Apr 17, 2024  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Mass Media Studies

  
  • MMS 486 - Premiere/Video Editing II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an intermediate overview of the practices, and software commonly used in the video editing industry. Through demonstrations, exercises and projects, students will learn editing and software techniques while creating various video assets.
    Prerequisite: MMS 484  
    Competencies
    1. Appraise multi-camera editing
      1. Prepare synchronized clips based on audio
      2. Review and merge clips to an exiting sequence
      3. Prepare multi-camera target sequences
      4. Examine multiple cameras views
      5. Select best recording of a multi-camera edit
      6. Examine and finalize a multi-camera editing project
    2. Perform editing and mixing audio techniques
      1. Develop and organize an interface to work with audio
      2. Examine the audio workspace
      3. Differentiate between audio characteristics
      4. Build voice over “scratch tracking”
      5. Prepare and adjust audio volume
      6. Select and implement levels in a sequence
      7. Demonstrate set-up of the Audio Clip Mixer and Audio Track Mixer
    3. Generate edits by sweetening the sound
      1. Change audio with audio effects
      2. Apply effects in the AUDIO Track Mixer
      3. Prepare working processes with sub mixes
      4. Examine and change the EQ adjustments
      5. Differentiate between cleaned up and noisy audio
      6. Review and understand dynamics
    4. Modify edits by adding video effects
      1. Distinguish between appropriate fixed effects
      2. Prepare master clip effects
      3. Develop masking and tracking visual effects
      4. Demonstrate applying and removing effects
      5. Examine key framing effects
      6. Select effect presets
      7. Identify frequently used effects
    5. Produce edits with color correction and grading
      1. Develop a color-oriented workflow
      2. Prepare a color correction workspace
      3. Examine vectorscopes and waveforms
      4. Prepare and implement color correction effects
      5. Examine and correct exposure problems
      6. Review and correct color balance issues
      7. Prepare special color effects
      8. Develop a creative and unique look
    6. Evaluate by exploring composition techniques
      1. Determine appropriate alpha channels
      2. Prepare compositing techniques
      3. Examine and correct with opacity
      4. Use alpha-channel transparencies
      5. Develop color keying on greenscreen shots
      6. Select and use appropriate mattes
    7. Create production titles
      1. Explore a test with titler
      2. Develop with video typography
      3. Prepare text titles
      4. Develop using stylized text
      5. Apply shapes and logos
      6. Prepare a text roll and a crawl
      7. Select and apply templates
    8. Organize all assets to manage your projects
      1. Demonstrate how to use the Project Manager
      2. Review project management steps
      3. Examine how to import projects and sequences
      4. Select exports for production
      5. Review and manage for collaboration
      6. Demonstrate and optimize hard drives for performance
    9. Design export frames, clips and sequences
      1. Apply the right export options
      2. Develop and make single frames
      3. Prepare a master copy
      4. Examine movie, image sequence and audio files
      5. Develop exports with Adobe Media Encoder Composer
      6. Review and rework with edit decision lists


Mathematics

  
  • MAT 034 - Arithmetic

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    A review of the fundamental operations of arithmetic, including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, decimals and fractions. This is a college preparatory course designed for those students who need to review and improve their knowledge of the fundamentals of mathematics. College preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Competencies
    1. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers, fractions and decimals.
      1. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers.
      2. Apply the four arithmetic operations to decimals.
      3. Add fractions with like denominators.
      4. Add fractions with unlike denominators.
      5. Subtract fractions with like denominators.
      6. Subtract fractions with unlike denominators.
      7. Add mixed numbers.
      8. Subtract mixed numbers.
      9. Multiply and divide fractions, whole, and mixed numbers.
    2. Relate number theory to arithmetic calculations.
      1. Write a word name for a number in standard or decimal notation.
      2. Write a number in standard or decimal notation from a word name.
      3. Write a word name for an amount of money and visa versa.
      4. Write related sentences.
      5. Write true number sentences using < or >.
      6. Round numbers to a given place value.
      7. Apply rules for exponential notation.
      8. Simplify expressions using the rules for order of operations.
      9. Find the factors and multiples of a number.
      10. Find the GCF of two or more numbers.
      11. Find the LCM of two or more numbers.
    3. Execute calculations involving ratio and proportion.
      1. Write ratios in fractional notation.
      2. Write ratios and proportions for verbal problems.
      3. Determine whether two pairs of numbers are proportional.
      4. Solve proportions.
      5. Define rate.
      6. Define unit price.
    4. Convert between fractional, decimal, and percent notation.
      1. Convert between proper fractions and mixed numbers.
      2. Convert between dollars and cents.
      3. Convert between rational and decimal fractions.
    5. Calculate with percents.
      1. Translate percent problems into a standard model.
      2. Calculate sales tax, commission, discounts and interest.
    6. Relate simple statistics to problems.
      1. Read data from tables, charts, and various graphs.
      2. Interpret data from tables, charts, and various graphs.
      3. Construct simple pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs.
      4. Distinguish between mean, median, and mode.
      5. Compute mean, medium and mode.
    7. Convert measurements within the Metric and American systems and between systems.
      1. State the common units of measure of weight and mass, capacity, time and length.
      2. Convert from one unit of time to another.
      3. Convert from one American unit to another.
      4. Convert from one Metric unit to another.
      5. Convert between Metric and American units.
      6. Convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature scales.
    8. Calculate the perimeter, area and volume of various geometric figures.
      1. Calculate perimeter and circumference.
      2. Relate diameter to radius.
      3. Find the area of parallelograms (including squares and rectangles), triangles, trapezoids, and circles.
      4. Calculate the volume of a rectangular solid, cylinder, sphere and cone.
    9. Use square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles.
      1. Simplify expressions involving the square root of a perfect square.
      2. Estimate square roots.
      3. Find the length of the third side of a triangle using the Phythagorean Theorem.
    10. Use estimation techniques to check the reasonableness of results.
      1. Estimate sums and differences by rounding.
      2. Estimate products by rounding.
      3. Estimate quotients by rounding.
      4. Use approximate measures to check unit conversions.
    11. Solve word problems involving any of the above.
      1. Determine what information in a problem is pertinent.
      2. Determine what operations will be necessary in solving the problem.
      3. Translate word problems into equations or other strategies.
      4. Check the feasibility of the answer.

  
  • MAT 053 - Pre-Algebra

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    A review of arithmetic and an introduction to algebra. This is a college preparatory course designed to strengthen arithmetic skills and introduce basic concepts of algebra in preparation for MAT 063 . College preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Competencies
    1. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.
      1. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers.
      2. Apply the four arithmetic operations to fractions.
      3. Apply the four arithmetic operations to decimals.
      4. Apply the four arithmetic operations to any expression involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals.
      5. Evaluate algebraic expressions using the four arithmetic operations. 
    2. Relate number theory to arithmetic calculations.
      1. Write related sentences.
      2. Write true number sentences using < or >.
      3. Round numbers to a given place value.
      4. Apply rules for exponential notation.
      5. Simplify expressions using the rules for order of operations.
      6. Find the factors and multiples of a number.
      7. Find the GCF of two or more numbers.
      8. Find the LCM of two or more numbers.
    3. Execute calculations involving ration, proportion, and percent.
      1. Write ratios and percents in fractional notation.
      2. Write percents in decimal notation.
      3. Write ratios and proportions for verbal problems.
      4. Translate percent problems into proportions.
      5. Solve proportions using variables.
    4. Relate simple statistics to problems.
      1. Interpret data from tables, charts, and various graphs.
      2. Compute mean, medium, and mode.
    5. Convert measurements within the Metric and U.S. Customary systems of measurement.
      1. State the common units of measure of weight, mass, capacity, length, time and temperature.
      2. Use unit fractions to convert between one U.S. Customary unit to another.
      3. Convert from one Metric unit to another.
      4. Convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature scales.
    6. Calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of various geometric figures.
      1. Calculate perimeter and circumference.
      2. Find the area of parallelograms (including squares and rectangles), triangles, trapezoids, and circles.
      3. Calculate the volume of a rectangular solid, cylinder, sphere, and cone.
      4. Calculate perimeter and area using variables.
    7. Use square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles.
      1. Simplify expressions involving the square root of a perfect square.
      2. Find the length of the third side of a triangle using the Pythagorean Theorems.
    8. Use estimation techniques to check the reasonableness of results.
      1. Estimate sums and difference by rounding.
      2. Estimate products and quotients by rounding.
    9. Compute with integers.
      1. Compare integers using <, >, or =.
      2. Name the additive inverse of any integer.
      3. Write the absolute value of any integer.
      4. Determine the sum of two integers.
      5. Determine the difference of two integers.
      6. Determine the product of two integers.
      7. Determine the quotient of two integers.
      8. Use the order of operations to evaluate numerical expressions.
    10. Simplify algebraic expressions.
      1. Evaluate an expression for a given value of the variable.
      2. Use the commutative or associative property to simplify a given expression.
      3. Use the distributive property to simplify an expression.
      4. Use the properties of 0 or 1 to simplify an expression.
      5. Identify the value of a given expression with exponents.
      6. Implement the order-of-operations rules.
      7. Solve first-degree equations in one variable.
        1. Solve linear equations involving one-step transformations using the addition property of equality.
        2. Solve linear equations involving one-step transformations using the multiplication property of equality.
        3. Solve linear equations involving two transformations.
    11. Simply expressions involving whole number exponents.
      1. Define a positive exponent.
      2. Define a zero exponent.
      3. Use exponent rules for products, quotients, and powers.
    12. Compute with polynomials.
      1. Define polynomial.
      2. Evaluate a polynomial, given values for the variable.
      3. Classify a given polynomial according to number of terms.
      4. Find the sum/difference of two polynomials.
      5. Multiply polynomials.
      6. Apply the order of operations to simplify polynomials.
    13. Graph using a number line and a rectangular coordinate system.
      1. Graph rational numbers on a number line.
      2. Plot a given ordered pair of rational numbers on a rectangular coordinate system.
    14. Solve word problems involving any of the above.
      1. Determine what information in a problem is pertinent.
      2. Determine what operations will be necessary in solving the problem.
      3. Translate word problems into equations or other strategies.
      4. Check the feasibility of the answer.

