Feb 21, 2024  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Computer Programming

  
  • CIS 413 - COBOL II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduces advanced COBOL programming techniques. Emphasis is given to the SORT verb, multiple level tables and ISAM file access techniques.
    Prerequisite: CIS 402  
    Competencies
    1. Develop programs that use Sequential file processing
      1. Write programs to use Sequential Card and Disk input
      2. Write programs to use Sequential Disk output
    2. Write programs that demonstrate their ability to Create and Update Sequential Disk Master file processing
    3. Code programs using COPY BOOKS
      1. Demonstrate purpose of a COPY BOOK
      2. Generate code to utilize COPY BOOKS
    4. Demonstrate an ability to use Internal Sorts effectively
      1. Develop programs using internal sorts
      2. Discriminate when to use INPUT and OUTPUT procedures vs USING and GIVING
    5. Demonstrate the purpose of SORTS, as to their functions and design in COBOL programs
    6. Write Programs using ISAM file structures
    7. Assess Job Specs and Write Programs from them
    8. Use ISAM file access methods
    9. Write KSDS file update programs
    10. Demonstrate the structure and purpose of BINARY and SEQUENTIAL Table SEARCHES and an ability to use them
      1. Use Indexes effectively
      2. Construct tables with indexes
    11. Develop programs to LINK and pass addressability between COBOL and Assembler language programs using LINKAGE SECTION, CALLS and ENTRY instructions
      1. Show effective use of COBOL LINKAGE commands
      2. Use ENTRY, CALL, USING and LINKAGE section properly
      3. Write program(s) to LINK between COBOL and ASSEMBLER Modules
    12. Demonstrate an ability to effectively use COBOL Debugging Tools
      1. Use Debug packets, TRACT, EXHIBIT, DISPLAY, ON and CBL Debugging Aids
      2. Explain the purpose of each
      3. Organize a program using a DEBUG packet
    13. Interpret and use COBOL System Core Dumps using ASNI Hex debug
    14. Develop an understanding of programs using SECTIONS and GOTO’S
    15. Create and maintain Relative Files using Valid and Invalid key structure
    16. Utilize Rewrite and Delete in Random Access files

  
  • CIS 450 - PLTW Computer Science Principles

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to be the first computer science course for students who have never programmed before. ICS is an optional starting point for the PLTW Computer Science program. In this course, students will create interactive stories in Scratch™ (an easy-to-use programming language); work in teams to create simple apps for mobile devices using App Inventor; and analyze data about students’ health, social habits, and interests using functions in Excel®. Students will learn the impact of computing in society and the application of computing across career paths. They will also transfer the understanding of programming gained in App Inventor to a third language, Python®, in which they learn introductory elements of text-based programming. The course aligns with the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) 3A standards.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate programming ablities
      1. Create original programs in Scratch
      2. Incorporate audio and visual elements in programs
      3. Solve algorithmic problems in programming
    2. Analyze existing code with an emphasis on the roles of variables
      1. Design and create an Android application
      2. Identify binary representations of numbers, letters, colors, and images
      3. Use CS unplugged to create physical representations of data storage
      4. Make minor modifications to existing App inventor programs
      5. Analyze complex programs and incorporate event handlers into programs in meaningful ways
    3. Prove understanding of algorithms with the use of a new language
      1. Utilize Python with functional, imperative, and declarative programming paradigms
      2. Simulate program execution in a model assembly language
      3. Create Python algorithms
    4. Use object-oriented libraries to become independent learners of a programming language
      1. Manipulate image files by modifying pixel data
      2. Use code libraries
      3. Use Application-programming interfaces (APIs)
      4. Read discuss and debate intellectual property issues associated with digital data
    5. Create Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) with considerations of audience and accessibility
      1. Generalize a user interface topic to the field of human-computer interactions
      2. Use an API to acquire methods that affect an object?s state
      3. Modify elements of a pattern to a stated programming need
      4. Create and model-view controller GUI
    6. Assess the components of a digital footprint
      1. Compare designs, strengths and weaknesses of content and flow of data of existing web pages
      2. Compare results from a variety of search engines to refine search techniques
      3. Explore the hierarchical nature of DNS and IP
      4. Use HTML and CSS to learn the tree structure of web documents
    7. Analyze client-side code, server-side code, and databases for delivery of interactive web content
      1. Collaborate between client-side code and server-side code to publish content on the web
      2. Use JavaScript and PHP code to problem solve
      3. Compare languages to generalize concepts of sequencing instructions, selection of instructions by conditionals, iterations and variables
      4. Explore and compare career paths within computing
    8. Maintain online security and improve personal cyber security hygiene
      1. Explore cyber security from the perspective of user, software developer, and a business
      2. Explore parallel strands in encryption and security
      3. Use encryption as a route to explore the efficiency of algorithms
    9. Create visualizations to analyze sets of larger data and interpret patterns
      1. Discuss societal concerns related to the collection and persistence of Big Data
      2. Use Python to make meaningful graphic representations of data
      3. Use basic Excel spreadsheet programming and cell manipulation
    10. Apply statistics to deepen the meaning of knowledge gained by visualization of data
      1. Draw conclusions from relevant data
      2. Manipulate and visualize data using multiple platforms
      3. Experiment with object recognition and facial recognition software
      4. Identify clustering and linear correlation patterns in data
    11. Use Moore’s law and computer modeling
      1. Discuss Moore’s law and its application to computer modeling and simulation
      2. Manipulate discrete electronic components to create logic gates and comparable results using integrated circuits
      3. Explore simulation in NetLego
      4. Examine the code of ethics for simulations
    12. Evaluate intelligent and complex behavior arising from simple rules and unintelligent agents
      1. Manipulate models to change behaviors
      2. Explore the generation and observation of fractals and diffusion limited aggregation models

  
  • CIS 451 - PLTW-Computer Science Applications

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course focuses on developing computational thinking skills through the medium of Android™ App development for mobile platforms. The course utilizes industry-standard tools such as Android Studio, Java™ programming language, XML, and device emulators. Students collaborate to create original solutions to problems of their own choosing by designing and implementing user interfaces and Web-based databases.
    Competencies
    1. Create a Java Program
      1. Define Object Oriented Programming
      2. Describe the basic features of the Java programming language
      3. Use an Integrated Development Environment to enter Java code
      4. Utilize programming logic to create a Java application
      5. Demonstrate ability to write Java methods that accept arguments and return a value.
    2. Assess and manipulate data in Java
      1. Demonstrate how to define an array
      2. Manipulate array elements
      3. Create a String object
      4. Write Java code that parses String data
      5. Develop Java code to manage and maintain lists
      6. Implement the autoboxing feature
    3. Incorporate and extend common User Interface (UI) features
      1. Create a Java application using graphical user interface components
      2. Investigate the concept of inheritance
      3. Understand class definitions
      4. Incorporate a navigation drawer
      5. Explore and critique a Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagram
      6. Outline the components of a Java method
      7. Demonstrate method overloading
    4. Implement common data structures
      1. Utilize an ArrayList
      2. Use loops to traverse Arrays and ArrayLists
      3. Define a stack data structure
      4. Describe a queue
      5. Access a Backend as a Service (Baas) to implement data persistence
    5. Demonstrate the App Development Process
      1. Define a project
      2. Follow the steps of prototyping and usability testing
      3. Present an app with documentation as a final project
    6. Create a backend service for apps
      1. Store and retrieve user data from the cloud
      2. Connect Object Oriented Programming (OOP) to Application Programming Interfaces (API)
      3. Create apps that store significant amounts of data
      4. Manage interfaces for a social networking app
    7. Develop a location aware app
      1. Define GPS (Global Positioning System)
      2. Utilize Google Play services
      3. Add location data to user posts in an app
    8. Analyze the concept of Java classes and objects
      1. Categorize data into subclasses of an abstract type
      2. Combine data into lists
      3. Understand and use polymorphism
      4. Demonstrate the use of dynamic late binding
      5. Construct classes that inherit from interfaces
    9. Implement Java computational algorithms
      1. Analyze the performance of various searches and sorts
      2. Perform statement execution counts
      3. Use a simple rounding algorithm
      4. Experiment with operator precedence and witness integer overflow
      5. Convert between hexadecimal and decimal number systems
    10. Utilize Java frameworks
      1. Use LibGDX (an open source game development framework)
      2. Access resources and utilize tools
      3. Collaborate with a team or a client
      4. Incorporate media assets
      5. Work with touch events
      6. Manipulate data in 2D data structures
      7. Communicate with a database
    11. Support Program Code Maintenance
      1. Identify code problems
      2. Correct existing logic errors
      3. Implement new features into existing apps
      4. Create checked exceptions

  
  • CIS 505 - Structured Systems Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Designed to acquaint the student with the various considerations in the design of a system. The course considers project initiation, fact gathering, procedures, forms, system implementation and evaluation.
    Prerequisite: CSC 116  
    Competencies
     

    1. Explain systems life cycle phases
      1. Describe preliminary investigation
      2. Describe detailed investigation
      3. Examine system design
      4. Identify system development
      5. Generalize system implementation
      6. Define system analysis
    2. Characterize systems analyst
      1. Relate to human response to change
      2. Give profile of the system analyst
      3. Practice teamwork
      4. Relate to system analysis as a career
    3. Develop communication skills
      1. Use documentation skills
      2. Use presentation skills
    4. Analyze preliminary investigation
      1. Define the problem
      2. Prepare organizational chart
      3. Examine preliminary investigation information
      4. Prepare the preliminary investigation report
    5. Conduct systems analysis
      1. Describe data gathering
      2. Define data analysis
      3. Produce analysis and requirement report
    6. Generate preliminary system design
      1. Convert the transfer from analysis to design
      2. Review system requirements
      3. Describe the system
      4. Give cost/benefit analysis
      5. Design preliminary document
    7. Design detailed output
      1. Discuss output media
      2. Describe output reports
      3. Discuss distribution of output reports
      4. Produce detailed output
    8. Design detailed input
      1. Define input considerations
      2. Discuss editing input data
      3. Summarize input devices
      4. Review forms design
      5. Produce detailed input
    9. Design systems processing
      1. Discuss detail processing considerations
      2. Review system design methodologies
      3. Review logical construction of program
      4. Identify detail processing tools
      5. Produce system flowcharts
      6. Prepare data flow diagrams
    10. Evaluate systems development
      1. Plan analysis role in the development phase
      2. Identify software tools
      3. Organize systems test
    11. Demonstrate knowledge of systems implementation
      1. Generalize system implementation
      2. Simulate system conversation

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CIS 588 - Computer Organization

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is focused on the relationship between computing hardware and machine language instruction sets. The course is organized into levels, beginning with logic gates on through microcode, machine language and assembly language. Several computer systems and microprocessors will be used as examples, in the course, along with their supporting hardware and organization of their instruction sets. Assembly language is studied in detail.
    Competencies
    1. Explain structured computer organization.
      1. Define the term structured computer organization.
      2. Explain various languages.
      3. Discuss the evolution of multilevel machines.
    2. Summarize the milestones in computer architecture.
    3. Describe the internal processor.
    4. Explain what is primary memory.
    5. Explain what is secondary memory.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of Input/Output.
    7. Analyze and demonstrate knowledge about Digital Logic Level.
      1. Gates & Boolean Algebra.
      2. Gates
      3. Boolean algebra.
      4. Circuit equivalence.
    8. Create basic digital logic circuits.
    9. Create drawing of integrated circuits.
    10. Demonstrate understanding of computer clocks.
    11. Demonstrate an understanding of micro architecture level.
    12. Analyze computer for improving performance.
    13. Define the instructor set architecture level.
    14. Demonstrate knowledge about the assembly language level.
    15. Understand and explain the assembly process.
    16. Explain the process of linking and loading.
    17. Explain the concept of Parallel computer architectures.
    18. Analyze the use of shared-memory multiprocessors.

  
  • CIS 604 - Visual Basic

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An elementary course in the use of the Visual Basic. NET programming language. The various commands will be presented. Students design, code and test several programs.
    Competencies
    1. Overview of .NET Framework and Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) concepts
      1. Explain the concepts of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP)
      2. Review versions of Visual Basic and the .NET Framework
      3. Discuss ASP.NET web development
    2. Identify the elements in the Visual Basic environment
      1. List several components of the Visual Basic Environment
      2. Explain the function of several components of the Visual Basic Environment.
    3. Illustrate the steps for writing a Visual Basic Project
      1. Outline the steps needed to write a Visual Basic Project
      2. Distinguish between design time, run time, and break time
      3. Identify compile errors, run-time errors and logic errors
    4. Select the proper controls needed to develop a user friendly application
      1. Explain the purpose of Visual Basic controls
      2. Set properties of Visual Basic controls
    5. Activate Visual Basic projects
      1. Identify the steps needed to load and save a Visual Basic Project
      2. Copy Visual Basic projects
      3. Identify the types of files that makeup a Visual Basic project
    6. Distinguish between variables, constants, and controls
      1. Apply consistent and descriptive naming conventions
      2. Appropriately determine the scope and type of variables and constants
    7. Examine output to determine the accuracy of program results
      1. Identify what expected result should be
      2. State the level of accuracy that is expected
      3. Discuss the outputs’ results
    8. Analyze the path of output to be used - screen or paper
      1. List the options available for output
      2. Outline the method to send output to paper
      3. Outline the method to send output to screen
    9. Examine flowcharts or other data logic diagrams
      1. Discuss the uses of a flowchart or other data logic diagrams
      2. Identify alternatives to a flowchart
      3. List the symbols used in flowcharting or other data logic diagrams
    10. Use decisions and conditions to control the flow of logic
      1. Use block Ifs and nested Ifs to control the flow of logic
      2. Evaluate conditions using relational operators
      3. Code selection logic using a Select Case statement
    11. Explain For/Next and Do/Loops and their applications
      1. Define the process of For/Next and Do/Loop statements
      2. Identify the beginning syntax in a For/Next and Do/Loop
      3. Identify the ending syntax in a For/Next and Do/Loop
    12. Explain sequential files processing
      1. Explain the purpose of the open and close command
      2. List the functions of open and close
      3. Trap user errors and handle errors appropriately
      4. Write code to read and write data using a sequential file
    13. Develop a menu driven program
      1. Explain the purpose of a menus
      2. Create menus and submenus for program control
      3. List the rules for development of menus
      4. Discuss both good and bad aspects of menus
    14. Create a project with multiple forms
      1. Write code to allow navigation between multiple forms of a project
      2. Create procedures that are accessible from multiple form modules
    15. Create an array and reference elements of the array
      1. Explain how to set up and use an array
      2. Store and retrieve data in an array
    16. Assess the logic for validating data from an input field
      1. Define validating as it applies to data
      2. List several methods of validating
      3. Review the necessity for validating data
    17. Prepare proper documentation
      1. Describe the use of internal documentation
      2. Identify uses for external documentation
    18. Explain database processing
      1. Use database terminology correctly
      2. Differentiate between a data control and data-bound controls
      3. Create a project that accesses a database file

  
  • CIS 720 - Help Desk Operations

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the help desk environment and the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to work in the user support industry. Students will learn valuable problem-solving and communication skills. Through hands-on exercises and case projects, students will learn how to apply their knowledge and develop their ideas and skills. They will also learn how to work individually and in teams, which will prepare them for a team-oriented environment.
    Prerequisite: CSC 116  
    Competencies
     

    1. Explain why it is important have a Help Desk in the IT department
      1. Describe the evolution of Technical Support
      2. Define the role of the help desk in technical support
    2. Identify Key Components of a Help Desk Department
      1. List the required components of a successful help desk
      2. Identify the primary function of a help desk
      3. List 5 reasons why customer service is of importance
    3. Determine the key functions of a help desk
      1. Define Internal Help Desk roles
      2. Define External Help Desk roles
      3. Compare large help desk vs. small help desk departments
    4. Contrast the Help Desk cost and profit centers
      1. Contrast Centralized vs. decentralized help desks
      2. Explain Help Desk as a cost center
      3. Explain Help Desk as a profit center
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of The Help Desk purpose and function
      1. Explain the concept of End-user computing
      2. Describe the function of Help Desk in relation to the End-user
      3. Define and describe a Help Desk center in a large corporation
      4. Identify and list the steps to trouble shoot a computer problem
    6. Explain the role of Soft Skills that apply to the Help Desk Department
      1. List Characteristics of successful Help Desk Communications
      2. Identify “Soft Skills” that apply to Help Desk personnel
      3. List strategies for dealing with difficult Clients
    7. Distinguish the Help Desk Operation
      1. Describe the most common support problems
      2. Outline the steps of Help Desk Operation
      3. Explain the purpose of Management Support
      4. Identify appropriate personal skills to interact with users
      5. Outline ISO 9000 standards for Help Desk Operations
      6. List the common processes of Help Desk Operations
    8. Determine the tools needed for establishing a help desk
      1. Identify how technology benefits help desk operations
      2. Define expert and knowledge management systems
      3. Contrast remote and local support technologies
      4. List the steps taken to select technology/software
    9. Blueprint Help Desk settings
      1. Design a physical layout
      2. Develop a Beginning of Day (BOD) procedure
      3. Develop an End of Day (EOD) procedure
      4. List priorities for any Help Desk
    10. Demonstrate proficiency in using Help Desk Evaluation Strategies
      1. Explain Product evaluation strategies
      2. Describe needs analysis and assessment
      3. Describe the process of installing end-user computer systems
      4. List the steps take to assess the effectiveness of Help Desk Strategies
    11. Characterize training of End users for the help desk system
      1. Define training of End-users
      2. Demonstrate appropriate writing for end user requests
      3. Define the terms associated with computer facilities management
    12. Analyze Organizations that focus on Help Desk Qualifications
      1. List Help Desk Certifications
      2. Outline a personal chart for Help Desk departments
      3. List 4 key factors that lead to a successful Help Desk Career

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CIS 932 - CIS Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 8
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides a semi-structured experience in the field of computer information technology working as an intern with a local business. The student has the opportunity to network with professionals and employers in his or her field. The student will write a resume suitable for employment applications, explore employment opportunities and practice job interview skills.
    Prerequisite: Instructor Approval: Successful completion of at least 12 credits in CIS or MDT courses with a grade of  B or above. Students must arrange an internship with a local business prior to enrolling in this course.
    Competencies
    1. Classify the various tasks performed in an IT/Developer job
      1. List each separate task assigned
      2. Outline the sequence in which each task is performed.
      3. Identify those aspects of each task that require the application of software development knowledge.
      4. Describe the steps used to train an individual to do each assigned task.
    2. Increase occupational proficiencies
      1. List the required IT skills involved in the internship
      2. Identify which skills need to be learned/practiced.
      3. Outline ways in which these skills are learned/practiced.
      4. Develop steps for learning/practicing skills.
      5. Apply the steps developed.
    3. Develop a set of objectives for a given task.
      1. List all desired goals of internship.
      2. Select six of the most appropriate goals listed
      3. List all activities to achieve goals.
      4. Describe appropriate evaluations for determining when goals are achieved.
      5. Select one evaluation for each goal.
    4. Meet report deadlines.
      1. List required reports.
      2. Identify recipients of reports.
      3. Show the due date of each report.
      4. Clarify the contents of each report.
      5. Complete report forms as required.
      6. Turn in reports to identified recipients
    5. Conform to employer policies and procedures.
      1. Identify employer expectations for an intern.
      2. List all employer policies and procedures to be complied with.
      3. Recognize differences between internship-employer policies and policies of other employers.
      4. Name probable reasons for company policies listed.
      5. Identify possible work-related problems in absence of policies.
      6. Observe all company policies that are applicable to interns.
    6. Develop knowledge of people skills required by a professional in the IT field.
      1. Follow a specified dress code.
      2. Display a positive attitude.
      3. Show good performance.
      4. Attend the required hours.
    7. Explore an IT Career
      1. Network with professionals and employers in your career field.
      2. Develop a resume suitable for an employment search.
      3. Discuss and practice job interview skills.


Communication

  
  • COM 146 - Gender, Sexuality and Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course explores the ways mass media help form, reproduce and challenge our understandings of gender and sexuality. Students will be intruduced to various theories and approaches to media and how and why certain stereotypes of gender and sexuality dominate across many formats. This course will increase students’ media literacy and understanding of the lack of diversity in stereotypical images of gender and sexuality, as well as investigate ways in which media has potential for social change in these areas. Students may not receive course credit for both COM 146 and JOU 113 .
    Competencies
    1. Analyze resources and methods needed to critically evaluate the mass media.
      1. Outline mass communication research
      2. Summarize mass communication theory
    2. Examine theories of social constructions of gender
      1. Identify components of the constructions of both masculinity and femininity
      2. Assess common assumptions of gender as a marker of identity.
      3. Analyze media portrayals and reinforcements of stereotypical representations of gender roles.
    3. Compare theories of the social construction of sexualities
      1. Analyze media portrayals and reinforcements of stereotypical representations of sexualities
      2. Assess common assumptions of sexuality as a marker of identity.
      3. Identify basic differences between heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality and other categorizations
    4. Analyze the relationships between gender, sexuality, and other categories of social difference in media representations.
    5. Evaluate various media formats targeted to specific genders and/or sexuality groups.
      1. Identify specific types of media forms or genres that are targeted to a specific gender/sexuality category
      2. Characterize ways in which targeted media reinforce or challenge stereotypes to their presumed audiences
    6. Predict alternatives and futures of representations of gender and sexuality in media.
      1. Identify alternative media voices and creators that challenge common portrayals and constructions of gender and sexuality
      2. Assess active campaigns against the perpetuation of media stereotypes
    7. Evaluate the impact and effects of mass communication on audiences and on modern society.
      1. Conduct an evaluation of a representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary U.S. media
      2. Question ethical obligations and responsibilities of media to diversify its images, particularly in areas of gender and sexuality
      3. Examine the role of media industry and markets in shaping constructions of gender and sexuality in contemporary media.
      4. Discover a sense of social responsibility as a media consumer

  
  • COM 148 - Diversity and the Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Diversity and the Media course presents a historical perspective and a current analysis of representations of various minority groups based on race, gender, social class, religion and disability. This course helps students understand why and how stereotypical media portrayals have been produced and how the under-representation of diversified images affects their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors toward others and contributes to multicultural illiteracy. Students may not receive course credit for both COM 148 and JOU 114 .
    Competencies
    1. Research current media effects on the consequences of stereotypical media portrayals and under-representation of alternative images
      1. Give examples of negative media portrayals of various minority groups.
      2. Discuss basic facts and concepts of the U.S. as a diverse country
      3. Evaluate the social and psychological effects of the portrayals of underrepresented groups in the media
      4. Identify and challenge portrayals, especially stereotypical representation, of underrepresented groups in the media.
    2. Examine theories of social construction of race, disability and age
      1. Assess common assumptions of diversity
      2. Compare and contrast theories of stereotypical representation of underrepresented groups in the media
    3. Evaluate the function and effects of the mass media on today’s society
      1. Discuss current mainstream media and its target audiences
      2. Analyze the print and electronic media as they relate to gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, mental or physical disability, and age issues.
    4. Distinguish alternative media voices and creators, multicultural contributions to media, the image rebuilding process, and corrective stereotypes.
      1. Analyze the needs and interests of diverse communities, and how they are being met by the mainstream media
      2. Investigate the role of nonmainstream media’s sources and outlets
    5. Evaluate various minority groups’ representations in the media.
      1. Analyze popular media products
      2. Infer the media’s cultural influence and become a more informed consumer and enlightened participant in our media/consumer culture
    6. Communicate clearly and concisely in professional contexts involving mediated communication in regards to diverse social groups
      1. Conduct a research project on the representation of an identified group
      2. Present results of a research project in both oral and written forms
    7. Integrate a variety of materials to critically address issues about media, race, religion, disability, sexuality and gender
      1. Analyze how images of diverse groups have changed over time and why
      2. Reframe a sense of responsibility as a media consumer and citizen
    8. Predict changes in the diversity of media images
      1. Examine active campaigns against the perpetuation of media stereotypes.
      2. Develop a course of action of what can be done to promote positive change of diverse groups
      3. Brainstorm what can be done to promote change.
    9. Critique ethical obligations and responsibilities of media.
      1. Analyze the role of ethics of media to diversify its images of race, religion, disability, sexuality and gender
      2. Compare and contrast popular media’s success at representing minority groups

  
  • COM 703 - Communication Skills

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Reading, writing, speaking and listening are studied as methods of exploring and evaluating technological advances in trades and industry. Adapting communication for different audiences, evaluating industry-related literature and basic business writing are emphasized.
    Competencies
    1. Apply active listening techniques
      1. List the five stages of listening
      2. Identify the different purposes for listening (gain information, empathy, critical listening, etc.) as they relate to workplace situations
      3. Explain the differences between active and passive listening
      4. Choose effective response strategies for a variety of workplace situations
    2. Create oral presentations on work-related topics using effective public speaking skills
      1. Explain the different strategies for upward, horizontal, and outward communication
      2. Apply speaking skills appropriate to workplace audience and purpose
      3. Use words, pronunciation, and grammar which are understood by and do not alienate others
      4. Practice presenting information in several oral formats (impromptu, small group, individual oral presentation) using effective organizational and speaking techniques
      5. Identify the purpose and function of visual aids
      6. Demonstrate appropriate use of visual aids when giving an oral presentation
    3. Analyze reading skills
      1. Differentiate the various purposes and strategies for reading (scanning, skimming, reading for detail, evaluating, etc.)
      2. Select a variety of literature in the student’s chosen field
      3. Find information for a work-related concern
      4. Review methods of making reading time more productive through the use of study methods, such as SQ3R
      5. Illustrate understanding of content through writing effective paraphrases and summaries
      6. Summarize work-related literature, appropriate for a particular audience
    4. Produce written communication for business and/or technical writing
      1. Analyze different target audiences for specific purposes
      2. Determine the anticipated audience appropriate to context
      3. State the purpose of a message quickly and clearly
      4. Choose appropriate editing and proofreading strategies for business and/or technical writing
      5. Examine the impact that visual presentation of written material can have on an audience, including the use of visual aids, such as charts, graphs, drawings or maps
    5. Produce projects collaboratively by working groups and dyads
      1. Distinguish between reasons for groups to meet
      2. Characterize what is meant by communication climate and strategies for creating positive communication climates
      3. Demonstrate the basic principles of interpersonal communication
      4. Categorize different types of conflicts
      5. Determine different types of conflict resolution strategies
      6. Differentiate the most appropriate time to use each strategy
    6. Evaluate the employment-seeking process as applicable to programs
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the current trends in the job market and how they affect the employment-seeking process
      2. Produce an easy-to-skim format for resumes and application letters
      3. Review appropriate dress and behavior for a job interview
      4. Practice interviews for jobs
      5. Critique interviews for jobs


