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides students practice in the installation, maintenance and troubleshooting of various security systems, as well as experience in troubleshooting, servicing and repairing copiers, laser printers, fax machines, scanners and peripherals.
    Prerequisite: ELT 728  , PHY 160  
    Corequisite: ELT 470  
    Competencies
    1. Set up a basic security system
      1. Demonstrate NEC-compliant security system installations
      2. Explain structural considerations of installation
      3. Connect sensors
      4. Program control panel
    2. Demonstrate proficiency implementing sensors and miscellaneous security devices
      1. Utilize types of indoor and outdoor sensors
      2. Connect various environmental sensors
      3. Demonstrate functions of access sensors and access control
      4. Show usage of pool monitors
      5. List types of stand alone alarms and methods of personal security
    3. Plan lighting for security
    4. Differentiate monitoring functions of security systems
      1. Explain call and access control
      2. Describe nurse call
      3. Operate a 24 hour central station
    5. Set up closed circuit television (CCTV) systems
      1. Install components of CCTV
      2. Prepare CCTV wiring
      3. Configure video multiplexers
      4. Configure video recording devices
    6. Investigate basic electronics relating to servicing business imaging devices
      1. Use point to point wiring diagrams
      2. Read point to point wiring diagrams
      3. Test photo sensors
      4. Explain photo interrupter operation
      5. Explain the actuation and de-activation of electrical and electro-mechanical devices
    7. Evaluate the imaging properties of various papers
      1. Determine the characteristics of paper that affect its imaging properties
      2. Identify the die cut edge of paper
    8. Summarize servicing paper feeding mechanisms
      1. Identify friction feed system failures
      2. Adjust corner separators
      3. Service spring slip clutches and torque limiters
      4. Clean one-way clutches and gears
    9. Service basic optic systems
      1. Clean mirrors and lenses
      2. Align mirrors and lens to the drum surface
      3. Adjust focal distances for proper magnification or reduction of an image
      4. Maintain digital laser imaging systems
    10. Outline the servicing of the drum and latent image developing components
      1. Service organic photo conductors
      2. Adjust drum charging currents
      3. Maintain image development systems
      4. Repair drum cleaning mechanisms
    11. Summarize the servicing of the fusing mechanisms
      1. Clean silicone rubber rollers and Teflon coated rollers
      2. Repair silicone rubber rollers and Teflon coated rollers
      3. Replace halogen lamps used for heating
      4. Adjust mechanisms that separate paper from rollers
    12. Demonstrate preventative maintenance and upgrade procedures
      1. How to enter and exit service program mode
      2. Understanding error code displays
      3. Use test point tables

  
  • ELT 474 - Communications Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The analysis of communications systems, including transmission and reception of AM and FM radio, television, satellite and microwave, including antenna and transmission line theory.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388  
    Corequisite: ELT 475  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze elements of communications systems
      1. Explain communications signals in time and frequency domain
      2. Explain type and effects of noise in signals
      3. Outline the radio frequency spectrum
    2. Analyze common radio frequency circuits
      1. Analyze high frequency effects
      2. Assess RF amplifiers
      3. Assess oscillator Circuits
      4. Assess RF mixer Circuits
      5. Assess intermediate frequency (IF) circuits
      6. Assess phase locked loops
    3. Examine Amplitude Modulation Circuits
      1. Describe full carrier amplitude modulation
      2. Analyze suppressed carrier amplitude modulation (single sideband) systems
    4. Distinguish angle modulation circuits
      1. Describe frequency modulation
      2. Describe phase modulation
      3. Analyze measurements in FM systems
    5. Examine digital transmission systems
      1. Describe Wi-Fi data communications
      2. Describe digital modulation
    6. Examine Transmitter Systems
      1. Describe full carrier amplitude modulation transmitters
      2. Describe FM transmitter systems
    7. Examine Transmission Lines
      1. Describe electromagnetic waves
      2. Assess step and pulse responses of transmission lines
      3. Estimate transmission line losses
      4. Perform impedance matching calculations for transmissions lines
      5. Interpret Smith Chart impedances
    8. Examine antennas used in radio systems
      1. Outline antenna types
      2. Examine antenna array systems
      3. Discriminate antenna gain of various antennas
    9. Outline various radio communication systems
      1. Explain radio broadcast transmitters
      2. Outline aviation communications equipment
      3. Analyze repeater systems
      4. Outline emergency and two-way communications systems
      5. Outline satellite communications systems
      6. Explain cable TV systems
      7. Explain fiber optic systems
      8. Examine Wi-Fi data communications
    10. Outline software defined RF equipment
      1. Examine software defined radio (SDR) equipment
      2. Examine software defined test and measurement equipment

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ELT 475 - Communications Systems Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Laboratory experiments in radio, television, satellite and microwave systems, including the construction and alignment of a broadcast radio receiver.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388 
    Corequisite: ELT 474  
    Competencies
    1. Use Decibel Measurements in radio frequency circuits
      1. Perform decibel calculations in dB, dBm, and dBv in common radio frequency circuits
      2. Measure gain and loss is radio frequency circuits
    2. Assess resonance circuits and how they are used
      1. Perform resonant frequency calculations and measurements
      2. Build a radio frequency (RF) oscillator
    3. Build an AM/FM radio receiver
      1. Outline basic building blocks of a broadcast receiver
      2. Demonstrate proper electronic construction techniques
      3. Perform alignment and calibration of tuned circuits
    4. Examine Distortion Analyzer operation
      1. Outline how a distortion analyzer operates
      2. Perform total harmonic distortion(THD) measurements on sine, triangular and square waves
    5. Examine spectrum analyzer operation
      1. Outline how a Spectrum Analyzer operates
      2. Perform signal strength measurements with a spectrum analyzer
      3. Perform distortion measurements using a spectrum analyzer
    6. Distinguish signals in time and frequency domain
      1. Describe a Fourier Series
      2. Contrast a square wave in time and frequency domains
    7. Evaluate mixer operation
      1. Outline various types of RF mixers
      2. Build and test a diode ring mixer
      3. Outline mixer operation in Intermediate Frequency (IF) circuits
    8. Evaluate noise in the radio spectrum
      1. Perform signal to noise ratio measurements using a spectrum analyzer
      2. Outline radio frequency noise types
    9. Outline Amplitude Modulation waveform measurements
      1. Measure AM modulation with an oscilloscope
      2. Measure AM modulation with a spectrum analyzer
    10. Characterize receiver sensitivity
      1. Measure receiver sensitivity with a microvolt signal generator
      2. Contrast AM, FM, Digital, and SSB reception sensitivity
    11. Describe single sideband transmission and reception
    12. Outline phase locked loop systems
      1. Describe a frequency synthesizer
      2. Build a phase lock loop
    13. Evaluate FM Modulation Measurements
      1. Measure frequency modulation with a spectrum analyzer
      2. Estimate frequency modulation in RF circuits
    14. Analyze Transmission Lines
      1. Outline transmission line types
      2. Measure Characteristic transmission line impedances
      3. Use a Smith Chart to estimate impedance transformations on a transmission line

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ELT 478 - Basic Imaging Devices

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An analysis of various imaging systems, including laser printers, copiers, fax machines, scanners, and such accessories as document feeders and sorters, monitors, cameras and LCD displays.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388 .
    Corequisite: ELT 479  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate paper feeding mechanisms
      1. Explain properties of paper which affect imaging
      2. Explain friction feed systems
      3. Describe the operation of corner separators
      4. Compare spring slip clutched and torque limiters
    2. Relate the basics of optics
      1. Relate the process of light transfer of an image through mirrors and lens to a drum surface
      2. Calculate focal distances to magnify or reduce an image
      3. Describe the creation of digital laser images
    3. Demonstrate familiarity with the drum and latent image developing
      1. Describe organic photo conductors and how they work
      2. Explain drum charging
      3. Explain exposure image development
      4. Describe the process of image transfer
      5. Discuss drum cleaning
    4. Analyze the process of fusing
      1. Describe heat and pressure fusing of toner to paper
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of silicone rubber rollers and teflon coated rollers
      3. Explain how halogen lamps are used for heating
      4. Discuss the process of separating paper from rollers
    5. Demonstrate basic mechanical knowledge and care relating to business imaging devices
      1. Describe spring clutch operation
      2. Explain spring clutch cleaning
      3. Illustrate one-way clutch and gear operation
      4. Outline one-way clutch and gear cleaning
    6. Explain basic electronics relating to business imaging devices
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in reading and using point to point wiring diagrams
      2. Describe photo sensors behavior
      3. Show photo interrupter operation
      4. Explain activation and deactivation of electrical and electro mechanical devices
    7. Understanding of digital copier machine information
      1. Specifications
      2. Machine configuration
      3. Paper path
      4. Mechanical component layout
      5. Electrical component descriptions
      6. Digital copy process
      7. Board structure
      8. Service program modes
      9. Troubleshooting of digital copiers
      10. Understanding error codes
    8. Networking of digital copiers and all in one office machines
      1. Understand the basics of networking
      2. Describe the stops in setting up networked office systems
      3. Integrating office machines with 802.3 Ethernet standards
      4. Setting up office machines on networks to fax, scan, and print
      5. Explain how to set up peer to peer networks
    9. Troubleshooting network problems
      1. Identify the steps in troubleshooting network problems

  
  • ELT 479 - Basic Imaging Devices Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Experience in troubleshooting, service and repair of copiers, laser printers, fax machines, scanners and peripherals, monitors, cameras, LCD displays.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388 .
    Corequisite: ELT 478  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the imaging properties of various papers
      1. Determine the characteristics of paper that affect its imaging properties
      2. Identify the die cut edge of paper
    2. Summarize servicing paper feeding mechanisms
      1. Identify friction feed system failures
      2. Adjust corner separators
      3. Service spring slip clutches and torque limiters
      4. Clean one-way clutches and gears
    3. Service basic optic systems
      1. Clean mirrors and lenses
      2. Align mirrors and lens to the drum surface
      3. Adjust focal distances for proper magnification or reduction of an image
      4. Maintain digital laser imaging systems
    4. Outline the servicing of the drum and latent image developing components
      1. Service organic photo conductors
      2. Adjust drum charging currents
      3. Maintain image development systems
      4. Repair drum cleaning mechanisms
    5. Summarize the servicing of the fusing mechanisms
      1. Clean silicone rubber rollers and teflon coated rollers
      2. Repair silicone rubber rollers and teflon coated rollers
      3. Replace halogen lamps used for heating
      4. Adjust mechanisms that separate paper from rollers
    6. Investigate basic electronics relating to servicing business imaging devices
      1. Use point to point wiring diagrams
      2. Read point to point wiring diagrams
      3. Test photo sensors
      4. Explain photo interrupter operation
      5. Explain the actuation and de-activation of electrical and electro-mechanical devices
    7. Servicing a digital copier
      1. How to enter and exit service program mode
      2. Understanding error code displays
      3. How to use test point tables
      4. Demonstrate preventative maintenance and upgrade procedures
      5. Troubleshoot and repair defective digital copier machines
    8. Networking and troubleshooting networked office machines
      1. Demonstrate how to setup and install a network printer
      2. Configuring a default printer
      3. Setting up multiple users for a networked office printer, fax, and scanner
      4. Understanding 802.3 Ethernet networks
      5. Demonstrate troubleshooting of networked office machines

  
  • ELT 482 - Security Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Analysis of video monitoring systems, fire and intruder alarm systems, climate control systems.
    Prerequisite: ELT 781 , ELT 782 .
    Corequisite: ELT 483  
    Competencies
    1. Explain basic security system composition
      1. Use control panels
      2. Identify sensors
    2. Compare the functions of sensors
      1. State types of indoor and outdoor sensors
      2. Name types of occupancy detectors
      3. Explain other environmental sensors, including smoke and fire, CO2, gas detection, flooding and leakage alarms
      4. List the functions of access sensors and access control
    3. Evaluate miscellaneous security devices
      1. Describe the operation of pool monitors
      2. Summarize applications of lighting
      3. Name types of stand alone alarms
      4. Explain methods of personal security
    4. Summarize how monitoring functions work with security systems
      1. Explain call and access control
      2. Describe the usage of nurse call
      3. Explain the operations of 24 hour central stations
    5. Analyze closed circuit television (CCTV) systems
      1. Identify the components of CCTV
      2. Draw CCTV wiring diagrams
    6. Categorize basic installation techniques
      1. Discuss common aspects of programming
      2. Review how the NEC regulates security system installations
      3. Identify structural considerations
      4. Determine need for wireless intruder alarms
    7. Two case studies for security systems projects
      1. Students will interview and recommend security systems for prospective clients
      2. Students will have a formal presentation with clients on security systems proposals
      3. Students will obtain all equipment specified in case study and purchase systems to be installed by the students starting at midterm

  
  • ELT 483 - Security Systems Lab

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of various security systems.
    Prerequisite: ELT 781 , ELT 782 .
    Corequisite: ELT 482  
    Competencies
    1. Set up a basic security system
      1. Program control panel
      2. Connect sensors.
    2. Use sensors appropriately
      1. Utilize types of indoor and outdoor sensors
      2. Connect various environmental sensors
      3. Demonstrate functions of access sensors and access control
    3. Demonstrate proficiency with miscellaneous security devices
      1. Show usage of pool monitors
      2. List types of stand alone alarms and methods of personal security
    4. Plan lighting for security
    5. Differentiate monitoring functions of security systems
      1. Explain call and access control
      2. Describe nurse call
      3. Operate a 24 hour central station
    6. Set up closed circuit television (CCTV) systems
      1. Install components of CCTV
      2. Prepare CCTV wiring
    7. Demonstrate basic installation techniques
      1. Demonstrate NEC-compliant security system installations
      2. Explain structural considerations of installation
      3. Utilize wireless intruder alarms
    8. Installation of security systems or CCTV systems
      1. Students must install and test two security systems
      2. Students must include all documentation, operating procedures, Schematics, and written instructions to operate the system to the client
      3. Students will train the clients in the use of the security system