  
  • MAT 063 - Elementary Algebra

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    A beginning algebra course covering most elementary topics of algebra. This includes the real number system, solving equations and inequalities, polynomials, fractional equations, and radical expressions. This is an adaptor course designed for students with no algebra background or for students who need review. It is designed to prepare students for MAT 141  (Finite Math) or MAT 773  (Applied Math II).
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 14% or MAT 053  with grade of C- or higher.
    Competencies
    1. Compute with integers.
      1. Compare integers using <, >, or =.
      2. Name the additive inverse of any integer.
      3. Write the absolute value of any integer.
      4. Determine the sum of two integers.
      5. Determine the difference of two integers.
      6. Determine the product of two integers.
      7. Determine the quotient of two integers.
      8. Use the order of operations to evaluate numerical expressions.
    2. Simplify algebraic expressions
      1. Evaluate an expression for a given value of the variable.
      2. Use the commutative or associative property to simplify a given expression.
      3. Use the distributive property to simplify an expression.
      4. Use the properties of 0 or 1 to simplify an expression.
      5. Identify the value of a given expression with exponents.
      6. Implement the order-of-operations rules.
    3. Solve first-degree equations and inequalities in one variable.
      1. Classify statement as identity, contradiction, or conditional.
      2. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving one-step transformations using the addition property of equality.
      3. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving one-step transformations using the multiplication property of equality.
      4. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving two transformations.
      5. Solve linear equations for one variable in terms of other variables.
    4. Write models for verbal problems that produce first-degree equations and inequalities in one variable.
      1. Translate phrases and sentences written in words into their algebraic form.
      2. Write an equation to solve a given word problem.
    5. Simplify expressions involving integer exponents.
      1. Define a positive exponent.
      2. Define the zero exponent.
      3. Define a negative exponent.
      4. Use exponent rules for products, quotients, and powers.
    6. Compute with polynomials.
      1. Define polynomial.
      2. Evaluate a polynomial, given values for the variable.
      3. Classify a given polynomial according to number of terms.
      4. Identify degree of term and/or polynomial.
      5. Find the sum/difference of two polynomials.
      6. Find the product of two polynomials.
      7. Calculate the square of a binomial.
      8. Apply the order of operations to simplify polynomials.
      9. Find the quotient of two polynomials.
    7. Factor polynomials.
      1. Remove the greatest common monomial factor.
      2. Factor by grouping.
      3. Factor a trinomial which is the product of two binomials with integral coefficients.
      4. Factor a binomial which is the difference of two squares.
      5. Factor polynomials completely.
    8. Operate on rational expressions.
      1. Identify whether an algebraic expression is rational or irrational.
      2. Determine whether two rational expressions are equivalent.
      3. State the restrictions on the variables in a given rational expression.
      4. Simplify a rational algebraic expression.
      5. Express the sum/difference of two rational expressions in simplest form.
      6. Express the product/quotient of two rational expressions in simplest form.
      7. Solve equations containing rational expressions.
    9. Graph a linear equation in two variables.
      1. Plot a given ordered pair of rational numbers on a graph.
      2. Name the coordinates, given a point on a graph.
      3. Determine ordered pairs which satisfy a given linear equation.
      4. State the x-intercept and y-intercept for a linear equation.
      5. Graph a linear equation on a coordinate plane.
    10. Write the equation of a specified line.
      1. Define slope.
      2. Determine the slope, given two points.
      3. Determine the slope, given the equation of a line.
      4. Write an equation for a line given the slope and the y-intercept.
      5. Write an equation for a line given the slope and one point (not the y-intercept).
      6. Write an equation for a line given two points.
      7. Determine the slope of a line parallel/perpendicular to a given line.
    11. Solve systems of linear equations.
      1. Recognize parallel, intersecting, and coinciding lines when given systems of two simultaneous equations.
      2. Solve system of equations by graphing method.
      3. Use elimination method to solve system.
      4. Use substitution method to solve system.
    12. Compute with radical expressions.
      1. Simplify a single radical.
      2. Rationalize a denominator.
      3. Express sums/differences of algebraic square roots in simplest terms.
      4. Express products/quotients of algebraic square roots in simplest terms.
      5. Recognize between which two integers a square root of a number lies.
    13. Solve quadratic equations in one variable.
      1. Use factoring to solve quadratic equations.
      2. Use the quadratic formula and/or completing the square.
      3. Write models for verbal problems that produce quadratic equations.
    14. Use algebraic techniques appropriate to real-world and mathematical problem situations.

  
  • MAT 064 - College Prep Math

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    This is a college preparatory course for students with no algebra background or for students who need to review. It is designed to prepare students for enrollment in MAT 110  (Math for Liberal Arts) or MAT 157  (Statistics). This course includes math study skills, arithmetic skills, problem-solving, algebra and geometry. This class is not recommended for science, math or engineering majors. College preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Prerequisite:  Minimum ALEKS score of 14% % or MAT 034  with grade of C- or higher or MAT 053  with grade of C- or higher.
    Competencies
    1. Practice study strategies that lead to math success.
      1. Explain thinking skills used in the study of mathematics.
      2. Demonstrate effective math study techniques.
      3. Identify resources for math help.
    2. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.
      1. Apply the four arithmetic operations to whole numbers.
      2. Apply the four arithmetic operations to integers
      3. Apply the four arithmetic operations to fractions.
      4. Apply the four arithmetic operations to decimals.
      5. Apply the four arithmetic operations to any expression involving whole numbers, integers, fractions and decimals.
      6. Evaluate algebraic expressions using the four arithmetic operations.
    3. Relate number theory to arithmetic calculations.
      1. Write related sentences.
      2. Write true number sentences using < or >.
      3. Round numbers to a given place value.
      4. Simplify expressions using the rules for order of operations.
      5. Find the factors and multiples of a number.
      6. Find the GCF of two or more numbers.
      7. Find the LCM of two or more numbers.
    4. Execute calculations involving ratios, proportion, and percent
      1. Write ratios and percents in fractional notation.
      2. Write percents in decimal notation.
      3. Write ratios and proportions for verbal problems.
      4. Translate percent problems into proportions.
      5. Solve proportions using variables.
    5. Develop basic understanding of simple statistics and probability.
      1. Interpret data from tables, charts, and various graphs.
      2. Compute mean, median, and mode.
      3. Determine sample space and basic probabilities.
    6. Recognize measurable attributes of objects and the units, systems, and processes of measurement.
      1. State the common units of measure of weight, mass, capacity, length, time and temperature.
      2. Make decisions about units and scales that are appropriate for problem situations involving measurement.
      3. Calculate perimeter and circumference.
      4. Find the area of parallelograms (including squares and rectangles), triangles, trapezoids, and circles.
      5. Calculate the volume of a rectangular solid, cylinder, sphere, and cone.
      6. Calculate perimeter and area using variables.
      7. Explore what happens to measurements of a two-dimensional shape such as its perimeter and area when the shape is changed in some way.
    7. Identify patterns and relations
      1. Recognize, describe, and extend patterns such as sequences of sounds and shapes or simple numeric patterns and translate from one representation to another.
      2. Analyze how both repeating and growing patterns are generated.
      3. Describe, extend, and make generalizations about geometric and numeric patterns
      4. Represent, analyze, and generalize a variety of patterns with tables, graphs, words, and, when possible, symbolic rules;
      5. Identify patterns as linear or nonlinear and contrast their properties from tables, graphs, or equations.
      6. Generalize patterns using explicitly defined and recursively defined formulas.
      7. Find the nth term of an arithmetic and geometric sequence.
    8. Simplify algebraic expressions.
      1. Evaluate an expression for a given value of the variable.
      2. Use the commutative or associative property to simplify a given expression.
      3. Use the distributive property to simplify an expression.
      4. Use the properties of 0 or 1 to simplify an expression.
      5. Identify the value of a given expression with exponents.
      6. Implement the order-of-operations rules.
    9. Solve first-degree equations and inequalities in one variable.
      1. Classify statement as identity, contradiction, or conditional.
      2. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving one-step transformations using the
      3. addition property of equality.
      4. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving one-step transformations using the
      5. multiplication property of equality.
      6. Solve linear equations/inequalities involving two transformations.
      7. Solve linear equations for one variable in terms of other variables.
    10. Write models for verbal problems that produce first-degree equations and inequalities in one variable.
      1. Translate phrases and sentences written in words into algebraic expressions.
      2. Write an equation to solve a given word problem.
    11. Simplify expressions involving exponents.
      1. Define a positive exponent.
      2. Define the zero exponent.
      3. Define a negative exponent.
      4. Use exponent rules for products, quotients, and powers.
      5. Perform basic operations using scientific notation.
      6. Define and evaluate square roots of real numbers.
    12. Write the equation of a specified line.
      1. Define slope.
      2. Determine the slope, given two points.
      3. Determine the slope, given the equation of a line.
      4. Write an equation for a line given the slope and the y-intercept.
      5. Write an equation for a line given the slope and one point (not the y-intercept).
      6. Write an equation for a line given two points. 