Computer Networking

  
  • NET 120 - Computer Hardware Basics OL

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Introduces the operation of a modern personal computer from a hardware point of view. Students learn about the basic components of a computer and develop troubleshooting skills for advanced courses. Some of the areas covered include system boards, storage drives, memory and power supplies. In addition, some software topics, such as operating systems, are presented.  The material covered in this course is in preparation for the COMPTIA A+ certification test or PC PRO certification course.
    Competencies
    1. Distinguish the most common devices inside a computer.
      1. Contrast RAM, CPU and RAM caching
      2. Identify processor types
      3. Describe RAM function and features
      4. Identify the types and configuration of a RAM
      5. Show how to properly install RAM
      6. Discuss RAM access speeds 
    2. Differentiate motherboards and BIOS
      1. Describe the functions of BIOS/UEFI
      2. Configure CMOS settings
      3. Identify different motherboard form factors
      4. Understand the operation of an external data bus
    3. Compare the standards of PC compatible power supplies
      1. Understand the safety concerns on working with power supplies
      2. Select the different power supply connectors and their function
      3. Identify the concern over electro-static discharge
      4. Discuss the need for surge suppressors
    4. Explain the feature and use of hard drives
      1. Identify the various types of hard drives
      2. Learn how to install a hard drive
      3. Discuss partitioning and formatting  
    5. Evaluate the different components that make sound work in a computer
      1. Identify the different components for sound
      2. Fix common sound issues
    6. Explain the function of a video card
      1. Describe the components that make the video work.
      2. Learn about refresh rates
      3. Discuss video resolution
    7. Outline the issues that differentiate mobile devices from desktops
      1. Classify mobile devices
      2. Summarize the impact on business integration 
    8. Evaluate the different types of printers in use today
      1. Examine the operation of a laser printer
      2. Perform basic printer repair
      3. Describe how a inkjet printer works
    9. Assess common operating systems utilized in business and home
      1. Install current versions of MS Windows
      2. Create user account with different privileges
      3. Troubleshoot operating system issues
    10. Explain networking standards and concepts
      1. Discuss basic typologies
      2. Discuss networking devices
      3. Discuss addressing and sub netting 

     

  
  • NET 123 - Computer Hardware Basics

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course follows the recommendations of CompTIA on the subject and materials to assist the student in learning about computer hardware and functions needed to pass the A Plus exam. A detailed study and hands-on lab component give the student the opportunity to install and troubleshoot computer hardware. It is recommended that the student have a basic understanding of computers, their use and operation.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the basic components of a computer
      1. List the various connectors on a computer
      2. Recognize the most common devise inside a computer.
      3. Show how to set jumpers and switches.
    2. Discuss the features of microprocessors
      1. Describe buses and their functions
      2. Understand clock speed
      3. Contrast RAM, CPU and RAM caching
      4. Install a processor
      5. Identify processor types
    3. Describe RAM function and features
      1. Identify the types and configuration of a RAM
      2. Show how to properly install RAM
      3. Discuss RAM access speeds
    4. Differentiate motherboards and BIOS
      1. Describe the functions of BIOS
      2. Configure CMOS settings
      3. Identify different motherboard form factors
    5. Understand the operation of an external data bus
      1. Discuss how IROs work
      2. Describe how DMAs work
      3. List the different types of expansion buses
      4. Describe how COM and LPT ports work
    6. Describe the standards of PC compatible power supplies
      1. Understand the safety concerns on working with power supplies
      2. Inspect the different power supply connectors and their function
      3. Identify the concern over electro-static discharge
      4. Discuss the need for surge suppressors
    7. Discuss the function of a floppy drive
      1. Understand the different types of floppy drives
      2. Install and maintain a floppy drive
    8. Explain the feature and use of hard drives
      1. Understand the concept of geometry
      2. Identify the various types of hard drives
      3. Learn how to install a hard drive
      4. Discuss partitioning and formatting
    9. Discover the basics of SCSI
      1. Describe what SCSI chains and IDs are
      2. Discuss the different types of SCSI
    10. Describe CD and DVD media
      1. Learn about the different types of CD media
      2. Learn about the different types of DVD media
      3. Install a CD drive
      4. Install a DVD drive 
    11. Discuss the different components that make sound work in a computer
      1. Identify the different types of sounds
      2. Install sound cards
      3. Fix common sound card problems
    12. Explain the function of a video card
      1. Describe the components that make the video work.
      2. Learn about refresh rates
      3. Discuss video resolution
      4. Contrast between CRT and LCD
    13. Understand the functions of modems and UARTS
      1. Discuss the difference between analog and serial communication
      2. Describe synchronous and asynchronous communication
      3. Identify different speed, error correction and data compression features
    14. Discuss the issues that differentiate portable PCs from desktops
      1. Describe the different battery types used in protables
      2. Explain power management
    15. Identify the different types of printers in use today
      1. Examine the operation of a laser printer
      2. Perform basic printer repair
      3. Describe how a inkjet printer works

  
  • NET 126 - Networking Tech-Mainframe

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    To provide a technical level of understanding in the areas of mainframe networking connectivity, data communication concepts and protocol communication concepts.
    Competencies
    1. Describe computer network development
      1. Identify the seven layers of the OSI Model and the key responsibilities of each layer.
      2. Recognize the interrelationship of the OSI models protocols and standards
      3. Describe Pre-Network Computer Environment and Islands of Operation
      4. Identify the major standards organizations and their responsibilities
    2. Describe computer codes and their representation signals.
      1. Differentiate between analog and digital signals
      2. Identify the major coding codes
      3. Identify the key characteristics of baseband and baseband transmissions
    3. Describe a synchronous and asynchronous communication techniques
      1. Define multiplexing and identify reasons for multiplexing
      2. Identify key characteristics of frequency-diversion and time-diversion multiplexing
      3. Define modem and identify reasons for using a modem
      4. Define codec and identify reasons for using a codec
      5. Identify a variety of media types
    4. Describe data communications characteristics
      1. Identify the functions and capabilities of repeaters, bridges, routers, and gateways
      2. Identify the components of the public switched telephone network and how they impact data communications
      3. Identify the standard networking services provided by ISDN
    5. Describe lower layer protocols
      1. Identify and describe other important Physical layer interfaces
      2. Identify organizations that promulgate SDLC, HDLC, and LAPB protocols.
      3. Identify the major services provided by SDLC, HDLC, and LAPB
      4. Identify and describe IEEE 802 specifications
      5. Identify the frame format and field functions of IEEE 802 packets
      6. Identify the characteristics and major services provided by LocalTalk
      7. Identify the frame format and field functions of a Localtalk frame
      8. Identify the characteristics and fields of and FDDI frame
    6. Describe the Internet protocol
      1. Identify the services provided by the Major Internet protocols
      2. Identify the characteristics of the major Internet protocols
      3. Identify the fields and field functions of IP and TCP packets
    7. Describe the Netware protocols
      1. Identify the major services provided by Netware
      2. Identify and label the fields and functions of Netware IPX and PSX packets
    8. Describe the SNA protocols
      1. Identify the major services provided by SNA
      2. Identify the characteristics of SNA
      3. Identify SNA modes and network connections
      4. Describe SNA sessions and Networks Management
    9. Describe the DNA protocols
      1. Identify the major services of DNA
      2. Identify the characteristics of DNA
      3. Compare DNA Phase V to the OSI Model
    10. Describe the AppleTalk protocols
      1. Identify the major services provided by AppleTalk
      2. Compare Apple Talk to the OSI Model
      3. Explain the AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol
      4. Distinguish between extended and non-extended networks
      5. Describe the Zone Information Protocol
      6. Describe the Apple Talk Filing protocol
    11. Describe probable future network development
      1. Define a Global network
      2. Define tools that will advance distributed processing
      3. Identify the potential possibilities of Mobile Networks
      4. Identify the problems that network diversity will create for existing management strategies

  
  • NET 139 - Microsoft Desktop Operate Sys

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the current Microsoft curriculum for the Microsoft Windows desktop operating system. For detailed information, contact the Advanced Technology Center or www.dmacc.edu (ITNA program).
    Competencies
    1. Describe the features and benefits of MS Win XP
      1. Identify the features of Windows XP
      2. Describe the benefits of Windows XP in a business environment
    2. Install Windows XP
      1. Determine hardware and software requirements for installing Windows XP
      2. Upgrade to Windows XP from the Windows XP and Windows 2000 pro operating systems
      3. Use a setup script to perform an automated installation
      4. Identify and resolve installation support issues
    3. Configure Windows XP
      1. Use Control Panel to configure hardware settings
      2. Use Control Panel to configure system settings
      3. Use Control Panel to configure software settings
      4. Use the registry to configure Windows XP settings 
    4. Manage Hard Disks in Windows XP
      1. Enable NTFS
      2. Identify the capabilities and limitations of FAT16 and FTFS file systems.
      3. Partition a hard disk
      4. Describe the use of long filenames in Windows XP
      5. Implement disk compression
      6. Use ScanDisk to troubleshoot disk errors
    5. Explain, manage and configure Printing in Windows XP
      1. Install a local printer
      2. Configure a local printer
      3. Manage a printer
      4. Configure a printer to meet specific needs
      5. Solve common Windows XP printing problems
    6. Maintain and Troubleshoot Windows XP in a Stand-Alone Environment.
      1. Describe the use of Microsoft System Information utility.
      2. Schedule maintenance tasks in Windows XP
      3. Update Windows 2000
      4. Back up the registry and create an emergency startup disk.
      5. Resolve hardware conflict.
      6. Control and troubleshoot the boot process
      7. Examine system files
      8. Troubleshoot application failures using Dr. Watson
    7. Install and Configure Windows XP Networking Components
      1. Choose a multiple installation method and location.
      2. Automate a multiple installation setup
      3. Install and configure network components in Windows XP.
      4. Set up Windows XP for resource sharing
      5. Configure the browser
      6. Administer a remote Windows XP-based computer
    8. Implement Windows XP on a Windows NT-Based Network
      1. Describe a distributed file system
      2. Log on to a Windows 2000 domain from Windows XP
      3. Set up Windows XP to share resources with Windows 2000-based network users
      4. Troubleshoot Windows XP interoperability with Windows 2000 
    9. Implement Windows XP on a Novell NetWare Network
      1. Install and configure IPX/SPX-compatible protocol
      2. Connect and log on to a NetWare server
      3. Print to a NetWare print queue
      4. Set up Windows XP to share resources with NetWare users
      5. Troubleshoot Windows XP interoperability with NetWare
    10. Manage Windows XP User Profiles
      1. Identify mandatory and roaming user profiles
      2. Load and update user profiles
      3. Enable user profiles
      4. Implement user profiles
      5. Troubleshoot user profiles
    11. Implement Windows XP System Policies
      1. Identify features of System Policy Editor
      2. Assign system policies to users, groups, and computers
      3. Implement system policies on a network
      4. Troubleshoot system policies
    12. Compare Internetworking and Intranetworking with Windows XP
      1. Describe security and access issues when browsing the Internet and intranets
      2. Identify Microsoft Internet Explorer 4l0 features for controlling access and security zones
      3. Install and administer Personal Web Server
      4. Describe the use of NetMeeting to provide long-distance communication
    13. Implement Dial-Up Networking in Windows XP
      1. Install and configure Dial-Up Networking
      2. Connect to a remote server
      3. Host a remote client
      4. Use direct cable connection
      5. Install and configure infrared devices
      6. Troubleshoot Dial-Up Networking
    14. Maintain and Troubleshoot Windows XP in a Network Environment
      1. Use Windows Update manager
      2. Use Web-based troubleshooting wizards
      3. Configure Web-Based Enterprise Management Support
      4. Troubleshoot remote computers

  
  • NET 144 - Digital & Computer Electronics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    In the context of today’s computer technology, this class studies digital electronic circuits, concentrating on gates, counters, registers and memory. Also included is the study of data communications by bus structure, parallel and serial ports and microprocessors.
    Competencies
    1. Define the basic principles of electricity
      1. Describe the motion of electrons in a closed circuit
      2. Explain the difference between AC and DC current.
      3. Identify the parameters of current, voltage and resistance.
      4. Explain Ohm’s law
      5. Convert between the various units of measure
    2. Evaluate the basic usage of the test equipment for digital circuits
      1. Use digital logic probes, pulsers, and oscilloscope
      2. Hookup circuits and test equipment
    3. Distinguish between computer codes and numbering systems
      1. Describe BCD and ASCII codes
      2. Explain Binary numbering systems
      3. Explain Octal number systems
      4. Describe Hexadecimal numbering systems
    4. Evaluate timing diagrams
      1. Draw timing diagrams
      2. Read timing diagrams
    5. Evaluate the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Describe logic circuits algebraically
      2. Identify gates by their symbols
      3. Calculate logic circuit outputs
    6. Analyze the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Construct various logic gate circuits
      2. Troubleshoot various logic gate circuits
      3. Demonstrate the characteristics of various logic gate circuits.
    7. Analyze Truth Tables
      1. Draw truth tables
      2. Read truth tables
    8. Simplify logic circuits using Boolean algebra and Demorgan’s Theorem.
      1. Describe combinations of gates with Boolean algebra.
      2. Apply Boolean Theorems
      3. Apply DeMorgan’s Theorems
    9. Evaluate counter and register theory
      1. Explain asynchronous counters
      2. Explain synchronous counters
      3. Describe shift registers
    10. Assess logic circuits used in interfacing
      1. Interface serial digital devices
      2. Interface parallel digital devices
      3. Interface using tri-state input and output devices.
    11. Analyze interfacing devices
    12. Evaluate memory devices
      1. Use the terminology associated with memory systems
      2. Describe the difference between read/write and read-only memory
      3. Discuss the difference between volatile and non-volatile memory
      4. Outline the steps that occur when the CPU reads from or writes to memory
      5. Distinguish among the various types of ROMS
    13. Evaluate basic microprocessor/microcontroller operations
      1. Describe the function and operation of each of the basic elements of any computer
      2. Explain the Fetch and execute operations
      3. Explain busses and their signals
      4. Cite the major functions performed by the microcomputer
    14. Examine microprocessors
      1. Identify the sections within a microcontroller
      2. Describe the operation of each section
      3. Demonstrate the operation of microcontroller programs

  
  • NET 145 - Digital & Computer Elect. Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    In the context of today’s computer technology, this class continues the study of digital electronic circuits, concentrating on gates, counters, registers and memory through hands-on lab experiments. Also included are lab tasks involving data communications by bus structure, parallel and serial ports and microprocessors.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the basic usage of the test equipment for digital circuits
      1. Use digital logic probes, pulsers, and oscilloscope
      2. Hookup circuits and test equipment
    2. Compare the applications of various test equipment
    3. Summarize the basics of applying Ohm’s law
      1. Define difference between AC and DC current
      2. Measure current, voltage and resistance in a circuit
    4. Analyze the operation of basic logic gates
      1. Construct various logic gate circuits
      2. Troubleshoot various logic gate circuits
      3. Demonstrate the characteristics of various logic gate circuits
    5. Summarize combinational logic circuits
      1. Construct combinational logic circuits
      2. Troubleshoot combinational logic circuits 
    6. Evaluate flip-flop and latch circuits
      1. Construct flip-flop and latch circuits
      2. Troubleshoot flip-flop and latch circuits
    7. Contrast various digital circuits
      1. Construct encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits using LSI circuits
      2. Troubleshoot encoder, decoder, counter, and multiplexer circuits
    8. Analyze interfacing devices
      1. Interface analog to digital devices
      2. Construct circuits with digital to analog devices
      3. Construct circuits with other peripheral devices
      4. Compare tri-state inputs and outputs
    9. Compare memory devices
      1. Test the operation of various memory devices
      2. Interface memory devices
    10. Examine microprocessors
      1. Identify the sections within a microprocessor
      2. Describe the operation of each section
      3. Demonstrate the operation of microprocessor programs

  
  • NET 147 - Networking Technologies

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provide a technical level of understanding in the areas of networking connectivity, data communication concepts and protocol communication concepts.
    Competencies
    1. Describe data communications characteristics
      1. Identify the functions and capabilities of repeaters, bridges, routers, and gateways
      2. Identify the components of the public switched telephone network and how they impact data communications
      3. Identify common standard networking services provided by commercial broadband carriers
    2. Explain the function of common networking protocols
      1. Identify commonly used TDP and UDP default ports
      2. Given a scenario, evaluate the proper use of IPV4 addressing schemes
      3. Identify common IPv4 and IPv6 routing protocols
      4. Explain the purpose and properties of routing
      5. Compare the characteristics of wireless communication standards
    3. Describe lower layer protocols
      1. Identify and describe other important Physical layer interfaces
      2. Identify and describe IEEE 802 specifications.
      3. Identify the frame format and field functions of IEEE 802 packets
    4. Categorize standard network media and topologies.
      1. Identify common connector types
      2. Identify common physical network topologies
      3. Given a scenario, differentiate and implement appropriate wiring standards.
      4. Categorize WAN technology types and properties
      5. Categorize LAN technology types and properties.
      6. Explain common logical network topologies and their characteristics
      7. Identify components of wiring distribution.
    5. Install, configure and differentiate between common network devices
    6. Understand network management
      1. Explain the function of each layer of the OSI model
      2. Identify types of configuration management documentation
      3. Given a scenario, evaluate the network based on configuration management documentation
      4. Conduct network monitoring to identify performance and connectivity issues
      5. Explain different methods and rationales for network performance optimization
      6. Given a scenario, troubleshoot common connectivity issues and select an appropriate solution.
    7. Understand the purpose of common software and hardware networking tools
      1. Given a scenario, select the appropriate command line interface tool and interpret the output to verify functionality
      2. Explain the purpose of network scanners
      3. Given a scenario, utilize the appropriate hardware tools
    8. Explain network security hardware and software
      1. Explain common features of a firewall
      2. Explain the methods of network access security
      3. Explain methods of user authentication
      4. Identify common security threats and mitigation techniques
    9. Describe a synchronous and asynchronous communication techniques
      1. Define multiplexing and identify reasons for multiplexing
      2. Identify key characteristics of frequency-diversion and time-diversion multiplexing
      3. Define modem and identify reasons for using a modem
      4. Define codec and identify reasons for using a codec
      5. Identify a variety of media types

  
  • NET 163 - Installing & Configuring Windows Server

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course collectively covers implementing, managing, maintaining and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server environment. Although there is some crossover of skills and tasks across these courses, this course focuses on the initial implementation and configuration of core services, such as Networking, Storage, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), Group Policy, PowerShell scripting, File and Print Services, and Hyper-V. This course covers objectives for the Microsoft Certification Exam.
    Competencies
    1. Deploy Windows Server
      1. Describe Windows Server
      2. Install Windows Server
      3. Perform post installation configuration of Windows Server
      4. Describe the management tools available in Windows Server
      5. Execute basic administrative tasks using Windows PowerShell
    2. Introduce active directory domain services
      1. Describe the structure of AD DS
      2. Explain the purpose of domain controllers
      3. Install a domain controller
    3. Manage active directory domain services objects
      1. Administer user and group accounts with graphical tools
      2. Oversee computer accounts
      3. Delegate permissions to perform AD DS administration 
    4. Automate active directory domain services administration
      1. Use command-line tools for AD DS administration
      2. Use Windows PowerShell cmdlets for AD DS administration
      3. Perform bulk operations by using Windows PowerShell 
    5. Implement IPv4 & IPv6
      1. Explain the TCP/IP protocol suite
      2. Describe IPv4 & IPv6 addressing
      3. Determine a subnet mask necessary for supernetting or subnetting
      4. Troubleshoot IPv4 communication
      5. Summarize coexistence with IPv4
      6. Outline IPv6 transition technologies
    6. Execute dynamic host configuration protocol
      1. Explain the DHCP server role
      2. Configure DHCP scopes
      3. Manage a DHCP database
      4. Secure the DHCP server.
    7. Apply DNS and group policy
      1. Describe name resolution for Windows operating system clients and Windows Server servers
      2. Install a DNS Server
      3. Manage DNS zones and group policy objects (GPOs)
      4. Describe group policy processsing
      5. Use a central store for administrative templates
    8. Implement local storage, file services, and print services
      1. Describe various storage technologies
      2. Explain how to manage disks and volumes
      3. Summarize how to implement storage spaces
      4. Secure shared files and folders
      5. Protect shared files and folders by using shadow copies
      6. Configure the work folders role service network printing
    9. Secure Windows Servers using group policy objects
      1. Describe Windows Server operating system security
      2. Configure security settings by using group policy
      3. Increase security for server resources
      4. Restrict unauthorized software from running on servers and clients
      5. Configure Windows firewall with advanced security
    10. Implement server virtualization with Hyper-V
      1. Describe virtualization technologies
      2. User Hyper-V
      3. Manage virtual machine storage and virtual networks

  
  • NET 166 - Applied Computer Security

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic concepts of practical computer and internet security: passwords, firewalls, antivirus software, malware, social networking, surfing the internet, phishing and wireless networks. This class is intended for students with little or no background in information technology or security. Basic knowledge of word processing required.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate Network Security
      1. Implement security configuration parameters on network devices and other technologies
      2. Use secure network administration principles
      3. Explain network design elements and components
      4. Implement common protocols and services
      5. Troubleshoot security issues related to wireless networking
    2. Assess Compliance and Operational Security
      1. Explain the importance of risk related concepts
      2. Summarize the security implications of integrating systems and data with third parties
      3. Implement appropriate risk mitigation strategies
      4. Implement basic forensic procedures
      5. Summarize common incident response procedures
      6. Explain the importance of security related awareness and training
      7. Compare and contrast physical security and environmental controls
      8. Select the appropriate control to meet the goals of security
    3. Evaluate Threats and Vulnerabilities
      1. Explain types of malware
      2. Summarize various types of attacks
      3. Summarize social engineering attacks and the associated effectiveness with each attack
      4. Explain types of wireless attacks
      5. Explain types of application attacks
      6. Analyze a scenario and select the appropriate type of mitigation and deterrent techniques
      7. Use appropriate tools and techniques to discover security threats and vulnerabilities
      8. Explain the proper use of penetration testing versus vulnerability scanning 
    4. Differentiate Application, Data and Host Security
      1. Explain the importance of application security controls and techniques
      2. Summarize mobile security concepts and technologies
      3. Select the appropriate solution to establish host security
      4. Implement the appropriate controls to ensure data security
      5. Compare alternative methods to mitigate security risks in static environments
    5. Evaluate Access Control and Identity Management
      1. Compare and contrast the function and purpose of authentication services
      2. Explain appropriate authentication, authorization, and access control
      3. Install and configure security controls when performing account management, based on best practices
    6. Examin different methods of Cryptography and its use in digital security
      1. Describe general cryptography concepts
      2. Use appropriate cryptographic methods
      3. Discuss use appropriate PKI, certificate management and associated components

  
  • NET 168 - Administering Windows Server

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course focuses on implementing, managing, maintaining, and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server environment. This course will include the administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server infrastructure such as configuring and troubleshooting name resolution, user and group management with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and Group Policy, implementing Remote Access solutions such as DirectAccess, VPNs and Web Application Proxy, implementing Network Policies and Network Access Protection, PowerShell scripting, Data Security, deployment and maintenance of server images, as well as update management and monitoring of Windows Server environments. It covers the current objectives for the Microsoft Certification Exam.
    Competencies
    1. Create Domain Name System (DNS) zones
      1. Install DNS server
      2. Troubleshoot DNS
      3. Configure DNS server role and zone transfers
    2. Maintain active directory domain services and windows server
      1. Implement virtualized domain controllers
      2. Instigate RODCs
      3. Administer AD DS
      4. Manage the AD DS Database
      5. Describe monitoring tools for Windows server
      6. Use performance monitor to analyze performance statistics
      7. Monitor event logs to interpret recorded events
    3. Manage user service accounts and user desktops with group policy
      1. Configure password policy, user account lockout, and folder redirection and scrips using GPOs
      2. Construct managed server accounts and GPO preferences
      3. Explain group policy
      4. Administer GPOs
      5. Identify group policy scope and processing
      6. Troubleshoot GPO application
      7. Use administrative templates
      8. Deploy software using GPOs
    4. Install the network policy server
      1. Configure a network policy server and RADIUS
      2. Demonstrate NPS authentication methods
      3. Troubleshoot NPS
    5. Implement network access protection
      1. Describe how NAP can protect your network
      2. Explain NAP enforcement processes
      3. Configure NAP
      4. Troubleshoot NAP
    6. Execute remote access and update management
      1. Install remote access in Windows
      2. Use Direct Access, VPN, and web application proxy
      3. Describe the role of WSUS and the update management process
      4. Deploy updates with WSUS
    7. Optimize file services
      1. Describe FSRM and DFS
      2. Use FSRM to manage quotas, file screens, and storage reports
      3. Implement classification and file management tasks
      4. Configure DFS namespaces
      5. Troubleshoot DFS replication
    8. Configure encryption and advanced auditing
      1. Secure data using BitLocker Drive Encryption
      2. Encrypt files using EFS
      3. Manage advanced auditing
    9. Perform deployments using WDS
      1. Describe features and functionality of WDS
      2. Configure Windows deployment services in Windows server
      3. Maintain server images
    10. Write Windows PowerShell scripts to administer Windows server
      1. Describe Windows PowerShell
      2. Explain how to use Windows PowerShell
      3. Use Windows PowerShell for administering Windows server