  
  • ELT 484 - Medical Electronics Systems

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course trains the student in electrical safety testing and the repair, calibration and preventive maintenance of patient-monitoring equipment such as ECG, blood pressure, defibrillators, ICN, CCU central station monitoring systems and respiratory instrumentation. Included will be a self-paced study of medical terminology.
    Prerequisite: ELT 728  , PHY 160  
    Corequisite: ELT 485  
    Competencies
    1. Complete a self-paced study of medical terminology
      1. Submit homework on time
      2. Define medical terminology
      3. Incorporate medical terminology in Biomedical field
    2. Identify the major publications and organizations concerned with electrical safety
      1. Report on research of organizations concerning electrical safety
      2. Define the requirements for AAMI certifications examination
      3. Describe the local and state code requirements for electrical safety
    3. Explain how preventative maintenance can reduce electrical hazards
      1. Describe equipment inspections
      2. Describe inspection documentation
      3. Describe results of equipment inspections
    4. Evaluate electrical safety in the medical electronics field
      1. State the physiological effects of electricity on the human body
      2. Describe leakage current
      3. Explain line isolation monitors
      4. Discuss monitoring equipment design considerations for reducing electrical shock hazards
      5. Outline the use of electrical safety test equipment in electrical safety programs
    5. Evaluate basic patient monitoring equipment
      1. Explain the principles of operation of bioelectric amplifiers
      2. Outline the fundamentals of ECG recording and monitoring equipment
      3. Compare the various techniques used to measure physiological pressure
      4. Describe the operation of medical pressure monitors
    6. Evaluate life support equipment
      1. Explain the operation of Defibrillators
      2. Outline the calibration and maintenance of Defibrillation
      3. Explain the operation of various types of pacemakers
      4. Describe the equipment used to measure pulmonary function
      5. Review the operation and maintenance of Ventilators
    7. Define general electronic considerations
      1. Describe typical medical electronic signals
      2. Compare the types of electrodes
      3. Understand general noise considerations
    8. Identify electrocardiography equipment and uses
      1. Discuss the anatomy involved
      2. Understand electrophysiology
      3. Define the uses in pathology
    9. Explain laboratory medical systems and devices
      1. Describe spectrophotometry
      2. Describe fluorometry
      3. Define mass spectroscopy
      4. Outline the types of automated clinical systems
    10. Characterize the various medical imaging devices
      1. Describe standard X-ray equipment
      2. Depict thermography
      3. Discuss ultrasound devices
      4. Describe CT scanning
      5. Explain MRI equipment use
    11. Incorporate Web Based information
      1. Understand the uses of search engines
      2. Determine vendor specific websites for biomedical equipment
      3. Incorporate vendor information to update biomedical equipment
      4. Recognize proper technical content
    12. Understand the techniques and concepts of calibration
      1. Define the accepted practices of calibration
      2. Describe the regulatory requirements of calibration
      3. Explain the legal aspects and liabilities of proper calibration

  
  • ELT 485 - Medical Electronics System Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the repair, calibration and preventive maintenance of critical care, diagnostic and life support equipment in a hands-on lab environment.
    Prerequisite: ELT 728  , PHY 160  .
    Corequisite: ELT 484  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the operation of electrical safety testing equipment
      1. Describe the block diagram of a safety analyzer
      2. Understand the components involved in a safety analyzer
    2. Perform electrical safety tests on hospital equipment
      1. Measure electrical safety tests on hospital equipment
      2. Check service outlets for proper connections
      3. Measure case leakage currents
      4. Measure lead leakage currents
    3. Maintain biomedical electronics department records
    4. Perform routine maintenance on medical electronics equipment
      1. Complete preventative maintenance procedures as specified in manual
      2. Calibrate equipment to manufacturer’s specifications
      3. Replace expendable parts as scheduled
      4. Clean unit as required
    5. Troubleshoot medical electronics equipment
      1. Practice sound troubleshooting procedures
      2. Utilize manufacturer?s service data
      3. Isolate failed modules or components
      4. Replace defective components
      5. Verify proper operation
    6. Networking and patient monitoring
      1. Set up and demonstrate how to network space labs monitoring equipment
      2. Know the concepts of networking Biomedical equipment
    7. Vendor specific searches
      1. Be able to demonstrate how to do specific vendor searches on equipment
      2. Learn to download and manage technical documentation on vendor’s websites
      3. Supplement technical manuals from vendor specific websites
    8. Patient safety recalls
      1. Learn how to obtain documents on patient safety recalls
      2. Implement the date into your preventative maintenance program

  
  • ELT 622 - Microcontrollers

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers two major areas of microcomputers and microcontrollers. The first is an investigation of the specific architecture of microcontrollers and fundamental microcomputer hardware. The second area is software and studies-specific c language and assembly language instructions for common routines and program structures.
    Corequisite: ELT 623  
    Competencies
    1. Relate a microcomputer and microcontroller
      1. Define a microcomputer and a microcontroller
      2. State how the microcomputer and microcontroller have evolved
      3. Identify examples of microcomputer and microcontroller applications
      4. Draw an overall fundamental block diagram of a basic microcomputer
      5. State the purpose of each microcomputer block
      6. List the three common computer buses and indicate them as being either uni-directional or bi-directional
      7. Describe the Computer Bus concept and the reason for its popular use
    2. Compare computer number systems
      1. Define bits, nybbles, bytes, words, double words
      2. Show numbers in decimal, binary, octal, and hexadecimal form
      3. Convert numbers between the following number systems: decimal, binary, octal, hexadecimal
    3. Generate standard flow charts for computer programs
      1. Draw the popular standard flow chart symbols
      2. Define the flow chart symbols
      3. Define the flow chart symbols
      4. Demonstrate proper flow chart techniques by drawing a flow chart of a computer program
      5. Describe the difference between high level and low level flow charting
    4. Contrast hand assembly and machine assembly of computer programs
      1. Write source programs using hand assembly
      2. Compile object code and list files using hand assembly
      3. Write source programs using a text editor
      4. Compile object codes and list files using a machine assembler
    5. Understand branch control group instructions for computer programs
      1. List the status flags, their bit position in the flag register, their functional meaning, and an example of common use
      2. Describe the microcontroller’s two-step decision making process
      3. Identify the Conditional Branch instructions and related flags
      4. Predict the outcome of a conditional branch decision making process relative to the value of the flag itself or based on the results of the math/logic computation
      5. Show how conditional branch instructions are used for generating time delays, loops, and nested loops
      6. Describe the difference between Jumps and Calls
      7. Describe the difference between routines and subroutines
      8. Describe Stack operation and Stack rules
      9. Illustrate Stack activity for Pushes, Pops, Calls and Rets
    6. Describe macros and subroutines for computer programs
      1. Describe how to make a subroutine transparent
      2. Define a macro
      3. Illustrate nested subroutines
      4. Show how a macro is used in a computer program
      5. Compare the advantages/disadvantages of using macros vs. subroutines
      6. Illustrate parameter passing methods for macros and subroutines
    7. Describe the basic structure and common syntax of a high-level programming language for microcontrollers such as C
      1. Identify variable types
      2. Contrast common looping structures in high-level programming such as while, do-while, and for loops.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of the three major decision-making structures in high-level programming language - if, if-else, and switch.
      4. Explain the purpose of pointers.
    8. Explain servicing I/O peripheral devices via polling
      1. Define polling and external flags
      2. Illustrate both hardware and software techniques for continuous polling and periodic polling
    9. Explain servicing I/O peripheral devices using interrupts
      1. Define a computer ‘Interrupt’
      2. Describe how the microcontrollers perform interrupt handling
      3. Describe the use of the restart instructions for interrupt handling
      4. Illustrate both hardware and software techniques for vectored interrupts, scanned/polled interrupts and daisy-chained interrupts
      5. Describe how to allow for “nested interrupts”
      6. Illustrate how to “mask” interrupts and set up “priority” interrupts
    10. Contrast external microcontroller communication methods
      1. Parallel (data bus)
      2. Balanced vs. unbalanced serial
      3. RS-232
      4. RS-485
      5. Misc. Serial: I2C, SPI, CAN

  
  • ELT 623 - Microcontrollers Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Includes experiments that exercise microcontroller instruction sets and microcomputer central processing units,memory and I/O devices. Routines and subroutines are written in assembly language, assembled, downloaded and tested.
    Corequisite: ELT 622  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize Assembly Language Programming
      1. Describe a digital computer’s basic hardware organization using an Overall Fundamental Block Diagram
      2. Define a computer program
      3. Explain the purpose of a computer’s operating system program
      4. Explain the fundamentals of low-level/assembly language and high-level language programming
    2. Compose software routines containing loops, jumps, labels and the decision making process
      1. Illustrate looping activity using the unconditional jump
      2. Explain how labels are used to identify relative jump addresses as opposed to absolute jump address
      3. List the two steps the uP must perform in the decision making process
      4. Write a routine to illustrate the decision making process
      5. Write a routine to illustrate looping using the conditional jump instruction
    3. Compose software routines containing constants and variables in assembly language programming
      1. Explain the difference between constants and variables in assembly language programming
      2. Illustrate constants and variables in assembly language routines
      3. Demonstrate how to establish and use a RAM buffer
      4. Write routines which can transfer blocks of data from one area of computer memory to another
    4. Generate Software Time Delays in Computer Programs
      1. Draw flow charts showing how to generate single delay-loops using an 8 bit counter and a 16 bit counter
      2. Calculate the precise amount of delay for single delay-loops using either an 8 bit counter or a 16 bit counter
      3. Draw a flow chart showing how to generate a nested time delay ­loop
      4. Calculate the precise amount of delay for nested delay-loops
    5. Relate Calls, Returns, Subroutines, and the Stack
    6. Compose Binary Integer Addition and Subtraction routines
    7. Compose Binary Integer Multiplication and Division routines
    8. Service Peripheral Devices via Computer Polling
      1. Define EXTERNAL FLAGS and POLLING and describe how they are used with computer I/O structures
      2. Identify real world examples where POLLING could be used
      3. Name the two generic types of POLLING structures and give a short definition of each
      4. Draw flow charts which illustrate the programming tasks and overall structure for the two generic POLLING structures
      5. List the characteristics, advantages and disadvantages for each of the two generic POLLING structures
      6. Describe two methods that may be used to cause an escape/exit out of a POLLING loop
    9. Program service execution via Internal and External Interrupts
    10. Debounce mechanical switches
      1. Explain the importance of debouncing mechanical switches
      2. Show how an RS flip-flop and mono-stable multivibrator (one shot) can be used to hardware debounce a mechanical switch
      3. Illustrate how to software debounce a mechanical switch when connected to a computer input port
    11. Implement serial communication via a micro controller

  
  • ELT 642 - Process Control & Instrumenta

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A comprehensive study of such process control characteristics as elements, modes, and stability, along with detailed knowledge of measurement technique, control mode implementation and final control element functions. In keeping with modern trends, the digital aspects of process control technology are stressed. Hydraulic and pneumatic process control is included.
    Corequisite: ELT 644  
    Competencies
    1. Investigate industrial Interfacing Devices used in process controls
      1. Outline Fundamental Operational Amplifiers
      2. Analyze Inverting Operational Amplifiers
      3. Develop Summing Operational Amplifier circuits
      4. Describe Non-Inverting Operational Amplifiers
      5. Explain Integrator and differentiator Operational Amplifiers
      6. Outline PhotoDiode, PhotoSCR and PhotoTRIAC characteristics
      7. Analyze Digital to Analog Converters
      8. Analyze Analog to Digital Converters
    2. Evaluate Thyristors in control circuits
      1. Explain operation of Silicon Controlled Rectifiers
      2. Describe control circuits utilizing TRIACs
      3. Analyze control circuits with IGBTs
    3. Assess Feedback Controller Operations
      1. Identify Control Modes
      2. Explain an ON-OFF industrial Control
      3. Analyze a Proportional Control system
      4. Analyze Steady State Error in control systems
    4. Examine Principle Operation of DC Motors
      1. Identify DC motor Current and speed characteristics
      2. Solve Work Calculations involving motors
      3. Solve Power Calculations involving motors
      4. Solve Horsepower Calculations involving motors
    5. Construct various AC MOTORS and Drive systems
      1. Build a control circuit involving a variable speed drive
      2. Build a control circuit involving an AC motor Brake
    6. Examine Pressure Systems and Controls
      1. Solve equations using Pressure Laws
      2. Experiment with Properties of gases
      3. Outline pressure measurement devices
    7. Investigate Temperature Control Systems
      1. Identify Temperature Scales
      2. Experiment with Thermal Control Systems
      3. Build a control circuit using Thermocouples
      4. Build a control circuit using Resistance Temperature Detectors
      5. Identify Radiation Thermometry techniques
    8. Evaluate Flow Control systems
      1. Contrast O.D. , I.D. and Trade size piping
      2. Build a control system using a Flowmeter
      3. Solve Reynolds number Calculations
      4. Solve Pump calculations
      5. Properly size pumps to prevent pump cavitation.
    9. Examine Level Control Systems
      1. Identify Point level Measurement systems
      2. Diagram Continuous level measurement systems
      3. Survey Conductivity Probes systems
      4. Survey Capacitance Probes
    10. Compare Analytical Instrumentation
      1. Identify pH measurement techniques
      2. Illustrate a pH process control system
      3. Examine Conductivity measurement instrumentation
    11. Evaluate Common Industrial Symbologies (P&ID)
      1. Identify Tag Numbers
      2. Identify Line Numbers
      3. Interpret Valve and Actuator Symbols
      4. Interpret Information Blocks
    12. Construct Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programs using an industrial standard G-code system
      1. Identify the elements of Motion Control Systems
      2. Identify common G and M Codes in CNC programming
      3. Outline Servo repair and calibration on CNC systems
      4. Write simple machining programs on a CNC machine