  
  • MAT 073 - Elementary Algebra II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    A review of elementary algebra along with new topics, including exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, quadratic equations, inequalities and systems of equations. This course cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 30% or MAT 063  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Solve first and second degree equations/inequalities.
      1. Solve first degree equations using the properties of equality.
      2. Solve first degree inequalities using the properties of inequalities.
      3. Solve second degree equations by factoring.
      4. Solve second degree equations by the square root method.
      5. Solve second degree equations by completing the square.
      6. Solve second degree equations by using the quadratic formula.
      7. Solve equations reducible to quadratic form.
      8. Solve quadratic inequalities.
    2. Solve absolute value linear equations/inequalities.
    3. Solve fractional equations/inequalities.
    4. Solve exponential equations.
      1. Solve radical equations.
      2. Solve exponential equations that do not require the use of logs.
      3. Solve exponential equations that do require the use of logs.
      4. Solve logarithmic equations.
    5. Write models for verbal problems that result in first degree equations/inequalities.
    6. Write models for verbal problems that result in second degree equations.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the real number system.
      1. Calculate with rational numbers using order of operations.
      2. Graph sets of real numbers on a number line.
      3. Use the properties of real numbers: commutative, associative, distribute, identities, inverses, closure, and order.
      4. Use scientific notation.
    8. Simplify an algebraic expression.
      1. Use the rules of exponents to simplify an expression.
      2. Use the properties of real numbers to simplify an expression.
    9. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with polynomials.
      1. Classify polynomials according to number of terms.
      2. Add polynomials.
      3. Subtract polynomials.
      4. Multiply polynomials.
      5. Divide polynomials.
      6. Factor polynomials.
    10. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with rational expressions.
      1. Express rational algebraic expressions in simplest form.
      2. Find sums, differences, products and quotients of rational algebraic expressions.
      3. Simplify a complex fraction.
    11. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with expressions containing rational exponents or radicals.
      1. Express the square root of a negative number as a complex number.
      2. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with expressions containing complex numbers.
      3. Use the rules of exponents to simplify expressions containing rational exponents.
      4. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with expressions containing rational exponents.
      5. Convert an expression from radical to exponential notation and vice versa.
      6. Use the properties of radicals to simplify radical expressions.
      7. Perform the basic arithmetic operations with expressions containing radical expressions.
    12. Graph linear equations/inequalities and quadratic equations.
      1. Graph linear equations.
      2. Write the equation of a line.
      3. Graph linear inequalities.
      4. Graph circles, parabolas, ellipses centered at the origin, hyperbolas centered at the origin.
      5. Identify the type of conic section by inspecting its equation.
    13. Solve systems of linear equations/inequalities and nonlinear systems of equations.
      1. Solve linear systems of equations by the elimination method.
      2. Solve linear systems of equations by the substitution method.
      3. Solve linear systems of equations by Cramer’s Rule.
      4. Solve systems of linear inequalities by graphing.
      5. Solve nonlinear systems of equations by graphing, elimination, or substitution.
    14. Demonstrate an understanding of functions, function notation, inverse functions, and properties of logarithms.
      1. Define a function.
      2. Determine the domain and range of a variety of functions.
      3. Construct a graph of functions including: linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, square root functions, and absolute value functions.
      4. Given two functions, construct the sum, difference, product, quotient and composition of the functions.
      5. Evaluate a given function.
      6. Determine the inverse of a function.
      7. State the relationship of a logarithmic function to an exponential function.
      8. Use a table to find common logarithms and antilogs.
      9. Apply the basic properties of logs when approximating computations of products, quotients, roots and powers.

  
  • MAT 093 - Math Study Skills

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Coll Prep
    Provides students with the study techniques necessary for successful completion of their college preparatory or college credit math courses. It also addresses feelings and attitudes that might block math learning and offers strategies and techniques designed to overcome these feelings. College preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.
    Competencies
    1. Recognize the uniqueness of college math courses.
      1. Differentiate between high school and college courses.
      2. Differentiate between math and other courses.
      3. Recognize the need to take responsibility for one’s own learning.
    2. Examine math related attitudes.
      1. Examine the causes of math anxiety.
      2. Practice strategies for overcoming math anxiety.
    3. Identify individual styles of learning.
      1. Analyze personal learning preference.
      2. Recognize characteristics of basic learning styles.
      3. Recognize characteristics of basic learning styles.
    4. Explain thinking skills used in the study of math.
      1. Explain what it means to know math.
      2. Explain what it means to understand math.
      3. Explain what it means to apply math.
      4. Explain what it means to analyze math.
    5. Manage time more efficiently and effectively.
      1. Discuss math time management.
      2. Plan a study schedule.
      3. Plan to take math courses in sequential semesters
    6. Demonstrate effective textbook study techniques.
      1. Read text and try problems prior to class.
      2. Recognize the necessity of using the text?s answer key.
      3. Mark problems to be asked in class/tutoring session/office hours.
      4. Make math note cards.
    7. Develop skills needed to be successful in the math classroom.
      1. Use two-column format for taking notes.
      2. Practice asking questions in a math class.
      3. Discuss active versus passive learning.
    8. Apply math test-taking skills.
      1. Prepare a study plan for tests.
      2. Preview tests.
      3. Rework problems.
      4. Analyze test errors.
    9. Identify resources for math help.
      1. Discuss meeting with an instructor during office hours.
      2. Identify supplements to the math text.
      3. Identify the process needed to obtain a tutor.
      4. Recognize services provided by the Academic Achievement Centers.
      5. Discuss the advantages of a study-group/study partner.

  
  • MAT 110 - Math for Liberal Arts

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    The student will begin to think critically by studying logic, sets and statistical reasoning. The student will examine problem-solving and decision-making by studying probability, application of statistical data, modeling, and financial mathematics. The student will become aware of possible abuses of mathematics. Finally the student will understand the broad usefulness of mathematics by studying history of mathematics and application of mathematics in art, music, business and/or politics.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 30% or MAT 064  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Begin to think critically with mathematics
      1. Become familiar with logic symbols, statements and truth tables
      2. Use basic logic to determine the validity of arguments
      3. Use Venn Diagrams to picture logic statements
      4. Describe sets using correct notation
      5. Perform basic set operations
      6. Understand the basic terms and ideas of statistics
      7. Create and use statistical tables and graphs
      8. Discuss deductive and inductive reasoning
    2. Use mathematics to solve problems
      1. Know and use methods of estimation.
      2. Recognize patterns and use them to solve problems
      3. Become familiar with Poly?s problem solving framework
      4. Be able to define probability, sample spaces, odds, and expectation
      5. Make tree diagrams to determine probability
      6. Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities
      7. Discuss the Law of Large Numbers
      8. Use geometric concepts to solve problems
      9. Use mathematics to make decisions
        1. Discuss sampling methods and experiments
        2. Understand and use measures of central tendency, dispersion, and position to describe a data set
        3. Use a visual methods to describe a data set
        4. Become familiar with the concept of the normal curve
        5. Define and apply the concept of function
        6. Examine relationships with data
        7. Model problem situations with linear functions
        8. Explore exponential functions
    3. Be aware of ways mathematics can be abused
      1. Recognize logical fallacies
      2. Understand misuses of percentages
      3. Explore misuses of statistical graphs
      4. Discuss correlation and causality
      5. Put very large and very small numbers in perspective
    4. Recognize mathematics impact on society
      1. Briefly overview the history of math
      2. Discuss early number systems
      3. Understand and use place value
      4. Examine systems of measurement
      5. Examine the relationship of mathematics and computers
    5. Explore the application of mathematics to other disciplines
      1. Understand and use percent, ratio, simple and compound interest
      2. Define the effective interest rate
      3. Apply percent to markups and markdowns
      4. Discuss mortgages, installment payments and annuities
      5. Explore perspective and symmetry in art
      6. Apply mathematics to business (i.e. network analysis, scheduling problems, cryptography, economics of resources).
      7. Discuss theories of voting

  
  • MAT 114 - Elementary Educators Math I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This is the first of two courses focusing on math concepts taught in K-6. Topics will be covered from both a practical and theoretical standpoint, with an emphasis on practical understanding using concrete examples. Course content includes problem-solving, systems of whole numbers, numeration, algorithms for computation, topics from number theory, and topics from geometry including measurement, polygons, polyhedra, congruence and transformations. This course is for students in education fields and is not appropriate for students majoring in other areas. This is not a methods course.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 46% or MAT 073  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate integrated mathematical problem-solving strategies to solve problems
      1. Solve problems including but not limited to inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, and basic set operations by applying and adapting a variety of appropriate strategies
      2. Model problem situations numerically and visually
      3. Use representations such as graphs, tables, and equations to draw conclusions
      4. Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
      5. Reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving
      6. Analyze the mathematical thinking and strategies of others
      7. Use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely
    2. Analyze the structure of numeration systems
      1. Understand ways of representing numbers
      2. Use multiple models to develop understanding of place value
      3. Analyze non-decimal numeration systems including different bases
    3. Assess the processes used by children to compute fluently and make reasonable estimates with whole numbers and extend them to non-decimal systems
      1. Develop the meanings of operations and how they relate to one another
      2. Illustrate general principles and properties (i.e, commutative, associative, distributive) of whole numbers using visual models and mathematical notation
      3. Apply standard and non-standard algorithms for additions, subtraction, multiplication, and division
      4. Select appropriate methods and tools for computing with whole numbers
    4. Evaluate number theory concepts
      1. Assess prime and composite numbers, factors, multiples, prime factorization, least common multiples, and greatest common factors
      2. Apply divisibility rules for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10
    5. Determine geometric properties and relationships in real-word and mathematical problem solving
      1. Describe geometric terms including point, line, plane, space, ray, line segment, angle, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, skew lines, and transversals
      2. Analyze characteristics and properties of polygons and circles developing mathematical arguments about geometric relationships using models where appropriate
      3. Measure lengths using non-standard units, the metric system, and the customary system
      4. Measure angles using degrees
      5. Convert from one unit of measurement to another within the same system
    6. Evaluate geometric objects
      1. Examine the congruence, similarity, and line or rotational symmetry of objects using transformations
      2. Represent translations, reflections, rotations, and dilations of objects in a plane
      3. Construct tessellations
      4. Build geometric objects including polyhedra