  
  • NET 173 - Configuring Advanced Windows Server Services

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Covers implementing, managing, maintaining and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server environment. This course focuses on advanced configuration of services necessary to deploy, manage and maintain a Windows Server infrastructure, such as advanced networking services, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS), Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), PowerShell scripting, Network Load Balancing, Failover Clustering, business continuity and disaster recovery services as well as access and information provisioning and protection technologies such as Dynamic Access Control (DAC), and Web Application Proxy integration with AD FS and Workplace Join. This course covers the current objectives for the Microsoft Certification Exam.
    Competencies
    1. Implement advanced network services
      1. Configure advanced features in DHCP with Windows Server
      2. Organize advanced DNS settings in Windows Server
      3. Design IP address management in Windows Server
    2. Execute advanced file services
      1. Configure iSCSI
      2. Implement BranchCache using Windows Server
      3. Use Windows Server features that optimize storage utilization
    3. Apply dynamic access control
      1. Explain DAC
      2. Configure components of DAC
      3. Implement DAC on file servers
      4. Describe access-denied assistance
      5. Integrate work folders with DAC
    4. Perform distributed active directory domain services
      1. Describe the components of a highly complex AD DS deployment
      2. Realize complex AD DS deployment
      3. Configure AD DS trusts
    5. Implement active directory domain services sites and replication
      1. Describe how replication works in a Windows Server AD DS environment
      2. Configure AD DS sites in order to optimize AD DS network traffic
      3. Monitor AD DS replication
    6. Employ AD CS
      1. Use certificates in business environments
      2. Describe the Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) components and concepts, and the options for implementing a certification authority infrastructure
      3. Plan an AD CS certification authority infrastructure
      4. Design a certificate distribution and revocation
      5. Configure key archival and recovery
    7. Use active directory rights management services
      1. Describe what AD RMS is, and how it can be used to achieve content protection
      2. Deploy an AD RMS infrastructure
      3. Configure content protection using AD RMS
      4. Enable users outside the organization to access content protected by using AD RMS
    8. Administer AD FS
      1. Describe the identity federation business scenarios and how AD FS can be used to address the scenarios
      2. Configure the AD FS prerequisites and deploy the AD FS services
      3. Implement AD FS to enable SSO in a single organization and between federated partners
      4. Apply the Web Application Proxy
      5. Explain WorkPlace Join integration with AD FS
    9. Plan NLB implemenatation
      1. Describe how NLB works
      2. Configure an NLB cluster
      3. Apply network load balancing 
    10. Implement failover clustering
      1. Explain failover clustering features in Windows Server
      2. Describe how to implement a failover cluster
      3. Summarize how to configure highly available applications and services on a failover cluster
      4. Illustrate how to maintain a failover cluster and how to use new maintenance features
      5. Outline how to implement multi-site failover cluster
    11. Execute failover clustering with Hyper-V
      1. Explain options for making virtual machines highly available
      2. Describe how to implement virtual machines in a failover cluster deployed on a host
      3. Outline options for moving a virtual machine or its storage
      4. Summarize a high level overview of Microsoft System Center - Virtual Machine Manager (VMM)
    12. Develop plan to implement server and data recovery
      1. Describe the considerations that must be included when you are implementing a disaster recovery solution
      2. Implement a backup solution for Windows Server

  
  • NET 179 - Digital Forensic Analysis I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course serves as a technical introduction to the forensic process involved in the imaging, searching and processing of digital evidence from computers and mobile devices. Topics covered in the course include a strong emphasis on investigative documentation, recognition of potential evidence sources, sterile evidence acquisition and analysis, and data recovery methodologies. State-of- the-art hardware and software will be used in hands-on labs and case studies.
    Prerequisite: NET 373  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate court-acceptable investigation procedures and documentation
      1. Identify/plan the chain-of-custody
      2. Utilize fact-based reporting
      3. Describe the importance of logging search, seizure, and processing of all electronic evidence
      4. Keep notes/ongoing documentation pertinent to investigation
      5. List details contained in typical post-examination reports
    2. Explain the steps of a forensic investigation: verification of legal authority, collecting preliminary data, investigative environmental impact determination, securing and transporting evidence, acquisition of evidence, examination
    3. Examine appropriate methods for securing and transporting evidence
      1. Locate and document potential evidence
      2. Tag evidence
      3. Bag evidence
      4. Transport evidence
    4. Demonstrate appropriate evidence acquisition techniques
      1. Document system physical topology
      2. Document logical system characteristics including BIOS properties, boot configurations and date/time settings
    5. Outline common secondary data storage
      1. Identify physical interfaces
      2. Differentiate between magnetic and solid state storage
      3. Describe standard hard drive geometry, addressing, and configuration
      4. Describe purpose/functionality of RAID
    6. Identify required hardware and software for forensic investigations
    7. Develop appropriate procedures for forensic duplication
      1. Determine proper wiping techniques
      2. Demonstrate proper write-blocking using accepted methods
      3. Show the function of hash values in authentication of data acquisition
      4. Explain the function of compression in data acquisition
    8. Describe evidence examination
      1. Describe physical extraction/examination techniques
      2. Describe logical extraction/examination techniques
    9. Analyze data
      1. Use manual methods to retrieve data
      2. Use industry standard tools to automate analysis including
      3. Apply data hash value comparisons to improve efficiency
    10. Examine typical user data and system files using automated tools
      1. Perform searches using various keywords and contextual indicators
      2. Examine data contained in compressed data files/containers
      3. Examine web based artifacts
      4. Examine mobile device data

  
  • NET 180 - Digital Forensic Analysis II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is a continuation of study relating to digital forensic artifacts and data recovery topics. Topics discussed in this course include the investigation and analysis of common evidentiary artifacts that are recoverable in typical operating systems and applications used in computers and mobile devices.  Software and hardware tools are widely used through various case studies and exercises to reinforce discussion topics.
    Prerequisite: NET 179  
    Competencies
    1. Perform in depth analysis of Internet-based data.
      1. Make use of captured traffic
      2. Identify on-line data types
    2. Analyze e-mail evidence
      1. Identify common email applications
      2. Conduct email preservation
      3. Conduct searches across emails
      4. Describe email header contents
    3. Utilize simple data encryption and decryption techniques
      1. Document encryption breaking processes
      2. Identifying specific types of encryption used
    4. Identify specific artifacts from Microsoft operating systems, to include as applicable: Registry, Recycle Bin, Date and Time stamps, Master File Table, Metadata files, and Databases.
    5. Analyze artifacts from Apple operating systems
      1. Recover data from various locations within the operating system
      2. Distinguish types of data relevant for investigations 
    6. Utilize advanced aspects of industry standard forensic tools
      1. Demonstrate use of forensically sound tools
      2. Contrast the different tools used in industry: open source vs proprietary.
    7. Describe use of virtualization for investigation
    8. Demonstrate appropriate documentation procedures
      1. List the steps necessary for proper documentation
      2. Outline the procedures for chain of custody 
    9. Evaluate proper procedures for investigating mobile devices
      1. Compare and contrast mobile devices from standard computers
      2. Define common terms and acronyms associated with mobile devices
      3. Describe the purpose and demonstrate the implementation of network isolation techniques during acquisition and investigation
      4. Use common software tools for mobile device analysis to obtain pertinent information

     

  
  • NET 183 - E-Discovery - Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course provides an overview of the E-discovery process.  Helpful for technical practitioners and legal assistants, this course explains legal requirements, appropriate protocol and common expectations for e-discovery implementation. 
    Competencies

    1. Examine E-discovery issues and explain the legal requirements. 
      1. Contrast process models for e-discovery 
      2. Describe the EDRM model 
    2. Cite Federal Rules of Civil Procedure pertaining to e-discovery 
      1. Describe the main impact of Zubulake v. UBS Warburg LLC  
      2. Discuss the changes to the FRCP 
    3. Cite State of Iowa Rules of Civil Procedure pertaining to e-discovery 
      1. Discuss the differences and similarities with the FRCP 
      2. Describe pertinent Iowa case law regarding E-Discovery 
    4. Summarize the litigation process. 
      1. Identify the importance of a “meet and confer” 
      2. Describe the components of a hold notice 
    5. Characterize the appropriate steps for case assessment. 
      1. Define and determine data custodian(s). 
      2. Describe relevant interview techniques and e-discovery specific motivations. 
      3. Identify common sources of data. 
    6. Distinguish the basic functions of computer servers 
      1. Describe common types of services including e-mail, web, file, and databases. 
      2. Describe common types of data including e-mail, web, source code, documents, and graphics. 
    7. Examine the concepts of corporate data mapping 
      1. Identify the main sources of ESI 
      2. Identify who should be interviewed to locate ESI 
      3. Describe the questions that should be asked 
    8. Describe data preservation options. 
      1. Discuss how ESI can be preserved 
      2. Describe the instances of when to collect and when not to 
    9. Summarize data collection procedures. 
      1. Describe functional benefits of full disk imaging. 
      2. Discuss the functional benefits of selective data acquisition. 
    10. Summarize data processing procedures. 
      1. Describe the process of case-specific data culling. 
      2. Discuss the practice of targeted keyword searching.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • NET 185 - E-Discovery I - Data Collect

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course explores the data identification and collection phases of the e-discovery process.  The principles of common hardware and logical file systems are also discussed.
    Competencies
    1. Differentiate data collection methods. 

      1. Identify various data sources

      2. Identify different storage types

      3. Describe issues associated with mobile and Cloud storage

    2. Examine the basic physical drive terminology. 

      1. Define internal components and controls including platters, heads, sectors, HPA, and DCO.

      2. Define common interfaces including SATA and SSD.

      3. Contrast magnetic, solid state, optical non-volatile storage. 

      4. Summarize the potential significance of printers, copiers, and the output from those devices.

    3. Contrast common file systems: FATx, exFAT, NTFS, EXTx, and APFs. 

      1. Discuss the impact of choosing specific file systems in data collection

      2. Demonstrate appropriate selection of a file system for collection 

    1. Distinguish between server types-file, domain controller, authentication, email, etc

      1. List common characteristics of Windows severs.

      2. List common characteristics of Linux servers.

    1. Evaluate storage backup methods 

      1. Describe magnetic tape backup and restoration procedures. 

      2. Summarize RAID solutions. 

      3. Demonstrate off-site and cloud backup strategies.

    1. Assess hardware-based and software-based write protection. 

      1. Demonstrate software write protection. 

      2. Apply problem-solving skills to demonstrate understanding in write protection.

    1. Demonstrate logical and physical acquisition using accepted software & hardware solutions. 

      1. Describe the common software used in data collection

      2. Demonstrate the use of the collection software 


    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • NET 186 - E-Discovery II - File Culling

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course focuses on the aspects of post acquisition, data processing as part of e-discovery implementations.  Additional consideration is given to review and reporting as well as testimony expectations surrounding the e-discovery process. 
    Prerequisite: NET 185  
    Competencies
     

    1. Discuss E-discovery Culling and Processing.
      1. Explain techniques used in the culling process.
      2. Discuss user documents, locations, and relevance.
    2. Analyze how to type specific data by type
      1. Explain the difference between the file extension and the file header.
      2. Describe separating files and emails by file signature
      3. Describe separating files and emails by category and provide counts
    3. Explore the purposes of hashing data.
      1. Explain near or fuzzy hashing
      2. Explore using hashing for de-duplication of data
      3. Describe hashing techniques to eliminate known data
    4. Analyze common data issues surrounding data searching and analysis
      1. Discuss the issues associated with compressed data and methods of examining the contents
      2. Describe the problems of data encryption and the methods to circumvent the situations
    5. Evaluate the significance and limitations of keyword searching and date ranging.
      1. Discuss the creation of single term or phrase search list
      2. Describe the usage of Boolean searching
      3. Explore the creation of acceptable keyword and phrase lists based on case specifics
      4. Describe the limitations of searching
    6. Characterize the methods and necessity for optical character recognition
      1. Classify files needing OCR
      2. Discuss the limitations of OCR
      3. Explain the OCR process and review of data
    7. Evaluate methods to deal with exceptions.
      1. Summarize technical implementations
      2. Discuss the importance client communication

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 187 - E-Discovery III - Data Prod

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course focuses on the aspects of post-acquisition, data processing as part of e-discovery implementations. Additional consideration is given to review and reporting as well as testimony expectations surrounding the e-discovery process.
    Prerequisite: NET 186  
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast the different output methods of processed data.
      1. Discuss the pros and cons of various production types.
      2. Compare and contrast TIFF, PDF, or Native output formats.
      3. Demonstrate the production of responsive data 
    2. Characterize the document manage process for big data 
      1. Explain page marking and Bates stamps 
      2. Discuss proper document management practice 
    3. Explain the review process. 
      1. Describe how to set review criteria. 
      2. Explain implementation of online review. 
      3. Describe review methods for both adversarial parties 
    4. Examine the iterative nature of the entire process 
      1. Discuss the instances of recalling and process needed after review 
      2. Demonstrate the practices of re-cycling through the processing, producing, and reviewing steps  
    5. Assess the final production of the responsive data 
      1. Describe the quality assurance measures of production data 
      2. Apply the quality assurance practices to produce responsive data. 
    6. Examine the expert testimony expectations regarding the e-discovery process. 
      1. Discuss the FRCP requirements for expert testimony 
      2. Construct a proper curriculum vitae 
      3. Demonstrate competency in explaining steps in management and production of responsive data
    7. Assess case data management post production 
      1. Discuss backup methods 
      2. Describe data retention methods
      3. Explain data destruction methods  

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 201 - Web Concepts for Network Administrators

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to teach students how to install, configure and maintain a Web Server with an emphasis on web page creation and website authoring. Students will learn to use state-of-the-art technology and software in this course. Students are introduced to relational databases and how to use SQL to access them. Students will learn to install a Web Server, a Relational Database, and create dynamic web content containing text, graphics, hyperlinks, tables, forms and frames.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate how to create a basic XHTML document
      1. Define the components of an XHTML document
      2. Use basic format tags to format Web pages
      3. Implement Cascading Style Sheets
    2. Define the functions of a Web Server
      1. Demonstrate how to install the Apache Web Server
      2. Describe and modify the apache Web Servers configuration files
      3. Determine the layout of the web site and where web content should be located
      4. Demonstrate adding web content to the web site
      5. Describe the importance of backing up the web content
      6. Demonstrate how to start and stop the Apache Web Server
    3. Demonstrate how to create a basic DHTML document
      1. Define the components of a DHTML document
      2. Describe the role of JavaScript
      3. Describe the Document Object Model
      4. Demonstrate how to implement XML files
    4. Compare a variety of tools used to create and manage a Web site
      1. Use an HTML editor
      2. Build a Web site using rapid application development tools
      3. Demonstrate how to stage and publish a Web site
    5. Define the function of a Relational Database
      1. Demonstrate how to install the MySQL database
      2. Describe and modify the MySQL configuration files
      3. Demonstrate how to create a MySQL database
      4. Demonstrate how to access the MySQL database using SQL
      5. Demonstrate how to start and stop the MySQL database

  
  • NET 202 - Programming for Network Administrators

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic programming techniques using the Python programming language to automate system administration tasks. Students will design, code, and test Python applications.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the history of Python
      1. Overview of Python features
      2. Accessing documentation
      3. Examine the basic structure of a Python program
      4. Using Python with other programming languages
    2. Discuss Python language fundamentals
      1. Python Lexical Analyzer
      2. Identifiers and keywords
      3. Naming objects and binding
      4. Immutable and mutable objects
      5. Creating and using variables
    3. Demonstrate Python Expressions
      1. Unary and binary arithmetic operations
      2. Comparison and Boolean operations
      3. Conditional and Lambda expressions
      4. Order of operations and operator evaluation
      5. Assignment operations
    4. Discuss Python Usage
      1. Executing Python programs from the command line
      2. Create and execute Python programs using IDLE
      3. If/elif/else statements
    5. Testing and debugging
      1. Testing programs with PyUnit
      2. Creating tests with TestCase and organizing tests with the TESTSuite object
      3. Work with pdb (debugger)
    6. Arrays, Collections, dictionaries
      1. Sequenced data structures
      2. Create access, manipulate lists
      3. Use dictionaries to create data records 
    7. Organizing code
      1. Define functions
      2. Create classes
      3. Use modules, import modules
    8. Define Regular Expressions
      1. Proper Syntax usage
      2. Using expression operators
    9. Data Management
      1. Best Practices for Data Management
      2. Discussing and Understanding the DB API
      3. Understanding and Using Common SQL Statements
      4. Implementing Error Handling with Database Connections
    10. Working with XML Data
      1. Discussing Python XML Processing Modules
      2. Importing the ElementTree API
      3. Using XML to Exchange Data Between Python Programs
    11. I/O Handling
      1. Sending Output to STDOUT Using the print() Method
      2. Reading Input with the input() Method
      3. Creating File Objects with the open() Method
      4. Working with File Object Attributes
    12. Web Application Programming
      1. Using Web and Network Programming Modules
      2. Understanding Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

  
  • NET 213 - Cisco Networking

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides the student with a technical level of understanding in the areas of PC and mainframe networking connectivity, data communications and protocol communication.
    Competencies
     

    1. Examine the devices and services used to support communications in data networks and the Internet
      1. Define common network services such as DNS, DHCP, HTTP, and FTP
      2. Differentiate between End devices, hubs, switches, and routers and their uses in network support
      3. Analyze a peer-to-peer and server-based network
    2. Assess the design of networks and network topologies
      1. Discuss designing the network layout with standard topologies and variations
      2. Describe various networking devices
    3. Assess the role of protocol layers in data networks
      1. Describe the network processes that use protocols and how they use them
      2. Map particular protocols to the appropriate OSI and TCP/IP model layers
    4. Determine the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data networks in IPv4 and IPv6 environments
      1. Apply appropriate addressing schemes to a network.
      2. Explain how a hierarchical naming convention is beneficial
    5. Design subnet masks and addresses to fulfill given requirements in IPv4 and IPv6 networks
      1. Explain VLSM and its use in creating IPv4 subnets
      2. Demonstrate IPv6 subnetting and what prefix is appropriate
    6. Develop fundamental Ethernet concepts such as media, services, and operations
      1. Discuss Wi-fi, copper UTP and Fiber optics and what environments to use each
      2. Build straight through, crossover, and rollover cables
    7. Construct a simple Ethernet network using routers and switches
      1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of network construction
      2. Produce a working internetwork consisting of multiple subnets
    8. Assess network architectures
      1. Discuss Ethernet features and performance considerations
      2. Identify the standard Ethernet components
      3. Review the features of each IEEE Ethernet standard topology
      4. Determine which Ethernet topology would be appropriate for a given site.
    9. Analyze and configure basic setting on routers and switches to produce a working network
      1. Explain the need to secure the intermediary devices
      2. Use Cisco command-line interface (CLI) commands to perform basic router and switch configurations
    10. Utilize common network utilities to verify small network operations and analyze data traffic
      1. Describe the use of ping, traceroute and other network utilities to test connectivity
      2. Discuss the uses of Network Protocol Analyzers the monitor network performance
    11. Analyze issues regarding Network Data Security
      1. Plan network security such as policies and training
      2. List the basic security requirements for any network
    12. Examine network routing
      1. Describe the functions of repeaters, bridges, routers, and gateways
      2. Determine when to expand a LAN
    13. Apply the usage of binary, decimal and hexadecimal numbering systems.
      1. Calculate numbers between decimal and binary systems.
      2. Calculate numbers between decimal and hexadecimal systems

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 225 - Routing & Switching Essential

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single area and mulit-area OSPF, virtual LANS, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.
    Prerequisite: NET 213  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate basic switching concepts and the operation of Cisco switches 
      1. Identify the role of Switched Networks
      2. Differentiate switch forwarding methods such as Cut Through and Store and Forward
      3. Explain basic switch configuration and management access
      4. Examine Switchport security
    2. Assess how VLANs create logically separate networks and how routing occurs between them 
      1. Examine basic VLAN configuration
      2. Explain VLAN Trunking protocols and their configuration
    3. Characterize the design of Inter-VLAN routing
      1. Discuss legacy Inter-VLAN routing
      2. Describe the router-on-a-stick method for Inter-VLAN routing
    4. Examine the purpose, nature, and operations of a router, routing tables, and the route lookup process 
      1. Describe initial router configuration for IPv4 and IPv6 networks
      2. Explain router forwarding decisions based upon routing table contents
    5. Troubleshoot static routing and default routing (RIP and RIPng) 
      1. Explain static routes and how to configure them
      2. Define RIP and RIPng configuration and operation
    6. Examine dynamic routing protocols, distance vector routing protocols, and link-state routing protocols 
      1. Identify distance vector routing protocols such as RIP and EIGRP, link-state routing protocols including OSPF
      2. Demonstrate how dynamic routing protocols discover remote networks
    7. Examine the characteristics and layout of the Cisco routing table
      1. Discuss differences between static and dynamically learned routes
      2. Describe the route lookup process 
    8. Design Standard access control lists (ACLs) for IPv4 and IPv6 networks 
      1. Define ACLs and their use in securing a network
      2. Explain the difference between Standard and Extended ACLs
    9. Troubleshoot Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) for IPv4 and IPv6 networks 
      1. Define DHCP operation for IPv4 and IPv6
      2. Discuss SLAAC, Stateless, and Stateful DHCP IPv6 methods
    10. Troubleshoot Network Address Translation (NAT) operations 
      1. Describe NAT configuration options
      2. Define the advantages of using NAT
    11. Evaluate intermediary device discovery, management, and maintenance.
      1. Demonstrate discovery techniques  using CDP and LLDP
      2. Describe IOS image management and software licensing management

  
  • NET 226 - Scaling Networks

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OPSF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network.
    Prerequisite: NET 225  
    Competencies
     

    1. Evaluate the use of the hierarchical network for a small business 

    1. Describe recommendations for designing a network that is scalable

    2. Select appropriate switch hardware features to support small to medium sized business networks

    3. Describe the types of routers available for small to medium sized business networks

    4. Configure basic settings on a Cisco IOS device

    2. Examine issues with implementing a redundant network 

    1. Describe the different spanning tree varieties

    2. Describe and configure PVST+ and Rapid PVST+ in a switched LAN environment

    3. Identify common STP configuration issues

    4. Understand, configure, and troubleshoot first hop redundancy protocols (HSRP) in a switched network

    3. Examine layer 3 switching operation and configuration

    1. Discuss Inter-VLAN routing with switch virtual interfaces

    2. Explain the use of routed ports

    4. Classify Link Aggregation and EtherChannel Technologies 

    1. Configure link aggregation with EtherChannel

    2. Troubleshoot link aggregation with EtherChannel

    5. Distinguish wireless LAN standards and the components of a wireless LAN infrastructure 

    1. Discuss wireless security mechanisms and how to mitigate network threats

    2. Identify common configuration issues of wireless access points and clients

    6. Compare and contrast link state and distance vector dynamic routing protocols

    1. Discuss the different link state routing protocols

    2. Explain distance vector routing protocols

    7. Examine an Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) network 

    1. Explain OSPF configuration and operation

    2. Assess design considerations for OSPF networks

    8. Categorize methods to modify and troubleshoot Single-Area OSPF to increase network performance 

    1. Examine and modify OSPF interface priority to influence the DR/BDR election process

    2. Explain OSPF authentication to ensure secure routing updates

    9. Point out why multi-area OSPF could be used in a routed network 

    1. Discuss how multi-area OSPF uses link-state advertisements in order to maintain routing tables

    2. Design and configure multi-area route summarization in a routed network

    10. Assess the features of EIGRP, including neighbor adjacencies, metrics, and the operation of DUAL 

    1. Verify and troubleshoot an EIGRP implementation in a small routed network

    2. Compare characteristics and operation of EIGRP for IPv4 and IPv6

    11. Perform EIGRP Advanced Configurations and Troubleshooting 

    1. Explain EIGRP automatic and manual summarization

    2. Modify EIGRP interface settings to improve network performance

  
  • NET 227 - Connecting Networks

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network operations in a complex network.
    Prerequisite: NET 226  
    Competencies
     

    1. Evaluate the structured engineering principles for hierarchical network design
      1. Examine the three layers of a hierarchical network and how they are used in network design
      2. Describe the need for business network architectures that are designed to address emerging trends in IT
      3. Describe various network architectures: borderless network architecture, collaboration network architecture, and the data center/virtualization network architecture
    2. Characterize the purpose of a WAN including WAN operations and services
      1. Compare various private and public WAN technologies
      2. Select the appropriate WAN protocol and service for a specific network requirement
    3. Outline the fundamentals of point-to-point serial communication across a WAN
      1. Discuss various encapsulation methods on a point-to-point serial link, including HDLC and PPP
      2. Identify configuration of PPP encapsulation and authentication protocols on a point-to-point serial link
    4. Asses Frame Relay operation and the benefits of using Frame Relay
      1. Describe bandwidth control mechanisms in Frame Relay
      2. Identify configuration methods for a basic Frame Relay PVC on a router serial interface and applying point-to-point sub-interfaces
    5. Illustrate QOS characteristics and the benefits and drawback of implementing QOS
      1. Demonstrate configuration methods for implementing QOS using the Cisco CLI
      2. Discuss how QOS affects network transmission quality
    6. Interpret the requirements for supporting a teleworking solution using broadband
      1. Describe a cable system and cable broadband access
      2. Describe a DSL system and DSL broadband access
      3. Explain the process to select an appropriate broadband solution for a given network requirement
      4. Identify the operation of Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE)
    7. Compare methods of securing site to site connectivity
      1. Explain the benefits of VPN technology and site to site or remote access VPNs
      2. Describe the characteristics of IPsec and the methods of implementation using the IPsec protocol framework
    8. Examine different methods of monitoring the network using syslog, SNMP and NetFlow
      1. Define syslog operation
      2. Define SNMP operation
      3. Describe NetFlow operation
    9. Compare and contrast various methods of troubleshooting the network
      1. Explain how network documentation is developed and used to troubleshoot network issues
      2. Explain troubleshooting methods that use a systematic, layered approach
      3. Describe troubleshooting tools used to gather and analyze symptoms of network problems
    10. Classify methods to configure and troubleshoot extended access control lists (ACLs) for IPv4 and IPv6 networks
      1. Define ACLs and their use in securing a network
      2. Explain the difference between Standard and Extended ACLs
    11. Examine the Internet of Things
      1. Describe Cloud Computing and Virtualization
      2. Discuss Software-Defined Networking