  
  • ELT 644 - Process Control Instr Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This lab includes experiments on transducers used in process control as well as experiments on proportional, integral and derivative control.
    Corequisite: ELT 642  
    Competencies
    1. Investigate industrial Interfacing Devices  used in process controls
      1. Analyze Inverting Operational Amplifiers
      2. Develop Summing Operational Amplifier circuits
      3. Experiment with Non-Inverting Operational Amplifiers
      4. Build Integrator and differentiator Operational Amplifier circuits
      5. Outline PhotoDiodes, PhotoSCR and PhotoTRIAC characteristics
      6. Construct Digital to Analog Converters
      7. Construct Analog to Digital Converters
    2. Evaluate Thyristors in control circuits
      1. Experiment with Silicon Controlled Rectifiers
      2. Examine control circuits utilizingTRIACs
      3. Analyze control circuits with IGBTs
    3. Examine Feedback Controller Operations
      1. Build control circuits using feedback
      2. Experiment with Proportional Control
      3. Analyze Controller Amplification
      4. Analyze Steady State Error
    4. Build Circuits with DC motor Controls
      1. Measure DC motor characteristics
      2. Solve Work Calculations involving motors
      3. Solve Power Calculations involving motors
      4. Solve Horsepower Calculations involving motors
      5. Analyze  various AC MOTORS and Drive systems
      6. Build  Three Phase, Synchronous and Stepper Motor Control Circuits
      7. Measure motor characteristics
    5. Examine Pressure Systems and Controls
      1. Experiment with Pressure measurement instrumentation
      2. Outline pressure measurement devices
    6. Investigate Temperature Control Systems
      1. Identify Temperature Scales
      2. Experiment with Thermal Control Systems
      3. Build a control circuit using Thermocouples
      4. Build a control circuit using Resistance Temperature Detectors
      5. Identify Radiation Thermometry techniques
    7. Evaluate Flow Control systems
      1. Contrast O.D. , I.D. and Trade size piping
      2. Build a control system using a  Flowmeter
      3. Solve Reynolds number Calculations
      4. Solve Pump calculations
      5. Understand pump cavitation and how to properly size pumps to prevent it.
    8. Evaluate Level Control Systems
      1. Identify Point level Measurement systems
      2. Construct a Continuous level measurement
      3. Survey Conductivity Probes systems
      4. Survey Capacitance Probes
    9. Compare Analytical Instrumentation
      1. Identify pH measurement techniques
      2. Illustrate a pH process control system
      3. Examine Conductivity measurement instrumentation
    10. Evaluate Common Industrial Symbologies (P&ID)
      1. Identify Tag Numbers
      2. Identify Line Numbers
      3. Interpret Valve and Actuator Symbols
      4. Interpret Information Blocks
    11. Construct  Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programs using an industrial standard G-code system
      1. Discuss elements of Motion Control Systems
      2. Identify common G and M Code
      3. Demonstrate G-code programs on a CNC system
      4. Outline Servo repair and calibration on CNC systems

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ELT 652 - Computer Repair & Networking

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed for the student who is already proficient with computers and electronic circuitry. The course follows the recommendations of CompTIA on the subjects and materials needed to assist the student in learning about computer hardware and the functions needed to pass the A Plus exam. A detailed study and hands-on lab component give students the opportunity to install and troubleshoot computer and networking hardware.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the basic components of a computer.
      1. List the various connectors on a computer.
      2. Recognize the most common devise inside a computer.
      3. Show how to set jumpers and switches.
    2. Discuss the features of microprocessors.
      1. Describe buses and their functions.
      2. Understand clock speed.
      3. Contrast RAM, CPU and RAM caching.
      4. Install a processor.
      5. Identify processor types.
    3. Describe RAM function and features.
      1. Identify the types and configuration of a RAM.
      2. Show how to properly install RAM.
      3. Discuss RAM access speeds.
    4. Describe Motherboard, BIOS and Operating System functions.
      1. Describe the functions of BIOS.
      2. Configure CMOS settings.
      3. Identify different motherboard form factors.
      4. Describe the function of the chipset.
      5. Describe the function of the OS as it relates to hardware, users and software.
      6. Describe the function of drivers.
    5. Understand the operation of an external data bus.
      1. Discuss how IROs work.
      2. Describe how DMAs work.
      3. List the different types of expansion buses.
      4. Describe how COM and LPT ports work.
      5. Discuss the use of usb, firewire and similar external bus types.
    6. Describe the standards of PC compatible power supplies.
      1. Understand the safety concerns on working with power supplies.
      2. Inspect the different power supply connectors and their function.
      3. Identify the concern over electro-static discharge.
      4. Discuss surge suppressors and UPS systems.
    7. Explain the feature and use of hard drives.
      1. Understand the concept of geometry.
      2. Identify the various types of hard drives.
      3. Learn how to install a hard drive.
      4. Discuss partitioning and formatting.
      5. Describe SCSI, IDE, PATA, SATA.
      6. Compare the use and characteristics of each.
    8. Describe removable media drives and drive types.
      1. Learn about the different types of CD, DVD media.
      2. Learn about external drive types.
      3. Describe solid state devices.
      4. Install a CD/DVD drive.
      5. Install external drives.
    9. Discuss the different components that are used in a computer.
      1. Identify the different types of sounds.
      2. Install sound cards.
      3. Fix common sound card problems.
      4. Describe the components that make the video work.
      5. Learn about refresh rates.
      6. Discuss video resolution.
      7. Discuss common monitor types.
      8. Discuss cameras, video capture, touchscreen, and data acquisition.
    10. Discuss the issues that differentiate portable PCs from desktops.
      1. Describe the different battery types used in portables.
      2. Explain power management.
      3. Discuss personal devices.
    11. Understand Computer Maintenance.
      1. Identify and resolve hardware and operating system problems.
      2. Understand antivirus software and firewalls.
      3. Understand operating system and software updates.
      4. Discuss data backup methods and strategies.
    12. Describe Network hardware and cabling.
      1. Learn the basics of network cabling.
      2. Identify and understand common network hardware.
      3. Learn common network and software protocols.
      4. Troubleshoot network connectivity problems.
    13. Discuss Network configuration.
      1. Understand IP addressing and subnets.
      2. Learn how to setup a network card or adapter.
      3. Understand Microsoft OS use of networking.
      4. Describe Client/Server networks.
      5. Describe SOHO networks.
      6. Describe peer to peer (ad hoc) networks.
    14. Describe Wireless networks.
      1. Describe the components of wireless network.
      2. Describe the features of a wireless network.
      3. Connect a computers and wireless devices to a wireless network.
      4. Describe data security methods for wireless networks.
      5. Setup a wireless network.
    15. Discuss other network types.
      1. Learn about additional network types in use.
      2. Describe features and limitations.

  
  • ELT 721 - Robotics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The course provides an introduction to robotic fundamentals. The student will examine parameters of robot operation and program robots for various applications.
    Competencies
    1. Interpret General safety guidelines
      1. Describe E-stops, deadman switches, and pendant e-stop
      2. Review hydraulic and pneumatic lockouts, gripper safety, DCS Dual check safety system, and physical barriers
      3. Explain hard limits and software limits
    2. Analyze by name all the parts on a robot
      1. Identify the drive motor, linkage and specifications for each axis of motion on the arm
      2. Identify the major system elements in a robot system
      3. Assemble the interconnection between components of a robotic system
    3. Connect and setup a robot and controller system
      1. Identify the safety regions in a work cell
      2. Identify the work volume
      3. Assemble the interconnections between components of a robotic system
    4. Demonstrate proficient ability to move the robot in the Cartesian and joint modes safely
      1. Identify robot speed settings
      2. Control robot speed settings
    5. Perform the following with R30ia controller
      1. Program accurately a remote tool center point
      2. Program accurately a tool center point
      3. Program accurately a user frame
    6. Use the various functions on a teach pendant
      1. Identify between command and arm control functions
      2. Teach points with a teach pendant
      3. Manipulate a robot from its teach pendant
      4. Write programs used for basic decision loops
    7. Compose Robot Programs
      1. Write a simple pick and place robot program
      2. Program with Macro functions
      3. Create, modify and delete programs
    8. Construct  programs that utilize robot I/O
      1. Interface the robot controller with the peripheral equipment
      2. Interface the robot controller to other intelligent machines
      3. Explain Fanuc AIO rack I/O systems
      4. Identify the differences between robot I/O, Digital I/O, Analog I/O and group I/O
      5. Explain input/output sinking and sourcing
      6. Integrate robot inputs and outputs with discrete devices
    9. Examine robot system maintenance procedures
      1. Identify types and procedures for robotic maintenance
      2. Outline typical preventative maintenance schedules for robotic systems
    10. Write, save and execute various upper level programs
      1. Write program which measure the repeatability of each axis
      2. Write a material handling application program
      3. Write a palletizing application program
      4. Write programs used for basic decision loops
      5. Write a program for item sorting that involves integrating the vision system with the FANUC LR-Mate robot
      6. Write a program using the offset command
      7. Efficiently write Marcos for various functions
      8. Be able to assign to a Macro to USER keys or operator panel on the R30-ia controller
    11. Understand position registers and how to manipulate them
      1. Outline individual components of a position register
      2. Apply position registers in Robot programs
    12. Perform backup and restore R30ia software using PCMCIA card
    13. Write programs using SIMPRO simulation software
      1. Simulate a pick and place program using the SIMPRO handling tool software
      2. Successfully demonstrate work cell programs on LR-MATE 200 work cell
      3. Successfully draw fixtures and objects in CAD and import them into a SIMPRO work cell
    14. Discuss robot end of arm tooling
      1. Describe grippers for pick and place
      2. Explain welding  and painting systems
      3. Identify other EOAT devices

  
  • ELT 722 - Advanced Robotics

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Sequel course of ELT 721 Robotics. Course includes advanced positioning control, measurements and integration of robotics into modern automation workcells.
    Prerequisite: ELT 721  with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Corequisite: ELT 125  or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
     

    1. Setup a machine vision system
      1. Set up a camera
      2. List software is needed for robot vision systems.
      3. Set up a teaching PC to a robot vision system.
      4. Program a robotic task using vision for error proofing
    2. Explain 2D, 2.5D, and 3D vision systems.
      1. Describe passive and active lighting systems
      2. Discuss range imaging sytem
    3. Interconnect Robotic system into workcell
      1. Discuss industrial communication protocols
      2. Discuss integration of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Software and Robotic Workcells.
    4. Construct a Human Machine Interface (HMI) into a Robotic Work Cell
      1. Diagram a complete automated workcell that uses a HMI interface.
      2. Examine HMI interface for minimizing human and machine errors in production.
      3. Demonstrate or simulate workcell production from HMI.
    5. Setup OSHA required guarding on Robotic Workcell.
      1. Discuss OSHA requirements for robotic and automated systems
      2. Measure stop time on an industrial machine.
      3. Calculate guarding requirements of an industrial machine base on stop time measurements.
    6. Calibrate Servo Feedback system
      1. Describe feedback systems in modern servo Control.
      2. Contrast position sensors types.
      3. Examine Proportional, Integral, and Differential (PID) types of feedback.
      4. Tune a servo control system to maximize speed and minimize error.
    7. Setup a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM)
      1. Discuss industrial standards of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.
      2. Use Verisurf or similar coordinate measuring machine to measure complex shapes.
    8. Analyze Modern Flexible Manufacturing Systems
      1. Explain lean manufacturing principles in modern industry.
      2. Discuss quality control principles.
      3. Calculate return on investment (ROI) of an automated production system.
      4. Describe Statistical Process Control (SPC).

  
  • ELT 725 - Intro Flexible Manufacturing

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course introduces the student to aspects of a flexible manufacturing cell. Course will familiarize the student with cell software and hardware, and includes labs on cell components.
    Prerequisite: ELT 721  
    Corequisite: ELT 722   or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Set-up and prepare CNC mill for cell integration
      1. Create CNC mill code for simple machining
      2. Edit CNC mill code for simple machining
      3. Download programs using direct numerical control (DNC)
      4. Set-up tools as required by machine program
      5. Integrate communication between cell and CNC mill
    2. Utilize programmable logic controller
      1. Write PLC logic into the controller
      2. Edit existing PLC programs
      3. Save and delete PLC programs
    3. Program and operate the AS/RS (automatic storage and retrieval system).
      1. Identify AS/RS components
      2. Teach controller bay locations
    4. Program and operate a SCARA robot
      1. Teach program points for operation
      2. Create and edit robot programs using C/ROS language
      3. Identify SCARA robot components
    5. Program and operate a general purpose robot
      1. Teach program points for operation
      2. Create robot programs using VAL language
      3. Edit robot programs using VAL language
      4. Identify general purpose robot components
    6. Program and operate a vision inspection system
      1. Define different methods of vision inspection
      2. Identify vision inspection components
    7. Manipulate cell conveyor hardware
      1. Describe the function of pallet stops and postioners
      2. Explain the interaction between the conveyor control and the cell components
      3. Describe the usage of external devices such as vibratory bowl feeders, tooling air, end effectors
    8. Gain familiarity with manufacturing control software
      1. Create a basic FactoryLink application
      2. Animate the application
      3. Run the application