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • MAT 116 - Elementary Educators Math II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course is a continuation of MAT 114 . Course content includes basic 2D and 3D geometry and measurement, elementary probability, data analysis and statistics, operations and algorithms for computing with fractions, decimals, percents and integers.
    Prerequisite: MAT 114  with a grade of “C-” or better
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate number sense with respect to fractions, decimals, percents, and integers
      1. Represent decimals with models
      2. Recognize equivalent representations for the same number
      3. Generate equivalent representations for the same number
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes, as parts of a collection, as locations on number lines, and as divisions of whole numbers
      5. Judge the size of fractions using models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms
      6. use ratios and proportions to represent quantitative relationships
      7. Develop numbers less than 0 by extending the number line and though familiar applications
    2. Compare the processes used by children to compute fluently and to make reasonable estimates with fractions, decimals, percents, and integers
      1. Develop the meanings of operations with rational numbers and how they relate to one another
      2. Use concepts from number theory such as factors, multiples, prime factorization, and relatively prime numbers to solve problems
      3. Use properties such as the distributivity of multiplication over addition
      4. Apply student developed algorithms for operations with rationals
      5. Apply standard algorithms for operations with rationals
      6. Solve problems involving proportions, such as scaling and finding equivalent ratios
      7. Develop the meaning of percents
      8. Solve problems involving percents
      9. Develop strategies to estimate results of computations and to judge the reasonableness of the results
      10. Use appropriate methods and tools for computing with fractions, decimals, percents, and integers from among mental computation, estimation, calculators and paper and pencil according to the context and nature of the computation
    3. Recognize geometry as measurement
      1. Use geometric models to answer questions in mathematics
      2. Solve problems concerning the perimeter of plane figures including circles
      3. Solve problems concerning the area of geometric figures, including circles, parallelograms, and trapezoids, and irregularly shaped figures
      4. Solve problems concerning the surface area of geometric figures, including spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids, prisms, and irregularly shaped objects
      5. Solve problems concerning the volume of geometric figures, including spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids, prisms, and irregularly shaped objects
      6. Use units of appropriate size and type to measure angles, perimeter, area, surface area, and volume
      7. Use common benchmarks to estimate measurements
    4. Develop statistical concepts
      1. Formulate questions that can be addressed with data
      2. Design investigations to address a question
      3. Collect data using observations, or surveys or experiments
      4. Represent data using tables and graphs such as scatter plots, stem and leaf plots, and histograms
      5. Analyze data using appropriate statistical methods
      6. Propose and justify conclusions and predictions that are based on data
      7. Propose and justify conclusions and predictions that are based on data
      8. Compute probabilities for simple compound events, using such methods as organized lists, tree diagrams, and area models
      9. Use data and probability to measure uncertainty

  
  • MAT 121 - College Algebra

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course provides an intensified study of algebraic techniques and prepares students for future study in mathematics. The central theme of this course is the concept of a function and its graph. Topics include: linear functions, polynomial functions, piece-wise functions, rational functions, radical functions, exponential/logarithmic functions, and systems of equations.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 46% or MAT 073  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Analyze equations, inequalities, and mathematical models
      1. Graph equations and inequalities
      2. Solve linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, and absolute value equations
      3. Model real-world situations through mathematics
      4. Simplify complex numbers
    2. Evaluate functions
      1. Calculate slope of linear functions
      2. Calculate midpoint and distance between two points
      3. Determine domain and range
      4. Utilize vertical line test
      5. Distinguish properties of functions (including piece-wise functions)
      6. Compare and contrast functions and their transformations
      7. Analyze combinations of functions
      8. Describe inverse functions
    3. Evaluate polynomial functions
      1. Analyze a polynomial function and relate it to a real-world application
      2. Rewrite a quadratic function in standard form
      3. Find the vertex and any x-intercepts of a graph of a quadratic function
      4. Determine real and complex zeros of a polynomial function
      5. Utilize the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
      6. Apply the intermediate value, remainder, factor, and rational root theorems to find polynomial roots
      7. Examine and graph polynomial functions
      8. Interpret inequalities involving polynomial functions
    4. Evaluate rational functions
      1. Analyze a rational function
      2. Determine horizontal/vertical/oblique asymptotes and any removable discontinuities
      3. Examine and graph a rational function
      4. Interpret inequalities involving rational functions 
    5. Evaluate exponential functions
      1. Analyze exponential functions
      2. Examine and graph exponential functions
      3. Solve exponential equations 
    6. Evaluate logarithmic functions
      1. Analyze logarithmic functions
      2. Apply the properties of logarithms
      3. Examine and graph logarithmic functions
      4. Solve logarithmic equations
      5. Apply exponential and logarithmic functions to problems involving interest, growth and decay
    7. Solve systems of equations
      1. Calculate and interpret solutions of linear systems
      2. Perform partial fraction decomposition
      3. Use Gaussian elimination to calculate matrix solutions to linear systems 

  
  • MAT 129 - Precalculus

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 5
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core


    The central theme of this course is the concept of a function and its graph. Topics include: functions (linear, radical, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, piecewise and trigonometric) and their graphs, and basic trigonometry.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 61% or MAT 130  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Analyze mathematical functions
      1. Describe a function
      2. Determine if a relation is a function
      3. Analyze the function to determine the domain and range of a function
      4. Determine minimum and maximum values of a function
      5. Analyze a function to determine whether functions are increasing, decreasing or constant
      6. Categorize whether functions have even or odd properties
    2. Evaluate functions
      1. Examine and graph common functions (including piece-wise functions)
      2. Compare and contrast transformations
      3. Create functions using standard function operations
      4. Describe an inverse function
      5. Manipulate a one-to-one function to create an inverse function 
    3. Evaluate polynomial functions
      1. Analyze a polynomial function and relate it to a real-world application
      2. Rewrite a quadratic function in standard form
      3. Find the vertex and any x-intercepts of a graph of a quadratic function
      4. Determine real and complex zeros of a polynomial function
      5. Utilize the fundamental Theorem of Algebra
      6. Apply the intermediate value, remainder, factor, and rational root theorems to find polynomial roots
      7. Examine and graph polynomial functions
      8. Interpret inequalities involving polynomial functions
    4. Evaluate rational functions
      1. Analyze a rational function
      2. Determine horizontal/vertical/oblique asymptotes and any removable discontinuities
      3. Examine and graph a rational function
      4. Interpret inequalities involving rational functions 
    5. Evaluate exponential functions
      1. Analyze exponential functions
      2. Examine and graph exponential functions
      3. Solve exponential equations
    6. Evaluate logarithmic functions
      1. Analyze logarithmic functions
      2. Apply the properties of logarithms
      3. Examine and graph logarithmic functions
      4. Solve logarithmic equations
      5. Apply exponential and logarithmic functions to problems involving interest, growth and decay
    7. Solve systems of equations
      1. Calculate and interpret solutions of linear systems
      2. Perform partial fraction decomposition
    8. Utilize matrices and determinants
      1. Compute matrix solutions to linear systems using Gaussian elimination
      2. Perform matrix operations
      3. Calculate multiplicative inverses
      4. Identify and solve matrix equations 
    9. Interpret angles and their measure
      1. Draw angles whose measures are given in degrees and radians
      2. Determine a positive angle less than one revolution that is coterminal with a given angle
      3. Use radian measure of angles
      4. Convert degree measure to radian measure
      5. Convert radian measure to degree measure
    10. Establish the trigonometric functions on a unit circle
      1. Determine sine, cosine, and tangent using the unit circle
      2. Determine the reciprocal functions using the unit circle
      3. Make sense of the eight fundamental identities
      4. Use the fundamental identities to simplify trigonometric expressions
      5. Evaluate trigonometric functions using the fundamental identities
      6. Determine the values of trigonometric functions
      7. Identify the signs of the trigonometric functions by quadrant 
    11. Assess trigonometric functions
      1. Interpret the generalized definition of the trigonometric functions
      2. Evaluate the trigonometric functions given a point on the terminal side
      3. Find the reference angle for any given triangle
      4. Evaluate trigonometric functions of real numbers by table/calculator
      5. List the exact values for the trigonometric functions pi/6, pi/4, pi/3, pi/2, pi
      6. Analyze the trigonometric functions using a table/calculator
      7. Determine the domain and range
    12. Graph trigonometric functions
      1. Sketch the standard forms of the cosine, sine, tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent curves from memory
      2. Graph by plotting points
      3. Analyze and sketch trig functions using: amplitudes, periods, and phase shifts
    13. Investigate trigonometric identities.
      1. Apply half angle, double angle, and sum/difference trigonometric identities to write equivalent forms of expressions
      2. Find exact values by using half angle, double angle, and sum/difference trigonometric identities 
    14. Solve trigonometric equations
      1. Solve linear and quadratic trigonometric equations
      2. Solve quadratic trigonometric equations
    15. Assess inverse trigonometric functions
      1. Define inverse trigonometric relations and functions
      2. Evaluate inverse functions including domain and range
    16. Investigate the right triangle definition of the trigonometric function
      1. Use the right-triangle definition of the trigonometric functions
      2. Solve mathematical and real-life right triangle problems
      3. Apply the Law of Cosines to mathematical and real-life problems
      4. Apply the  Law of Sines to mathematical and real-life problems

     

  
  • MAT 130 - Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    The central themes of this course include: circular functions and their inverses, trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, solving triangles and graphing.
    Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 46% or MAT 121  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
     