  
  • NET 228 - Cisco Networking II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with static routing, virtual LANS, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.
    Prerequisite: NET 213  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate configuration of devices by using security best practices.
      1. Configure initial settings and switch ports to meet network requirements on a Cisco switch.
      2. Configure secure management access on a switch.
      3. Configure basic settings on a router to route between two directly connected networks.
      4. Verify connectivity between two networks that are directly connected to a router.
    2. Examine how Layer 2 switches forward data.
      1. Explain how frames are forwarded in a switched network environment.
      2. Compare a collision domain to a broadcast domain.
    3. Implement VLANs and trunking in a switched network.
      1. Explain the purpose of VLANs in a switched network.
      2. Explain how a switch forwards frames based on VLAN configuration in a multi-switch environment.
      3. Configure a switch port to be assigned to a VLAN based on requirements.
      4. Configure a trunk port on a LAN switch.
      5. Configure Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP).
    4. Troubleshoot inter-VLAN routing on Layer 3 devices.
      1. Describe options for configuring inter-VLAN routing.
      2. Configure router-on-a-stick inter-VLAN routing.
      3. Configure inter-VLAN routing using Layer 3 switching.
      4. Troubleshoot common inter-VLAN configuration issues
    5. Assess how STP enables redundancy in a Layer 2 network.
      1. Explain common problems in a redundant, L2 switched network.
      2. Demonstrate how a simple, switched network that uses STP operates.
      3. Explain how Rapid PVST+ operates.
    6. Characterize EtherChannel technology.
      1. Configure EtherChannel.
      2. Troubleshoot EtherChannel on switched links.
    7. Implement DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 to operate across multiple LANs.
      1. Implement DHCPv4 to operate across multiple LANs.
      2. Configure a router as a DHCP server.
      3. Configure a router as a DHCP client.
      4. Explain the operation of SLAAC and DHCPv6.
      5. Configure stateful and stateless DHCPv6
    8. Analyze how FHRPs (First Hop Redundancy Protocol) provide default gateway services in a redundant network.
      1. Explain the purpose and operation of first hop redundancy protocols.
      2. Configure FHRP on routers for redundancy
    9. Explain how vulnerabilities compromise LAN security.
      1. Explain how use endpoint security to mitigate attacks.
      2. Discuss how AAA and 802.1x are used to authenticate LAN endpoints and devices.
      3. Identify Layer 2 vulnerabilities.
      4. Explain how a MAC address table attack compromises LAN security.
      5. Describe how LAN attacks compromises LAN security.
    10. Configure switch security to mitigate LAN attacks.
      1. Implement port security to mitigate MAC address table attacks.
      2. Configure DTP and native VLAN to mitigate VLAN attacks.
      3. Configure DHCP snooping to mitigate DHCP attacks.
      4. Configure ARP inspection to mitigate ARP attacks.
      5. Configure portfast and bpdu guard.
    11. Explain how WLANs enable network connectivity.
      1. Describe WLAN technology and standards.
      2. Describe the components of a WLAN infrastructure.
      3. Explain how wireless technology enables WLAN operation.
      4. Explain how a WLC uses CAPWAP to manage multiple APs.
      5. Describe channel management in a WLAN.
      6. Identify threats to WLANs.
      7. List WLAN security mechanisms.
    12. Implement a WLAN using a wireless router and WLC.
      1. Configure a WLAN to support a remote site.
      2. Configure a WLAN using the GUI on a WLC.
      3. Explain how to troubleshoot common wireless configuration issues.
    13. Illustrate how routers use information in packets to make forwarding decisions.
      1. Describe the primary functions and features of a router.
      2. Explain the path determination function of a router.
      3. Configure basic settings on a router.
      4. Describe the structure of a routing table.
      5. Compare static and dynamic routing concepts.
    14. Apply IPv4 and IPv6 static routing.
      1. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 static routes.
      2. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 default static routes.
      3. Configure a floating static route to provide a backup connection.
      4. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 static host routes that direct traffic to a specific host.
    15. Discuss how to troubleshoot static and default route configurations.
      1. Explain how a router processes packets when a static route is configured.
      2. Explain how to troubleshoot common static and default route configuration issues.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 229 - Cisco Networking III

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OPSF, NAT, ACL’s and wide area networking.
    Prerequisite: NET 228  
    Competencies
    1. Explain how single-area OSPF operates in both point-to-point and broadcast multi-access networks.
      1. Describe basic OSPF features and characteristics.
      2. Describe the OSPF packet types used in single-area OSPF.
    2. Implement single-area OSPFv2 in both point-to-point and broadcast multiaccess networks.
      1. Configure an OSPFv2 router ID.
      2. Configure single-area OSPFv2 in a point-to-point network.
      3. Configure the OSPF interface priority to influence the DR/BDR election in a multiaccess network.
      4. Implement modifications to change the operation of single-area OSPFv2.
      5. Configure OSPF to propagate a default route.
      6. Verify a single-area OSPFv2 implementation.
    3. Explain how vulnerabilities, threats, and exploits can be mitigated to enhance network security.
      1. Describe the current state of cybersecurity and vectors of data loss.
      2. Explain the threat actors and tools used to exploit networks.
      3. Describe common network attacks.
      4. Explain how IP vulnerabilities are exploited by threat actors.
      5. Describe best practices for protecting a network.
      6. Discuss common cryptographic processes used to protect data in transit.
    4. Examine how ACLs are used as part of a network security policy.
      1. Explain how ACLs use wildcard masks.
      2. Explain how to create ACLs.
      3. Compare standard and extended IPv4 ACLs.
    5. Implement IPv4 ACLs to filter traffic and secure administrative access.
      1. Configure standard and extended IPv4 ACLs to filter traffic to meet networking requirements.
      2. Use sequence numbers to edit existing standard IPv4 ACLs.
      3. Explain the structure of an extended access control entry (ACE).
    6. Examine the purpose, function and operation of NAT.
      1. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of NAT.
      2. Configure static and dynamic NAT using the CLI.
      3. Configure PAT using the CLI.
      4. Describe NAT for IPv6.
    7. Characterize how WAN access technologies can be used to satisfy business requirements.
      1. Explain the purpose of a WAN.
      2. Explain how WANs operate.
      3. Compare private and public WAN technologies.
      4. Describe the appropriate WAN protocol and service for a specific network requirement.
      5. Explain the fundamentals of point-to-point serial communication across a WAN.
      6. Compare remote access broadband connection options for small to medium-sized businesses.
    8. Explain how VPNs and IPsec are used to secure site-to-site and remote access connectivity.
      1. Describe benefits of VPN technology.
      2. Describe different types of VPNs
      3. Explain how the IPsec framework is used to secure network traffic.
    9. Explain how networking devices implement QoS.
      1. Discuss how network transmission characteristics impact quality.
      2. Describe minimum network requirements for voice, video, and data traffic.
      3. Explain how QoS uses mechanisms to ensure transmission quality.
    10. Implement network management protocols to monitor the network.
      1. Use CDP to map a network topology.
      2. Implement NTP between an NTP client and NTP server.
      3. Explain how SNMP operates.
      4. Explain syslog operation.
      5. Use commands to back up and restore an IOS configuration file.
      6. Perform an upgrade on an IOS system image.
    11. Explain the characteristics of scalable network architectures.
      1. Explain how data, voice, and video are converged in a switched network.
      2. Describe a switched network in a small to medium-sized business.
      3. Discuss hierarchical small business network designs.
      4. List considerations for designing a scalable network.
      5. Identify how switch hardware features support network requirements.
      6. Describe the types of routers available for small to-medium-sized business networks.
    12. Examine enterprise networks.
      1. Explain how network documentation is developed and used to troubleshoot network issues.
      2. Describe the general troubleshooting process.
      3. Compare troubleshooting methods that use a systematic, layered approach.
      4. Describe different networking troubleshooting tools.
      5. Determine the symptoms and causes of network problems using a layered model.
      6. Troubleshoot a network using the layered model.
    13. Explain the purpose and characteristics of network virtualization.
      1. Explain the importance of cloud computing.
      2. Explain the importance of virtualization.
      3. Describe the virtualization of network devices and services.
      4. Describe software-defined networking.
      5. Describe controllers used in network programming.
    14. Analyze how network automation is enabled through RESTful APIs and configuration management tools.
      1. Describe automation.
      2. Compare JSON, YAML, and XML data formats.
      3. Explain how APIs enable computer to computer communications.
      4. Explain how REST enables computer to computer communications.
      5. Compare configuration management tools.
      6. Explain how Cisco DNA center enables intent-based networking.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 315 - Cloud Systems Administration

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides exposure to cloud terminologies/methodologies, and hands-on experience implementing cloud technologies and infrastructures. Additionally, aspects of IT security and industry best practices related to cloud implementations and the application of virtualization are explored. This course is intended to aid student preparation for CompTIA’s Cloud+ certification.
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast cloud concepts and models.
      1. Summarize cloud characteristics and terms.
      2. Explain object storage concepts.
    2. Evaluate virtualization solutions.
      1. Explain the differences between hypervisor types.
      2. Install, configure, and manage virtual machines and devices.
      3. Perform virtual resource migration.
      4. Explain the benefits of virtualization in a cloud environment.
      5. Compare and contrast virtual components used to construct a cloud environment.
    3. Interpret infrastructure and configuration requirements.
      1. Compare and contrast various storage technologies.
      2. Explain storage configuration concepts.
      3. Execute storage provisioning.
      4. Implement appropriate network configurations based on scenario specifications.
      5. Explain the importance of network optimization.
      6. Given a scenario, troubleshoot basic network connectivity issues.
      7. Explain common network protocols, ports, and topologies.
      8. Explain common hardware resources and features used to enable virtual environments.
    4. Implement solutions aligned to resource management specifications.
      1. Implement and use proper resource monitoring techniques given a specific scenario.
      2. Appropriately allocate physical (host) resources using best practices.
      3. Appropriately allocate virtual (guest) resources using best practices.
      4. Use appropriate tools for remote access.
    5. Evaluate practical security measures for cloud environments.
      1. Explain network security concepts, tools, and best practices.
      2. Explain storage security concepts, methods, and best practices.
      3. Compare and contrast different encryption technologies and methods.
      4. Identify access control methods.
      5. Implement guest and host hardening techniques.
    6. Examine common systems management topics related to cloud environments.
      1. Explain policies and procedures related to a cloud environment.
      2. Diagnose, remediate and optimize physical host performance.
      3. Explain common performance concepts as they relate to the host and the guest.
      4. Implement appropriate testing techniques when deploying cloud services.
    7. Qualify cloud-effects on business continuity challenges.
      1. Compare and contrast disaster recovery methods and concepts.
      2. Deploy solutions to meet availability requirements.

  
  • NET 350 - Cisco Security

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The Cisco Networking Security course provides a next step for individuals who want to enhance their CCENT-level skill set and help meet the growing demand for network security professionals. The curriculum provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the installation, troubleshooting, and monitoring of network devices to maintain the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data and devices.
    Prerequisite: NET 225  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate modern network security threats
      1. Describe the evolution of network security
      2. Distinguish the major organizations responsible for enhancing network security
      3. Describe computer network viruses, worms, and Trojan Horses
      4. Describe mitigation techniques for viruses, worms, and Trojan Horses
      5. Explain how reconnaissance, access, and Denial of Service attacks are launched
      6. Give examples of how to secure the three functional areas of Cisco routers and switches
    2. Assess how to secure network devices
      1. Explain how to secure a network perimeter
      2. Configure secure administrative access to Cisco routers and enhanced security for virtual logins
      3. Use role-based CLI access to control command availability
      4. Compare in-band and out-of-band management access
      5. Configure SNMP to monitor system status
      6. Use NTP to enable accurate time stamping between all devices
    3. Evaluate Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting as it pertains to network security
      1. Configure AAA authentication using the CLI and CCP, to validate users against a local database
      2. Describe the benefits of server-based AAA and compare the TACACS+ and RADIUS authentication protocols
      3. List the features of Cisco Secure ACS for Windows
      4. Configure server-based AAA authentication using the CLI and CCP on Cisco routers
      5. E. Troubleshoot sever-based AAA authentication using Cisco Secure ACS
    4. Analyze firewall implementation technologies
      1. Configure standard and extended IPv4 and IPv6 ACLs using CLI and CCP
      2. Verify functionality of a configured ACL in relation to the network topology
      3. Configure TCP established, reflexive, dynamic, and time-based ACLs
      4. Use ACLs to mitigate common network attacks
      5. Explain how firewalls are used to help secure networks
      6. Describe the operation and benefits of a Zone-Based Policy Firewall
    5. Examine intrusion prevention as implemented on a network
      1. Describe the characteristics of IPS signatures
      2. Explain how the signature actions affect network traffic
      3. Configure, verify, and monitor Cisco IOS IPS configuration
    6. Assess methods of securing a local network
      1. Describe endpoint security and the enabling technologies
      2. Explain how Cisco IronPort and Cisco NAC products are used to ensure endpoint security
      3. Describe Layer 2 vulnerabilities, MAC address spoofing, and table overflow attacks
      4. Demonstrate how to mitigate STP manipulation, LAN storm attacks, and VLAN attacks
      5. Configure and verify port security using BPDU Guard, BPDU Filter, and Root Guard
      6. Configure VLAN trunk security to mitigate VLAN hopping attacks
      7. Describe fundamental aspects of enterprise, wireless, VoIP, and SAN security
    7. Compare and contrast methods of cryptographic systems
      1. Describe integrity, authentication, and confidentiality
      2. Explain cryptography, cryptanalysis, and cryptology and provide examples
      3. Examine the importance and functions of cryptographic hashes
      4. Describe the features and functions of the MD5 and SHA-1 algorithms
      5. Illustrate the mechanisms used to ensure data confidentiality
      6. Describe the function of DES, 3DES, and AES algorithms
      7. Explain the difference between symmetric and asymmetric encryptions
      8. Discuss the functionality of digital signatures
      9. Describe the principles behind a public key infrastructure (PKI) and various PKI standards
    8. Evaluate methods of implementing virtual private networks
      1. Describe VPNs and their benefits
      2. Identify the Cisco VPN product line and the security features of these products
      3. Describe the IPsec protocol and its basic features
      4. Compare AH and ESP protocols
      5. Explain how to prepare IPsec by ensuring that ACLs are compatible with IPsec
      6. Configure a site-to-site VPN using Quick Setup and step-by-step VPN Wizard in CCP
      7. Explain how the corporate landscape is changing to support telecommuting
      8. Examine how SSL is used to establish a secure VPN connection
    9. Evaluate the Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance
      1. Describe and compare ASA solutions to other routing firewall technologies
      2. Configure an ASA to provide basic firewall services using ADSM
      3. Explain and configure access lists with object groups on an ASA
      4. Configure an ASA to provide NAT services
      5. Assess access control using the local database and AAA server
      6. Describe the configuration of ASA policies using the Cisco Modular Policy Framework
      7. Describe ASA VPN features
      8. Configure remote-access VPN support using a clientless SSL VPN and Cisco Anyconnect
    10. Critique methods of managing a secure network
      1. Describe the high level considerations for ensuring that a network is secure
      2. List the benefits of risk management and the measures to take to optimize risk management
      3. Define and describe the components, technologies and devices of the Cisco SecureX Architecture
      4. Explain the overarching concepts and core principles of operations security
      5. Evaluate the purpose of, the techniques, and the tools used in network security testing
      6. Describe business continuity and disaster recovery
      7. Review the goals of a security policy
      8. Assess the roles and responsibilities entailed within a security policy
      9. Describe the concepts of security awareness
      10. Evaluate ethical guidelines and laws for network security
      11. Describe how to respond to a security breach

  
  • NET 373 - Forensic Prac Cybersecurity

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Upon completion of this course, students will be familiar with the interface, file management, resource allocation and common administration procedures of various popular operating systems. The course describes data organization and file properties that contribute to forensic investigation. Additional topics include a strong emphasis on investigative documentation, recognition of potential evidence sources, sterile evidence acquisition and analysis, and data recovery methodologies. State-of-the-art hardware and software will be used in hands-on labs and case studies.
    Competencies
     

    1. Interpret computer codes and numbering systems
      1. Describe ASCII codes
      2. Explain Binary numbering systems
      3. Explain Hexadecimal numbering systems
    2. Evaluate purpose of a computer operating system (OS) and its components
      1. Define kernel
      2. Differentiate between single-user and multi-user systems
      3. Explain file management
      4. Explain memory management including virtual memory/swap space
      5. Explain OS security
    3. Compare and contrast the main user features and typical user data of various, PC-class, operating systems including but not limited to
      1. DOS
      2. Windows NTx (NT, 2K, XP, Vista, Server 20xx, Win7, Win8, Win10)
      3. UNIZ/POSIX (Linux/OS X)
    4. Demonstrate effective use of a Hex Editor application.
      1. Explain the term offset.
      2. Practice inserting, altering, deleting, and carving data using the software tool.
      3. Describe HPFS
      4. Describe NFS
      5. Describe HFS Plus
    5. Assess significance and key components of boot records.
      1. Contrast Master Boot Record (MBR) and GUID Partition Table (GPT) organizational schemes.
      2. Decode appropriate data structures to identify volume parameters on a storage device.
      3. Identify file attributes and permissions
      4. Describe metadata
      5. Describe beneficial OS-specific artifacts and logs
    6. Understand and identify different file systems, including respective data saving, recall and deletion methods.
      1. Describe FAT/FAT16/FAT32.
      2. Describe NTFS
      3. Describe exFAT.
      4. Describe Extended File System (ext2/ext3/ext4).
      5. Describe HFS Plus.
    7. Analyze primary user data and OS artifacts.
      1. Describe file naming conventions.
      2. Describe dating methods (creation/modification/access).
      3. Identify file attributes and permissions.
      4. Recognize common file extensions including, but not limited to: .txt, .pdf, .doc, .docs, .xls, .jpg, .gif, .bmp, .tmp, .htm, .xml, .log, .zip.
      5. Explain the correlation of “magic numbers”/file signatures and specific application data.
      6. Describe metadata.
      7. Describe beneficial OS-specific artifacts and logs.
    8. Demonstrate appropriate evidence acquisition techniques
      1. Document system physical topology
      2. Document logical system characteristics including BIOS properties, boot configurations and date/time settings
    9. Assess common secondary data storage
      1. Identify physical interfaces
      2. Differentiate between magnetic and solid state storage
      3. Describe standard hard drive geometry, addressing, and configuration
      4. Describe purpose/functionality of RAID
      5. Define slack
      6. Describe optical storage solutions
    10. Demonstrate appropriate procedures for forensic duplication
      1. Describe the purpose of and demonstrate proper wiping techniques
      2. Show proper write-blocking using accepted methods
      3. Describe the function of hash values in authentication of data acquisition
      4. Describe the function of compression in data acquisition
    11. Analyze data
      1. Use manual methods to retrieve data
      2. Use popular tools to automate analysis including EnCase and FTK
      3. Apply data hash value comparisons to improve efficiency
    12. Examine typical user data and system files using automated tools
      1. Perform searches using various keywords and contextual indicators
      2. Examine data contained in compressed data files/containers

  
  • NET 377 - Ethical Hacking Prac Cybersec

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will introduce the student to hacking performed by a company or individual to help identify potential threats on a computer or network. An ethical hacker attempts to bypass system security and search for any weak points that could be exploited by malicious hackers. This information is then used by the organization to improve the system security, in an effort to minimize or eliminate any potential attacks.
    Competencies
     

    1. Evaluate Information Security Threats and Attack Vectors
      1. Discuss Motives, Goals, and Objectives of Information Security Attacks
      2. Discuss Information Security Threat Categories
      3. Define Information Warfare
      4. Outline Ethical Hacking and Scope
      5. Describe Information Security Controls
    2. Assess Footprinting Concepts and Methodology
      1. Demonstrate Website footprinting
      2. Critique Social Networking construction
      3. Illustrate Email footprinting
      4. Dicuss and demonstrate the following: WHOIS, DNS, Networking
    3. Critique Network Scanning
      1. Break down Live Systems
      2. Examine Open Ports
      3. Compare & Contrast Vulnerabilities
    4. Perform System Hacking.
      1. Generate Password cracking techniques
      2. Demonstrate Privilege Escalation
      3. Illustration of Covering Tracks
    5. Evaluate Malware
      1. Discuss Trojan Concepts
      2. Demonstrate Viruses and Worms
      3. Perform Malware Reverse Engineering
      4. Critique Malware Detection
      5. Discuss Countermeasures
    6. Perform Sniffing
      1. Perform Sniffing Concepts and Tools
      2. Develop MAC Attacks
      3. Show DHCP Attacks
      4. Demonstrate ARP Poisoning
      5. Show Spoofing Attacks
      6. Discuss DNS Poisoning
    7. Examine Social Engineering
      1. Demonstrate Techniques
      2. Discuss Impersonation
      3. Discuss Identity Theft
      4. Demonstrate Social Engineering Countermeasures
    8. Simulate Denial of Service/Distributed Denial of Service Attacks
      1. Discuss Techniques
      2. Discuss Botnets
      3. Demonstrate Attack Tools
      4. Review DOS/DDOS Countermeasures
    9. Demonstrate Session Hijacking
      1. Identify the Application Level
      2. Demonstrate the Network Level
      3. Demonstrate Tools
      4. Review Countermeasures
    10. Perform Webserver and Web Application Hacking
      1. Dicuss Webserver Attacks
      2. Demonstrate attack Methodology
      3. Discuss Tools
      4. Demonstrate Countermeasures
      5. Discuss the importance of timely Patch Management
    11. Evaluate Wireless Network Hacking
      1. Discuss Concepts
      2. Compare and Contrast Encryption Methodologies
      3. Discuss Tools
      4. Demonstrate wireless hacking Threats
      5. Generate wireless hacking Methodologies
    12. Assess IDS, Firewalls, and Honeypots
      1. Discuss Placement
      2. Evaluate SNORT as a solution
      3. Demonstrate IDS Evasion

  
  • NET 402 - Linux Network Administration

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is the first in a series of ITNA Linux courses. This course covers the basic installation and administration of Linux operating system. For more information, contact the program chairperson of the ITNA Department.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate how to install the Linux operating system to function as a workstation
      1. Configure the partitions required for a workstation
      2. Format the partitions required for a workstation
      3. Select the required services to be installed for a workstation
      4. Configure network addressing for a workstation
      5. Evaluate workstation application programs
    2. Demonstrate how to install the Linux operating system to function as a server
      1. Configure the partitions required for a server
      2. Format the partitions required for a server
      3. Identify and select the required services to be installed for a server
      4. Configure network addressing for a server
      5. Configure startup server procedures
      6. Describe the different run levels
      7. Describe the different common configuration files
      8. Configure shutdown server procedures
    3. Describe and demonstrate basic Linux console commands
      1. Illustrate proper command syntax
      2. Describe various command options and parameters
      3. Demonstrate the proper usage of console commands 
    4. Manage users with and without a GUI interface
      1. Create user accounts
      2. Create groups and add users to groups
      3. Configure file ownership and permissions
    5. Shell programming
      1. Describe the need for shell programming
      2. List the common shell environment variables
      3. Illustrate proper shell programming syntax
      4. Create and demonstrate shell programs that automate network administration
    6. Merge packages with RPM
      1. Explain the advantages of using a package manager
      2. Demonstrate how to download and install Linux RPM programs
      3. Demonstrate how to download and update a Linux RPM program
    7. Describe and manage the basic network services that are ran at the server
      1. Demonstrate how to configure, start and stop a telnet service
      2. Demonstrate how to configure, start and stop a WEB service
      3. Demonstrate how to configure, start and stop an FTP service
    8. Analyze and demonstrate sharing files with NFS
      1. Demonstrate how to format a file system
      2. Demonstrate how to mount and unmount a file system
      3. Demonstrate how a Linux workstation can mount a servers file system
    9. Share Windows/Linux resources with Samba
      1. Describe the reason for Samba
      2. Edit Samba configuration files
      3. Demonstrate how to start and stop Samba
      4. Test the Samba configuration by sharing Linux resources with Windows workstations
    10. Printing from Linux
      1. Demonstrate the different types of printers and printer interfaces
      2. Describe the Linux printing process
      3. Describe the reason for device files
      4. Demonstrate how to install and manage local printers
      5. Demonstrate how to install and manage remote printers
    11. Archiving, backing up and restoring
      1. Describe the importance of backing up files
      2. Describe the different backup strategies
      3. Describe the different dump levels
      4. Demonstrate usage of the tar, dump and restore utilities

  
  • NET 412 - Linux System Administration

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is the second in a series of ITNA Linux courses. This course covers administration of the Linux operating system. For further information, contact the program chairperson of the ITNA Department.
    Prerequisite: NET 402  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate how to administer the Domain Name Service (DNS).
      1. Describe the need for DNS
      2. Describe how to register a domain name
      3. Configure resource records
      4. Configure zone files
      5. Create sub-domains and slaves
    2. Demonstrate how to administer Email Services
      1. Describe how email is routed
      2. Describe the different type of mail servers
      3. Configure and manage sendmail
      4. Configure and manage qpopper
      5. Demonstrate how to administer Email user accounts
    3. Demonstrate how to administer a Web Service
      1. Describe how http web traffic is routed
      2. Start and stop the Web Service
      3. Describe the different configuration files for the Apache web service
      4. Configure the apache web service
      5. Compare the different types of Common Gateway Interfaces (CGI)
      6. Configure Common Gateway Interfaces (CGI)
      7. Describe how to authenticate users using Directory services and LDAP
      8. Configure the Apache web service to authenticate users using Directory services and LDAP
    4. Analyze the properties of a Secure Shell
      1. Identify what network traffic is not secure
      2. Describe the importance of a secure shell
      3. Compare the different types of Authentication
      4. Describe Public-Key Encryption and Digital Signatures
      5. Demonstrate how to secure telnet
      6. Demonstrate how to secure ftp
      7. Demonstrate how to secure http
    5. Demonstrate how to administer a Linux firewall
      1. Describe the importance of a firewall
      2. Describe the components of a firewall
      3. Demonstrate how to configure and administer Network Address Translation (NAT)
      4. Demonstrate how to configure and administer Packet Filtering with IPTables
      5. Demonstrate how to configure and administer Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)