  
  • ELT 728 - Motor Controls and Power Electronics

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An overview of industrial motor controls and industrial control electronics. Students will learn ladder diagrams to implement practical control systems. Student will learn power electronics used in industry
    Competencies
    1. Acquire safety awareness
      1. Determine the correct fire extinguisher for clas A, B, or C fire.
      2. Determine the proper use of trade hand tools.
      3. Describe power tools and their use in the trade.
      4. Lockout/tag out procedures
      5. Describe safety precautions when working with HV wiring.
      6. Wire circuits with power off.
      7. Run neutral only to loads or coils to protect students and circuit breakers.
    2. Understand motor ladder/line diagrams.
      1. Fabricate two and three wire control circuits.
      2. Proper notation, descriptions, notation of ladder diagrams.
      3. Proper notation, descriptions, notation of ladder diagrams.
      4. Relate the three basic sections of a ladder diagram.
      5. Implement memory/latching circuits.
      6. Implement relay logic (AND/OR/NAND/NOR) circuits.
      7. Use interlocking and sequence control.
      8. Select proper parameters in solenoid application.
      9. Describe shading coil induction motor, solenoids, contactors and coils.
    3. Design circuits using timers to facilitate applications.
      1. Draw timing charts.
      2. Use pneumatic timers.
      3. Use synchronous timers.
    4. Describe the principles of operation, advantages of, and typical uses of most electric motors.
      1. Discuss: split phase, capacitor start, shunt, series, compound DC, brushless and stepping motors.
      2. Discuss: 3 phase, synchronous and wound rotor motors
      3. Discuss : Stepping motors full and half stepping
      4. 3Describe the shunt, series and compound motors.
      5. Discuss Forward and reverse operation of three phase, single phase and brush type motors.
      6. Disccuss Reduced current starting.
      7. Discuss servo motors
      8. Discuss motor braking systems
    5. Analyze power distribution systems and fundamentals.
      1. Describe Delta connected three phase power systems
      2. Describe Wye connected three phase power systems
      3. Calculate and measure Phase to phase voltages
      4. Calculate and measure Phase to Neutral Voltages
      5. Measure and calculate apparent, real and imaginary power in three phase circuits
      6. Discuss over current protection
    6. Analyze the following types of electrical components specifications.
      1. Switchboards
      2. Panelboards
      3. M.C. Centers
      4. Busways
      5. NEMA enclosures
      6. Electrical load requirements for machinery and organizations
      7. Alternative conventions: IEC vs. NEMA
    7. Measure practical parameters of DC electric motors.
      1. Measure and use Kt.
      2. Measure and use Kemf.
      3. Predict electrical motor performance given measured motor parameters.
    8. Understand power handling semiconductor circuits.
      1. Describe Silicon Controlled Rectifiers (SCRs)
      2. Describe Triacs
      3. Describe Power MOS-FETS
      4. Describe Unipolar Junction Transistors (UJTs)
    9. Understand Switching Power Supplies.
      1. Describe Buck Converters
      2. Describe Boost Converters
      3. Describe Push-Pull Converters
    10. Understand power handling capabilities of power semiconductors.
      1. Explain what Thermal Resistance is and its importance in cooling systems
      2. Properly size heat sinks and cooling fans for power semiconductors
      3. Understand proper power semiconductor mounting techniques
      4. Describe arc suppression techniques

  
  • ELT 781 - Electro-Mechanical Systems

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The basic theories, concepts and principles of such electro-mechanical devices as relays, contactors, and DC/AC motors will be covered, along with the basic principles of mechanical relationships: gears, pulleys, belt drives, wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, wedge and levers. Pneumatic devices such as compressors, motors, valves and actuators are covered, along with basic sensors.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388 .
    Corequisite: ELT 782  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the operation of electro-magnetic devices
      1. Describe the operation of relays and contactors
      2. Relate the operation of solenoids
      3. State the operation of DC and AC motors and generators
    2. Analyze simple machines
      1. Determine how energy is transferred using simple machines
      2. Evaluate the efficiency and mechanical advantages of simple machines
      3. Distinguish the three types of levers and the mechanical advantage of each
      4. Determine the mechanical advantage of the wheel and axle
      5. Evaluate the mechanical advantage of the pulley
      6. State the mechanical advantage of the inclined plane
      7. Determine the mechanical advantage of the screw
    3. Analyze rotational motion
      1. Distinguish between rectilinear, curvilinear and rotational motion
      2. Apply the torque equation to rotational problems
      3. Calculate the centripetal force of moving objects
      4. Find power in rotational systems
      5. Evaluate how gears and gear trains are used to transfer rotational power
    4. Analyze non-concurrent forces
      1. Solve parallel force problems
      2. Express the conditions of equilibrium using torque concepts
      3. Calculate center of gravity
    5. Discriminate the gas laws pertaining to pneumatics
      1. State the relationship between gas temperature and pressure
      2. Calculate gas temperatures relative to pressures
      3. State the relationship between gas pressure and volume
      4. Find gas pressures relative to volume
      5. Determine gas pressures relative to volume and temperature
    6. Explain generation, regulation, and measurement of compressed air
      1. Describe how the gas laws apply
      2. Outline the use of a pneumatic cylinder
      3. Evaluate the various types of pressure regulators
      4. Determine the operation of the various types of pressure regulators
      5. Describe the operation of displacement compressors
      6. State the operation of dynamic compressors
    7. Explain the measurement of compressed air
      1. Review the operation of a Burdon tube
      2. Describe the operation of a manometer
      3. Compare the various types of pressure regulators
    8. Explain how valves are used in controlling pneumatic energy
      1. State the operation of the various valves
      2. Describe the construction of the various valves types
      3. Identify valve functions by their symbol
    9. Explain how pneumatic power may be used to develop rotary mechanical power
      1. Describe the operation of the piston type motor
      2. Outline the operation of the van type motor
      3. Describe the operation of the turbine type motor
    10. Explain the construction, operation and applications of pneumatic cylinders
      1. Review the operation of a pneumatic cylinder
      2. Describe the types of pneumatic cylinders
      3. Identify the parts to a pneumatic cylinder
      4. Calculate the force delivered by a cylinder

  
  • ELT 782 - Electro-Mechanical Systems Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application of the basic theories, concepts and principles of electro-mechanical devices. Projects are applications of principles used in business machines, security systems, and medical electronics systems including construction of various examples of compound machines using wheel and axle, gears, levers and belt drives. Projects using basic sensors, pneumatic valves, cylinders and actuators will be constructed. Students will participate in a minimum of four, two-hour, job-shadowing experiences, which may take place outside of regular class time.
    Prerequisite: ELT 387 , ELT 388 .
    Corequisite: ELT 781  
    Competencies
    1. Examine electromagnetic relays
      1. Utilize relays in switching circuits
      2. Control events using solenoids
    2. Examine switch actuated timing circuits
      1. Use relays in timing circuits
      2. Draw timing diagrams
      3. Predict the outcome of a timing circuit
    3. Design Pneumatic circuits
      1. Draw logic truth tables
      2. Construct pneumatic circuits designed to perform specific functions as requested
      3. Pipe-up logic “AND/OR” functions
    4. Explain the operations of pneumatic cylinders
      1. Identify the differences between single and double acting cylinders
      2. Connect single and double acting cylinders
      3. Calculate the parameters of force, pressure, and area for cylinders
    5. Investigate the operation of direction control valves
      1. Describe the operation of 3 and 4 port valves
      2. Utilize 3-port and 4-port valves
    6. Evaluate regulators
      1. Identify the differences between single and two stage regulators
      2. Build circuits using flow regulators
      3. Adjust regulators to achieve desired speeds
    7. Investigate combinations of circuits
      1. Build time delay circuits
      2. Pipe-up automatic sequence control circuits
    8. Evaluate mechanical systems to perform specific functions
      1. Build a pulley and belt drive mechanism to provide specific output-input ratios
      2. Build a chain drive mechanism to provide specific input/output ratios
      3. Develop a gear train to provide specific output direction, force and speed ratios
      4. Construct a complex mechanism using gears and levers to provide various output-input ratios
    9. Construct electrically controlled mechanical systems
      1. Use relays or switches to control mechanical functions
      2. Utilize cams and ramps to operate switches controlling functions
    10. Evaluate cam actuated switch banks
      1. Predict the outcome of a switch bank
      2. Connect up a switch bank
    11. Participate in four job-shadowing experiences
      1. Describe the work environment and job duties of four different industry professionals
      2. Describe the work settings in which these four industry professionals are employed