    1. Interpret angles and their measure
      1. Draw angles whose measures are given in degrees and radians
      2. Convert degree-minutes-seconds to decimal degrees
      3. Determine a positive angle less than one revolution that is coterminal with a given angle
      4. Convert degree measure to radian measure and vice versa
      5. Determine arc length and the area of a sector
    2. Establish the trigonometric functions on a unit circle
      1. Determine sine, cosine, and tangent using the unit circle
      2. Determine the reciprocal functions using the unit circle
      3. Make sense of the eight fundamental identities
      4. Use the fundamental identities to simplify trigonometric expressions
      5. Evaluate trigonometric functions using the fundamental identities
      6. Determine the values of trigonometric functions
      7. Identify the signs of the trigonometric functions by quadrant
    3. Assess trigonometric functions
      1. Interpret the generalized definition of the trigonometric functions
      2. Evaluate the trigonometric functions given a point on the terminal side
      3. Find the reference angle for any given triangle
      4. Evaluate trigonometric functions of real numbers by table/calculator
      5. List the exact values for the trigonometric functions pi/6, pi/4, pi/3, pi/2, pi
      6. Analyze the trigonometric functions using a table/calculator
      7. Determine the domain and range
    4. Graph trigonometric functions
      1. Sketch the standard forms of the cosine, sine, tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent curves from memory
      2. Graph by plotting points
      3. Analyze and sketch trig functions using amplitudes, periods, and phase shifts
    5. Investigate trigonometric identities.
      1. Apply trigonometric identities to write equivalent forms of expressions
      2. Prove identities using a variety of techniques
      3. Prove or disprove that a given equation is an identity
      4. Find exact values by using identities
    6. Solve trigonometric equations
      1. Solve linear trigonometric equations
      2. Solve quadratic trigonometric equations
      3. Solve trigonometric equations by using identities
      4. Determine solutions to trigonometric equations with multiple angles
    7. Investigate inverse trigonometric functions
      1. Determine inverse trigonometric relations and functions
      2. Evaluate inverse functions
      3. Sketch the inverse function
      4. Determine the Domain and Range of Inverse Functions
    8. Investigate the right triangle definition of the trigonometric function
      1. State the right-triangle definition of the trigonometric functions
      2. Solve right triangle problems
      3. Solve solutions to problems using the Law of Cosines
      4. Solve problems using the Law of Sines
      5. Find the area of any triangle.
      6. Find the area of a sector of a circle
    9. Utilize complex numbers and polar form
      1. Plot complex numbers and polar coordinates
      2. Convert complex numbers into trigonometric form
      3. Convert complex numbers into rectangular form
      4. Convert between polar and rectangular form and vice versa.
      5. Use DeMoivre’s Formula to raise complex numbers to integral powers and to find the nth roots of a complex number
    10. Analyze conic sections using rectangular coordinates
      1. Formulate the standard equation of a parabola, an ellipse, and a hyperbola
      2. Determine the vertex, focus, and directrix of a parabola
      3. Determine the center, vertices, foci, and eccentricity of an ellipse
      4. Determine the center, vertices, foci, and asymptotes of a hyperbola
      5. Classify a conic from its general equation
    11.   Examine the graph of polar-form curves (cardioid, rose, limaçon, and lemniscate)

  
  • MAT 141 - Finite Math

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    A general education course in practical mathematics for those students not majoring in mathematics or science. This course will include such topics as set operations and applications, methods of counting, probability, systems of linear equations, matrices, geometric linear programming and an introduction to Markov chains.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 30% or MAT 063  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
    1. Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable
      1. Determine if the sentence is linear
      2. Isolate the variable
      3. Change order when operating with a negative factor
    2. Describe the functions and functional notation
      1. Define a relation
      2. Define a function
      3. Determine the dependency relationship between the variables
      4. Use f(x) notation
    3. Graph linear equations and inequalities in two variables
      1. Describe the Cartesian coordinate system
      2. Determine the coordinates of sufficient points needed to draw the line of the equation
      3. Locate and indicate the proper half-plane for an inequality
    4. Write linear models for verbal problems
      1. Identify the quantities pertinent to the problem
      2. Identify extraneous information
      3. Label clearly the necessary constant and variable quantities
      4. Write a mathematical sentence that relates the necessary quantities
      5. Identify, when necessary, missing information
    5. Perform basic matrix operations
      1. Define a matrix and related terms
      2. State the conditions under which various operations may be performed
      3. Add, subtract, and multiply matrices when possible
      4. Invert a 2 x 2 or a 3 x 3 matrix, when possible
    6. Solve systems of linear equations by a variety of methods
      1. State the possible solutions and the conditions of their appearance for a linear system
      2. Graph the set of equations on one set of axes
      3. Use the ‘multiply and add’ method to determine the solution
      4. Apply row operations to an augmented matrix to determine the solution (Gauss-Jordan method).
      5. Solve the system by applying matrix algebra
    7. Identify the feasible region and vertices for a set of linear constraints
      1. Graph each of the constraints on the same set of axes
      2. Indicate the intersection of all the half-planes as a polygon
      3. Find the coordinates of the vertices of the polygon
    8. Solve linear programming problems
      1. Model the limited resource problem in terms of an objective function and a set of constraints
      2. Graph the constraints
      3. Apply the Corner Point Theorem
      4. Confirm the result for reasonableness
    9. Perform basic set operations, using correct notation
      1. Define a set and its related terms
      2. Determine the intersection and union of given sets
      3. Illustrate the intersection and union of sets with Venn diagrams
      4. Use set notation to describe a Venn diagram
    10. Solve counting problems using the multiplication principles
      1. State the Fundamental Counting Principle
      2. Determine if a problem is a permutation or a combination
      3. State the relationship between combinations, Pascal’s triangle, and the binomial coefficients
      4. Use correctly combination and permutation notations
      5. Calculate factorials
    11. Write the sample space and specific events of an experiment
      1. Define sample space and event
      2. Distinguish between continuous and discrete outcomes
      3. Describe a trial of an event
      4. Write a clear description of an event of interest
    12. Evaluate the probabilities of basic problems such as dice, cards, coins, and balls
      1. Define the probability of an event
      2. Apply the addition rule for combined probabilities
      3. Apply the multiplication rule for combined probabilities
      4. Determine if events are mutually exclusive
    13. Calculate conditional probabilities by various methods
      1. Calculate conditional probability by formula
      2. Calculate conditional probability by probability trees
      3. Determine if events are independent
      4. Calculate probabilities by Bayes’ formula
    14. State characteristic properties of probability distributions
      1. Create a probability distribution form a frequency distribution table
      2. Create a probability distribution graph
      3. Relate the area under a probability distribution graph to the probability of an event
      4. State the random variable of the probability distribution
      5. Calculate the mean, median, mode, and standard deviation of the random variable
    15. Calculate the probabilities of events by means of known probability distributions
      1. Apply Chebychev’s Theorem
      2. Find the probabilities of events based on normally distributed random variables
      3. Estimate the probabilities of binomial events by means of a normal distribution

  
  • MAT 148 - Linear Algebra w/Applications

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A study of the use and application of matrices in the solution of systems of linear equations, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, bases and projections. Linear algebra is a core course in many engineering, physics, mathematics and computer science programs. This course makes heavy use of computing technology. Graphing calculators required.
    Prerequisite: MAT 211  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Solve a system of linear equations
      1. Identify whether a system of linear equations has none, one or infinitely many solutions
      2. Solve a system of linear equations using row-reduction and back-substitution
      3. Perform arithmetic operations with vectors
      4. Discuss the span of a set of vectors
      5. Solve the matrix equation Ax=b
      6. Decide whether a set of vectors is linearly independent
      7. Discuss linear transformations from one Euclidean space to another
      8. Identify whether a transformation is one-to-one
    2. Perform operations on matrices
      1. Compute a linear combination of matrices
      2. Computer the product of two matrices, if it exists
      3. Write the transpose of a matrix
      4. Find the inverse of a matrix, if it exists
      5. Perform arithmetic operations on partitioned matrices
    3. Discuss various Euclidean spaces
      1. Define what a Euclidean space is
      2. Find the dimension of a given space
      3. Define what a subspace is and state conditions for its existence
      4. Find the column space of a matrix
      5. Find the row space of a matrix
      6. Find the nullspace of a matrix
      7. State the rank of a matrix and relate it to the column and row spaces of the matrix
    4. Discuss the determinant of a matrix
      1. Compute the determinant of a matrix by using a cofactor expansion across a row or down a column
      2. Describe how various row operations on a matrix affect its determinant
      3. Use Cramer’s rule to solve a system of linear equations
      4. Use the determinant of a matrix to determine whether a matrix is invertible
    5. Discuss vector spaces
      1. State the definition of a vector space
      2. State the definition of a vector subspace
      3. Define what is meant by a linear transformation from one vector space to another
      4. Decide whether a given set of vectors is linearly independent
      5. Find the coordinate vector in one coordinate system with respect to another coordinate system
      6. Find a set of vectors which form a basis of a vector space
      7. State the dimension of a given vector space
      8. Use the Rank Theorem to relate the rank of a matrix and the dimension of its nullspace
      9. State several conditions equivalent to a matrix being invertible
      10. Find the change-of-coordinate matrix from one coordinate system to another
    6. Discuss the eigenspace of a matrix
      1. Find the characteristic polynomial of a matrix
      2. find the eigenvalues, real and complex, of a matrix
      3. For each eigenvalue of a matrix, find a corresponding eigenvector
      4. use eigenvalues and eigenvectors to diagonalize a matrix
      5. Write the Jordan form of a matrix
    7. Perform vector operations in n-dimensional space
      1. Compute the inner product of two column matrices or, equivalently, the dot product of two vectors
      2. Calculate the angle between two vectors
      3. Compute the length (or norm) of a vector
      4. Decide whether a given set of vectors forms an orthonormal basis of a vector space
      5. Find the orthogonal projection of one vector onto another
      6. given a set of linearly independent vectors spanning a vector space, use the Gram-Schmidt process to find an orthogonal basis for that space