  
  • NET 432 - Linux System Security

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is the first in a series of ITNA Security courses. This course details how to protect your network from malicious users and how to choose and configure a Firewall for Microsoft Windows, Novell, Linux and Cisco. For further information, contact the program chairperson of the ITNA Department.
    Competencies
    1. Characterize the need for security policies
      1. Define the scope of the problem
      2. Determine Objectives, Constraints, Risks and Cost
    2. Analyze the Authentication process
      1. Describe session hijacking
      2. Describe how to verify the source and destination.
      3. Describe DNS poisoning
      4. Describe the use of Digital Signatures
    3. Analyze the need for Encryption
      1. List the protocols that use clear text
      2. Illustrate clear text packets that may be captured by malicious users
      3. Describe the methods of Encryption
      4. Describe Encryption weaknesses
      5. Describe Public-Key Encryption
    4. Describe and compare the major operating systems secure features
      1. Analyze Windows 2000 Local Security
    5. Describe the need for a Firewall
      1. List and explain the different firewall elements.
    6. Compare the strengths and weaknesses of different firewalls
      1. For Window
      2. For Linux
      3. For Novel
      4. For Cisco

  
  • NET 434 - Linux Systems & Certification

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides the student with a thorough study into various Linux/Unix systems available, the advantages and disadvantages, installation techniques and management functions. A significant amount of time will be spent loading, operating and contrasting the various operating systems.
    Prerequisite: NET 402 , NET 412 , NET 432  
    Competencies
    1. List the various Linux distributions
      1. Discuss which versions of Linux to use
      2. List the installation console options
      3. Describe the boot loaders
    2. Describe using the Linux shell
      1. Explain differences in shell sessions
      2. Discuss controlling command execution
      3. List environment variables and settings
    3. Explain the Installation Basics
      1. Discuss portioning of hard drives
      2. Describe using the command line
    4. Discuss the File systems and commands
      1. List the different types of editors
      2. Demonstrate saving and quitting files
      3. Demonstrate the cut, copy and past commands
    5. Describe the Linux boot process and run levels
      1. Discuss boot messages
      2. Show configuration addresses
      3. List the Linux boot process
    6. Demonstrate the use of Linux and GNU documentation
      1. Describe the use of man pages
      2. Discuss third party documentation
      3. Describe communicating with users
    7. Explain managing users and groups
      1. Discuss the importance of user and group management
      2. Describe how the kernel understands users and groups
      3. Discuss adding, deleting and modifying users and groups
    8. List the purpose and tasks of system administration
      1. Explain managing system services
      2. Describe controlling your daemons
      3. Describe how to schedule and run tasks
    9. Discuss kernel configuration and custom compilation
      1. Discuss and overview of the kernel
      2. Describe the different kernel versions
      3. Explain patching the kernel
      4. Discuss configuring the kernel
    10. Describe Linux shells and scripting
      1. Demonstrate writing scripts
      2. Discuss scripting constructs
      3. List the typical environment variables
    11. Explain Linux network services
      1. Describe Apache
      2. Discuss Samba
      3. Explain DNS service
    12. Describe using firewalls and implementing security
      1. Understand permission problems
      2. Discuss secure shell function
      3. Describe the installation of firewalls

  
  • NET 435 - Linux Programming for Admin

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course includes the study of creating and installing bash and Perl scripts as well as a detailed study of their uses and power controlling a Linux or UNIX environment. The student will also create, compile and link C code and explore the UNIX/Linux kernel.
    Prerequisite: NET 402   or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the power of bash scripting
      1. Demonstrate installing bash as the standard shell
      2. Describe how to obtain bash
      3. Discuss environment customization
      4. Describe the security features
    2. Demonstrate creating Perl scripts
      1. Discuss locating and installing modules
      2. Describe the power of pearl over file systems
      3. Discuss manipulating disk quotas
    3. Describe creating and compiling C code
      1. Discuss the code structure
      2. Demonstrate writing code
      3. Describe the use of compilers
    4. Describe the compilization and installation of Linux services from the source code
      1. List the programs commonly used in decompiling Linux code
      2. Discuss the editors used for modifying the code 
    5. Discuss how to recompile the Linux kernel
      1. List the tests for verifying code integrity
      2. Describe testing the code for function
      3. List the errors and troubleshooting of the code
    6. Explain process control
      1. Discuss NT/200/XP process control
      2. Describe MacOS process control
      3. Discuss Unix process control
    7. Discuss directory services
      1. Describe the Finger as a simple directory service
      2. Discuss the WHOIS directory service
      3. Explain LDAP as the more sophisticated directory service
    8. Explain the functioning of log files
      1. Discuss text log files
      2. Describe binary log files
      3. Contrast stateful and stateless data
      4. Describe log analysis
    9. Describe command line editing of bash files
      1. Discuss enabling command line editing
      2. Describe the history file
      3. Discuss emacs editing mode
      4. Describe vi editing mode
    10. Explain basic shell programming
      1. Describe shell scripts and functions
      2. Discuss command line options and types variables
      3. Explain input/output and command line processing
      4. Discuss process handling
    11. Discuss related shells
      1. Describe the Bourne shell
      2. Describe the IEEE 1003.2 POSIX shell
      3. Discuss the Korn shell
      4. Discuss pdksh

  
  • NET 436 - Linux Network Programming

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The purpose of this class is to familiarize the student with the functions and program skills to successfully support Linux in a network environment. The course will include a major project of programming and installing a successful Linux network service.
    Prerequisite: NET 435  
    Competencies
    1. Define the Transport layer
      1. Describe TCP
      2. Discuss UDP
      3. Explain SCTP
    2. Explain the socket address structures
      1. Demonstrate the creation of elementary TCP sockets
      2. Discuss using connect, bind, listen and connect functions
      3. Describe byte ordering functions
      4. Describe byte manipulation functions
    3. Compare the fork and exec functions
      1. Describe fork concepts
      2. Discuss the exec function
    4. Explain TCP client/server examples
      1. Describe the functions of TCP Echo server
      2. Discuss normal startup and termination
      3. Explain POSIX signal handling
      4. Discuss handling SIGCHLD
    5. Define I/O multiplexing
      1. Discuss the I/O modes
      2. Discuss str-cli functions
      3. Explain pselect function
    6. Describe name and address conversions
      1. Discuss DNS service
      2. Define gethostbyname function
      3. Define gethosbyaddr function
      4. Discuss getaddinfo function
      5. Discuss getservbyname function
      6. Describe host_serv function
    7. Explain about advanced sockets
      1. Discuss IPv4 and IPv6 interoperabiity
      2. Discuss Daemon processes and the inetd superuser
      3. Describe advanced I/O functions
    8. Describe datalink access
      1. Discuss BSD packet filtering
      2. List SOCK_PACKET and PF_PACKET
      3. Contrast libcap and libnet
    9. Discuss client/server design alternatives
      1. TCP client alternatives
      2. Discuss test client
      3. Describe iterative server
      4. Contrast concurrent and preforked servers
    10. Explain debugging techniques
      1. Describe system call tracing
      2. Discuss standard internet services
      3. List the typical debug programs
    11. Create a final project by installing and operating a web server service
      1. Derive and document a project proposal
      2. Plan the design
      3. Build and program the design
      4. Demonstrate the function ability of the project
         

  
  • NET 484 - Netplus Certification

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is a comprehensive study for learning, mastering and practicing the concepts required to pass the CompTIA Net+ Certification Exam. The student will have a significant amount of reading and studying as well as skill-building lab time. This course is intended for the student seeking certification.
    Competencies
    1. Examine Network Theory
      1. Analyze a scenario and determine the corresponding OSI layer.
      2. Explain the basics of network theory and concepts.
    2. Characterize Network Architecture
      1. Differentiate between common network topologies.
      2. Differentiate between network infrastructure implementations.
      3. Explain the functions and applications of various network devices.
      4. Compare and contrast the use of networking services and applications.
      5. Explain the characteristics and benefits of various LAN and WAN technologies.
      6. Identify the basics elements of unified communication technologies.
      7. Compare and contrast technologies that support cloud and virtualization.
    3. Evaluate Network Operations
      1. Use appropriate monitoring tools
      2. Analyze metrics and reports from monitoring and tracking performance tools for a given scenario.
      3. Use appropriate resources to support configuration management.
      4. Explain the importance of implementing network segmentation.
      5. Install and apply patches and updates based on configuration and performance.
    4. Implement and configure a basic network based on a given set of requirements
      1. Install and properly terminate various cable types and connectors using appropriate tools.
      2. Implement and configure the appropriate addressing schema.
      3. Explain the basics of routing concepts and protocols.
      4. Install and configure networking services/applications.
      5. Configure a switch using proper features based on specific requirements.
      6. Install and configure wireless LAN infrastructure and implement the appropriate technologies in support of wireless capable devices.
    5. Formulate Network Security
      1. Compare and contrast risk related concepts.
      2. Compare and contrast common network vulnerabilities and threats.
      3. Implement network hardening techniques
      4. Compare and contrast physical security controls.
      5. Install and configure a basic firewall based on specific requirements.
      6. Explain the purpose of various network access control models.
      7. Summarize basic forensic concepts.
    6. Demonstrate Troubleshooting
      1. Analyze and interpret the output of troubleshooting tools.
      2. Troubleshoot and resolve common physical component issues related to wireless, copper cable, or fiber cable.
      3. Troubleshoot and resolve common logical network settings issues
      4. Troubleshoot and resolve common security issues.
      5. Troubleshoot and resolve common WAN issues.
    7. Apply Industry Standards and Practices
      1. Identify appropriate wireless and wired connectivity.
      2. Implement the appropriate policies or procedures.
      3. Summarize safety practices.
      4. Install and configure equipment in the appropriate location using best practices.
      5. Explain the basics of change management procedures.
      6. Compare and contrast the following ports and protocols: 80, HTTP; 443, HTTPS; 137-139, NetBIOS; 110, POP; 143, IMAP; 25, SMTP; 5060/5061, SIP; 2427/2727, MGCP; 5004/5005, RTP; 1720, H.323 .
      7. Configure and apply the appropriate ports and protocols: 20/21,FTP; 161,SNMP; 22,SSH; 23,Telnet; 53,DNS; 67/68,DHCP; 69,TFTP; 445,SMB; 3389,RDP.

  
  • NET 488 - Netware 4.x Administration

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Course covers the knowledge and skills needed to perform Netware 4.x network administration or system management tasks effectively.
    Competencies
    1. Connect a DOS workstation to the network and log in
      1. Describe the basic functions and services of a network
      2. Describe workstation communications with the network, and list the files required to connect a DOS workstation to the network
      3. Describe the function of the software necessary to connect a workstation to the network, including local operating systems, NetWare DOS Requester, communications protocol, and network board
      4. Connect a workstation to the network by loading the appropriate DOS workstation files
    2. Utilize NetWare utilities
      1. Identify, navigate, and perform similar basic functions using a graphical utility, a DOS text utility, and a command line utility
      2. Activate and navigate Help for each type of utility
      3. Activate and navigate Novell Electro Text
    3. Manage NetWare Directory Services
      1. Describe NetWare 4.X Directory Services (NDS) and the NDS database
      2. Describe NDS objects, properties, and values
      3. Describe the Directory tree
      4. Create, delete, rename, and move objects within the NDS database
      5. Enter and modify property values of objects
      6. Set up network user accounts
    4. Access Network Resources with NDS
      1. Define NDS context and current context
      2. Demonstrate correct NDS object naming
      3. Access NDS information from the command prompt using NLIST and CX
      4. Search NDS information using the NetWare Administrator 1
    5. Plan File Systems
      1. Explain the basic concepts of network file storage, including volumes and directory structure
      2. Define a directory, including its main function, tree structure, directory name, and path
      3. List the system-created directories on the SYS: volume and describe their contents
      4. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of sample directory structures
      5. Design a directory structure based on a given scenario
    6. Manage Network File Storage
      1. Access file storage by mapping network drives to volumes and directories
      2. Navigate volumes and directories by using network drives
      3. Access network applications by mapping search drives to application directories
      4. Perform directory management tasks, such as creating, deleting, and renaming directories
      5. Perform file management tasks such as copying, moving, deleting, salvaging and purging files
    7. Implement Network File System Security
      1. Identify the levels and functions of network security
      2. Plan file system security using groups, users, directory rights, file rights, and Inheritance Rights Filters
      3. Describe directory and file attributes and their use in a file system security plan
      4. Implement a file system security plan using NetWare Administrator
    8. Implement NetWare Directory Services Security
      1. Explain NetWare Directory Services access control including the concepts of trustees, object and property rights, inheritance, IRF, and effective rights
      2. Plan NetWare Directory Services access control security using roups, users, object rights, property rights, and Inheritance Rights filters
      3. Implement NetWare Directory Services access control by adding and removing a trustee, adding and removing object and property rights, and setting and IRF
      4. List, define, and set up user account login restrictions 
    9. Manage the NetWare 4.x Server
      1. Describe console commands and identify the function of command commonly used by network administrators
      2. Describe NLM’s, how they are loaded, and their types
      3. Identify the purpose and function of the major management NLM’s, such as INSTALL, MONITOR, SERVER MANAGER, and UPS
      4. Describe remote console management, list the steps to setting up the server for both SPX and asynchronous remote connects, use RCONSOLE.EXE to connect remotely to the server
      5. Implement console security features on the server by assigning a console passwork and keeping the server in a secure location
    10. Set up printing services on a NetWare 4.X network
      1. Describe the basic components of network printing, how they interrelate in processing a print job, and the general steps to their setup
      2. Create and configure the NetWare Directory Services network printing objects:
      3. Set up network printing hardware by bringing up a print server on a NetWare server and connecting a printer to the network through a NetWare server and DOS workstation Print Queue, Printer, and Print Server
      4. Manage print jobs in the print queue by viewing their properties, pausing, rushing, delaying printing and deleting jobs in the queue

  
  • NET 515 - Linux Enterprise

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course teaches system administrators how to implement a cloud-computing environment using the OpenStack Platform, including installation, configuration, and maintenance.
    Competencies
    1. Understand Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform features and terminology.
    2. Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform using packstack and Foreman.
    3. Create an instance with the Horizon web front-end.
    4. Install and configure the Qpid message broker service.
    5. Install, configure, and use the Keystone authentication services.
    6. Install, configure, and use the Swift object storage service.
    7. Install and use the Glance image service.
    8. Install and manage the Cinder block storage service.
    9. Install, configure, and manage Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform networking service.
    10. Install and deploy Nova compute and controller services.
    11. Learn to add and remove additional Nova compute nodes.
    12. Install the Heat orchestration service.
    13. Install and manage the ceilometer metering service.

  
  • NET 532 - Linux Enterprise Admin. II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides advanced administration skills to design, configure and administer a complex NetWare 5 network.
    Prerequisite: NET 213  
    Competencies
    1. Contrast the different methods that can be used for upgrading to NetWare 5
      1. List the minimum hardware required to perform an upgrade
      2. Select the appropriate upgrade method and protocol
      3. Demonstrate how to upgrade a NetWare 3.1x server and a NetWare 4.1x server to NetWare 5
    2. Explain the usage of the Novell server console
      1. Identify the server configuration files
      2. Demonstrate how to execute console commands
      3. Demonstrate loading and unloading of NLMs
      4. Demonstrate loading support for Java applications and using ConsoleOne.
    3. Compare the different methods of setting up network printing
      1. Create printing objects
      2. Configure printing objects
      3. Demonstrate how to connect a printer to the network
      4. Demonstrate management of network print services
    4. Explain how to secure and optimize the Network File System
      1. Plan a customized network file system
      2. Create a customized network file system
      3. Describe the advantages and limitations of the NSS file system
      4. Demonstrate how to setup and configure the NSS file system
    5. Compare the different methods used for managing and securing the NDS tree.
      1. Describe replication and synchronization
      2. Identify the NDS default rights
      3. Describe the guidelines for implementing NDS security
    6. Justify backing up servers and workstations
      1. Describe Storage Management Services
      2. Choose the most appropriate Backup Strategy
      3. Demonstrate how to backup servers and workstations
    7. Justify why DNS/DHCP services are used in a Novell network
      1. Describe DNS/DHCP
      2. Demonstrate how to install DNS/DHCP services
      3. Demonstrate how to install a Web server and an FTP server
      4. Demonstrate how to import a DHCP databases
    8. Assess how Z.E.N. works can be used to help manage a network
      1. Describe distributing and managing Network Applications with Z.E.N. works
      2. Explain managing workstations in a NDS environment with Z.E.N. works
      3. Demonstrate how to distribute applications with Z.E.N. works

  
  • NET 653 - Microsoft Exchange Server

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the current Microsoft Curriculum in the Microsoft Exchange Server Series.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the components of the Microsoft Exchange Server
      1. Compare and contrast shared-file messaging systems with client/server messaging systems
      2. Identify the clients supported by Exchange Server
      3. Describe the new features that are supported in Exchange Server 5.5
    2. Describe the Microsoft Exchange Server Architecture
      1. Explain the function of the Exchange Server core and additional components.
      2. Describe the communication paths between the core Exchange Server components
      3. Trace the flow of a message through an Exchange Server computer in a single-server environment
      4. Describe Cluster Server
    3. Examine Microsoft Exchange Server Administration
      1. View the hierarchy of an Exchange Server Organization and describe how to customize the Exchange Server Administrator Program through command-line switches
      2. Set permissions on the objects in the hierarchy
      3. Describe the Windows NT Server administration tools that are used to support an Organization
      4. Customize the views, settings, and toolbar in the Administrator Program
    4. Create and manage recipients
      1. List the Microsoft Exchange Server recipient types
      2. Create and configure mailboxes
      3. Create and configure mailboxes by using the Administrator Program.
      4. Create and configure custom recipients
      5. Create and configure distribution lists
      6. Configure the common configuration tabs for each recipient
      7. Perform a directory import and export
      8. Manage each recipient type
      9. Configure Address Book views
    5. Deploy Microsoft Exchange Server Clients
      1. List the different electronic-mail clients and their features
      2. Describe the installation requirements for the Microsoft-based e-mail and collaboration clients
      3. Choose the appropriate method for installing the various clients
      4. Create a user profile
      5. Configure support for roving users
      6. Configure Outlook to use the various information services that it supports
    6. Configure Microsoft Outlook
      1. Describe the optional tools in Outlook that can be applied to e-mail messages
      2. Configure the order of protocols that remote procedure calls use to attempt a connection from a client to a Microsoft Exchange Server computer
      3. Describe how to use Windows NT system policies to manage an Outlook configuration
    7. Manage Site Configuration and Server Configuration
      1. Describe the purpose of each container and object in the Site Configuration container
      2. List the contents of each container within the Site configuration container
      3. Explain which site properties can be configured through the objects in the Site Configuration container
      4. Identify the objects that are in the Servers container, and describe the configuration options available in each object
      5. Configure the properties and component options for a server in a site.
    8. Create and Manage Public Folders
      1. Distinguish between public folder hierarchy and public folder contents.
      2. View and assign public folder permissions, and create and implement a moderated folder
      3. Describe configuration options for the Information Store Site object, and discuss the affect of affinity settings on client connection to other sites in an Organization
      4. Explain how the Microsoft Exchange Server Scripting Agent enables server-side scripting of events for folders, link a script to a folder event, and describe the steps involved in folder event processing
    9. Maintain a Microsoft Exchange Server Organization
      1. Identify the role of each database log file and how to maintain each database log file that is used by the Exchange Server database engine
      2. Describe the backup processes
      3. Use the Exchange Server Performance Optimizer to optimize an Exchange Server installation
      4. Back up Exchange Server
      5. Describe troubleshooting tools that are used for maintaining Exchange Server
    10. Monitor Microsoft Exchange Server and explain the Microsoft Exchange Server Forms Administration
      1. Configure server monitors
      2. Configure link monitors
      3. Use Windows NT Performance Monitor
      4. Check message queues
      5. Use Windows NT Performance Monitor to monitor Exchange Server activities
      6. Use the SNMP monitoring tool
      7. Describe the primary tasks involved with form administration
      8. Explain which types of forms are available through Outlook.
    11. Explain the components of Microsoft Exchange Server
      1. Compare and contrast shared-file messaging systems with client/server messaging systems
      2. Identify the clients supported by Exchange Server
      3. Describe the new features that are supported in Exchange Server 5.5
    12. Describe Microsoft Exchange Server Architecture
      1. Explain the function of the Exchange Server core and additional components
      2. Describe the communication paths between the core Exchange Server components
      3. Trace the flow of a message through an Exchange Server computer in a single-server environment
      4. Describe Cluster Server
    13. Design a Microsoft Exchange Organization
      1. Evaluate the network and messaging needs of an organization
      2. Design a server, site, and user placement plan for a given Exchange Server organization
      3. Establish an address and naming scheme to support a planned messaging system
      4. Evaluate real-world Exchange Server deployment case studies by using the design criteria discussed in this competency
    14. Install Microsoft Exchange Server
      1. Explain which components are installed with each installation option
      2. Differentiate between creating a new site, adding a server to an existing site, and upgrading an existing server to Exchange Server 5.5
      3. Discuss post-installation considerations
      4. Identify common installation problems
      5. List the Exchange Server services and their dependent services
      6. Perform an automatic installation
      7. Describe the issues involved when installing Exchange Server in a cluster environment
    15. Explain Intrasite Server Communication
      1. Describe the components that enable intrasite communication between computers running Microsoft Exchange Server
      2. Explain how RPC traffic can fill network bandwidth
      3. Discuss the role of MTA in intrasite server communication
      4. Explain how services communicate within a site
      5. Describe how Exchange Server maintains updated directory information on all servers in a site
    16. Compare X.400 and X.500 Concepts
      1. Describe the X.400 and X.500 messaging recommendations
      2. Identify the components of the X.400 message handling system
      3. Compare and contrast an administrative management domain (ADMD) and a private management domain (PRMD
      4. Define the X.400 interpersonal message protocols
      5. Explain the role of IPMS and MTS
    17. Configure a Site Connector and a X.400 Connector
      1. Describe the configuration options for the Site Connector
      2. Create a Site Connector between two sites
      3. Configure the Site Connector
      4. Describe the usage and benefits of the X.400 Connector
      5. Configure a network transport to enable the X.400 Connector to communicate over the specified MTA transport stack
      6. Configure the X.400 Connector to communicate over a TCP/IP network
      7. Configure the X.400 Connector to communicate over TP4
    18. Create and Configure a Dynamic RAS Connector
      1. Describe when to use a Dynamic RAS Connector between sites with no permanent local area network (LAN) or WAN connection
      2. Identify the transports that can be used with the Dynamic RAS Connector
      3. Create a connection between sites by using the Dynamic RAS Connector.
      4. Configure a connection between sites by using the Dynamic RAS Connector
      5. Explain the security levels that can be set on the Dynamic RAS Connector.
    19. Explain Multisite Message routing and selection
      1. Explain the role of MTA in the message routing and selection process
      2. Describe how MTA determines which connector to route through based on the gateway address routing table (GWART
      3. Describe the selection criteria used by MTA to determine a list of connectors
      4. Use the GWART table
      5. Apply the technique of restricting address space
    20. Manage and demonstrate Directory Replication
      1. Describe how Exchange Server communicates directory information between sites.
      2. Configure Directory Replication between sites
      3. Manage directory information between sites
    21. Create and resolve public folder conflicts
      1. Configure public folder content replication at either the folder level or the information store level
      2. Describe the public folder replication process
      3. Describe the backfill process
      4. Explain how to configure a home server for a public folder
    22. Create Microsoft Server Integration with the Internet
      1. Identify which Internet protocols Exchange Server supports
      2. Describe the difference between multipurpose Internet mail extensions (MIME) and non-MIME content types for Internet messages
      3. Explain how protocol-logging values can be used to troubleshoot a problem
      4. Discuss how performance counters can be used to gather statistical information about system performance
      5. Describe some of the security considerations involved with connecting your organization to the Internet
      6. Explain how DNS resolves hot names to IP addresses
    23. Use the Internet Mail Service
      1. Describe how the Internet Mail Service provides access and message exchange to and from a simple mail transfer protocol (SMTP)-based mail system
      2. Prepare to install the Internet Mail Service
      3. Install the Internet Mail Service by using the Internet Mail Wizard
      4. Configure the Internet Mail Service
      5. Optimize the performance of the Internet Mail Service
    24. Configure the Internet News Service
      1. Describe the functionality of Internet newsgroups
      2. Describe the functionality of the Internet News Service
      3. Create and configure an Internet News Service
      4. Pubic Microsoft Exchange Server public folders as Internet newsgroups
      5. Describe the details of NNTP
      6. Use performance counters to analyze message traffic through the Internet News Service
      7. Use available tools for troubleshooting the Internet News Service
      8. Describe how to backfill newsfeeds
    25. Configure Internet Mail client access protocols
      1. Explain how POP3 and IMAP4 clients retrieve electronic mail from a server
      2. Configure POP3 and IMAP4
      3. Troubleshoot POP3 and IMAP4 using Telnet, protocol logging, and diagnostic logging
    26. Configure Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
      1. Explain the function and purpose of LDAP
      2. Configure LDAP to allow clients to access the Directory Service on a Microsoft Exchange Server computer
    27. Install and use Outlook Web Access
      1. Describe how Active Platform and Outlook Web Access provide access to a Microsoft Exchange Server computer through a Web browser
      2. Install Outlook Web Access on a computer
      3. Configure the HTTP object
      4. Describe how self-registration provides unique identities to anonymous users so they may access public folders
    28. Explain Connector for Lotus Notes and Lotus cc:Mail
      1. Describe Connector for Lotus Notes functionality and components
      2. Describe the message flow from Microsoft Exchange Server to Lotus Notes and from Lotus Notes to Exchange Server
      3. Locate and configure the Connector for Lotus Notes
      4. Describe the functionality of the Connector for Lotus cc:Mail
      5. Describe the architecture of the connector
      6. Install and configure a Lotus cc:Mail postoffice to exchange e-mail with Microsoft Exchange Server
      7. Identify common support issues with the connector
    29. Connect to Microsoft Mail and Schedule+
      1. Describe the Microsoft Mail Connector architecture and the flow of a message between Microsoft Exchange Server and Microsoft Mail for PC Networks
      2. Install and configure the Microsoft Mail Connector
      3. Implement Dirsync between Exchange Server and Mail for PC Networks
      4. Configure the Schedule+ Free/Busy Connector