  
  • ELT 791 - Hydraulics & Pneumatics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The basic principles of fluid power and the operation and application of fluid power components are introduced. In the lab we will evaluate valves along with linear and rotary actuators. In addition, pneumatic position control servomechanisms are evaluated.
    Corequisite: ELT 792  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize common PHYSICS QUANTITIES used in hydraulic and pneumatic applications
      1. Define the following dimensional quantities
      2. Label typical English units of measure for each of the dimensional quantities listed above
      3. Show a commonly used equation for each of the dimensional quantities listed above.
      4. Illustrate each of the dimensional quantities listed above
    2. Differentiate FORCE AND PRESSURE
      1. Define a solid and a liquid
      2. Discuss compression of solids and liquids
      3. Describe how force is transmitted through a solid and a liquid
      4. State Pascal’s Law as it applies to a liquid in both words and in equation form
      5. Explain the difference between “Force” and “Pressure”.
      6. Describe the following pressure gages, explain how they work, and compare their accuracy
    3. Outline basic ACTUATOR, INTENSIFIER AND ACCUMULATOR OPERATION
      1. Define a hydraulic actuator
      2. List the most common type of linear actuator and rotary actuator
      3. Draw a pictorial of a hydraulic cylinder and label its parts
      4. Explain how a hydraulic cylinder functions
      5. Associate Pascal’s Law to hydraulic cylinders regarding mechanical force multiplication
      6. Draw a pictorial of a hydraulic intensifier
      7. Explain what an intensifier does and how it functions
      8. Illustrate hydraulic transmission of energy
      9. Draw a pictorial of a simple hydraulic accumulator
      10. Explain the purpose of an accumulator and how it functions
      11. Perform calculations relating Force, Pressure, and Area with hydraulic cylinders and intensifiers
    4. Contrast HYDRAULIC PUMP DESIGNS AND OPERATION
      1. Draw a simple piston type positive displacement pump and label its parts
      2. Define “positive fixed displacement (PFD)II as it applies to pumps
      3. Explain how the piston type pump functions
      4. State the fundamental operating principle which explains how all PFD pumps work
      5. Draw a pictorial of a simple rotary (vane) type pump
      6. Explain how the rotary (vane) type pump functions
      7. Draw a pictorial of a simple gear type pump
      8. Explain how the gear pump functions
      9. Draw a pictorial of a simple gerotor type pump
      10. Explain how the gerotor type pump functions
    5. Summarize basic OPERATION OF A HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT
      1. Describe what determines system operating pressure in a hydraulic circuit which uses a PFD pump
      2. List the two basic factors that determine resistance to flow in a hydraulic circuit using a PFD pump
      3. Describe how heat is generated in a hydraulic system
    6. Differentiate FLOW RATE AND FLOW VELOCITY
      1. Define viscosity and its unit of measure
      2. List the three factors that determine a liquid’s viscosity
      3. Explain how viscosity is measured
      4. Describe how the velocity of a liquid flowing through a pipe is related to its flow rate.
      5. Identify the English units of measure for Flow Rate and Flow Velocity
      6. Identify the two variables that determine Flow Velocity in both words and as stated in an equation
      7. State the recommended maximum Fluid Velocities in Feet per Second at the following points in a hydraulic system
      8. Describe how bends in hydraulic pipes/plumbing effects heat generation
      9. Define pressure differential and explain its significance in a hydraulic system
      10. List three design features which must be considered to minimize heat generation in a hydraulic system
    7. Outline the EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE AND ALTITUDE ON PUMP OPERATION
      1. Describe how a barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure
      2. Explain how altitude affects atmospheric pressure
      3. Explain the difference between absolute and gauge pressure
      4. Calculate absolute pressure given gauge pressure and ambient atmospheric pressure
      5. Explain how a pump and atmospheric pressure work together at the suction side (inlet) of a pump
      6. Define vacuum
      7. Describe a vacuum gauge and how it measures vacuum
      8. Explain how Inches of Mercury translates into Pounds per Square Inch
      9. Explain the difference between Inches of Mercury Gauge vs.Inches of Mercury Absolute
      10. Compute Inches of Mercury Absolute given Inches of Mercury Gauge and Ambient Atmospheric Pressure (in Inches of Mercury).
      11. Describe how atmospheric pressure is used in two phases at the suction side of a pump
    8. Differentiate PUMP CAVITATION AND PSEUDO-CAVITATION
      1. Define cavitation (true cavitation).
      2. List two ways that cavitation affects pump life
      3. Identify how true pump cavitation can be detected and prevented
      4. Explain how temperature and vapor pressure affect boiling and how these factors relate to cavitation.
      5. Explain the difference between dissolved air in a liquid vs. entrained (undissolved air
      6. Define pseudo-cavitation
      7. Compare and contrast pump true cavitation with pseudo­cavitation
      8. Identify how pump pseudo-cavitation can be detected and prevented
      9. Determine if a pump can be operated at a given altitude when given a pump’s suction specification at sea level
      10. Explain how a pump’s rotational speed (in RPM) affects its suction specification
      11. Define Flooded Suction, Head Pressure, Lift, Suction, and Suction Pressure
    9. Examine HYDRAULIC CYLINDER PARAMETERS
      1. Calculate a hydraulic cylinder’s rod area when given its rod diameter
      2. Calculate a hydraulic cylinder’s piston area when given its piston diameter
      3. Define cylinder stroke
      4. Calculate cylinder volume in terms of cylinder stroke and piston area
      5. List the two variables that determine cylinder rod
      6. Calculate cylinder rod speed/velocity speed/velocity
    10. Examine HYDRAULIC MOTOR PARAMETERS
      1. Define mechanical torque
      2. List the two variables that determine mechanical torque
      3. Calculate mechanical torque
      4. Define hydraulic motor torque
      5. List the two variables that determine hydraulic motor torque
      6. Calculate hydraulic motor torque
      7. Define hydraulic motor displacement
      8. Calculate hydraulic motor displacement
      9. Calculate hydraulic motor shaft speed in RPM in terms of flow and motor displacement
      10. List the two variables that determine hydraulic motor horsepower
      11. Calculate hydraulic cylinder horsepower in terms of flow and pressure
      12. Calculate hydraulic motor horsepower in terms of shaft speed (RPM) and torque
    11. Summarize how valves are used to CONTROL HYDRAULIC ENERGY
      1. Define a valve
      2. List the three main uses of valves (what they control).
      3. Draw a pictorial of a Pressure Relief Valve and explain how it functions
      4. Describe how a Pressure Relief Valve is used to control hydraulic pressure in a circuit using a Positive Fixed Displacement (PFD) pump
      5. Draw a pictorial of a double-acting cylinder and explain how it functions
      6. Draw a pictorial of a 4-way directional control valve (using a blocked center spool) and show how it can control the direction of a double-acting cylinder
      7. Draw a pictorial of a flow control valve (needle valve) and explain how it functions to control actuator flow in a hydraulic circuit consisting of a PFD pump, hydraulic cylinder, and relief valve
      8. Explain the terminology - “normally open(NO)” and “normally closed(NC) ” as it applies to flow control valves
      9. Draw the hydraulic schematic diagram ANSI symbols of the following
    12. Use CHECK VALVES in hydraulic circuits
      1. Draw a pictorial of a check valve and label its parts
      2. Draw the schematic diagram symbol of the check valve
      3. Explain how the check valve functions and its purpose
      4. Show how a check valve may be connected across a flow control valve in a hydraulic circuit to increase cylinder rod speed during the return stroke
      5. Show how the check valve is used in a circuit containing an accumulator
      6. Show how the check valve may be used as a simple pressure relief valve
      7. Explain the problem of DCV spool leakage and cylinder drift when a hydraulic cylinder is used to suspend a heavy load and how a check valve cannot completely solve the problem
    13. Use PILOT OPERATED CHECK VALVES & LOAD LOCK VALVES in hydraulic circuits
      1. Draw a pictorial of a pilot operated check valve (P.O.C.V) and label its parts
      2. Draw the schematic symbol of the P.O.C.V
      3. Explain how a P.O.C.V. operates
      4. Explain what is meant by a 5:1 ratio P.O.C.V
      5. Show how to connect the P.O.C.V. to solve the cylinder drift problem of suspending a heavy load (mentioned above).
      6. Explain how to make a “Load Lock Valve” from two P.O.C.V.s
      7. Show how to connect a Load Lock Valve to lock a horizontally mounted double-acting cylinder
    14. Use ACCUMULATORS in hydraulic circuits
      1. List the three types of accumulator loading methods
      2. Draw the three accumulator schematic symbols used to indicate the methods of loading
      3. Describe the construction and operation of the three types of accumulators
      4. Describe the construction and operation of the three types of hydro-pneumatic accumulators (the piston, diaphragm, and bladder types).
      5. Explain and emphasize the importance of using DRY NITROGEN gas to precharge the hydro-pneumatic accumulators and why compressed air or oxygen gas must NEVER be used
      6. Explain how pressure, temperature and volume are related to form the gas laws and how these laws relate to hydro-pneumatic accumulators
      7. Describe isothermal and adiabatic charging and discharging of accumulators
      8. List three purposes of using accumulators in a hydraulic system
      9. Explain how to calculate the pre-charge pressure of a hydro­pneumatic accumulator
      10. Define “useable volume”.
      11. Show how useable volume is affected by pre-charge
      12. Determine the actual useable volume when given an accumulator performance chart and pre-charge pressure
      13. Show how to correct the performance chart readings for an accumulator whose volume capacity may be different that what the performance chart was designed for
    15. Summarize SPECIAL HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS AND CYLINDER FEATURES
      1. Describe the types of hydraulic cylinder seals
      2. Describe a hydraulic cylinder cushion’s construction, purpose, and operation in a hydraulic circuit
      3. Describe a stroke adjuster’s construction, purpose, and operation in a hydraulic circuit
      4. Explain the difference between a cylinder thrust load and tension load
      5. Show how a stop tube is used in a cylinder to protect its rod gland bushing
      6. Describe the following cylinders according to their construction and use
      7. Show how to synchronize the movement of two cylinders
      8. Define a 2:1 cylinder
      9. Show how to operate a 2:1 cylinder in a regenerative circuit and explain the purpose and operation of this circuit
    16. Use NON-COMPENSATED AND PRESSURE COMPENSATED FLOW CONTROL VALVES in hydraulic circuits
      1. List the three factors that affect flow through an orifice and describe how they affect flow
      2. List the three overall types of variable orifices and describe their constructions and common applications
      3. List the factors which affect actuator flow in a hydraulic circuit consisting of a positive fixed displacement (PFD) pump, relief valve, flow control valve, actuator, and operating a work load. Then describe how these factors affect flow as they are vari
      4. Draw the schematic diagram of a restrictor type pressure compensated flow control (P.C.F.C.) valve and explain how it operates
      5. Draw the schematic diagram of a hydraulic circuit using a restrictor type P.C.F.C. valve connected in a meter-in application and explain how it operates should
      6. Draw the schematic diagram of a bypass type pressure compensated flow control (P.C.F.C.) valve and explain how it operates
      7. Draw the schematic diagram of a hydraulic circuit using a bypass type P.C.F.C. valve connected in a meter-in application and explain how it operates should
      8. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of using a restrictor type P.C.F.C. valve vs. a bypass type P.C.F.C
      9. Explain how temperature affects flow in a hydraulic circuit
      10. List the two types of temperature compensation techniques for flow control valves and explain how they operate
      11. Draw the schematic diagram of a temperature compensated restrictor type P.C.F.C. valve
      12. Describe a restrictor type P.C.F.C. valve using a lunge control and explain how it operates
    17. Contrast the four popular GENERIC HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT CONFIGURATIONS
      1. Draw the schematic diagrams of the following hydraulic circuits using a PFD pump, relief valve, flow control valve, cylinder, work load
      2. Explain the operation of each of the four generic hydraulic circuit configurations
      3. List the advantages and popular applications for each of the four generic hydraulic circuit configurations
      4. Calculate system pressure, flow control valve pressure drop, and work load pressure in each of the four generic hydraulic circuit configurations
    18. Use DIRECTIONAL CONTROL VALVES in hydraulic circuits
      1. Draw the schematic diagram symbols of a 2-way, 3-way, and 4­way directional control valve (DCV).
      2. Show how the 2-way, 3-way, and 4-way DCVs are used in hydraulic circuits
      3. List the four most common 4-way DCV spools, draw their schematic diagram symbols, explain their use, and illustrate their operation in hydraulic circuits
      4. List the DCV actuators, draw their schematic diagram symbols, and illustrate their operation
      5. Explain spring offset and detents as applied to DCVS
      6. Explain the following topics as related to DCVS
      7. Explain how a deceleration valve is used in a hydraulic circuit
    19. Analyze the following PRESSURE CONTROL VALVES
      1. Pressure Relief Valve
      2. Sequence Valve
      3. Directly Operated Counterbalance Valve
      4. Remotely Operated Counterbalance Valve
      5. Unloading Valve
      6. Pressure Reducing Valve
      7. Brake Valve
      8. Draw the schematic diagram symbol for each valve
      9. Explain the operation of each valve using a pictorial diagram
      10. Identify each valve as normally open or normally closed
      11. Identify where each valve’s pilot line(s) is/are connected
      12. Identify each valve as internally or externally drained
      13. List common applications for each valve
      14. Illustrate the operation of each valve in hydraulic circuits
      15. Calculate pressures, cylinder forces, and cylinder piston areas for hydraulic circuits using the pressure control valves listed above
    20. Illustrate a ‘HI-LO HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT’
      1. Draw the schematic diagram of a ‘Hi-Lo Hydraulic Circuit’
      2. Explain the purpose of a ‘Hi-Lo Hydraulic Circuit’
      3. Describe the operation of a ‘Hi-Lo Hydraulic Circuit’
    21. Contrast the three most popular types of HYDRAULIC MOTORS
      1. List the three most popular types of hydraulic motors
      2. Describe motor drains and explain their purpose
      3. Describe a balanced vane motor and how it functions
      4. Describe an unbalanced vane motor and how it functions
      5. Explain the methods of extending the vanes of a vane motor
      6. Describe a external gear motor and how it operates
      7. Describe an internal gear motor such as the gerotor motor and how it operates
      8. Describe a piston motor and how it operates
      9. Explain how swashplate angle of a piston motor affects
    22. Use HYDRAULIC MOTORS in hydraulic circuits
      1. Calculate motor shaft speed, motor torque, and motor horsepower
      2. Connect a hydraulic motor in meter-in and meter-out circuits and explain the characteristics and operation of each
      3. Illustrate the techniques of braking hydraulic motors
      4. Explain hydraulic motor cavitation and the methods used to prevent it
    23. Differentiate OPEN LOOP AND CLOSED LOOP HYDROSTATIC DRIVES
      1. Draw the schematic diagram of an open loop hydrostatic drive
      2. Draw the schematic diagram of a closed loop hydrostatic drive
      3. Explain the difference between the open loop and closed loop hydrostatic drive
      4. List the four types of pump-motor combinations used for hydrostatic drives
      5. Identify the following parameters for each of the hydrostatic drive combinations as either fixed or variable
    24. Compare the special types of ROTARY ACTUATORS
      1. List the special rotary actuators.
      2. Show a pictorial illustration of each rotary actuator
      3. Describe the operation of each rotary actuator.
      4. List typical torque and angle of rotation for each rotary actuator
    25. Summarize ENERGY TRANSMISSION IN A PNEUMATIC SYSTEM
      1. Describe the characteristics of gases
      2. Associate the affects of temperature and pressure on gases via the gas laws
      3. Explain how air compression and expansion affects gases
      4. Describe the pneumatic transmission of energy
      5. Explain how a positive displacement compressor operates
      6. Describe inefficiencies in a pneumatic system
      7. Describe air flow rate in terms of cubic feet per minute (CFM) and
      8. Explain how air velocity and critical velocity is related to piping size in a pneumatic system standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM).
    26. Illustrate CONTROL OF PNEUMATIC ENERGY
      1. Draw the schematic diagram of a pneumatic system showing, the compressor, pressure switch, check valve, receiver tank, safety relief valve, pressure regulator, flow control valve, and actuator
      2. Explain how each of the components (listed above) operates in a pneumatic system
      3. Explain the difference between a vented and non-vented pressure regulator (refer to Chap. 10 for additional information).
    27. Use COMPRESSORS in pneumatic circuits. (Chap. 5)
      1. List the compressor types according to “displacement” or “dynamic” grouping
      2. Explain how each of the compressor types operate and their uses
      3. Discuss the methods of unloading a compressor
      4. Illustrate how to select a compressor for a system
      5. Describe how to install a compressor
    28. Relate AFTERCOOLERS, DRIERS, RECEIVERS AND AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS
      1. Explain the purpose of an aftercooler
      2. Discuss the following processes
      3. Explain the purposes of an air receiver tank
      4. Size a receiver tank
      5. Discuss air piping systems and installation considerations
    29. Summarize PNEUMATIC CHECK VALVES, CYLINDERS, AND MOTORS
      1. Explain the following topics
      2. Explain how to size an air cylinder
      3. Calculate air flow rate into an air cylinder
      4. Discuss how to select an air motor
    30. Illustrate PNEUMATIC DIRECTIONAL CONTROL VALVES.
      1. Describe the following 4-way DCV center spools and why they are used
      2. Discuss the varieties of DCV spool designs