  
  • MAT 157 - Statistics

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Tabular and graphical presentation, measures of central tendency and variability, standard elementary procedures involving the binomial, normal, student’s T, chi-square and F distributions, correlation, regression, analysis of variance and several nonparametric procedures.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS score of 30% or MAT 064  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss statistical processes
      1. Compare and contrast various sampling methods
      2. Distinguish between data types
      3. Discuss the impact of experimental design on experimental results, and
      4. Discuss ethical issues involved in establishing an hypothesis test
    2. Generate standard displays of data
      1. Create appropriate tables, charts, and graphs
      2. Calculate representative values of a distribution
      3. Calculate positional values of a distribution, and
      4. Calculate measures of dispersion of a distribution
    3. Demonstrate fundamentals of probability
      1. Relate experimental and theoretical probability
      2. Calculate simple probability, and
      3. Calculate the probability of simple, compound, conditional, independent, and mutually exclusive events
    4. Analyze probability distributions
      1. Define a probability distribution in terms of a random variable
      2. Calculate the descriptive values of a given probability distribution
      3. Compare and contrast discrete and continuous distributions
      4. Determine the probabilities of events from appropriate distribution tables, and
      5. Apply the normal distribution to binomial events, when appropriate
    5. Discuss sampling distributions
      1. State the conditions of the central Limit Theorem
      2. Find the mean and standard error of a sampling distribution, and
      3. Compare and contrast the standard deviation of a sample to the standard error of a sampling distribution
    6. Discuss the basics of hypothesis testing
      1. Distinguish between Type I and Type II errors
      2. Discuss the impact of choosing a particular significance level
      3. State the purpose of the hypotheses
      4. State the possible conclusion for an hypothesis test, and
      5. Determine the appropriateness of a one-or two-tailed test
    7. Perform significance tests
      1. Write appropriate hypotheses
      2. Execute tests on the mean, proportion, and variance when one population is being studied
      3. Execute tests on the difference of the means and proportions and on the ratio of the variances when two populations are being studied
      4. Perform goodness-of-fit tests
      5. Perform tests on contingency tables, and
      6. Write a clear conclusion for each significance test
    8. Construct confidence intervals
      1. Estimate the parameter value.
      2. Calculate the estimate of error, and
      3. Determine the sample size needed to restrict error to a given limit
    9. Implement the Analysis of Variance technique
      1. State what is being tested
      2. Write the appropriate hypothesis
      3. Complete an ANOVA table, and
      4. State the conclusion of the test
    10. Operate on bivariate data, and
      1. Determine Pearson’s Product Moment, r,
      2. Determine the line of best fit
      3. Test the correlation value r for significance, and
      4. Test the regression coefficients for significance
    11. Execute various non-parametric tests

  
  • MAT 160 - Statistical Business Appl.

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This is the second course in the statistics sequence. Course content includes application and interpretation of probability and statistics as applied to business situations by using sampling, confidence intervals, control charges, simple linear regression analysis, multiple regression analysis, correlation analysis, data analysis, time series analysis, hypothesis testing and computer analysis.
    Prerequisite:  MAT 157  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Discuss statistical processes
      1. Compare and contrast descriptive and inferential statistics
      2. State the elements of statistical problems
      3. Discuss the role of statistics in managerial decision-making
    2. Discuss sampling distributions
      1. State properties
      2. Calculate representative values
      3. Compare the relationship between sample size and a sampling distribution
    3. Discuss estimation and a test of hypothesis
      1. Calculate large-sample estimation of a population mean
      2. Calculate necessary sample size
      3. Write appropriate hypotheses
      4. Calculate and interpret p-values
      5. Distinguish between Type I and Type II errors
      6. Interpret results of hypothesis tests
    4. Discuss quality control charts
      1. Calculate appropriate values
      2. Draw appropriate charts
      3. Analyze and interpret results
    5. Discuss simple linear regression
      1. Define a first-order model
      2. Calculate, using least squares method
      3. State assumptions
      4. Calculate an estimate for the population variance
      5. Assess the usefulness of the model
      6. Calculate and interpret coefficient of determination
      7. Estimate and predict, using the model
      8. Perform hypothesis tests
      9. Calculate, using computer spreadsheets
    6. Discuss multiple regression
      1. Identify the model assumptions
      2. Calculate the model, using the method of least squares
      3. Estimate variance of population
      4. Estimate and test hypothesis
      5. Test the usefulness of the model
      6. Estimate and predict, using the model
      7. Relate to business world
      8. Calculate, using computer spreadsheet
      9. Perform residual analyses
      10. Identify pitfalls
    7. Discuss qualitative independent variables
      1. Use appropriate terminology
      2. Write a model

  
  • MAT 162 - Prin. of Business Statistics

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Make inferences about population parameters. Conduct regression inferential analyses. Obtain, present and organize statistical data using measures of location and dispersion; the Normal distribution; sampling distributions; estimation and confidence intervals; inference for simple linear regression analysis. Use computers to visualize and analyze data.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 46% or MAT 073  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
    1. Examine data distributions
      1. Display distributions graphically
      2. Describe distributions numerically
      3. Use data to describe a population with a normal distribution
      4. Introduce statistical inference
    2. Examine relationships between variables
      1. Display the relationship graphically with a scatterplot
      2. Describe the relationship numerically with a correlation coefficient
      3. Use least-squares linear regression to examine the relationship
      4. Use data to conduct a regression analysis
      5. Explain the advantages and limitations of correlation and regression for describing the relationship between variables
    3. Consider population parameters and probability concepts
      1. Examine probability.
      2. Examine population parameters
      3. Use probability to test parameters for significance
    4. Infer conclusions about population parameters
      1. Explore inferences about populations means
      2. Examine matched pairs data
      3. Explore inferences about the sample proportion
      4. Determine the appropriate sample size for a stated margin of error
    5. Explore regression inferential analyses
      1. Define simple linear regression
      2. Estimate least-squares linear regression parameters
      3. Define and calculate the standard error estimate of the regression model?s standard deviation
      4. State and discuss the conditions for regression inference
      5. Define and discuss the sampling distribution of the regression parameter estimates
      6. Conduct a test for zero population correlation
      7. Examine the mean response and predict the value of an individual response
      8. Conduct a preliminary data analysis for multiple regression
      9. Determine the multiple regression equation using least-square to estimate coefficients
      10. Examine multiple regression residuals
      11. Calculate and discuss the multiple regression standard error
      12. Use statistical software to perform a multiple regression analysis
      13. Write a summary of a regression analysis including hypotheses, statistics used, results of tests, and inferences made

  
  • MAT 164 - Calculus for Busn/Social Sci

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Functions, graphs, differential calculus, integral calculus, introduction to max-min theory for functions of two variables. Emphasis on application of calculus to business problems. Not a substitute for MAT 211  and MAT 217 .
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 61% or MAT 121  with a C- or better
    Competencies
     

    1. Perform basic operations with numbers, functions, and graphs
      1. Graph elementary equations
      2. Find distances in the plane
      3. Graph special types of functions
      4. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide elementary functions
      5. Find the composite of two functions
    2. Establish the limit of a function
      1. Find the slope of a curve at a specific point
      2. Calculate the limit of a function at a specific point
      3. Define continuity
      4. Calculate one-sided limits
      5. Calculate limits at infinity
    3. Differentiate functions
      1. Define the derivative for real-valued functions of one real variable
      2. Calculate the derivative of certain elementary functions directly from the definition
      3. Calculate derivatives using various elementary rules: sum, product, quotient, power, etc
      4. Calculate derivatives using the Chain Rule
      5. Compute derivatives by the method of implicit differentiation
    4. Apply the derivative
      1. Locate Increasing and Decreasing Functions
      2. Discuss the concavity of a function
      3. Find any relative extrema of a function
      4. Find any absolute extrema of a function
      5. Sketch many general functions
      6. Solve general applied Maximum-Minimum problems
      7. Set up and solve applications to Economics and Business
      8. Set up and solve related rate problems
      9. Apply the mean value theorem
    5. Calculate the indefinite and definite integrals
      1. Calculate indefinite integrals for elementary functions
      2. Use indefinite integrals to calculate definite integrals
      3. Calculate definite and indefinite integrals by substitution
    6. Apply the integral
      1. Find areas by integration
      2. Apply the definite integral to economics and business
      3. Find volumes by integration
    7. Solve problems involving exponential and logarithmic functions
      1. Differentiate both exponential and logarithmic functions
      2. Integrate both exponential and logarthmic functions
      3. Solve exponential growth and decay problems