  
  • NET 708 - Database Concepts for Cyber

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course explores databases topics from the perspective of a cyber-security discipline.  The course introduces fundamentals of database management systems (DBMS), common practices to secure and audit DBMS, SQL characteristics and commands, and methods for using database-related information in incident response and digital forensics investigations.
    Competencies
    1. Describe major DBMS functions and their role in a database system.
      1. Generalize the fundamentals of relational, object-oriented, and distributed database systems including: data models, database architectures, and database manipulations
      2. Explain the fundamental terminology used in the relational data model
      3. Summarize the client/server model, and describe the key components used to implement Internet database environments;
    2. Utilize different methods to perform basic database administration tasks including database creation, manipulation, and control;
      1. Make use of GUI administration/management tools
      2. Make use of common manually-entered SQL syntax
    3. Formulate relational algebra operations from mathematical set theory (including union, intersection, difference, and Cartesian product) and the relational algebra operations developed specifically for relational databases (select, product, join, and division).
      1. Model queries in relational algebra.
      2. Construct queries in SQL to elicit information from a database.
    4. Incorporate fundamental security concepts and architectures that serve as building blocks to database security.
      1. Contrast with security components of operating systems, including system vulnerabilities and password policies, and file permissions.
      2. Explain principles of data encryption
      3. Summarize limitations associated with implementing encryption policies for relational databases.
      4. Summarize the auditing environment, process, objectives, classifications, and types of database auditing possible.
      5. Break down how triggers and stored procedures assist with the enforcement of database security and data integrity.
    5. Characterize the concepts of user account management and administration
      1. Relate confidentiality, integrity, and access concepts to users, authentication, tablespace (default & temporary), and quotas.
      2. Summarize security risks which administrators must be aware using Oracle and Microsoft’s SQL Server.
    6. Apply DBMS access controls.
      1. Choose the user permissions to address roles, profiles, policies, privileges, and rules.
      2. Choose the data permissions to address roles, profiles, policies, privileges, and rules.
    7. Generate investigative reports from DBMS artifacts.
      1. Deduct end-user activity based on DBMS journal and audit data.
      2. Break down B-Tree structured raw database data.
      3. Utilize manual and software-assisted methods to classify active and deleted data from relational databases in mobile apps.
    8. Determine DBMS-related vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies.
      1. Explain specific vulnerability causes and consequences.
      2. Make use of common vulnerability scanning tools.
      3. Examine privilege-escalation exploits.
      4. Evaluate targeted defenses for identified vulnerabilities.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • NET 711 - SQL Database

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the current curriculum for implementing a database in Microsoft SQL Server. For more information, contact the chairperson of the ITNA program.
    Prerequisite: NET 333, NET 664, NET 343 
    Competencies
    1. Use SQL Server books online
      1. Describe Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 and its supporting operating systems.
      2. Describe SQL Server architecture
      3. Describe SQL Server components
      4. Identify SQL Server design options, as well as implementation and administration activities
    2. Demonstrate ways to use Transact-SQL
      1. Describe the basic elements of Transact-SQL
      2. List data definition statements
      3. List data manipulation statements
      4. List data control statements
      5. Describe the ways to execute Transact-SQL statements
    3. Create databases
      1. Evaluate database considerations
      2. Create and configure a database.
      3. Manage a database and transaction log
      4. Create and drop user-defined data types
      5. Create and drop user tables
      6. Generate a script
    4. Implement Data Integrity
      1. Describe the three types of data integrity
      2. Determine which features to use to enforce data integrity
      3. Define and use DEFAULT and CHECK constraints
      4. Define PRIMARY KEY, UNIQUE, and FOREIGN KEY constraint
      5. Describe and use defaults and rules
    5. Plan and create indexes
      1. Determine when indexes are useful and decide the types of indexes to create
      2. Create clustered and nonclustered indexes with unique or composite characteristics
      3. Use the CREATE INDEX options to expedite index creation and improve index performance
      4. Apply the appropriate fillfactor value to accommodate the future growth of tables
      5. Use various tools and verification features to maintain indexes and enhance their optimal performance
    6. Perform advanced queries
      1. Combine data from two or more tables using joins
      2. Combine multiple result sets into one result set using the UNION operator and the SELECT INTO statement
      3. Use subqueries to break down and perform complex queries
      4. Use joins and subqueries as selection or data modification criteria within a statement
      5. Set up a distributed environment that accesses data stored in a remote SQL Server 
    7. Summarize data.
      1. Generate a single summary value using aggregate functions.
      2. Organize summary data for a column using aggregate functions with the GROUP BY, HAVING, COMPUTE, and COMPUTE by clauses
      3. Generate summary data for a table using aggregate functions with the GROUP BY clause and the ROLLUP or CUBE operators
      4. Use the TOP n keyword to retrieve a list of the specified top values in a table
    8. Manage transactions and locks
      1. Describe transaction processing
      2. Execute, cancel, or roll back a transaction
      3. Identify resource items that can be locked
      4. Identify the types of locks
      5. Set locking options and display locking information
      6. Initiate a distributed transaction
      7. Compare distributed transactions and replication
    9. Implement views
      1. Explain the purpose and benefits of using views
      2. Create a view using the CREATE VIEW statement
      3. Drop a view from a database
      4. Locate view definition information
      5. Alter a view
      6. Update a source table using a view
    10. Implement stored procedures
      1. Describe how a stored procedure is processed
      2. Create, execute, modify, and drop a stored procedure
      3. Execute a stored procedure on a remote server
      4. Use parameters with stored procedures
      5. Recompile a stored procedure
      6. Create custom error messages
    11. Implement triggers
      1. Define a trigger
      2. Explain the advantages of using a trigger
      3. Describe some considerations when using a trigger
      4. Create a trigger
      5. Drop a trigger
      6. Alter a trigger

  
  • NET 715 - Database Security & Auditing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is intended for students preparing for careers as developers, systems analysts, business analysts, database administrators or system development managers working with database applications. Students learn to implement database security and auditing in order to protect data.
    Prerequisite: CIS 303  
    Competencies
    1. Examine database security architecture
      1. Identify levels of database security
      2. Examine database security methods
    2. Identify components of an Operating System Security Environment
    3. Explain the importance of administration documentation
      1. Create and modify users and logins
      2. List security risks of remote and linked servers
      3. Describe best practices for user administration
    4. Identify the security components of a database account
      1. Define a user profile
      2. Design a password policy
      3. Describe best practices for securing a network environment
    5. Examine database application security models
      1. Identify and explain more than one security model
      2. Explain data encryption within database applications
    6. Define Virtual Private Database
      1. Use a data dictionary to view a virtual private database
      2. Use a Policy Manager to view a virtual private database
    7. Examine Database Auditing Models
      1. Create a flowchart of the auditing process
      2. List the benefits and side effects of auditing
      3. Create an auditing mode
    8. Explain the steps in developing and implementing application data auditing
    9. Analyze case studies related to database security

  
  • NET 932 - Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A semistructured experience in the student’s chosen field of information technology working as an intern with a sponsoring organization. The student has the opportunity to network with professionals and employers in his or her field. The student will write a resumé suitable for employment applications.
    Competencies
    1. Describe duties completed through internship
      1. Utilize knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for computer/IT technicians
      2. Recognize the importance of retraining and learning new skills
    2. Perform limited entry-level duties of a technician in the IT field
      1. Install/deploy hardware
      2. Perform preventative maintenance on selected equipment
      3. Complete proper paperwork related to job
      4. Accomplish assigned servicing tasks
    3. Apply techniques and skills learned in the course work
      1. List the required skills involved in the internship
      2. Learn to work under pressure
    4. Display knowledge of basic inventory control concepts implemented by the organization
    5. Observe policies, procedures and regulations
      1. Identify employer expectations for an intern
      2. List employer policies and procedures to be complied with
    6. Develop knowledge of “people skills” required by a technician in the IT field.
      1. Follow a specified dress code
      2. Display a positive attitude
      3. Display good performance
      4. Attend the required hours
    7. Project professional appearance
      1. Avoid tardiness
      2. Understand safety and function of certain required clothing and equipment
    8. Develop ability to show initiative
    9. Develop pride in doing a job well
    10. Develop a resume suitable for an employment search


Computer Science

  
  • CIS 940 - Software Project Application

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An object-oriented programming language and full stack development will be used to expose students the process of software development from problem identification, storyboarding, planning, testing and development using Agile methodology.
    Prerequisite: CIS 125  or instructor approval
    Corequisite: WDV 101  and CIS 171  OR CIS 161  OR CIS 169  
    Competencies
    1. Create Software Solutions for real-world problems
      1. Identify real-world problems that can be solved with software
      2. Utilize Software Development Approaches
      3. Use Version Control for development
    2. Perform Software maintenance
      1. Identity errors, tasks for maintenance and a process for continued error/maintenance notifications
      2. Determine a process for bug fixes and maintenance
      3. Perform code updates, upgrades, bugfixes as necessary
    3. Demonstrate good programming practices
      1. Apply code testing for input validation, use-cases, and errors
      2. Document process including code comments, user manual or notes, maintenance manual or notes

  
  • CSC 105 - Computer Essentials

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    The basics of the Windows operating system, electronic communications and internet research will be covered. Students will use basic features of word processing and presentation software. This course is intended for students with limited or no computer skills.
    Competencies
    1. Perform basic computer operations.
      1. Correctly identify user interface components of a computer.
      2. Correctly start up and shut down computer system and peripherals.
      3. Demonstrate the various functions of a mouse.
      4. Differentiate between computer hardware and software.
    2. Use the Windows operating system to manage files.
      1. Define an operating system.
      2. Use tools on the Taskbar.
      3. Open and close programs utilizing icons.
      4. Manipulate windows by opening, resizing, moving, scrolling, and closing.
      5. Use menus, toolbars, and online help.
      6. Create, copy, move, delete, and restore files and folders.
      7. Save files on a hard drive, removable media, and network drive.
      8. Compress and extract files using compression software.
      9. Locate saved and downloaded files.
    3. Demonstrate the basic use of email.
      1. Access the email system using login name and password.
      2. Open, close, delete, reply to, forward, print, and save messages.
      3. Compose and send a message.
      4. Demonstrate basic email etiquette.
      5. Add attachments to an email
      6. Download, save, and open attachments.
      7. Maintain a contact list.
    4. Use the Internet to access information.
      1. Launch a browser and access specific web pages.
      2. Use a search engine and search function to locate information.
      3. Navigate web pages by using the browser’s toolbar functions.
      4. Manage a list of frequently visited web pages.
      5. Download files.
      6. Print text and images found on a web page.
      7. Manage history and cookies in the web browser.
      8. Navigate the DMACC website.
      9. Access Blackboard for course information.
    5. Demonstrate basic skill in word processing software.
      1. Enter text, use word wrap, and delete text.
      2. Create, edit, save, print, close, and reopen a word processing document.
      3. Format text by modifying fonts and styles.
      4. Use formatting tools for text alignment, margins, line spacing, and indents.
      5. Move, copy, paste, cut, and delete text.
      6. Insert headers/footers and page numbers in documents.
    6. Demonstrate basic skill in presentation software.
      1. Create, save, and close new presentations.
      2. Add slides and apply slide layouts.
      3. Format slides with text and graphics.
      4. Reopen and edit presentations.
      5. Print slides and handouts.
      6. Switch between different views and advance slides through normal view and slide show view.
    7. Perform Basic Troubleshooting
      1. Determine Internet connectivity
      2. Differentiate between basic user errors and system errors
      3. Interpret basic error statements in operating systems and applications
      4. Discuss printing errors
      5. Understand basic hardware malfunctions
      6. Know when, where, and from whom to get help

  
  • CSC 109 - Experience Information Technology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course will assist students in selecting the appropriate career path in the IT field through hands-on, lab-orientated assignments.
    Competencies
    1. Create an example web page
      1. Define the client server structure of web applications
      2. Examine HTML and its role in web applications
      3. Define CSS and its role in web applications
      4. Examine Javascript and its role in web applications
      5. Use a code editor to build a web page
      6. Apply HTML elements to define and structure a web page
      7. Apply CSS rules to define the presentation of a web page
      8. Implement an image on a web page
      9. Implement a Javascript slide show on a web page
      10. Demonstrate the web page using one or more web browsers
    2. Evaluate features of a basic IP based communication system
      1. Use and connect basic copper and fiber optic lines needed for a communications system
      2. Compare and contrast fiber optic, copper and wireless communication systems for business and residential users
      3. Experiment and use various communications software for both wired and wireless technology
      4. Describe the basics of voice and data communication systems
    3. Assess the fundamentals of computer programming
      1. Compare current programming languages
      2. Discuss the primary structures used in a software program
      3. Explain variables and data types
      4. Understand the software development cycle
      5. Install an Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
      6. Design a software program in a designated programming language
      7. Compile a software program using the appropriate IDE
      8. Develop and execute a test plan
      9. Explore object oriented programming
    4. Design relational databases
      1. Develop a logical data model
      2. Develop a conceptual schema
      3. Define the data dictionary
      4. Model and Entity-Relationship Diagram
      5. Discuss normalization techniques
      6. Determine the difference in logical and physical database design
    5. Generate a relational database using a popular PC RDBMS
      1. Select the database software
      2. Create a new, empty database
      3. Create a table
      4. Change the design of a table
      5. Enter and edit data in a table
      6. Describe relationships between tables in the database
      7. Enforce relationships between tables in the database
    6. Create a simple mobile application
      1. Install the Android Software Development Kit
      2. Configure application settings including the application name, package name, target SDK and theme
      3. Create a simple user interface using various views (buttons, text boxes, check boxes) and layouts
      4. Modify resource files to add strings, drawables, and colors
      5. Describe the relationship between activities, services, content providers and intents
      6. Utilize buttons to initiate activities
      7. Create and configure an emulator using the Android Virtual Device Manager
      8. Implement API demos to an application
      9. Deploy applications to an emulator
      10. Describe the process of publishing an app to an app store
    7. Demonstrate the features and use of hardware basics
      1. Understand the concept of geometry
      2. Identify the various types of hard drives
      3. Perform a hard drive swap
      4. Discuss partitioning and formatting
      5. Perform a memory upgrade
    8. Evaluate the concept of networking
      1. Identify the components of a local area network
      2. Describe the advantages of networking
      3. Analyze a peer-to-peer and server-based network
    9. Examine career paths within business and industry
      1. Interact with guest lecturers in the classroom
      2. Explore Iowa Technology-TAI Tour(s)
      3. Attend at least one Technology Fair
      4. Define the roles and careers available in IT
      5. Interview one manager and one entry level employee in an IT field of choice

  
  • CSC 116 - Information Computing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course presents the basic concepts of information systems and computer literacy. The course incorporates theory as well as hands-on practice which focuses on spreadsheets and database management systems (DBMS).
    Competencies
     

    1. Create and edit spreadsheets
      1. Describe the purpose of spreadsheets and their common components
      2. Identify the functionality available on the command ribbons and put them to proper use
      3. Manipulate text and numbers by entering, selecting, editing, finding, copying, and rearranging
      4. Format the contents of a spreadsheet and copy formatting and style from one item to another
      5. Implement conditional formatting
      6. Manage rows and columns by inserting, deleting, altering height, changing width and using autofit
      7. Enhance the workbook by coloring, rearranging and renaming worksheet tabs
      8. Utilize page setup, formatting, scaling, backgrounds, breaks, borders, and titles
      9. Employ commands available to review and correct the spreadsheet such as spell check, track changes, freeze and unfreeze rows or columns, add comments, and change workbook views
      10. Alter standard document properties
      11. Save a spreadsheet in multiple formats including the default format, PDF and as a web page
      12. Print, publish, submit or otherwise share a workbook
    2. Incorporate functions and formulas in a spreadsheet
      1. Demonstrate using the formula ribbon and differentiate  between automatic and manual calculation options
      2. Incorporate absolute, relative and 3D references in a formula
      3. Use math functions such as SUM, AVERAGE, COUNT, COUNTA, MIN, MAX
      4. Execute logical tests using functions such as IF, SUMIF, COUNTIF
      5. Utilize date and time functions
      6. Implement financial functions such as PMT, NPV
      7. Demonstrate the use of VLOOKUP, XLOOKUP function
      8. Verify formulas and the results of a formula
      9. Display the formulas in cells rather than the resulting value
    3. Evaluate worksheet data and create reports
      1. Perform What-if analysis with tools such as scenarios, goal seek and data table
      2. Create and format column charts, line charts, and pie charts
      3. Implement chart components such as data labels, data point and data series
      4. Implement filters to display a subset of data
      5. Alter the chart type and style
      6. Summarize data with a pivot tables and pivot charts
      7. Import data into and export data from a spreadsheet
    4. Examine fundamental concepts in a database management system (DBMS)
      1. Describe the features and components of a DBMS
      2. Define relational database terminology such as byte, field, record, table, data type, query and relationship
      3. Explain the purpose and necessity of queries and querying a database
      4. Summarize the basic concepts of SQL
      5. Introduce database software and provide an overview
    5. Support principles of effective database design and maintenance
      1. Design a database to satisfy a collection of requirements
      2. Create tables in datasheet and design views
      3. Identify the requirements of database tables including fields, data types, format, input masks and steps that can be taken to reduce redundancy
      4. Establish relationships between tables
      5. Enforce referential integrity with primary key and foreign key fields
      6. Specify validation rules and default values
      7. Add, change and delete records in a table
      8. Update table design and edit field properties
      9. Use lookup fields and multi-valued look-up fields
      10. Create forms using wizards
      11. Produce reports using wizards
      12. Manage a database with operations such as backup, recovery, repair, compacting and checking for dependent objects
    6. Produce queries that provide accurate results when executed
      1. Construct queries with relational and conditional operators (>, >=, <, <=, =, <>)
      2. Produce queries using logical operators (BETWEEN, OR, AND)
      3. Utilize the wildcard operator (*)
      4. Sort data in query results
      5. Form queries using aggregate functions and group by
      6. Develop cross-table queries
      7. Generate calculated fields
      8. Export, print, publish, submit or otherwise share query results
    7. Utilize a word processing application for data display
      1. Use graphs in a professionally formatted document
      2. Use charts in a professionally formatted document
    8. Develop a slideshow presentation to display data
      1. Construct graphs in a professionally formatted presentation
      2. Construct charts in a professionally formatted presentation
    9. Demonstrate file management on a computer
      1. Make and save files
      2. Rename files
      3. Retrieve files
      4. Manage files
    10. Appraise the principals and components of an Information System (IS)
      1. Differentiate the various types of information systems such as transaction processing, decision support, knowledge management, learning management, and database management
      2. Compare IS to Information Technology (IT)
      3. Describe methodologies used in the development and acquisition of IS
      4. Explain how information systems impact an organization’s operations and contribute to gaining a competitive advantage
      5. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of cloud-based information systems
      6. Summarize digital crime, digital security threats and security measures
    11. Examine topics in technology
      1. Discuss digital literacy and digital citizenship
      2. Give examples of connecting and communicating online including types of websites and media
      3. Describe computer and mobile device hardware and software
      4. Identify programs, apps and tools
      5. Explain digital security risks and defenses

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

Construction

  
  • CON 205 - Introduction to Construction Technology

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to give students practical experience to apply classroom knowledge. Safety, professionalism, & career opportunities will be a focus of the course. Topics also include safe and proper use of tools, layouts, home maintenance projects, standards and applications for stairs, roof layouts, and introduction of green building technology.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate proper industry safety standards
      1. Examine basic construction safety guidelines
      2. Complete OSHA 10-hr Construction Industry test
      3. Review function of MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets)
      4. Practice safe work procedures in classroom, lab, and work environment
    2. Interpret building codes
      1. Identify building codes appropriate to building projects
      2. Discuss how codes impact building projects
    3. Practice appropriate industry math skills
      1. Measure accurately
      2. Cut accurately to a measurement
      3. Use speed square
      4. Use Construction Master 5 calculator
    4. Use professionalism in classroom, lab, and work environment
      1. Describe personality characteristics that may cause workplace and social problems
      2. Examine experiences that affect job performance
      3. Assess work environment strengths/weaknesses
    5. Research career opportunities in the building trades industry
      1. Visit local business/industry and job sites
      2. Discuss local career opportunities
      3. Identify career possibilities that satisfy student’s goals
    6. Demonstrate safe and proper use of tools
      1. Demonstrate proper use of hand and power tools
      2. Explain the procedures to properly maintain power tools
      3. Discuss the procedures for basic maintenance of hand tools
    7. Practice laying out walls
      1. Construct wall with window opening
      2. Construct wall with door opening
    8. Complete home maintenance projects
      1. Describe general rules and safety related to wiring
      2. Wire outlet, switch, and 3-way switch
      3. Repair drywall
      4. Install laminate flooring
      5. Finish and stain woodwork
      6. Set tile
    9. Demonstrate standards and applications of plumbing
      1. Define safety procedures for plumbing
      2. Describe principles of plumbing
      3. Practice sweat joint copper
      4. Cut copper pipe
      5. Glue pipe
      6. Use plumbing layouts and diagrams to complete a plumbing project
    10. Implement Green Principles to building projects
      1. Discuss mold prevention
      2. Explain how to build a ?healthy house?
      3. Practice installing Tyvek
    11. Construct stair system
      1. Discuss principles of a stair system
      2. Layout basic stair system

  
  • CON 333 - Materials/Construction Theory

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 5
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the materials used in the construction industry and the methods involved in the application of these building materials.
    Competencies
    1. Identify appropriate wood materials to be used for a construction project
      1. Identify the softwood lumber grading system
      2. List the standard fire-plywood grades by face veneer
      3. Identify the grading stamp used for construction panels
      4. List the major methods of sawing lumber
      5. List the major methods of drying lumber
      6. Identify common lumber defects
      7. Identify the lumber stamp
    2. Identify appropriate fastening systems used for a construction project
      1. Identify the lengths and the pennyweights of nails used by the carpenter
      2. Name coatings for nails
      3. Identify types of screws
      4. Identify types of bolts
      5. List types of glues and mastics
    3. Identify the appropriate materials to be used for a construction project
      1. Identify the components used to construct the metal stud wall
      2. Identify the length of the standard stud
      3. Identify types of wood trusses
      4. Identify the types of roof coverings
      5. Identify types of roof felts and flashings
      6. Identify types of cornices
      7. Identify types of roof trim
      8. Identify types of exterior siding
      9. Identify types of insulation
      10. Identify types of interior wall finish
      11. Identify types of ceiling tiles
      12. Identify types of interior doors
      13. Identify types of flooring materials
      14. Identify types of counter tops
      15. Identify basic stair terminology
    4. Describe the application of various building materials
      1. Identify types of dormers
      2. Identify the process to apply roof sheathing
      3. Describe the application of various insulating materials
      4. Identify the correct application of gypsum wallboard
      5. Identify the proper order to install a suspended ceiling system
      6. Identify the application of interior trim
    5. Specify building material requirements as they apply to building codes
      1. Identify types of footings
      2. Identify types of foundations
      3. Identify minimum depth of foundation to protect against frost
      4. Identify the proper nailing sequence for the placement of the box sill
      5. Identify the rules that govern a cantilevered joist
      6. Identify types of corner blocks and receiving blocks
      7. Identify types of wind bracing used in wall framing
      8. Determine the proper ceiling joist size
    6. Demonstrate the ability to make appropriate computations for construction framing problem
      1. Compute board feet
      2. Determine proper girder size for safe use.
      3. Determine proper floor joist size for ordinary load conditions
      4. Identify the rough opening dimension for windows and exterior doors
      5. Calculate the rough opening for interior doors
      6. Calculate the header lengths for windows and doors
    7. Describe the use of the transit to layout a construction site
      1. Identify the different types of levels used in site layout
      2. Identify the fundamental parts of a transit
      3. Identify the hand motions used by the instrument person to guide the target person
      4. Read the leveling rod

  
  • CON 334 - Construction Techniques

    Credits: 7
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 15
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A practical hands-on introductory experience that covers the construction process, including rough and finish carpentry.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately for specific types of construction projects
      1. Employ the accurate use of tape measure
      2. Use a combination square accurately
    2. Install a door lock
      1. Make accurate measurements to place lock and strike
      2. Measure accurately for placement of hinges
      3. Mortise for a hinge gain using appropriate hand tools
    3. Lay out a building to establish 90 degree corners and accurate dimensions
      1. Locate stakes to correct dimensions
      2. Prove, using any one of several methods to do so, that the building is square
    4. Demonstrate the ability to properly cut and place moldings used for standard trim applications
      1. Demonstrate skill using the block plane
      2. Cut and place base molding
      3. Cut and place cove moldings
      4. Trim a window
    5. Demonstrate the skills necessary to cut and place rafters
      1. Determine lengths on common rafters
      2. Determine lengths of hip or valley rafters
      3. Determine lengths of jack rafters
    6. Install gypsum wall board by nailing/screwing it into place
      1. Tape wallboard joints and depressions
      2. Finish wallboard joints and depressions
    7. Determine the solution to a stair problem
      1. Lay out and cut a stair stringer
      2. Place a stair stringer

  
  • CON 336 - Care/Use of Hand/Power Tools

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Proper care, use and selection of hand and power tools with an emphasis on maintenance and safety.
    Competencies
    1. Use hand and power tools properly and safely.
      1. Identify the hand tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses.
      2. Use hand tools in a safe and appropriate manner.
      3. State the general safety rules for operating common power tools, regardless of type.
      4. State the general rules for properly maintaining common power tools, regardless of type.
      5. Identify the portable power tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses.
      6. Use portable power tools in a safe and appropriate manner.  
    2. Evaluate basic hand tools and their proper uses in the construction trade.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to use the proper hand tool for the application/process.
      2. Visually inspect hand tools to determine if they are safe to use.
      3. Safely use hand tools.
    3. Assess electrical safety.
      1. Identify electrical safety rules.
      2. Visually inspect electrical cords to determine if they are safe to use.
      3. Safely handle and store electrical cords. 