  
  • ELT 792 - Hydraulics & Pneumatics Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The basic principles of fluid power and the operation and application of fluid power components are introduced. In the lab we will evaluate valves along with linear and rotary actuators.
    Corequisite: ELT 791  
    Competencies
    1. Operate and troubleshoot hydraulic and pneumatic circuits. PERFORM THE FOLLOWING TASKS FOR EACH OF THE LAB EXPERIMENTS AS INSTRUCTED
      1. Observe and practice safety precautions
      2. Interpret a given circuit plumbing diagram
      3. Draw a schematic diagram when given the plumbing diagram using standard American National Standards Institute (ANSI) symbols
      4. Connect the circuit using either the plumbing diagram or the schematic diagram
      5. Make settings and adjustments
      6. Record settings and measurements
      7. Analyze and evaluate circuits and recorded data
      8. Calculate circuit parameters
      9. Compare and list similarities/differences between circuits
      10. Predict results/outcomes when circuit variables are changed
      11. Complete check-out activities at the end of each lab exercise
    2. Set maximum pump pressure to safely limit system pressure
    3. Operate hydraulic components within manufacturer’s specified limits
    4. Identify a pump which is experiencing cavitation (true cavitation
      1. Demonstrate true pump cavitation
      2. Recognize sounds associated with true cavitation
      3. List causes and effects of true cavitation
    5. Identify a pump which is experiencing pseudo-cavitation
      1. Demonstrate pseudo-cavitation
      2. Recognize sounds associated with pseudo-cavitation
      3. List causes and effects of pseudo-cavitation
    6. Measure pump flow rate
    7. Describe how to test a new or rebuilt pump
    8. Control cylinder position and movement
    9. Observe how valve spool variations effect double acting cylinder behavior in different applications
    10. Verify that cylinder entering and discharge flow rates are not the same
    11. Determine the size of system components
    12. Use hydraulic cylinders which employ cushions
      1. Explain why cylinder cushions are used
      2. Observe how cylinder cushions function
      3. Describe cushion limitations
      4. Perform cushion adjustments
    13. Use a 2:1 cylinder to increase rod velocity when approaching the work load
      1. Show how a cylinder of the correct proportion (rod to bore) can be used to obtain a rod speed twice the normal speed that pump flow alone would normally dictate
      2. Describe how cylinder regeneration works
      3. Illustrate how to automatically take a cylinder out of regeneration when it contacts the work load
    14. Operate a hydraulic circuit employing meter-in speed control
      1. Observe how Meter-In speed control effects all of the components in the interacting hydraulic circuit
      2. Explain why and when Meter-In control is used
      3. Determine repeatability for a given pressure setting
    15. Summarize the effects of system pressure variations and work load variations in determining actuator speed for hydraulic circuits employing ‘non-compensated’ flow control valves
      1. Determine how flow varies with pressure change using a non­compensated needle valve
      2. Observe cylinder action during cylinder extension and retraction
      3. Observe how a needle valve combined with a reverse free flow check valve effects cylinder operation in both Meter-In and Meter-Out modes
      4. Verify that non-compensated flow control valves are good metering devices as long as pressure differential across the valve remains relatively constant
    16. Summarize the effects of system pressure variations and work load variations in determining actuator speed for hydraulic circuits employing ‘pressure compensated’ flow control valves
      1. Demonstrate the conditions under which a pressure compensated flow control valve is effective
      2. Describe the limitations of a P.C.F.C. valve in controlling actuator speed
    17. Compare the action of Meter-Out with Meter-In flow control using the pressure compensated type flow control valve
      1. Determine the effectiveness of the P.C.F.C. valve in Meter-Out mode with sudden changes in work load resistance
      2. Observe that cylinder rod end pressure intensification can occur with Meter-Out flow control unless proper precautions are taken
    18. Compare bleed-off flow control with series flow control as they effect circuit operation
      1. Analyze a hydraulic circuit which employs a pressure compensated flow control valve in a bleed-off circuit configuration
      2. Determine how and when to use Bleed-Off flow/speed control
    19. Compare 3-port with 2-port pressure compensated flow control valves
      1. Observe how a bypass (3-port) flow control valve functions
      2. Determine the applications which use a bypass flow control valve
      3. Determine 3-port flow control valve limitations
    20. Use Accumulators in hydraulic circuits
      1. List safety precautions associated with accumulators and accumulator circuits
      2. Determine how accumulators interact with other circuit components
      3. Identify the limitations of accumulator circuits
    21. Use pilot operated check valves in hydraulic circuits
      1. List the safety precautions associated with P.O.C.V.s.
      2. Observe P.O.C.V. action in a hydraulic circuit
      3. Identify proper applications and limitations of P.O.C.V.s
      4. Describe variations of P.O.C.V.s for special applications
    22. Operate hydraulic motors connected for Meter-In configurations
      1. Identify applications and limitations of Meter-In circuits
      2. Discuss malfunctions and troubleshooting related to hydraulic motors
      3. Observe operation for constant and variable loads
    23. Compare circuit operation when hydraulic motors are connected for Meter-Out vs. Meter-In configurations
      1. Operate hydraulic motors connected for Meter-Out configurations
      2. Determine if more accurate speed control can be obtained with Meter-Out flow control
      3. Gather data on non-pressure and pressure compensated flow control Meter-Out performance
    24. Use Brake Valves to stop hydraulic motors
      1. Observe how the hydraulic actuated brake valve is applied to a hydraulic motor circuit
      2. Observe the interaction between components
    25. Use Cross-Over Relief Valves to stop hydraulic motors.
      1. Operate and adjust the Cross-Over Relief valve for various circuit conditions
      2. Observe cross-over relief valve behavior and limitations
    26. Summarize applications, advantages, and disadvantages of compressed air
    27. Outline safety practices associated with compressed air operations
      1. Describe 13 safety rules necessary to use compressed air or gas
      2. List devices or methods used to safely apply compressed air or gas
    28. Use pneumatic symbols in pneumatic circuit schematic drawings
      1. Identify and group the symbols used for pneumatic fluid power components
      2. Explain the need for symbol use in everyday fluid power work
      3. Draw commonly used pneumatic symbols
    29. Measure pressures in pneumatic circuits
      1. Use the draft gauge (manometer)
      2. Explain how higher pressures are commonly measured
    30. Relate volume and pressure
      1. Observe the effect of moving a ‘piston’ on the internal gas pressure of a tube or cylinder as a demonstration of force transmission through a fluid by Pascal’s law
      2. Differentiate gage pressure vs. absolute pressure
    31. Measure Flow and Pressure Drop
      1. Show the behavior of fluid gas (or compressed air) during transmission from point of generation (or storage) to point of use
      2. Adjust flow and pressure to obtain desired results
    32. Adjust a typical Pressure Switch Control
      1. Draw a pressure switch symbol
      2. Explain terms and definitions for pressure switch adjustments
      3. Set desired cut-in and cut-out pressures
    33. Use Safety Relief Valves in pneumatic circuits
      1. Actuate the compressed air safety relief valve
      2. Set safety relief valve trip pressure
      3. Test a safety relief valve
    34. Operate Pressure Regulators in pneumatic circuits
      1. Draw the schematic symbol for a vented type pressure regulator
      2. Explain pressure regulator behavior
      3. Describe the reaction of the pressure regulator during adjustment and under flow conditions
    35. Use Directional Control Valves in pneumatic circuits
      1. Draw the schematic symbols for directional control valves
      2. Describe how directional control is achieved in pneumatic systems
      3. Explain the three major valve classifications
    36. Relate force, area, and pressure in pneumatic cylinders
      1. Demonstrate use of the force triangle
      2. Calculate annular areas of cylinder pistons and rods
      3. Determine the behavior of different types of linear actuators
      4. Demonstrate force/area/pressure results of friction using linear actuators
    37. Summarize Linear Actuator operation
      1. Analyze linear actuator behavior under load
      2. Explain linear actuator behavior as affected by
      3. Determine actuator air consumption
    38. Use Rotary Actuators in pneumatic circuits
      1. Describe the CRAM
      2. List the advantages of continuous rotation air motors (CRAM).
      3. Define torque and how it applies to air motors
      4. Describe operation and performance characteristics
    39. Control actuators with 3-Way Directional Control Valves
      1. Demonstrate 3-way DCV operation in several circuits with actuators
      2. Show manual valve metering
    40. Control actuators with 4-Way Directional Control Valves
      1. Operate linear actuators with 4-way manual valve
      2. Describe common industrial applications for air bearings
      3. Show the behavior of equal bore and unequal bore cylinders operating in parallel
      4. Calculate air bearing lifting force
      5. Compare action of pressure regulator speed control to that of valve metering control
      6. Determine operating pressures and clearances on different work surfaces
      7. Show control of pilot operated directional control valve using 3-way valves
      8. Demonstrate limits of pilot pressure shifting
    41. Relate air flow velocity to air pressure
      1. Demonstrate the relationship between air flow velocity and pressure
      2. Explain how the air flow velocity-pressure relationship makes pneumatic devices such as a lubricator function
    42. Contrast air bearings and ground effect machines

  
  • ELT 793 - Advanced Fluid Power

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An advanced course that includes demonstrations of pressure-compensated pumps and valves. Electronic controls and monitoring of hydraulic systems, evaluating various fluids for hydraulic systems, describing and observing the operation of fluid power in various industrial/mobile situations will be covered.
    Prerequisite: ELT 791 , ELT 792  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of pressure compensated pumps on a written test
      1. Identify parts on a pressure compensated axial pump
      2. Identify parts on a pressure compensated redial pump
      3. Adjust pressure on a pressure compensated pump
      4. Describe operation of a pressure compensated pump
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of pressure compensated control valves on a written test
      1. Demonstrate the understanding of basic system schematics by color coding circuits
      2. Describe the operation of a pressure compensated flow control valve
      3. Explain the advantages of using pressure compensated flow control valves.
      4. Explain the purpose of a pressure reducing valve
      5. Demonstrate in the laboratory how a pressure reducing valve functions
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of priority valves, and make-up valves on a written test
      1. Explain a simple flow control valve
      2. Disassemble and identify parts on a simple flow control valve
      3. Explain a complex flow control valve
      4. Disassemble and identify parts on a complex flow control valve
      5. Explain the operation of a make-up valve
      6. Disassemble and identify the parts in a make-up valve
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the signal network used in pressure compensated systems on a written test
      1. Explain the purpose of a double check valve (RESOLVER) services in the system
      2. Describe the purpose of primary and secondary resolvers
      3. Disassemble an individual valve in the lab and identify the parts and check for wear
      4. Explain oil flow through the valve
      5. Explain the purpose of an advanced signal passage found in the main control valve
      6. Describe how a signal pressure limiter functions
    5. Describe AC and DC control of systems
      1. Causes of solenoid coi8l failures
      2. Explain how sticking valve spools can burn out solenoid coils
      3. Explain valve logic systems
      4. Explain how counter-electromotive Force (EMF) from solenoids can destroy control circuitry
      5. Explain how solenoids can be controlled by switches, relays, thyristors and other electronic devices
      6. Explain how valves can be controlled by programmable logic controllers (PLCs).
    6. Describe electrical measurement of pressure and flow
      1. Describe how a Wheatstone bridge pressure transducer works
      2. Describe how a Wheatstone bridge flow control sensor works
      3. Explain how to calibrate pressure and flow control sensors
      4. Explain when temperature compensated sensors are needed
    7. Be able to correctly select and substitute hydraulic fluids
      1. Define tribology
      2. Describe where different viscosities are used in fluid power
      3. Define aniline point and how it affects hydraulic seals
      4. Lists oil types than can and cannot be used with hydraulic systems that use bronze parts
    8. Describe the operation of the following fluid power systems
      1. Air counterbalance systems on a modern stamping press
      2. Load sensing/pressure compensated hydraulic system of modern construction/excavating machinery
      3. Modern high speed hydraulic stamping press
      4. Hydraulic table style surface grinders

  
  • ELT 816 - Systems Troubleshooting

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of electronic systems troubleshooting theory, methods and techniques.
    Prerequisite: ELT 474 , ELT 475  
    Corequisite: ELT 817  
    Competencies
    1. Relate the different types of failures in electronics
      1. Identify complete failures
      2. Outline overheating situations
      3. Recognize operator-induced problems
    2. Categorize system troubleshooting procedures.
      1. Look for easy cures
      2. Use the substitution methods
      3. Discuss block diagrams
      4. Utilize documentation to evaluate problems
    3. Review safety and cautionary measures
    4. Compare various test equipment
      1. Discuss proper use of DMM
      2. Discuss proper use of oscilloscopes
      3. Discuss proper use of hand tools
    5. Summarize power supply troubleshooting procedures
      1. Recognize three types of power supplies
      2. Discuss bridge rectifiers
      3. Describe the operation of voltage regulators
    6. Interpret signal tracing analog signals using oscilloscopes
      1. Discuss signal tracing procedures
      2. Explain low frequency circuits procedures
      3. Distinguish high frequency circuits

  
  • ELT 817 - Systems Troubleshooting Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A hands-on experience troubleshooting and repairing a variety of electronic equipment, including copiers, security monitors and cameras, radio, television and satellite systems.
    Prerequisite: ELT 474 ELT 475  
    Corequisite: ELT 816  
    Competencies
    1. Initiate repair of defective units
      1. Identify problems in units
      2. Demonstrate the use of common sense problem solving strategies
      3. Demonstrate the process of locating the problem
    2. Evaluate troubleshooting procedures
      1. Employ block diagrams to isolate problem area
      2. Use service data to pinpoint area
      3. Incorporate previous repair data
    3. Compare measurement tools
      1. Utilize a DMM
      2. Employ an oscilloscope to trace signals
    4. Perform measurements
      1. Measure resistance
      2. Measure voltage
    5. Test for malfunctioning parts
    6. Remove defective parts
      1. Employ correct de-soldering procedures
      2. Identify connectors
    7. Restore units to safe and normal operation
      1. Replace components
      2. Use reliable soldering procedures
      3. Reassemble repaired units
    8. Serve as class Service Manager
      1. Receive units
      2. Create work orders
    9. Serve as class Parts manager
      1. Maintain inventory of parts
      2. Locate suppliers for parts
      3. Acquire inventory from suppliers
    10. Relate the diagnosis and estimate of cost of repairs to the customers
      1. Promote positive customer relations
      2. Communicate effectively via telephone with customers
    11. Perform routine and preventative maintenance
      1. Choose the correct cleaning instruments
      2. Select the correct chemicals
      3. Note abnormalities
    12. Perform final inspections
      1. Verify unit functionality
      2. Perform visual inspections
      3. Complete final paperwork
    13. Develop proficiency with office management software
      1. Enter data into system
      2. Create printed work orders
      3. Generate final invoice
    14. Utilize repair data
      1. Identify relevant data
      2. Develop informative visual representations
      3. Evaluate repair data

  
  • ELT 870 - Electronics Capstone Project

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides hands-on experience in a significant design project involving technological competence, open-ended problem-solving, teamwork, and both written and oral communication skills.
    Prerequisite: Instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Identify a problem and formulate a strategy to solve it in a systematic fashion with given constraints of time, budget and other resources
    2. Generate necessary project reports such as project proposal, project time-line, design reports, and final reports, etc
    3. Make necessary presentations for critical review of their work
    4. Design, build and test a system or subsystem to meet given specifications
    5. Apply the skills they have learned in other courses as well as use modern analysis and design tools in the design of systems and subsystems
    6. Work in teams and subgroups