  
  • MAT 211 - Calculus I

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 5
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Introduction to limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, the definite and indefinite integral, numerical integration, exponential and logarithmic functions, other transcendental functions and introduction to differential equations.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 76% or MAT 121  and MAT 130  with a C- or better, or MAT 129  with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Establish the limit of a function
      1. Associate the proper limit symbolism with a given graphical situa­tion
      2. Calculate limits of certain elementary functions
      3. Define the concept of limit for real-valued functions of one real variable
      4. Prove that a given limit statement is valid
      5. Compute limits involving the trigonometric functions
    2. Determine the continuity of functions
      1. State the conditions for the continuity of a function at a point
      2. Define continuity on an open interval and on a closed interval
      3. Identify intervals of continuity from a given graph
      4. Determine points of discontinuity
      5. Identify points of discontinuity as removable or non-removable
      6. State and apply the Intermediate Value Theorem
    3. Apply the basic rules of differentiation
      1. Define the derivative for real-valued functions of one real variable
      2. Calculate the derivative of certain elementary functions directly from the definition
      3. Calculate derivatives using the appropriate rules for sums, products, and quotients
      4. State the connection between differentiability and continuity
      5. Calculate higher order derivatives
    4. Differentiate composite functions
      1. Calculate derivatives using the chain rule
      2. Compute derivatives by the method of implicit differentiation
      3. Set up and solve related rate problems
    5. Use the derivative to identify extrema
      1. Define relative maximums and minimums of a function
      2. Define and find critical values of a function
      3. Find the relative extrama of a function using the first and second derivative tests
      4. State and apply the Extreme Value Theorem
    6. Identify increasing and decreasing functions
      1. Define an increasing (and decreasing) function on an open interval
      2. Use the first derivative to determine if a function is increasing (or decreasing) on an interval
      3. Determine the open intervals on which a function is increasing and on which it is decreasing
    7. Identify the concavity of a function on an interval
      1. Define concave up (and concave down) on an open interval
      2. Use the second derivative to determine if a function is concave up (or concave down) on an interval
      3. Determine the open intervals on which a function is concave up and on which it is concave down
    8. Find vertical, horizontal and slant asymptotes of a function
      1. Define and locate the vertical asymptotes of a function
      2. Evaluate infinite limits of a function
      3. Use limits at infinity to determine the ?end behavior? of a function
      4. Use the end behavior of a function to identify any horizontal or slant asymptotes
    9. Apply the derivative to real-world problems
      1. Write models for real-world problems
      2. Set up and solve applied min/max problems
      3. Use the first and second derivative to graph certain elementary functions
      4. State the geometrical significance of the first and second derivatives
      5. State the physical significance for the first and second derivatives for rectilinear motion
      6. State and apply the mean Value Theorem for derivatives
    10. Calculate indefinite and definite integrals
      1. Calculate indefinite integrals for elementary functions
      2. Calculate Riemann sums in simple cases
      3. Define the concept of the definite integral for real-valued functions of one real variable
      4. Calculate the definite integral in simple cases directly from the definition
      5. State the first and Second Fundamental theorems of calculus
      6. Apply the fundamental Theorem of calculus to evaluate definite integrals
      7. State the mean Value Theorem for integrals
    11. Find inverse functions
      1. Determine whether a function is one to one
      2. Define the inverse of a function
      3. State the graphical relationship of inverse functions
      4. Find the derivative of an inverse function a specified point
    12. Calculate the logarithmic and exponential functions
      1. Define the logarithm function in the natural base e
      2. Demonstrate the basic properties of logarithms using the definition in 6.1
      3. Define logarithms in bases other than e.
      4. Calculate derivatives and anti-derivatives of the logarithmic functions
      5. Define the exponential function in the natural base e.
      6. Define the exponential functions in based other than e
      7. Calculate derivatives and anti-derivatives that are inverse trigonometric functions
    13. Calculate the inverse trigonometric functions
      1. Define the inverse trigonometric functions
      2. State the domain and range of the inverse trigonometric functions
      3. Calculate derivatives of the inverse trigonometric functions
      4. Recognize and calculate anti-derivatives that are inverse trigonometric functions
    14. Calculate the hyperbolic trigonometric functions
      1. Define the hyperbolic trigonometric functions
      2. State the geometrical interpretation of the hyperbolic functions
      3. Calculate derivatives and anti-derivatives of the hyperbolic functions
      4. Calculate derivatives and anti-derivatives of the inverse hyperbolic functions
    15. Solve simple differential equations
      1. Solve differential equations using separation of variables and anti-differentiation
      2. Solve differential equations involving exponential growth or decay

  
  • MAT 217 - Calculus II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 5
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Continuation of Calculus I. Topics include applications of integration, integration techniques, L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals, infinite sequences, series, Taylor and Maclaurin series, the calculus of plane curves, parametric equations and polar equations.
    Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: MAT 211  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
    1. Solve application problems using calculus
      1. Use an integral to calculate area between two curves
      2. Find volume of a solid of revolution using the disk method
      3. Find volume of a solid of revolution using the shell method
      4. Calculate arc length using an integral
      5. Calculate area of a surface of revolution using an integral
      6. Use an integral to calculate work done by a variable force
      7. Use integrals to calculate moments and center of mass of a planar lamina
    2. Use basic techniques of integration
      1. Calculate certain integrals by integration by parts
      2. Integrate powers of Sine and Cosine
      3. Integrate powers of Secant and Tangent
      4. Integrate by Trig substitution
      5. Integrate by partial fractions
      6. Integrate by using tables and other miscellaneous techniques
    3. Evaluate indeterminate forms
      1. Identify the basic 0/0 indeterminate form
      2. Use L.’Hopital’s rule for the 0/0 form
      3. Identify other indeterminate forms
      4. Use L.’Hopital’s rule for the other forms
    4. Integrate improper integrals
      1. Identify the various types of improper integrals
      2. Evaluate a given improper integral
    5. Evaluate infinite series
      1. Define the limit of an infinite series
      2. Determine convergence by the integral test
      3. Determine convergence by the comparison test
      4. Determine convergence for alternating series
      5. Define conditional convergence
    6. Evaluate power series
      1. Define power series
      2. Determine the radius of convergence for a power series
      3. Determine Taylor and Maclaurin series for certain elementary functions
      4. Differentiate and integrate power series
    7. Analyze plane curves and 2-D geometry
      1. Evaluate derivatives and integrals of parametric equations
      2. Calculate arc length for parametric equations using an integral
      3. Calculate area of surface of revolution for parametric equations using an integral
      4. Define polar coordinates
      5. Write the equations relating polar coordinates and rectangular coordinates
      6. Graph functions represented in polar form
      7. Determine areas of regions defined by polar form equations
      8. Calculate slopes and arc lengths for functions specified in polar form

  
  • MAT 219 - Calculus III

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Continuation of Calculus II. Topics include vectors and vector-valued functions, tangent and normal vectors, arc length and curvature, vector fields, line and surface integrals, Green’s theorem, the divergence theorem and Stokes’s theorem, multivariable functions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives and gradients, optimization of multivariable functions.
    Prerequisite: MAT 217  or equivalent with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Use and understand vectors in space
      1. Define vectors in the plane and space
      2. Calculate the dot product of two vectors
      3. Calculate the cross product of two vectors
    2. Apply vectors to the geometry of space
      1. Construct the equations of lines and planes in space
      2. Construct the equations of surfaces in space
    3. Evaluate vector-valued functions
      1. Define vector-valued functions
      2. Differentiate and Integrate of vector-valued functions
    4. Apply vector valued functions
      1. Compute velocity and acceleration
      2. Compute tangent, normal and bi-normal vectors
      3. Compute arc length and curvature
    5. Utilize vector analysis is 2D
      1. Define and use vector fields
      2. Compute line integrals
      3. Use and understand Green’s Theorem
    6. Utilize vector analysis is 3D
      1. Compute parametric surfaces
      2. Compute surface integrals
      3. Use and understand the Divergence Theorem
      4. Use and understand Stroke’s Theorem
    7. Analyze multi-variable functions
      1. Evaluate the limit of a multi-variable function
      2. Discuss continuity of a multi-variable function
      3. Evaluate the partial derivative of a multi-variable function
      4. calculate the differential of a multi-variable function
      5. Evaluate the derivative of multi-variable function using the chain rule
      6. Find and discuss the directional derivatives of multi-variable function
      7. find and discuss gradient of a multi-variable function
      8. find the equation for a tangent plane
      9. Calculate optimum value of a multi-variable function, with or without constraints

  
  • MAT 227 - Diff Equations with Laplace

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Ordinary differential equations, systems of ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, numerical methods and applications.
    Prerequisite: MAT 217   or equivalent with a C- or better
    Competencies
    1. Solve First-Order Differential Equations
      1. Establish the existence of solutions
      2. Establish the uniqueness of solutions
      3. Graph an approximate solution by using isoclines
      4. Solve Variable Separable differential equations
      5. Solve First-Order Linear differential equations
      6. Solve Exact differential equations
      7. Find Integrating Factors to convert a differential equation to exact
      8. Solve Homogeneous Differential Equations
      9. Reduce differential equations to First Order
      10. Solve application problems involving various of the above
    2. Solve Linear Differential Equations
      1. Establish independence of functions by using the Wronskian
      2. Find the characteristic equation of Homogeneous Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients
      3. Solve Euler Differential Equations
      4. Solve differential equations by Reduction of Order
      5. Solve differential equations by the Method of Taylor Series
      6. Solve Nonhomogeneous Differential Equations
      7. Solve differential equations by the Method of Undetermined Coefficients
      8. Solve differential equations by the Method of Variation of Parameter
      9. Solve application problems involving various of the above
    3. Solve Linear Systems of Differential Equations
      1. Establish independence by using the Wronskian
      2. Solve differential equations by the Method of Elimination
      3. Solve differential equations by the Matrix Method
      4. Solve Nonhomogeneous Systems by Variation of Parameters
    4. Solve by the Laplace Transform
      1. Use the definition of Laplace Transforms to produce formulae
      2. Apply the Laplace Transform and The Inverse Laplace Transform to solve differential equations
      3. Apply the Laplace Transform and The Inverse Laplace Transform to solve systems of differential equations
      4. Solve differential equations using the Heaviside function
      5. Solve differential equations using the Dirac Delta function
    5. Solve by using numerical methods
      1. Solve differential equations and systems by using Euler’s method
      2. Solve differential equations and systems by using Taylor Series
      3. Solve differential equations and systems by using the Runge-Kutta method