  
  • CON 337 - Construction Blueprint Reading

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Fundamentals of blueprint reading designed to allow the student to translate plans into practical job experience.
    Competencies
    1. Recognize standard blueprint symbols
      1. Identify types of architectural drawings
      2. Classify types of architectural drawings by their characteristics
      3. Identify types of lines
      4. List standard types of symbols used in construction
      5. Identify architectural elevations
      6. Identify architectural schedules
      7. Identify mechanical symbols
      8. Identify electrical symbols
    2. Interpret the position of walls and openings from reading the blueprint
      1. Read the architect’s scale ruler
      2. Estimate materials needed to trim a room
      3. Estimate materials for wall and partition framing
    3. Estimate the amount of materials needed to construct a building by reading the working drawings
      1. Estimate materials needed to form a footing
      2. Estimate the amount of concrete to pour a footing
      3. Estimate material needed to build a wall form
      4. Estimate the amount of concrete to pour a wall
      5. Estimate the amount of material needed for the floor system
      6. Estimate the materials needed to frame a roof
      7. Estimate materials needed for cornices and gable trim
      8. Estimate roofing materials
      9. Estimate sheathing and siding for a house with a gable roof
      10. Estimate insulation materials
      11. Estimate drywall materials
      12. Estimate materials needed to trim a door

  
  • CON 338 - Materials Takeoff

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of the techniques needed to create a materials list by reading a blueprint.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CON 337    
    Competencies
     

    1. Estimate the amount of materials needed to construct a foundation by reading the working drawings
      1. Estimate the amount of dirt to be removed during excavation
      2. Estimate materials needed to form a footing
      3. Estimate the amount of concrete to place in a footing
      4. Estimate material needed to build a wall form
      5. Estimate the amount of concrete to place in a wall form
      6. Estimate the amount of materials needed to insulate the foundation
      7. Estimate the amount of materials needed to provide waterproofing for the foundation
    2. Estimate the amount of materials needed to construct a framing system for the construction
      1. Estimate the amount of material needed for a floor system
      2. Estimate the amount of material needed for a wall system
      3. Estimate the amount of material needed for a ceiling system
      4. Estimate the amount of material needed for a roof system
    3. Estimate the amount of materials needed to complete the shell of the construction
      1. Estimate the amount of materials needed for cornices and roof trim
      2. Estimate the amount of materials needed for roofing materials
      3. Estimate the amount of materials needed for exterior windows and doors
      4. Estimate the amount of materials needed for siding
    4. Estimate the amount of materials needed to complete the interior of a construction
      1. Estimate the insulation materials
      2. Estimate drywall materials
      3. Estimate the materials needed to trim the interior

  
  • CON 341 - Construction Drafting & Desig

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the fundamentals of design and basic drafting methods. Includes the preparation of the blueprint used to construct the student-built project.
    Prerequisite: CON 337  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate appropriate use of drafting tools to produce a floor plan
      1. List the drafting tools
      2. Demonstrate the ability to use the drafting tools
      3. Interpret proper line quality
      4. Identify proper lettering and numbering
      5. Determine correct lettering, numbers, and symbols
    2. Assess appropriate tools for project
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the appropriate use of the architect’s scale ruler
      2. Interpret the scale ruler to dimension to an accuracy of 2” using &frac14; scale
    3. Demonstrate the ability to dimension a floor plan
      1. Identify the use of extension and dimension lines
      2. Label wall and exterior openings
    4. Create building designs that can be effectively communicated to inspector
      1. Implement building codes
      2. Apply correct symmetry and symbols
      3. Determine proper dimensioning
      4. Formulate correct proportions
    5. Communicate building ideas graphically
      1. Draw plan to scale using both hand drawn and using a CAD design program
      2. Label drawing
      3. Apply building symbols correctly

  
  • CON 342 - Interior Trim Practices

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 7
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Advanced lab experience that emphasizes complex finish skills. The student will be able to demonstrate the skills and work habits necessary to complete tasks in a safe manner and to adapt previously learned skills to complete more complex building tasks.
    Prerequisite: CON 334  
    Competencies
    1. Install interior door
      1. Identify all materials required
      2. Install doorjamb
      3. Route for hinges on jamb and door
      4. Hang door in jamb
      5. Install door lock
      6. Install doorstop
      7. Install door trim
    2. Construct a kitchen cabinet
      1. Identify all materials required
      2. Read the cabinet plans for correct dimensions
      3. Assemble a cabinet to achieve proper dimensions

  
  • CON 347 - Concrete Systems and Forming

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This concrete lab course will provide students with a basic understanding of concrete, and its relationship to residential construction.
    Prerequisite: CON 336  
    Competencies
    1. Practice ladder and scaffold safety
      1. Erect ladders and scaffolding properly
      2. Use scaffolding and ladders according to safety procedures
    2. Construct footing forms
      1. Identify shoring techniques
      2. Identify types of footings and stepped footing
    3. Build level footing forms
      1. Layout forms
      2. Install keyway
      3. Identify materials needed to construct sample wall forms and form construction Explain the purpose of forms
      4. Define parts of a form
      5. Erect forms
      6. Create and set batter boards
    4. Construct column forms
      1. Identify materials needed to build column forms
      2. Layout column
    5. Plumb column using transit
      1. Operate the builder’s level/transit
      2. Give hand signals
      3. Respond to hand signals
      4. Establish elevation point from a blind bench mark
    6. Demonstrate skills needed to square a building layout
      1. Square a building layout
      2. Transfer elevation with folding rule as a rod
      3. Layout a slab form

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CON 480 - Const Procedure/Application I

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course includes footings, drainage, foundation, basement insulation and decking. (5-week session)
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CON 333 , CON 347 CON 342   
    Competencies
     

    1. Identify job site safety hazards
      1. List job site safety hazards
      2. Demonstrate the ability to remedy hazards
    2. Construct footing forms
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Assemble form
      3. Position forms for correct dimension and height
    3. Construct wall forms
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Assemble forms
      3. Plumb form
    4. Estimate the amount of material needed to frame a floor assembly
      1. Describe the methods used to fasten sills
      2. Place sill
      3. Layout sill for placement of floor joists
      4. Place floor joists
      5. Place bridging
      6. Place floor sheathing
    5. Construct floor system
      1. List safety precautions associated with this task
      2. Identify correct materials
      3. Assemble girder
    6. Construct wall system
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Layout plates
      3. Cut headers
    7. Assemble wall components
      1. Erect walls
      2. Plumb and straighten walls
    8. Construct ceiling system
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Layout second plate for correct placement of ceiling joists
      3. Assemble ceiling system
    9. Construct rafter system
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Layout positions for rafters
      3. Layout rafters
    10. Assemble rafter system
      1. Cut rafters
      2. Place roof sheathing

  
  • CON 481 - Constr Proc & Applications II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course includes exterior wall construction, interior wall construction, ceiling joist framing, rafter framing, exterior trim, window installation and roofing. (5-week session)
    Prerequisite: CON 480  
    Competencies
    1. Install roofing products
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Apply flashing materials
      3. Apply roofing product
    2. Install exterior windows and doors
      1. Identify correct window or door for the opening
      2. Hang window or door in opening
    3. Install appropriate materials to trim and side structure
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Install exterior trim
      3. Install siding
      4. Apply caulking
    4. Install appropriate materials to insulate structure
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Insulate walls
      3. Demonstrate the ability to use foams to stop air infiltration
      4. Install vapor barrier

  
  • CON 482 - Const Proc & Applications III

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course includes concrete flatwork, insulation, drywall application, cabinet work and interior trim. (5-week session)
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CON 481   
    Competencies
     

    1. Place and straight edge concrete
      1. Construct form for a slab on grade
      2. Install reinforcing wire
      3. Place concrete
    2. Prep area to drywall
      1. Inspect area for obstructions or problems that need to be fixed
      2. Mark placement of light fixtures and vents
    3. Install drywall
      1. Hang drywall (by nailing/screwing drywall into place).
      2. Tape joints in drywall
      3. Apply at least two coats of mud to all joints and imperfections
    4. Install interior doors
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Hang interior doors
      3. Trim door
    5. Install interior trim
      1. Identify correct materials
      2. Hang interior windows
      3. Trim windows
    6. Construct kitchen/vanity cabinets
      1. Assemble key tools and materials
      2. Read print for correct dimensions
      3. Set cabinet height and order
      4. Level and set boxes
      5. Cut plumbing and electrical outlets
    7. Finish cabinet installation with doors and trim
      1. Replace drawers
      2. Rehang doors
      3. Adjust hinges to ensure alignment
    8. Demonstrate ability to remedy safety hazards
      1. Wear appropriate safety gear
      2. Identify potential hazards
    9. Interpret building codes
      1. Identify building codes appropriate to building projects
      2. Discuss how codes impact building projects
    10. Demonstrate safe and proper use of tools
      1. Explain the procedures to properly maintain power tools
      2. Discuss the procedures for basic maintenance of hand tools

  
  • CON 615 - Technical Internship I

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 20
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The student will work with a participating employer. The work will be full-time, approximately 40 hours per week. The tasks will be consistent with the student’s ability and previous coursework. A task list will be issued to the employer.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits
      1. Attend regularly
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide employer a responsible and productive employee
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate work relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Demonstrate ability to remedy safety hazards
      1. Wear appropriate safety gear
      2. Identify potential hazards
    5. Construct footing forms
      1. Choose type of foundation
      2. Set footings
    6. Construct wall forms
      1. Measure area of wall
      2. Lay out corner positions
    7. Build floor system
      1. Square the sill plate layout on the foundation
      2. Install floor joists
    8. Construct wall system
      1. Calculate amount of materials needed
      2. Review local building codes
    9. Construct ceiling system
      1. Determine layout
      2. Cut studs to desired dimensions
    10. Build rafter system
      1. Cut rafter parts
      2. Assemble rafters
    11. Place roof sheathing
      1. Check for level nailing surface
      2. Provide roof ventilation
      3. Fasten panels

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CON 616 - Technical Internship II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 20
    Course Type: Voc/Tech

    Work experience with a participating employer. The tasks will be consistent with the student’s ability and previous coursework.
    Competencies

    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits
      1. Attend regularly
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide employer a responsible and productive employee
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate work relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Install roofing products
      1. Measure roof area
      2. Order materials
      3. Remove old roof
    5. Install exterior windows and doors
      1. Calculate dimensions of the rough opening
      2. Dry-fit the new door and window
    6. Install appropriate materials to trim and side structure
      1. Measure area
      2. Order materials
    7. Install appropriate materials to insulate structure
      1. Identify appropriate insulation to use
      2. Use appropriate safety gear
    8. Demonstrate ability to remedy safety hazards
      1. Wear appropriate safety gear
      2. Identify potential hazards
    9. Conform to employer policies and procedures
      1. Observe all company policies
      2. Identify employer expectations for an intern
    10. Develop occupational proficiencies
      1. Implement steps for learning/practicing skills
      2. Apply the steps developed

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CON 617 - Technical Internship III

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 20
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Work experience with a participating employer. The tasks will be consistent with the student’s ability and previous coursework.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits
      1. Attend regularly
      2. Demonstrate job punctuality
    2. Provide employer a responsible and productive employee
      1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work
      2. Apply yourself when working
      3. Show employee dependability
      4. Display quality work
      5. Exhibit good judgment
      6. Present ability to learn
      7. Reveal initiative
      8. Illustrate work relations with others
    3. Complete internship weekly work reports
      1. Log daily work
      2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person
    4. Place and straight edge concrete
    5. Install drywall
      1. Measure wall
      2. Plan for windows, doors, outlets, and other fixtures
    6. Install interior doors/trim
      1. Align main frame
      2. Install door hardware
      3. Apply trim
    7. Construct kitchen/vanity cabinets
      1. Prepare case panels
      2. Assemble pieces
      3. Build cabinet doors
    8. Install kitchen/vanity cabinets
      1. Identify cabinet height
      2. Layout plumbing and electrical openings
    9. Demonstrate ability to remedy safety hazards
      1. Wear appropriate safety gear
      2. Identify potential hazards
    10. Conform to employer policies and procedures
      1. Observe all company policies
      2. Identify employer expectations for an intern

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CON 949 - Spcl Topic:Green Bldg Concepts

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    In this special topics course, students will examine green building concepts, concerns and material characteristics as well as selection. Students will also be introduced to current Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Building certification standards and processes. Theory will be provided that will help the students understand the reasoning behind green concepts and practices. Students will learn basic concepts of a cost benefit analysis when selecting environmentally friendly or energy-saving housing systems.
    Competencies
    1. Describe heat flow
      1. Define conduction
      2. Define radiation
      3. Define convection
    2. Describe water flow
      1. Define moisture movement
      2. Examine states of water
      3. Define diffusion
      4. Demonstrate capillary action
    3. Describe air flow and ventilation concerns
      1. Examine vapor barriers
      2. Examine effects of showering, cooking and breathing
      3. Research mold and its causes
      4. Examine mold and its effects on humans and animals
    4. Explain environmentally friendly housing systems
      1. Examine HVAC systems and indoor air quality
      2. Examine insulation and house sealing
      3. Describe electrical systems and energy efficiency standards
      4. Examine water efficiency
      5. Research renewable energy
      6. Identify waste reduction options
      7. Examine toxics reductions options
      8. Identify environmentally preferable building materials, processes, and designs
      9. Explain storm water runoff
      10. Identify noise concerns
      11. Describe sitting as an aspect of the building and environment
      12. Identify green building designs
    5. Describe EPA involvement in green building movement
      1. Examine the history of green building
      2. Identify EPA programs related to green building
      3. Discuss current issues related to green building
    6. Explain green building retrofit options for homes
      1. Describe options for home owners
      2. Presenting options to a home owner
      3. Develop a cost benefit analysis using green options in a retrofit/remodel project
    7. Examine the LEED certification process
      1. Define LEED certification
      2. Identify LEED certification processes
      3. Describe LEED issues and concerns
      4. Examine a LEED building project


Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJ 100 - Intro to Criminal Justice

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    An in-depth examination of the three components of the criminal justice system and the roles they play in society.
    Competencies
    1. Explain basic concepts and theories of criminology, criminal justice, and crime prevention.
      1. Describe the social content of crime and the mechanisms of inform and formal social control
      2. Define the consensus, conflict, and interactionist perspective of the criminal justice system
    2. Examine adult and juvenile criminal justice institutions (to include law enforcement, the courts, and corrections), and how they interact and complement each other.
      1. Identify the nature of crime, crime measurement, types of crime, and crime victims
      2. Explain the development, sources, and types of law in democratic societies
    3. Analyze the criminal justice system through a process view.
      1. Discuss how a criminal case proceeds through a typical criminal justice system
      2. Generalize the constitutional principles relevant to the administration of justice
    4. Appraise current trends in criminal justice.
      1. Review the use of technology in criminal justice
      2. Summarize unintended consequences of high incarceration
      3. Recall the development of the area of homeland security
    5. Differentiate the roles performed by criminal justice personnel.
      1. Assess the use of discretion used by criminal justice personnel
      2. Determine potential career paths in the area of criminal justice
    6. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations with the criminal justice system.
      1. Illustrate why professional are motivated to commit ethical violations
      2. Establish the importance of professionalism in the area of criminal justice

  
  • CRJ 107 - Survey Crim Justice Agencies

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study of the criminal justice system through an examination of actual agencies, focusing on theoretical vs. real roles and functions of the agencies. Includes on-site visits.
    Competencies

    1. Discuss the criminal justice system.
      1. Discuss the functions of the subsystems of the criminal justice system.
      2. Explain the systemic nature of the criminal justice system.
      3. Identify the basic problems of the criminal justice system.
      4. Explain the terminology and the processes of the criminal justice system.
    2. Analyze the role of law enforcement agencies.
      1. Examine the nature of the work and role expectations for law enforcement officers at the municipal, county, state and federal levels.
      2. Describe the pressures, conflicts, and frustrations of  jobs in law enforcement agencies.
    3. Analyze the role of the courtroom work group.
      1. Identify the role expectations of the court system, to include judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, bailiffs, court reports and clerks.
      2. Describe the pressures, conflicts, and frustrations for members of the courtroom work group
    4. Analyze the role of corrections agencies.
      1. Examine the nature of the work and role expectations in corrections, to include institutional positions and community-based corrections positions at the local, state and federal levels.
      2. Describe the pressures, conflicts, and frustrations of jobs in corrections agencies.
    5. Analyze the role of members of private security and investigations.
      1. Examine the nature of the work and role expectations for private security and investigations.
      2. Identify the differences between public and private sector positions.
    6. Evaluate personal career goals in the criminal justice system.
      1. Evaluate criminal justice internship and career opportunities, career availability and current profession trends.
      2. Define a career plan and goals for criminal justice employment.
      3. Demonstrate effective communication and interview skills.
    7. Discuss the salient characteristics and challenges of the various positions in a juvenile institution. 

  
  • CRJ 109 - Theories of Interviewing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course focuses on the successful use of both interviews and interrogations for criminal justice professionals. The student will learn a “Reid”-based system that will assist the student, not only in the criminal justice field, but any other profession requiring human interaction.
    Competencies
    1. Define the characteristics of an interview.
      1. Characteristics of an interrogation.
      2. Benefits of conducting an interview first.
      3. Understand and explain Miranda Rights and when they should be given.
      4. Explain why Miranda Rights are legal, moral, and ethical.
    2. Obtaining factual information.
      1. Define “case facts”
      2. Explain the process of fact gathering.
      3. Explain how an investigator should ethically follow the facts in order to obtain truthful information.
    3. Explain the traits and qualifications of a good interview and a good interrogation.
      1. Provide the reasons for the “assumption of guilt”.
      2. Provide the reasons for “assumption of innocence”.
      3. Define the “neutral position”.
    4. Define the process of formualtion of interview questions.
      1. Provide an example of a good “opening question”.
      2. Identify the three parts of a truthful account.
      3. Identify indications of deception.
      4. Provide the technique for handling an evasive response.
      5. Provide an example of a good “opening question”.
    5. Explain the process of behavior symptom analysis.
      1. Define the verbal channel.
      2. Define the paralinguistic channel.
      3. Define the nonverbal channel.
      4. Explain the importance of not projecting your personal assumptions and conclusions into the interview.
    6. List the behavior symptoms of truthful subjects.
      1. List the behavior symptoms of untruthful subjects.
      2. Define how a cultural difference can affect a truthful or untruthful account.
    7. Define the 9 steps of the Reid system of interview and interrogation.
      1. Explain the direct, positive confrontation.
      2. Explain the process of theme development and provide one.
      3. Explain how to handle a denial.
      4. Explain how to treat an objection.
      5. Describe the technique to employ in keeping the suspect’s attention on the theme.
      6. Define a passive mood and explain how to recapture the suspect’s attention.
      7. Explain and present an alternative question.
      8. Explain how to draw out a full admission of guilt from the suspect.
      9. Describe how to safeguard the effectiveness of the confussion.
      10. Explain the importance of verifying information obtained in the confession.

  
  • CRJ 111 - Police and Society

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An examination of the role of the police in American society and a discussion of prominent issues. The course will examine the various eras of policing agencies. The structure and style of various policing agencies will also be covered. Agency application of internal and ethical issues including use of force will be examined. Strategies and policies to improve policing work environment will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100   or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the historical foundations of American policing.
      1. Describe how policing in England influenced American policing.
      2. Identify specific periods related to the origins of American policing.
    2. Analyze the various types of law enforcement agencies which exist within the American criminal justice system
      1. Discuss the role of police agencies at the various levels of government.
      2. Recall the primary functions of police operations.
      3. Contrast crime prevention and crime solving strategies.
    3. Evaluate principles necessary for the effective administration of a police agency.
      1. Illustrate the typical organizational structure of a police agency.
      2. Explain the use of technology in police agencies in carrying out their duties.
    4. Examine how police organizations and officers can be influenced by social, cultural, legal and/or political institutions.
      1. Make sense of important issues in policing, such as stress management, use of force, implicit bias, or recruitment.
      2. Analyze police discretion, both the positive and negative aspects.
    5. Apply the foundations of criminal justice ethics
      1. Recall the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics
      2. Explain various types of misconduct
      3. Solve ethical dilemmas commonly encountered in policing.
      4. Enumerate civil, criminal, and administrative liabilities for officers in policing.
    6. Demonstrate proper communication skills
      1. Apply appropriate written skills through course activities.
      2. Use effective verbal skills through course activities.

  
  • CRJ 120 - Introduction to Corrections

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A survey course reviewing the history, development, and function of the correctional system and programs.  Introduces the history, philosophies, goals, and processes of the correctional system with an emphasis on the U.S. correctional system. Students learn about the purposes and goals, the methods to achieve the goals of the corrections system, and examine the system components from the legal, ethical, and functional perspectives.  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the historical development of corrections.
      1. Explain the origins of corrections.
      2. Compare the different types of corrections used historically.
    2. Differentiate the purposes or philosophies of punishment.
      1. Identify the sentencing process, its goals, decision-making mechanisms, and strategies.
      2. Describe trends in sentencing and corrections.
    3. Compare and contrast institutional and community-based corrections.
      1. Identify the functions of diversion, intermediate sanctions and probation.
      2. Describe jail, prison, parole, and reentry into the community.
    4. Analyze major challenges in corrections.
      1. Recall principles and practices of treatment of individuals in various correctional settings.
      2. Explain rise in individuals with mental disorders.
      3. Summarize issues regarding gender and sex, youth, and issues involving other special populations.
    5. Examine emerging issues in corrections.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of core controversies surrounding the capital punishment.
      2. Describe development and types of prisoners’ legal rights.
      3. Explain the history and status of private corrections.
    6. Compare different ethical frameworks.
      1. Analyze why people are motivated to commit ethical violations.
      2. Describe the importance of professionalism in the field of corrections.

  
  • CRJ 128 - Victimology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Examination of the field of victimology, including its scope and development, the impact of victimization, and the relationship between the victim and the offender, criminal justice system, and society. Various practical applications and policies will also be investigated.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the historical development of victimology and the victim rights movement
      1. Define the term of victim and methods of reporting, with a focus upon criminal victimization
      2. Recall the development of victim rights in the United States
    2. Examine the impact of crime on individuals, organizations, and society
      1. Understand specific types of victimization and victims who belong to special populations
      2. Describe personal effects of victimization
      3. Discuss  proactive and reactive responses to victimization
    3. Evaluate reasons and motivations of victimization and patterns of future victimization
      1. List theoretical explanations of forms of victimization
      2. Describe examples of the relationships between victim and offender
    4. Analyze victim participation in criminal justice decision-making
      1. Identify victim services, compensation, and restitution
      2. Describe restorative justice processes
    5. Design victim empowerment proposal or activity
      1. Research use of legislation, the media, governmental and non-governmental organizations
      2. Apply empowerment or advocate perspectives
    6. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations when working with victims
      1. Identify legal rights and issues while working within the victim services field
      2. Recognize why people are motivated to commit ethical violations

  
  • CRJ 141 - Criminal Investigation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Rudiments of criminal investigation: techniques, principles, problems, sources of information and evidentiary processes.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Review contemporary protocols associated with basic criminal investigations.
      1. Define common criminal investigation terminology.
      2. Summarize the goals and priorities of criminal investigations.
      3. Give examples of possible sources of information. 
    2. Demonstrate correct procedures for identifying, preserving and documenting a crime scene.
      1. Discuss the significance of commonly identified and examined physical evidence.
      2. Illustrate accurate field notes and sketches.
      3. Describe how to properly photograph a crime scene.
      4. Report steps taken to maintain evidence integrity for presentation in court. 
    3. Assess the importance of writing effective reports.
      1. Analyze the components of a well-written report.
      2. Produce an accurate report.
    4. Establish legal principles associated with criminal investigations.
      1. Determine the constitutional standards relating to all stages and procedures of a criminal investigation.
      2. Discuss ethical considerations and potential impact on a case.
    5. Examine criminal investigation and legal standards for various crimes.
      1. Recall elements of common crimes investigated, to include crimes against persons, property, and society.
      2. Describe modern techniques utilized in criminal investigations and special considerations dependent upon the crime being investigated.
      3. Identify current challenges facing criminal investigators. 
    6. Explain the importance of preparing for presenting cases in a court of law.
      1. Discuss necessary steps to adequately prepare a case for prosecution.
      2. Generalize considerations for appropriate testimony.
      3. Predict possible effects improper preparation, or unlawful testimony, could have on a case.