  
  • ELT 932 - Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A semi-structured experience in the student’s chosen field working as an intern with a sponsoring organization. Students have the opportunity to network with professionals and employees in their field. Students will write a resume suitable for employment applications.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Describe duties completed through internship
      1. Utilize knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for service technicians
      2. Recognize the importance of retraining and learning new skills
    2. Perform limited entry-level duties of an Electronics Technician
      1. Perform preventative maintenance on selected equipment
      2. Complete proper paperwork related to job
      3. Accomplish assigned servicing tasks
    3. Observe state of the art equipment not available in school labs
      1. See the types of electro-mechanical equipment
      2. Observe the function of the electro-mechanical equipment
      3. View the repair work necessary on electro-mechanical equipment
    4. Develop objectives that measure directed activities and performance standards
      1. List goals related to internship activities
      2. Select six of the most appropriate listed goals
      3. Develop performance standards to determine when goals are achieved
    5. Display knowledge of the role of contract organizations in the maintenance of electro-mechanical equipment
      1. List manufacturers offering contract services
      2. List third party service organizations offering contract services
      3. State the pros and cons of utilizing contract organizations
    6. Apply techniques and skills learned in the course work
      1. List the required skills involved in the internship
      2. Learn to work under pressure
    7. Display knowledge of basic inventory control concepts
      1. List paper records of inventory
      2. Enumerate computer-based systems of inventory
      3. State the pros and cons of both paper and computer based systems
    8. Exhibit knowledge of basic maintenance scheduling concepts
      1. Describe the importance of paper records
      2. List computer based systems of maintenance files
      3. State the advantages of a computer based file system
    9. Complete college and employer reports
      1. List required reports
      2. Identify recipients of reports
      3. Complete reports
      4. Submit reports
    10. Observe policies, procedures, and regulations
      1. Identify employer expectations for an intern
      2. List employer policies and procedures to be complied with
    11. Develop a knowledge of “people skills” required by an Electronics Technician
      1. Follow a specified dress code
      2. Display a positive attitude
      3. Display good performance
    12. Attend the required hours
    13. Project professional appearance
      1. Avoid tardiness
      2. Develop ability to show initiative
      3. Develop pride in doing a job well
    14. Develop a resume suitable for an employment search

  
  • ELT 950 - Intro to Renewable Energy

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course outlines renewable energy markets and applications, defines minimum safety considerations, reviews pertinent electrical basics, and analyzes renewable energy fundamentals. 
    Competencies
    1. Assess the basic and emerging principles and concepts that impact generation, transport, installation, operation, and maintenance of technologies and related equipment used to produce energy. 
      1. Explain sources of renewable energy. 
      2. Summarize energy standards produced by industry organizations. 
    2. Compare and contrast the roles of various segments of the PV industry and how they interact with one other. 
      1. Identify key contributions to the development of PV technology.  
      2. Classify common types of PV system applications for both stand-alone and utility interactive systems with and without energy storage.   
      3. Associate key features and benefits of specific types of PV systems, including residential, commercial, BIPV, concentrating PV, and utility-scale.  
      4. List the advantages and disadvantages of PV systems compared to alternative electricity generation sources.   
      5. Explain the features and benefits of PV systems that operate independently of the electric utility grid.   
      6. Describe the features and benefits of PV systems that are interconnected to and operate in parallel with the electric utility grid.  
      7. Examine market indicators, value propositions, and opportunities for both grid-tied and stand-alone PV system applications.   
      8. Discuss the importance of conservation and energy efficiency as they relate to PV system applications.   
    3. Determine the principal electrical safety hazards associated with PV systems, including electrical shock and arc flash.   
      1. Identify the various safety hazards associated with both operating and non-operating PV systems and components.   
      2. List different types of personal protective equipment (PPE) commonly required for installing and maintaining PV systems.   
      3. Practice safe practices for hoisting and rigging, the use of ladders, stairways and guardrails, the use of head, feet, hearing and face protection, the use of power tools, and the use of the appropriate fall protection, including the requirements for personal fall arrest and safety-monitoring systems according to OSHA standards.   
    4. Prove Ohm’s Law in analyzing simple electrical circuits, and to calculate voltage, current, resistance or power given any other two parameters.  
      1. Assess basic electrical parameters including electrical charge, current, voltage, power and resistance, and relate these parameters to their hydraulic analogies (volume, flow, pressure, hydraulic power and friction).                    
      2. Explain the difference between electrical power (rate of work performed) and energy (total work performed).   
      3. Describe the function and purpose of common electrical system components, including conductors, conduits/raceways and enclosures, overcurrent devices, diodes and rectifiers, switchgear, transformers, terminals and connectors, grounding equipment, resistors, inductors, capacitors, etc.                       
      4. Identify basic electrical test equipment and its purpose, including voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters and watt-hour meters.                                    
      5. Examine the fundamentals of electric utility system operations, including generation, transmission, distribution and typical electrical service supplies to buildings and facilities.         
    5. Quantify the effects of changing orientation (azimuth and tilt angle) on the amount of solar energy received on an array surface at any given location using solar energy databases and computer software tools.   
      1. Define basic terminology, including solar radiation, solar irradiance, solar irradiation, solar insolation, solar constant, air mass, ecliptic plane, equatorial plane, pyrometer, solar declination, solstice, equinox, solar time, solar altitude angle, solar azimuth angle, solar window, array tilt angle, array  azimuth angle, and solar incidence angle.   
      2. Diagram the sun’s apparent movement across the sky over any given day and over an entire year at any given latitude, and define the solar window.  
      3. Solve the sun’s position using sun path diagrams, and determine when direct solar radiation strikes the north, east, south and west walls and horizontal surfaces of a building.  
      4. Differentiate between solar irradiance (power), solar irradiation (energy), and understand the meaning of the terms peak sun, peak sun hours, and insolation.   
      5. Identify factors that reduce or enhance the amount of solar energy collected by a PV array.   
      6. Demonstrate the use of a standard compass and determine true geographic south from magnetic south at any location given a magnetic declination map.  
      7. Describe the consequences of array shading and best practices for minimizing shading and preserving array output.  
      8. Demonstrate the use of equipment and software tools to evaluate solar window obstructions and shading at given locations, and quantify the reduction in solar energy received.   
      9. Predict spacing distances required to avoid inter-row shading from adjacent saw tooth rack mounted arrays at specified locations between 9 am and 3 pm solar time throughout the year.   
      10. Define the concepts of global, direct, diffuse and albedo solar radiation, and the effects on flat-plate and concentrating solar collectors.   
      11. Identity the instruments and procedures for measuring solar power and solar energy.   

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • ELT 951 - Applied Photovoltaic Systems

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course outlines basic PV fundamentals, electrical and mechanical design, and maintenance and troubleshooting PV systems.
    Competencies
    1. Distinguish between PV cells, modules, panels and arrays.
      1. Explain how a solar cell converts sunlight into electrical power.                
      2. Identify the five key electrical output parameters for PV modules using manufacturers’ literature (Voc, Isc, Vmp, Imp and Pmp), and label these points on a current-voltage (I-V) curve. 
      3. Describe the effects of varying incident solar irradiance and cell temperature on PV module electrical output, illustrate the results on an I-V curve, and indicate changes in current, voltage and power. 
      4. Explain why PV modules make excellent battery chargers based on their I-V characteristics.        
      5. Observe the effects of connecting similar and dissimilar PV modules in series and in parallel on electrical output, and diagram the resulting I-V curves.                                    
      6. Discuss the significance and consequences of PV modules being limited current sources.              
      7. Explain the purpose and operation of bypass diodes.                                     
      8. Identify the standards and design qualification testing that help ensure the safety and reliability of PV modules.                                                                                                                         
    2. Examine the efficiency and determine the power output per unit area
      1. Determine the operating point on a given I-V curve given the electrical load.      
      2. Define various performance rating and measurement conditions for PV modules and arrays, including STC, SOC, NOCT, and PTC. 
      3. Compare the fabrication of solar cells from various manufacturing processes.
      4. Describe the components and the construction for a typical flat-plate PV module made from crystalline silicon solar cells, and compare to thin-film modules.
    3. Assess the purpose and principles of operation for major PV system components, including PV modules and arrays, inverters and chargers, charge controllers, energy storage and other sources.                               
      1. List the types of PV system balance of system components, and describe their functions and specifications, including conductors, conduit and raceway systems, overcurrent protection, switchgear, junction and combiner boxes, terminations and connectors.                              
      2. Identify the primary types, functions, features, specifications, settings and performance indicators associated with PV system powerprocessing equipment, including inverters, chargers, charge controllers, and maximum power point trackers. 
      3. Explain the basic types of PV systems, their major subsystems and components, and the electrical and mechanical BOS componentsrequired.                                                               
    4. Integrate basic principles, rationale and strategies for sizing stand-alone PV systems versus utility-interactive PV systems.                                         
      1. Calculate the peak power demand and energy consumption over a given period of time.              
      2. List the de-rating factors and other system losses, and their typical values, and calculate the resulting effect on AC power andenergy production, using simplified calculations, and online software tools including PVWATTS.        
      3. Analyze the maximum and minimum number of modules that may be used in source circuits and the total number of source circuitsthat may be used with a specified inverter                     
      4. Size and configure the PV array, battery subsystem, and other equipment as required, to meet the electrical load during the criticaldesign period.   
    5. Draw and prepare simple one-line electrical diagrams for interactive and  standalone PV systems showing all major components andsubsystems, and  indicate the locations of the PV source and output circuits, inverter input and  output circuits, charge controller and battery circuits, as applicable, and mark  the directions of power flows through the system under various load conditions.   
      1. Describe how PV modules are configured in series and parallel to build voltage, current and power output for interfacing with inverters, charge controllers, batteries and other equipment.   
      2. Summarize importance of nameplate specifications on PV modules, inverters and other equipment on determining allowable systemvoltage limits, and for the selection and sizing of conductors, overcurrent protection devices, disconnect means, wiring methods and in establishing appropriate and safe interfaces with other equipment and electrical systems.
      3. Consider the requirements for charge control in battery-based PV systems, based on system voltages, current and charge rates.                                                                                         
      4. Identify the labeling requirements for electrical equipment in PV systems, including on PV modules, inverters, disconnects, at pointsof interconnection to other electrical systems, on battery banks, etc.
      5. Illustrate the basic principles of PV system grounding, the differences between grounded conductors, grounding conductors, grounding electrode conductors, the purposes of equipment grounding, PV array ground-fault protection, and the importance of single-point grounding.                
      6. Recommend requirements for plan review, permitting, inspections, construction contracts and other matters associated with approvals and code-compliance for PV systems.              
    6. Evaluate the features and benefits of different PV array mounting systems and practices, including their design and materials, standardization and appearance, applications and installation requirements, thermal and energy performance, safety and reliability, accessibility and maintenance, costs and other factors.
      1. Identify the common ways PV arrays are mechanically secured and installed on the ground, to building rooftops or other structures, including rack mounts, ballasted systems, pole mounts, integral, direct and stand-off roof mounts, sun tracking mounts and for other building-integrated applications. 
      2. Describe the effects on PV cell operating temperature of environmental conditions, including incident solar radiation levels, ambient temperature, wind speed and direction for various PV array mounting methods.                                                                                                                             
      3. List various building-integrated PV (BIPV) applications and compare and contrast their features and benefits with conventional PV array designs.                                                      
      4. Choose desirable material properties for weather sealing materials, hardware and fasteners, electrical enclosures, wiring systems and other equipment, such as UV, sunlight and corrosion resistance, wet/outdoor approvals and other service ratings appropriate forthe intended application, environment and conditions of use, and having longevity consistent with the operating life expectancies of PV systems.
      5. Summarize the requirements for roofing systems expertise, and identify the preferred structural attachments and weather sealingmethods for PV arrays affixed to different types of roof compositions and coverings.                                                                                                            
      6. Identify the types and magnitudes of mechanical loads experienced by PV modules, arrays and their support structures, includingdead loads, live loads, wind loads, snow loads, seismic loads, in established combinations according to ASCE 7-05 Minimum DesignLoads for Buildings and Other Structures.                                                                                                                                   
    7. Predict mechanical design features that affect the electrical and thermal performance of PV arrays, including array orientation, mounting methods and other factors.
      1. Explain PV system mechanical design attributes that affect the installation and maintenance of PV arrays, including hardware standardization, safety and accessibility, and other factors.                 
      2. Review the importance of PV equipment manufacturers’ instructions with regard to mounting and installation procedures, the skillsand competencies required of installers, and the implications on product safety, performance, code-compliance and warranties.                
    8. Execute basic troubleshooting principles and progression, including recognizing a problem, observing the symptoms, diagnosing the cause and taking corrective actions leading from the system, subsystem to the component level. 
      1. Discuss various potential problems related to PV system design, components, installation, operation or maintenance that may affect the performance and reliability of PV systems.      
      2. Identify the use and meaning of typical performance parameters monitored in PV systems, including DC and AC voltages, currents and power levels, solar energy collected, the electrical energy produced or consumed, operating temperatures and other data.                                                            
      3. Compare PV system output with expectations based on system sizing, component specifications and actual operating conditions, and understand why actual output may be different than expected. 
      4. Describe typical maintenance requirements for PV arrays and other system components, including inverters and batteries, etc.                                                                   
      5. Explain the safety requirements for operating and maintaining different types of PV systems and related equipment.                                                                     
      6. Identify the most common types of reliability failures in PV systems and their causes due to the equipment, quality of installationand other factors.                                          
      7. Review component manufacturers’ instructions for operation, maintenance and troubleshooting for PV modules and power processing equipment, and develop a simple maintenance plan for a given PV system detailing major tasks and suggested intervals.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