  
  • CRJ 178 - E-Crime Investigative Methods

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course identifies electronic crime, instructs the student on current laws, and teaches the investigative methods used in law enforcement today to gather evidence to prosecute and testify regarding these criminal acts.
    Competencies
    1. Explain computer crime
      1. Define cyber computer fraud
      2. Define identify theft and list the steps to prevent identify theft
      3. Define cyber stalking
      4. Define and describe juvenile cyber crime
      5. Define and describe pornography on the web
      6. Demonstrate knowledge of electronic banking and money laundering
      7. Demonstrate knowledge of gambling in cyberspace
    2. Describe search and seizure as it relates to electronic crime
      1. Describe the Fourth Amendment ?Reasonable Expectation of Privacy?
      2. Define reasonable expectation of privacy in computers as storage devices
      3. Define reasonable expectation of privacy and third-party possession
      4. Define and outline consent searches
      5. Define exigent circumstances
      6. Define plain view searches
      7. Define and describe special cases such as searches in the work place
    3. Describe searching and seizing electronic evidence with a warrant
      1. Describe basic strategies for planning and executing electronic searches
      2. Describe when hardware is merely a storage device for evidence of a crime
      3. Describe when hardware is itself contraband, evidence, or an instrumentality of the fruit of the crime
    4. Explain the Privacy Protection Act
      1. Outline a brief history of the privacy Protection Act
      2. List the terms of the Privacy Protection Act
      3. Define how the Privacy Protection Act applies to computer searches and seizures
      4. Explain the civil liability under the Electronic communications Privacy Act
      5. Define privileged communications in regards to lawyers, physicians, and clergyman
    5. Search warrants.
      1. Explain and understand the search warrant application process appropriate to electronic evidence at a single location crime scene
      2. Explain an affidavit
      3. Explain probable cause to search
      4. Describe chain of custody as it relates to processing evidence
      5. Describe search methods to utilize when executing a search warrant
      6. Identify hardware and storage devices potentially containing evidence of a crime
      7. Define return of service
      8. Describe the best current practices for the collection, preservation, transportations, and storage of electronic evidence
    6. Understand the nature of victimization that can occur in cyber crime
      1. Describe the groups affected by cyber exploitation, stalking, and obscenity
      2. Describe the offenders who typically prey on victims in cyber stalking and exploitation case via the Internet
      3. Understand the law and legislation in the areas of cyber stalking, cyber exploitation and pornography
      4. Describe the Supreme Court cases that have recently been decided concerning federal effort to target cyber criminals and protect children online
      5. Understand and describe the issues with pornography online, child pornography, and child exploitation facilitated by the Internet
      6. Understand and describe difficulties faced by law enforcement in detecting, investigating, and prosecuting case of cyber stalking and cyber exploitation
      7. Describe the elements of the crime for cyber stalking
      8. Describe the elements of the crime for child pornography
    7. Analyze topics pertaining to anarchy and hate on the World Wide Web
      1. Legally define a hate crime and describe how specific groups use the internet to spread their messages of hate
      2. Explain the relationship of ?special interest or single-issue extremist? groups
      3. Describe recent terrorist activities of activist groups in the United States
      4. Describe some of the techniques that hate groups use to spread their propaganda
      5. Discuss the primary issues associated with the USA PATRIOT Act and list traditional tools or surveillance that have been expanded with the act
      6. Explain the conflicting roles and activities observed within law enforcement pertaining to investigation versus intelligence gathering
    8. Analyze topics pertaining to digital laws and legislation
      1. Explain the intent and fundamental concepts of search and seizure laws as it applies to digital crime
      2. Identify situations where search and seizure is possible without a warrant
      3. Describe the federal statutes that govern electronic surveillance in communication networks
      4. Discuss the issues presented regarding the admission of digital evidence at trail
      5. Identify and discuss significant court cases on scientific evidence and digital crime
    9. Discuss law enforcement roles and responses to digital crime and digital terrorism
      1. Discuss federal law enforcement roles and responses to digital crime and digital terrorism
      2. Describe state law enforcement responses to computer crime
      3. Describe local law enforcement responses to computer crime
      4. Identify the factors that have limited law enforcement efforts against electronic crime.
    10. Discuss the investigation of computer-related crime
      1. Explain and understand the search warrant application process appropriate to electronic evidence at a single-location crime scene
      2. Identify hardware and storage devices potentially containing evidence of a crime
      3. Explain and understand the legal standard and best current practices for the documentation of a single-location electronic crime scene
      4. Explain and describe the best current practices for the collection, preservation, transportation, and storage of electronic evidence
      5. Distinguish between sing-scene, multiple-scene, and network crimes
      6. Be able to communicate an understanding of network architectures and standards relevant to network investigations
      7. Identify sources of assistance for multiple-scene and network operations
      8. Identify categories of evidence and probable locations of that evidence
    11. Explain digital terrorism
      1. Define the concepts of ?information warfare? and ?cyber terrorism?.
      2. List the four categories of attacks that encompass cyber terrorism and/or information warfare: infrastructure attacks, information attacks, technological facilitation and promotion
      3. Identify critical infrastructure elements that are potentially vulnerable to cyber terrorism and/or information warfare
      4. Define and describe an information attack
      5. Describe some tactics used in cyberspace to share information and promote terrorist ideologies
      6. Define the words “stenography” and “cryptography” with relation to their use in information warfare in cyber terrorism
      7. Explain the active role of global entities in recent cyber attacks against the United States
    12. Describe digital criminals and hackers
      1. Distinguish between computer crime, criminal hacking, and non criminal hacking
      2. Recognize the role media hype plays in influencing young hackers
      3. Describe the role of technology that drives the hacker subculture
      4. Predict hacker actions based on their type
      5. Explain the terminology used to describe hackers in the media
    13. Analyze and describe white collar crimes using computer technologies
      1. Describe how computer technologies have altered the ways in which embezzlement is committed
      2. Describe how computer technologies have increased the opportunities to commit money laundering
      3. Describe how computer technologies have affected the crime of corporate espionage
      4. Describe how computer technologies and the increasing use of the Internet have affected identity and fraud crimes
    14. Analyze topics pertaining to viruses and malicious code
      1. Identify and distinguish the various type of viruses and malicious code
      2. Understand the differences between the differing types of viruses, including file viruses, boot viruses, macro viruses, and network viruses
      3. Understand the differences between a virus and a worm
      4. Understand the definition and operation of a ?Trojan Horse? and how it differs from a standard virus
      5. Describe adware and spy ware and explain why such applications are controversial
      6. Describe and understand other types of malicious code and attacks, including denial of service attacks and blended threats
      7. Describe the impact of virus hoaxes
      8. Understand who the virus writers are and why they write viruses
    15. Court testimony
      1. Describe how a witness is made an expert witness
      2. Describe the order of a trial
      3. Explain the term procedural fairness
      4. Describe testimonial evidence
      5. Outline the best practices for presenting testimonial evidence
      6. Describe the best practices for preparing for trial
      7. Define the importance of integrity in legal proceedings

  
  • CRJ 179 - White Collar Crime

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course provides basic understanding of white-collar crime and some of its ramifications. Special attention will be paid to the study of white collar crimes pertaining to corporate crime, occupational crime, governmental and political crime, enterprise/ organized crime, prevention/control mechanisms and societal responses to these crimes.
    Competencies
    1. Define white collar crime and differentiate white collar crimes from other types of crime.
    2. Identify various examples of white collar crime, deceptive practices and fraud.
      1. List and recognize examples of corporate crime.
      2. List and recognize examples of occupational crime.
      3. List and recognize examples of governmental crime including state crime and political crime.
      4. List and recognize examples of enterprise or organized crime.
      5. List and recognize examples of technology-related crime.
    3. Explain the effects of white collar crime.
      1. Describe the economic effects in both macro and micro perspectives.
      2. Identify potential environmental effects of white collar crime.
      3. Recognize the human impact of white collar crime both directly to the victim and indirectly to society.
    4. Describe legal responses and social controls of white colar crime.
      1. Provide examples of common methods to police and regulate against white collar crimes.
      2. Engage in case studies that explore the prosecution, defense, and adjudication of white collar crime.
    5. Compare and contrast the effects of white collar crime within cultural institutions of American society, specifically taking in to account financial, political, media and religious institutions.

  
  • CRJ 196 - Crime Scene Investigation 1

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is an introduction to the nature of crime scenes and physical evidence collection including descriptions of forensic analysis, techniques for proper collection and preservation of evidence, and interpreting the significance of evidence.
    Competencies
    1. Assess documentation of evidence and crime scenes
      1. Define what a constitutes evidence and a crime scene
      2. Utilize documentation techniques of photography, sketching, report writing, and fingerprinting.
    2. Perform collection of evidence
      1. Identify the steps in proper crime scene examination
      2. Describe official personnel involved in the crime scene process and define their roles.
    3. Examine evidence and crime scenes
      1. Demonstrate proper collection, storage and preservation of various types of evidence.
      2. Use proper evidence packaging for chain of custody.
    4. Evaluate the processing of evidence and crime scenes
      1. Describe proper techniques for evidence processing and analysis.
      2. Explain the CSI effect and how it influences ethics and court proceedings.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 197 - Crime Scene Investigation 2

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course focuses upon the collection and analysis of evidence as it relates to crime scene processing and current forensic investigation trends or technologies.
    Competencies
    1. Collect and analyze trace evidence.
      1. Explain trace evidence and the various sources of trace evidence.
      2. Discuss the analytical instruments and techniques used in the collection of trace evidence.
    2. Collect and analyze blood and DNA evidence.
      1. Report the methods of collecting blood and DNA evidence from crime scene.
      2. List the instruments, techniques, and interpretive methods employed with blood, blood spatter and DNA evidence.
    3. Collect and analyze toxicological evidence.
      1. Identify toxicological evidence and the various sources of toxicological evidence.
      2. Recognize the analytical instruments and techniques used in the collection of toxicological evidence.
    4. Collect and analyze impression evidence.
      1. Indicate impression evidence, the types of impression evidence and its use in investigations.
      2. Analyze footprint, tool mark, and ballistic evidence.
    5. Examine cyber-crime and computer forensic investigations.
      1. Define cyber-crime terms and explain the forensic analysis of digital evidence as it relates to criminal investigations.
      2. Describe the extraction and preservation of electronic evidence from various devices.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 200 - Criminology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course explores the nature, extent, measurement, causes, and control of law-breaking behavior. The course also introduces different types of crime as well as the theories of crime.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interdisciplinary science of criminology.
      1. Explain the historical development of criminology
      2. Recall differences between fields of criminology and criminal justice
    2. Assess the nature of crime and victimization
      1. Identify strengths and limitations of the major sources of crime data
      2. Utilize crime data to understand the extent and patterns of crime.
    3. Examine core theoretical explanations of crime or law-breaking behavior
      1. Classify typologies of crime
      2. Apply theoretical explanations to the various crime typologies, criminals, and victims. 
    4. Determine the impact of the field of criminology to historical and contemporary public policy.
      1. Review the historical and contemporary trends in crime types and criminals.
      2. Assess the linkages between research on crime, criminological theory, and public policy
    5. Produce effective communication while demonstrating course content
      1. Create writing assignments that reflect understanding of disciplinary conventions.   
      2. Express ideas in verbal assignments  
    6. Evaluate ethical dilemmas in the areas of criminology and criminal justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 201 - Juvenile Delinquency

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course surveys of the causes of delinquency in children, focusing upon research and the major theories that have been proposed as explanations of delinquent behaviors.  The course will also consider the control and prevention of delinquency through policies and programs of the juvenile justice system.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate juvenile delinquency from a legal and sociological perspective
      1. Recognize the historical development of juvenile delinquency
      2. Compare and contrast adult and juvenile justice system
    2. Assess the differences between crime and delinquency
      1. Differentiate between sources of data
      2. Analyze techniques for measuring juvenile delinquency.
      3. Summarize juvenile crime trends
    3. Examine the theories of delinquency causation and understand the significance of delinquency within society’s context.
      1. Discuss theories of delinquency impact on policy and programs
      2. Describe theories of delinquency support by empirical evidence
    4. Assess roles of juvenile justice system
      1. Illustrate the interaction of juvenile offenders with law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
      2. Identify juvenile control, prevention, and treatment programs
    5. Evaluate student’s own collaboration skills within a  project-based learning activity
      1. Demonstrate teamwork skills
      2. Create a respectful and constructive environment with others
    6. Assess ethical dilemmas in the areas of  juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps and application

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 220 - Community-Based Corrections

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    An in-depth examination of the components of community based corrections; the study of the principles and practices of evidence-based approaches used in today’s community corrections field; and an exploration of the use of research-proven treatment strategies by parole, probation, and community corrections practitioners in helping offenders change their behavior and live a more prosocial and law-abiding life.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CRJ 120  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. ​Contrast the history of community-based corrections
      1. Discuss the history of probation and parole supervision
      2. Describe the history of pretrial supervision
    2. Argue the importance of evidence-based practices in community corrections
      1. Explain outcome measures and effectiveness for programs and policies
      2. Summarize current assessment, treatment, and supervision/case management practices
      3. Show the relationship between philosophy, theory, policy, and practice in community-based corrections 
    3. Summarize re-entry and frequent challenges experienced during reentry
      1. Enumerate understanding of collateral consequences
      2. Recall community-based reentry efforts with restorative solutions
    4. Examine the juvenile justice issues
      1. Differentiate between at-risk and protective factors
      2. Describe the juvenile justice process in comparison to the adult justice process.
    5. Differentiate the roles performed by community-based corrections personnel
      1. Identify roles and procedures performed by performed by community based corrections personnel in interactions with law enforcement and the courts
      2. Determine potential career paths in the area of community corrections
    6. Compare different ethical frameworks
      1. Analyze why people are motivated to commit ethical violations
      2. Relate the importance of professionalism in the area of community corrections

     

     

  
  • CRJ 222 - Correctional Treatment Method

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Examines the history, evolution, and development of correctional treatment in the United States and present an overview of the strategies that are used in the rehabilitation and counseling of juvenile and adult criminal offenders who are incarcerated or assigned to residential facilities.  Institutional and non-institutional programs are reviewed and treatment models are discussed.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CRJ 120  or instructor approval
    Competencies
     

    1. Apply correctional intervention, counseling, and treatment methods for correctional clients of varying types.
      1. Describe special challenges in working in a correctional setting
      2. Identify principles of effective intervention
    2. Evaluate current and future correctional intervention methods
      1. Discuss common theoretical counseling perspectives
      2. Understand evidence-practices when evaluating research, interventions, or treatment strategies with clients
    3. Determine correctional interventions for special populations
      1. Explain issues associated with clients with special attributes, such as youth, gender/sex, and age
      2. Summarize issues associated with clients with special offenses, such as sex offenses or drug offenses
    4. Create appropriate case plans for clients
      1. Understand risks, needs, and responsivity as part of assessment of clients
      2. Apply relevant contemporary approach for correctional intervention, counseling, or treatment method
    5. Differentiate the roles performed by corrections personnel
      1. Explain roles and procedures performed by personnel in interactions clients, the institution, and the courts.
      2. Determine potential career paths in the area of correctional intervention, counseling, or treatment
      3. Defend the importance of professionalism in the area of correctional interventions, counseling, or treatment
    6. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations with correctional interventions, counseling, or treatment
      1. Identify legal issues when providing interventions, counseling, or treatment at a correctional facility
      2. Recognize why people are motivated to commit ethical violations

  
  • CRJ 237 - Criminal & Constitutional Law

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course will review the historical development of constitutional law, the philosophy of law and the current impact on law enforcement officials. The judicial process will be examined to better understand the societal and political influences that impact current-day constitutional decisions and a review of the current constitutional protections afforded to an individual. The course will also provide an examination of the elements of common offenses and the procedural safeguards in the criminal process.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Outline the sources and historical evolution of criminal law doctrines and principles
      1. Describe the primary sources of criminal law in the United States, including common law and the Model Penal Code
      2. Explain the difference between civil and criminal law
      3. Differentiate elements of various crimes against persons, property, order, and state
    2. Assess the process of a criminal prosecution from investigation through trial and sentencing
      1. Define, recognize, and apply reasonable suspicion and probable cause
      2. Identify strengths and reliability of the evidence obtained in a criminal investigation
      3. Explain various defenses to prosecution
    3. Analyze the doctrinal limitations on criminal law
      1. Recall important court decisions that impact civil and criminal procedure
      2. Discuss key considerations in case law involving the rights of criminal defendants
    4. Summarize historic and current constitutional case law that impacts the criminal justice system
      1. Identify state and federal constitutional protections and limitations
      2. Explain applicable amendments of the Constitution in relation to the criminal justice system
    5. Evaluate student’s own collaboration skills within a  project-based learning activity
      1. Demonstrate teamwork skills
      2. Create a respectful and constructive environment with others
    6. Assess ethical dilemmas in the areas of law and criminal justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps and application

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 245 - Scientific Investigation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An in-depth study into forensic science examinations and analysis techniques with a focus on the crime laboratory. 
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast the services provided by a crime laboratory.
      1. Identify evidence associated with each service provided by the laboratory, including: forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent fingerprints, questioned documents, fire debris, firearms/tool mark impression evidence, and digital evidence.
      2. Identify the proper processes and procedures for handling and testing evidence.
    2. Differentiate forensic chemistry techniques and procedures.
      1. Identify equipment for chemical examination.
      2. Describe the types of chemical tests for identification of evidence such as unknown substances, toxicology, poisons, drugs, and plants
    3. Evaluate forensic biology identification techniques.
      1. Identify instruments of microanalysis.
      2. Distinguish the varieties of biological evidence, such as bodily fluids, blood, and DNA.
    4. Assess the examination methods of comparative evidence.
      1. List the tools used for comparison.
      2. Explain the types of evidence associated with comparative analysis, such as forensic biometrics, fingerprints, ballistics, toolmarks, tire marks, footwear, trace evidence, and documents.
    5. Evaluate the different aspects of death investigations.
      1. Evaluate anthropology evidence and collection.
      2. Discuss forensic entomology and how it is used in death investigation. 
    6. Analyze ethics in forensic science.
      1. Define professional integrity and conflict of interest.
      2. Discuss objectivity.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 292 - Police Phys Fitness and Cond

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course presents the specific requirements of the State of Iowa police physical fitness entry standards (Cooper Test) and academy physical training for the police officer. A fitness exam will be conducted and a personal exercise and nutrition program will be developed to meet each student’s needs. Students will be evaluated at the beginning of the course to ensure they meet at least a 35% fitness level (as outlined in the State of Iowa Police Fitness Standards, Cooper Institute Standards). Each student’s fitness levels will be monitored throughout the course and student adherence to exercise and nutrition prescription will be assessed. Students will be expected to improve at a minimum of 15% above the 35% level of fitness.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the specific requirements of the Cooper Test.
    2. Design an individual exercise and nutrition plan.
      1. Demonstrate personal improvement in executing specific requirements of the Cooper Test.
      2. Describe the purpose of each exercise.
      3. Model the use safe use of exercise equipment, weight machines, and any other physical activity for the purposes of exercise.

  
  • CRJ 293 - Crim Justice Report Writing

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    This course will help Criminal Justice students master the ability to translate actions and observations into complete, accurate and understandable written reports for law enforcement and/or corrections professionals. Emphasis will be on the purpose of reports in the criminal justice field, the uses of reports, basic report components and guidelines for good report writing.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the fundamentals of proper report writing for criminal justice.
      1. Identify the common purposes and uses of reports
      2. Describe the issues of liability and responsibility as they relate to criminal justice reports 
    2. Examine the basic organizational structure of report writing.
      1. Demonstrate how to construct a report with clarity
      2. Report pertinent facts in chronological order.
      3. Demonstrate methods to convey information so that it can be understood by anyone
      4. Recognize criminal justice jargon and bias language and its detriment on reports
    3. Develop review techniques for written reports.
      1. Identify appropriate proofreading methods
      2. Demonstrate effective report editing techniques

     

  
  • CRJ 294 - CJ Communication Strategies

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focus upon the unique types of verbal and written communication skills required in a criminal justice career. Students will learn and practice verbal and written communication strategies by completing a variety of projects representative of the documents created, or skills utilized, by individuals working within the criminal justice system.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100   or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of effective communication skills
      1. Identify the basic communication process
      2. Explain the value of empathic listening and effective feedback
      3. Delineate verbal and non-verbal communication 
    2. Examine the purpose of the differing types of interviews, such as ones with suspects, defendants, clients, witnesses, victims, or informants
      1. Describe the three basic steps of an interview, to include planning, conducting, and recording
      2. Describe techniques used to document an interview
      3. List characteristics of interviews and interrogation
      4. Explain circumstances in which Miranda warnings apply
    3. Distinguish between a well-written criminal justice report and a poorly-written report
      1. Summarize the elements of a fair, accurate, complete, and concise report
      2. Explain written reports such as reports of investigation, reports of violations, case file notes, field notes, or other types of reports
      3. Describe the presentation of a report in a variety of criminal justice settings
    4. Determine types of criminal justice legal proceedings in which testimony may be required
      1. Explain the functions of administrative, civil, and criminal proceedings
      2. Describe the differences between depositions, hearings, grand juries, trials, sentencings, and revocations
    5. Investigate the judicial proceedings for which testimony is important
      1. Explain the different types of testimony which may be provided by witnesses, laypersons (opinion), and experts
      2. Describe how witness statements, arrest reports, incident reports, pre-sentence reports, and violation reports are used in court proceedings
      3. Understand the duties and responsibilities for testifying 
    6. Demonstrate the ability to conduct an interview and document the interview
      1. Choose the appropriate communication strategy involving a suspect, defendant, witness, and/or a victim
      2. Prepare a criminal justice report based on a practical exercise involving a suspect, defendant, witness, and/or a victim
    7. Demonstrate the ability to testify effectively in a criminal justice matter involving a report prepared by the student
      1. Display proper demeanor and attire for court testimony
      2. Demonstrate the proper technique for answering questions while testifying
      3. Determine knowledge of the facts and circumstances documented in a criminal justice report 
    8. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations when working in criminal justice
      1. Identify relevant caselaw, statutes, and other guidance for criminal justice professionals
      2. Understand the ethical obligations and consequences of false reporting and testimony

  
  • CRJ 296 - Latent Friction Ridge Evidenc

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This unit of study is intended to introduce the student to the basic preservation, development and collection of friction ridge evidence commonly found at crime scenes.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the importance of friction ridge impressions and how such evidence can help solve crimes.
      1. Define common terms regarding friction ridge evidence.
      2. Describe different types of friction ridge evidence.
    2. Apply criminal justice field standards regarding friction ridge evidence.
      1. Identify locations where friction ridge evidence might be located.
      2. Discuss importance of preserving areas likely to contain friction ridge evidence.
      3. Demonstrate proper documentation, processing, and collection techniques.
      4. Explain appropriate chain-of-custody steps.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  
  • CRJ 297 - Death & Injury Investigations

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This unit of study is intended to present a wide range of topics related to the investigation of death and injury to the human body from the standpoint of the investigating police officer. The presentation is intended primarily for law enforcement officers.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze appropriate investigative strategies.
      1. Define common terms regarding death and injury investigations.
      2. Differentiate among the various causes and manners of death
    2. Comprehend the basics of how injuries appear on the human body.
      1. Summarize the nature of postmortem changes in human body.
      2. Recall identification and recovery procedures for human skeletal remains.
      3. Discuss injuries common to child victims.
      4. Explain how fire and heat affect the human body.
    3. Identify the various professionals commonly involved in death investigations.

     

     

     

     

     

  
  • CRJ 298 - Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course of study is intended to introduce the student to the basic recognition, preservation, development, and collection of bloodstain evidence commonly found at crime scenes.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate bloodstain evidence
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in preserving, documenting, and examining bloodstain evidence.
      2. Explain motion, direction, and point of convergence.
      3. Discuss how surface texture, height, and force affect bloodstains.
    2. Characterize bloodstain patterns.
      1. Recall common terms, concepts, and descriptions of typical bloodstain evidence.
      2. Summarize presumptive and confirmatory testing, blood enhancement chemicals, DNA and serological testing.

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • CRJ 301 - Intro to Homeland Security

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course is an examination of the role government and, more specifically, first responders play in the current threat to our nation from terrorism. The course will examine the role, authority and history of the government when faced with these threats. The structure, style and current practices will be covered along with an attempt to discover best practices and cost-effective solutions.
    Competencies
    1. Construct a historical timeline reflecting significant terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally.
      1. Identify the role of the U.S. Constitution defines for federal, state and local governments in the area of emergency management and public safety.
      2. Identify which president established the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), identify which president established the Department of Homeland Security,
      3. Explain the history of emergency management in the United States and its priorities.
      4. Outline the essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism.
    2. Demonstrate very clear written and oral skills that describe:
      1. Essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism.
      2. Factual information in order to coordinate law enforcement agencies.
      3. Explain the statutory authority of the government in terrorism related events.
    3. Compose a historical timeline reflecting methods and outcomes used by national and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
      1. Classify the roles, functions, of and interdependency between local, federal and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
      2. Classify the roles, functions and interdependency between local, federal and international law.
      3. Explain the law enforcement and military interdependency between local, federal and international agencies to counter terrorist and criminal activity.
    4. Differentiate between ethical and unethical attitudes and actions regarding the execution of Homeland Security practices.
      1. Define unethical attitudes regarding race, religion and national identity.
      2. Explain how societies can view similar or same activities as having different levels of acceptance.
    5. Identify the characteristics, ideologies, motives, and behaviors of various extremist and terrorist groups.
      1. Explain how these characteristics foster and support terrorist activities
      2. Explain how these characteristics foster and support criminal behaviors.
    6. Examine and interpret forensic evidence to reconstruct crime and terrorism.
      1. Explain the role of physical evidence and its use in securing search and arrest warrants.
      2. Explain the “chain of evidence” regarding physical and forensic evidence and its value in a court of law.
    7. Craft effective strategies to generate useful information for local, national and international law enforcement agencies.
      1. Explain how this information is “vetted” and released.
      2. Explain the difference between information sources.
    8. Solve problems as an individual and in coordinated team setting.
      1. Define the cultures that may cause problems in this coordination.
      2. Define the problems inherent in team building during a crisis.
    9. Write clear and concise reports.
      1. Explain how these reports provide factual information, and accurate data analysis, and sound recommendations.
      2. Explain the consequence of poor reporting and inaccurate analysis and their effect on recommendations.

  
  • CRJ 302 - Transportation & Border Sec

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is an examination of the field of transportation and border security. The course will examine the role of both government and private enterprise in securing one of the most vulnerable and important industries worldwide. The course will discuss the threats to this industry with a view toward passenger, cargo and infrastructure protection. Strategies and policies to improve and protect the system will be discussed.
    Competencies
    1. Outline the essential characteristics of acts of terrorism.
      1. Describe the characteristics of national terrorism.
      2. Describe the characteristics of international terrorism.
    2. Construct a historical timeline relfecting significant transportation related terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally.
      1. Discuss the interdependency between nations regarding transnational terrorist organizations.
      2. Explain both military and law enforcement options available to nations and the problems inherent to these options.
    3. Differentiate between natural and unnatural threats to transportation systems and how to detect the difference.
      1. Discuss how a natural threat can morph into an unnatural threat to the transportation system.
      2. Explain how an unnatural threat can affect the policy makers and affect worldwide transportation systems. 
    4. Identify the characeristics of vulnerabilities in transportation systems.
      1. Discuss current attempts to remove these vulnerabilities.
      2. Articulate an understanding of developing research designed to harden the transportation system against future threats.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of technology on countering threats to transportation systems.
      1. Discuss current “threat” and “no fly” lists and their impact on passenger transportation systems.
      2. Articulate an understanding of “next generation” systems that might impact the freight and passenger systems.
    6. Discuss differences in dealing with security threats various tranportation systems.
      1. Describe security threats related to passenger transportation systems.
      2. Describe security threats related to freight transportation systems.
    7. Classify the roles, functions of, and interdependency between local, Federal and International law enforcement agencies and the military to foster border security.
    8. Create effective strategies to generate useful information for local, national and international law enforcement agencies.
      1. Explain how these strategies are designed to concur with current United States and international law.
      2. Explain cultural differences that might impact the initiation of these strategies.
    9. Solve problems as an individual and in a coordinated team settings.
      1. Describe the issues regarding combining subcultures and organizational expertise while preserving team integrity.
      2. Describe the issues inherent in team building during a crisis.
    10. Write clear, concise and accurate reports.
      1. Discern relevant, factural information.
      2. Demonstrate accurate data analysis.
      3. Make sound recommendations.

 

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