Emergency Medical Service

  
  • EMS 105 - IA Law Enforcement Emerg Care

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Designed to help Iowa Law Enforcement personnel gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to be a competent, productive and valuable member of the Emergency Medical Services team.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the responsibilities of a ILEECP
    2. Define Emergency Care/Fist Aid/OSHA Standards
    3. Identify the need for knowledge and skills required for administration of emergency care
      1. Determine emergency situations one can manage
      2. Decide when an emergency requires a more advanced trained responder and the need to activate the EMS System (911).
    4. Express knowledge of protection given a rescuer by the Good Samaritans Law
      1. Define actual and implied consent and know how consent applies in helping an adult in an emergency
      2. Define rumored consent and know how consent applies in helping a child in an emergency
    5. Evaluate an injured victim by use of a primary and secondary survey
      1. Use BCLS shells to correct airway, breathing and circulation problems discovered in the primary survey
      2. Assess when not to move a victim with serious injuries discovered in the secondary survey
    6. Identify signs and symptoms of respiratory emergencies
    7. Demonstrate the correct procedures for rescue breathing for an adult, child and infant
    8. Demonstrate the correct procedures for relieving FBOA for the conscious, becomes unconscious, and found unconscious adult, child and infant
    9. Perform one rescuer CPR for the adult, child and infant
    10. Identify common childhood/adult illnesses and injuries
    11. Express a minimal knowledge of the circulatory, respiratory, and skeletal systems
    12. State and demonstrate correct methods for controlling bleeding, including direct pressure, elevation, and pressure point
    13. Define shock and identify injuries which are most likely to cause shocks
    14. Recognize the signs of symptoms of shocks and demonstrate appropriate treatment
    15. State the principals of care for open and closed soft tissue injuries
      1. Know the difference between a bandage and dressing
      2. Demonstrate the proper procedure for management of a soft tissue injury
    16. Identify signs and symptoms of fractures
      1. Know when not to move a patient with a fracture
      2. Identify situations in which the necks or backs might be fractured and know not to move the patient
    17. Identify and manage common medical emergencies including seizures, asthma, abdominal distress, diabetic coma and insulin shock
    18. Identify four ways children/adults are poisoned
      1. Contact poison control center
      2. Demonstrate first aid for a poison emergency
    19. Identify heat and cold emergencies
      1. Be able to identify partial and full thickness burns and know first aid for burns
      2. Know first aid for heat exhaustion and heat stroke
      3. Know first aid for frostbite
    20. Identify the symptoms of a patient under the influence of alcohol or drugs
      1. Know emergency care for a drug overdose
    21. Evaluate the pregnant woman and provide assistance for emergency birth

  
  • EMS 214 - Emergency Medical Technician

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to educate students on how to provide basic emergency medical care and transportation for critical and noncritical patients who access the emergency medical system. EMTs possess the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. These skills include but are not limited to airway management, bleeding control, cervical spine stabilization, vehicle extrication techniques and vital sign assessment. EMT’s function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight, and perform interventions with basic-level emergency equipment. This course is the required entry-level EMS certification course designed to prepare students for advanced-level EMS courses.
    Prerequisite: High School Diploma or GED, American Red Cross BLS (Basic Life Support)Card or American Heart Association BLS (Basic Life Support) Card, 17 years of age
    Competencies
    1. Define the role and responsibilities of an EMT.
      1. Discuss the legal responsibilities of the EMT.
      2. Discuss the ethical responsibilities of the EMT.
      3. Define and list the scope of practice by which an EMT is governed.
      4. Define and discuss the role that the EMT plays inside of the EMS system.
      5. Define and discuss the history of EMS.
    2. Identify and define basic body antomy and functions, using appropriate medical terminology.
      1. Define and discuss the features and roles of the musculoskeletal system.
      2. Define and disucss the features and roles of the respiratory system.
      3. Define and discuss the features and roles of the nervous system.
      4. Define and discuss the features and roles of the endocrine system.
      5. Define and discuss the features and roles of the integumentary system.
      6. Define and discuss the features and roles of the digestive system.
      7. Define and discuss the features and roles of the urinary system.
      8. Define and discuss the features and roles of the reporductive system.
    3. Discuss and comprehend the role of aerobic versus anearobic metabolism.
      1. Define the composition of ambient air.
      2. Define and discuss blood components and the transport and oxygenation of blood.
      3. Define and understand the mechanics of ventilation of functions of the myocardium.
      4. Define the role that vascular resistance plays in blood pressure and microcirculation.
    4. Perform initial patient assessment and evaluation (primary survey) using diagnosis signs and symptoms.
      1. Discuss and understand the importance of scene safety.
      2. Discuss how to form a general impression of the patient.
      3. Discuss how to obtain a chief complaint.
      4. List the various life threats that can occur and their treatments.
      5. Discuss and demonstrate the management of C spine injuries.
      6. Discuss of various levels of consciousness and ways to grade a patien’ts level of consciousness.
      7. Define methods on how to assess and manage the airway.
      8. Explain and assess the quality, rate, and work of breathing.
      9. Explain and assess the pulse and perfusion of a patient.
      10. Define the criteria that classify a patient as critical versus non critical.
    5. Peform secondary assessment of the patient.
      1. Obtain and interpret baseline BP.
      2. Obtain and interpret baseline pulse.
      3. Obtain and interpret baseline respiration.
      4. Obtain and interpret baseline temperature.
      5. Obtain and interpret baseline pulse oxygen.
      6. Obtain a history of present illness from the patient.
      7. Define and perform a detailed hands-on-assessment of the patient.
      8. Discuss and review significant mechanisms of injury.
      9. Demonstrate a systematic rapid trauma examination.
      10. Demonstrate C spine immobilization methods.
      11. Define and obtain a SAMPLE/OPQRST history.
      12. Discuss what criteria transport decisions are based upon.
      13. Define and list the various treatment options available during transport.
    6. Perform basic life supoort according to American heart Standards/Red Cross healthcare Professional standards.
      1. Demonstrate the techniques and steps involved in chest compressions for all age groups.
      2. Demonstrate the correct use of a defibrillator on a pt in cardiac arrest with the review of the appropriate procedures and safety techniques.
    7. Demonstrate the use of mechanical aids to provide effective ventilation.
      1. Demonstrate how, when and why to use the BVM.
      2. Demonstrate how, when and why to use the nasal airway.
      3. Demonstrate how, when and why to use an oral airway.
    8. Discuss and define the various types of bleeding including.
      1. The management and identification of arterial bleeding.
      2. The management and identification of venous bleeding.
      3. The management and identification of capillary bleeding.
      4. The management and identification of external bleeding.
      5. The management and identification of internal bleeding.
    9. Demonstrate the various treatment methods for bleeding.
      1. Demonstrate how, when, and why to use direct pressure.
      2. Demonstrate how, when, and why to use elevation.
      3. Demonstrate how, when, and why to use a tourniquet.
      4. Demonstrate how, when, and why to use a pnuenomatic anti shock garment.
    10. Define and discuss the stages of shockincluding:
      1. Demonstration on how, when and why to manage hypovolemic shock.
      2. Demonstration on how, when and why to manage septic shock.
      3. Demonstration on how, when and why to manage distributive shock.
      4. Demonstration on how, when and why to manage cardiogenic shock.
    11. Discuss and list the various types of treatments available for shock patients in the pre hospital setting including:
      1. Demonstration of how, when and why to elevate the feet.
      2. Demonstration of how, when and why to use warming procedures.
      3. Demonstration of how, when, and why to use oxygen.
      4. Demonstration of how, when, and why to assist an advanced provider with IV access and the administration of with fluids.
    12. Define and discuss the various types of open and closed soft injuries.
      1. The management and treatment of abrasions.
      2. The management and treatment of lacerations.
      3. The management and treatment of avulsions.
      4. The management and treatment of penetrations/punctures.
      5. The management and treatment of crush injuries.
      6. The management and treatment of contusions.
      7. The management and treatment of hematomas.
      8. The management and treatment of burns.
    13. Define and demonstrate basic emergency care to patient with open and closed soft tissue injuries.
      1. Application of sterile dressings.
      2. Application of non sterile dressings and bandages.
      3. Stabilization of impaled objects.
      4. Application of occlusive dressings.
      5. Application of burn sheets.
      6. Irrigation of a wound.
      7. Application of a pressure dressing.
      8. Application of PASG.
    14. Define and provide basic emergency care to a person suspected of having open and closed fractures using the following methods:
      1. Application of a PASG.
      2. Application of a long back board.
      3. Application of a c collar.
      4. Application of manual C spine immobilization.
      5. Application of a vacuum splint.
      6. Application of an air splint.
      7. Application of a SAM splint.
      8. Application of a sling ans swathe.
    15. Assess and provide basic emergency care to the patient with head, neck, and/or spine injuries via immobilization devices.
    16. Assess and provide basic emergency care to the patient with injuries of the chest, abdomen and/or genitalia.
    17. Define the signs and symptoms of the following disease states along with the treatment and management of:
      1. Diabetes.
      2. Cardiac events.
      3. CVA/TIA
      4. Allergic reactions
      5. Heat and cold emergencies
      6. Water emergencies
      7. Psychological
      8. Abdominal
      9. Altered mental status
      10. Drug and alcohol
      11. Seizures
      12. Syncope
      13. Respiratory
    18. Evaluate the pregnant woman and provide assistance for emergency birth.
      1. Describe the anatomy of pregnancy.
      2. Describing the menstrual cycle.
      3. Describing and understanding the physical changes in pregnancy.
      4. Describe the various medical complications that can arrise prior to delivery: vaginal bleeding and discharge; seizures and blood pressure issues.
      5. Describe the stages of labor.
      6. Describe the signs and symptoms of a normal vaginal delivery versus an abnormal delivery.
      7. Discuss the various field procedures and treatments for dealing with both the normal and abnormal delivery.
      8. Discuss the methods of care of the newborn population as well as assessment criteria for this population.
    19. Discuss the care and management of the pediatric and infant populations.
      1. Demonstrating techniques for interacting with care givers.
      2. Defining the physical, emotional and psychosocial characteristics of these populations.
      3. Define the various anatomical differences between child, ingants and adults.
      4. Define the changes in methods of assessment for this population including the primary and secondary assessment.
      5. Discuss the special considerations that must be remembered when assessing children and infants in terms of vital signs, medical events, trauma events, SAMPLE/OPQRST history, and pain scale assessment.
      6. Discuss the overview of the assessment and management of respirator emergencies including: early respiratory distress, decompensated respiratory failure, respiratory arrest, airway obstruction, FBAO, Croup, epiglottitis, Bronchiolitis, and Asthma.
      7. Discussion and overview of various other medical and trauma emergencies effecting this population including: seizures, cardiac arrest, drowning, altered mental status, fever, poisoning,and multi systems trauma from car crashes, abuse and falls.
    20. Discuss and review the signs and symptoms of environmental emergencies along with the management and treatment of environmental emergency conditions.
      1. Heat and cold emergencies for generalized hypothermia, Pathophysiology of hypothermia, localized cold injuries, Hyperthermia, and pathophysiology of heat emergencies.
      2. Bites and stings.
      3. Lighting strikes.
      4. High altitude sickness.
    21. Define and demonstrate triage in emergency situations/disasters.
      1. Define and list the various forms of triage including Jumpstart and Start.
      2. Define primary versus secondary triage.
      3. Define and demonstrate the patient tagging system.
      4. Define the roles and responsibilities of the various sectors including staging, treatment, transport and incident command.
    22. Demonstrate how to position, lift and move emergency patients efficiently and safely.
      1. Demonstrate the various techniques for moving a patient including: cot, drawsheet, stair chair, LBB/scoop, Fireman’s carry, two man carry, power lift, pwer squat, push/pull, two person carry and one person carry.
      2. Discuss the four principles of a safe moving and lifting.
      3. Discuss the need for teamwork and physical fitness.
      4. Differentiage between the different types of moves available to EMS providers and define when and where they should be used including: emergency moves, urgent moves, and non urgent moves.
      5. Discuss and define the requirements and prcedures for pt transports via ground and air ambulance.
    23. Demonstrate how to extircate, stablize, package and transport an emergency patient.
      1. Practice the various forms of extication including rapid and normal.
      2. Discuss and define the most common types of trauma present in pt’s involved in car crashes and methods to treat these injuries.
    24. Discuss ambulance operations with regard to state laws and safety.
      1. Define who should be driving the ambulance.
      2. Define the need to vehicle inspections at the start of every shift.
      3. Define applicable state laws regarding the operations of lights and siren.
      4. Define and discuss principles of safe driving.
      5. Define and discuss state laws pertaining to the operation of an ambulance responding emergent to the scene or hospital.
    25. Record and report patient information systematically.
      1. Discuss and define the various methods of documentation and data management including CHART and SOAP.
      2. Discuss the importance of the accurate collection and documentation of information.
      3. Discuss the notion of the PCR as a legal document.
      4. Define the confidentially aspects of documentation.
      5. Define and disucss the various accepted forms of medical abbreviations.
    26. Identify the various signs and symptoms of dependent adult and child abuse.
      1. Define and list the legal requirements as to reporting these suspicions.
      2. Define and list the procedures and methods for interacting with parents or care givers suspected of child or dependant adult abuse.
    27. Define the importance and rational of body substance isolation (BSI).
      1. Define and list the various forms of BSI.
      2. Define and list the various commerical products available for BSI.
      3. Define the reasons as to why BSI is needed and also the various diseases an EMS provider may be exposed to including: Hep B, Hep A, Hep C; AIDS/HIV, TB, MRSA/VRSA and SARS.
    28. Define the EMT’s role in medication administration.
      1. Define and list various medications that the EMT may assist a pt in administering including: Aspirin, epi pens and oral glucose.
    29. Define the signs and symptoms that would warrant the administration of these drugs.
      1. Discuss the effects, side effects and contraindications of these drugs.
      2. Discuss and review the 5 “R”s of medication administration.
      3. Discuss and list the various medication names that a drug may be referred to.
      4. Define and discuss the various routes of administration for medications.
      5. Define and discuss the concept of standing orders versus online medical direction for medication administration.
    30. Special needs population.
      1. Discuss and review the assessment and treatment techniques for patients who are hearing impaired, vision impaired, speech impaired, sensory impaired, mentally or emotional impaired, brain injured, paralyzed, obses, and homeless.
      2. Review and define the various pieces of technology that may be encountered by EMS providers including medical oxygen, Apnea monitors, pulse ox, tracheostomy tubes, CPAP and BiPAP, home mech ventilators, central lines, implanted ports, dialysis pts, feedin

 

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