  
  • MAT 772 - Applied Math

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course in elementary mathematical skills for technicians. Topics covered include fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and signed numbers; percents; geometric figures and basic constructions; area and volume formulas; English/Metric systems; measurements; and the interpretation of graphs and charts.
    Competencies
    1. Use numbers in a variety of equivalent forms
      1. Read whole numbers, fractions, and decimals
      2. List equivalent fractions
      3. Convert fractions to mixed numbers (and vice versa
      4. Convert fractions to decimals (and vice versa).
      5. Find common denominators
      6. Define percents
      7. Convert fractions and decimals to percents (and vice versa).
      8. Read signed numbers
      9. Describe the real number line
      10. Define absolute value
      11. Define exponential notation
      12. Define scientific notation
    2. Compute with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers in real world and mathematical solving
      1. Apply the four arithmetic operations (add, subtract, multiply, and divide) to whole numbers
      2. Apply the four arithmetic operations to fractions
      3. Apply the four arithmetic operations to decimals
      4. Apply the four arithmetic operations to integers
      5. Apply the four arithmetic operations to complex fractions
      6. Demonstrate the use of exponential notation in computation
      7. Demonstrate the use of scientific notation in computation
    3. Use computational techniques appropriate to specific problems
      1. Model real-world problems
      2. Calculate a solution to the problem
      3. Round the answer when necessary
      4. Calculate using a calculator
    4. Recognize whether or not an answer is reasonable
      1. Estimate an answer
      2. Determine the reasonableness of the answer
    5. Identify basic geometric figures
      1. Identify two dimensional figures and parts
      2. Identify three dimensional figures and parts
    6. Demonstrate basic geometric constructions
      1. Construct
    7. Apply geometric properties and relationships in real-world and mathematical problem solving
      1. Demonstrate the properties of
      2. Use the Pythagorean theorem
      3. Use similarity in solving applied problems
      4. Demonstrate the relationships between central angle, arcs, and inscribed angles
      5. Explain the intersection of lines and circles
      6. Calculate the angles formed by circles and lines
      7. Use a protractor to measure angles
      8. Use geometric formulas to solve problems
        1. Calculate the measure of an angle in both degrees and radians
        2. Calculate the area and volume of plane figures
        3. Calculate lateral surface area, total surface area and volume of geometric solids (prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres).
    8. Convert measurements within the metric and English systems and between systems
      1. Identify the units in the English and Metric systems
      2. Convert within the English System
      3. Convert within the Metric System
      4. Convert between Metric and English Systems
      5. Model dimensional figures
      6. Calculate answers to dimensional figures
    9. Use appropriate units and tools to measure to the degree of accuracy required in a particular situation
      1. Calculate answers to the correct degree of precision
      2. Calculate answers to the correct degree of precision
      3. Calculate the greatest possible error
      4. Demonstrate measurement using calipers and micrometers
      5. Find the tolerance allowed for measurements
    10. Interpret scales to the degree of accuracy required in a particular situation
      1. Interpret circular scales
      2. Interpret uniform and nonuniform scales
      3. Demonstrate the use of the color codes in reading the value of electrical resistors
    11. Interpret graphs and charts
      1. Read data
      2. Interpret data
      3. Analyze data
      4. Create graphs/charts to depict given data

  
  • MAT 773 - Applied Math II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course in algebra and trigonometry for technicians. Topics covered include polynomials, equations, systems of linear equations, factoring, quadratic equations, trigonometry, powers, roots and logarithms.
    Prerequisite: Minimum ALEKS scores of 30% or MAT 063  with a C- or better.
    Competencies
    1. Perform fundamental algebraic operations with polynomials
      1. Find the sum of 2 polynomials
      2. Find the difference of 2 polynomials
      3. Find the product of 2 polynomials
      4. Find the quotient of 2 polynomials
      5. Use order of operations to evaluate expressions
      6. Simplify an expression
      7. Calculate the value of an expression with exponents
      8. Calculate radicals involving perfect squares and other numbers
    2. Solve algebraic equations having variables in both members, parentheses, and frac­tions
      1. Translate phrases and sentences written in words into algebraic form
      2. Solve linear equations involving one step transformations using the addition property of equality
      3. Solve linear equations including one step transformations using the multiplication property of equality
      4. Solve linear equations involving two transformations
      5. Solve linear equations for one variable in terms of other variables
      6. Evaluate a literal equation given the other variables’ values
      7. Use an equation to solve a given word problem
    3. Solve linear systems by graphing, addition, and substitution
      1. Plot a given ordered pair of numbers on a graph
      2. Name the coordinates given a point on a graph
      3. Determine ordered pairs which satisfy a given linear equation
      4. Graph a linear equation on a coordinate plane
      5. Recognize parallel, intersecting, and coinciding lines when given systems of 2 simultaneous equations
      6. Solve system of equations by graphing method
      7. Solve system of equations by elimination method
      8. Solve system of equations by substitution method
    4. Factor algebraic expressions including general trinomial
      1. Remove the greatest common monomial factor
      2. Factor a trinomial which is the product of 2 binomials
      3. Factor a binomial which is the difference of 2 squares
      4. Factor polynomials completely
    5. Solve quadratic equations by factoring, the quadratic formula, and graphing
      1. Use factoring to solve quadratic equations
      2. Use the quadratic formula to solve quadratic equations
      3. Use graphing to solve quadratic equations
      4. Write models for verbal problems that produce quadratic equations
      5. Solve models
    6. Use geometric concepts and formulas to solve problems
      1. Use the Pythagorean Theorem
      2. Use similarity in solving applied problems
      3. Demonstrate the relationships between central angles, arcs, and inscribed angles
      4. Explain the intersection of lines and circles
      5. Calculate the angles formed by circles and lines
      6. Calculate the measure of an angle in both degrees and radians
      7. Calculate the area and volume of plane figures
      8. Calculate the lateral surface area, total surface area, and volume of geometric solids (prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres)
    7. Use trigonometric ratios to find sides and angles of right triangles
      1. Define the 6 basic trig ratios in relation to a right triangle
      2. Use trigonometric ratios to find angles of a right triangle
      3. Use trigonometric ratios to find sides of a right triangle
      4. Use trigonometric ratios to solve given applied problems
    8. Graph sine and cosine functions
      1. Define the components of a graph
      2. Graph the functions showing the components (amplitude, period, and phrase shift).
    9. Solve oblique triangles
      1. Solve for missing parts of a triangle by Law of Sines
      2. Solve for missing parts of a triangle by Law of Cosines
      3. Show the ambiguous case involving Law of Sines
      4. Solve the ambiguous case
      5. Use trig area formula. (K=1/2 ab sin C)

  
  • MAT 900 - Field Studies in Actuarial Science

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to study the mathematical foundational concepts of life, property and casualty, and health insurance as well as how actuarial science is applied with the insurance industry outside the typical classroom setting. Students will learn foundational mathematical concepts and apply their learning to real world problems within the industry.
    Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
    Competencies
    1. Interpret categorical and quantitative data.
      1. Summarize categorical data for two categories in two-way frequency tables.
      2. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data.
      3. Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.
      4. Represent data on two quantitative variables on a scatter plot, and describe how the variables are related.
      5. Decide if a specific model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using simulation.
      6. Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems.
      7. Measure success/profitability and justify the appropriate tools to support accuracy
      8. of the results.
    2. Justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments and observational studies.
      1. Interpret and explain random processes underlying statistical experiments.
      2. Use statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population.
      3. Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.
      4. Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion; develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling.
      5. Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant.
      6. Evaluate reports based on data.
    3. Evaluate probability outcomes of decisions, including complex situations.
      1. Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model
      2. Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
      3. Describe events as subsets of a sample space using characteristics of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections, or complements of other events.
      4. Construct and interpret two-way frequency tables of data when two categories are associated with each object being classified.
      5. Recognize and explain the concepts of conditional probability and independence in everyday language and everyday situations.
      6. Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts.
      7. Weigh the possible outcomes of decisions by assigning probabilities to payoff values and find expected values.
    4. Apply the fundamentals of actuarial science competencies
      1. Explain how a variety of disciplines interact within the larger process through determining actuarial values, engaging in pricing exercises, analyzing trends, etc.
      2. Summarize the purpose for insurance.
      3. Explain the concept of risk and risk management and evidence it in a qualitative and quantitative manner.
      4. Use key technical vocabulary and acronyms unique to actuarial science.
    5. Evaluate the role insurance plays in building economies.
      1. Summarize the role of insurance in terms of globalization.
      2. Articulate the role of regulations based on professional readings such as Affordable Care Act or other summaries.
      3. Gain exposure and understanding of property, casualty, health, annuities, and life insurance.
      4. Investigate and analyze various companies? vision and mission statements, as well as marketing slogans and mottos.
      5. Articulate and fulfill the company promise to serve the client by providing trust, security, safety, and protection.
    6. Analyze relevant literature of the field.
      1. Review relevant actuarial information
      2. Distinguish peer-reviewed, actuarial literature from other published information
      3. Read, interpret, comprehend and reflect upon the credibility of professional literature.
      4. Compare and contrast various authors? or companies? perspectives on leadership
      5. and ethics within the industry.
      6. Analyze documents such as the Own Risk Solvency Assessment (ORSA) documents and critique their success in demonstrating sound risk management
    7. Demonstrate effective professional skills and leadership within the context of the industry.
      1. Identify the traits of successful actuarial professionals as defined by SOA, AAA and ASPCA.
      2. Simulate and apply the concept of professionalism as it relates specifically to actuarial science.
      3. Define and express the characteristics of servant leadership.
      4. Practice confidentiality and discretion.
      5. Develop trusting relationships with clients, colleagues, mentors and other professionals.
    8. Evaluate actuarial careers within various industries.
      1. Participate in and reflect on at least three different actuarial settings such as life, property and casualty, and healthcare insurance.
      2. Differentiate each actuarial setting.
      3. Compare and contrast different actuarial-related fields in terms of cost of education, time in school, and work-life balance.
      4. Investigate educational requirements of an actuary and summarize necessary certification, registration and licensure requirements.
    9. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving in a professional setting.
      1. Present thoughtful questioning that challenges assumptions, promotes higher order thinking, leads to new insights, and validates perceptions.
      2. Engage in metacognition that supports reflective practice.
      3. Support processes that analyze, select, use, and evaluate various approaches to develop solutions.
      4. Engage in analysis and synthesis of multiple sources and points of information.
      5. Demonstrate intentional use of disciplinary frameworks to analyze complex issues and information.
      6. Suspend judgment while collecting evidence to make determinations.
      7. Explain how a variety of disciplines interact within the larger process.
      8. Demonstrate technical, analytical problem solving with results-oriented solutions.
      9. Analyze a hard theoretical idea and create a concise business memo, visual or other communication tool for various audiences such as the CFO, CEO, Sales or Marketing Department, the public, media, or other internal stakeholders.
      10. Investigate data analytics and justify the power of data.
    10. Investigate technology concepts, systems, and operations within the industry.
      1. Use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
      2. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of sources and media and use the information in a legal and ethical manner.
      3. Describe and defend human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and its relation to the practice of legal and ethical behavior from the lens of various stakeholders.
      4. Apply available, and most appropriate tools, such as an AV calculator, TAS or ALFA software, etc., to gather, evaluate and use information.
      5. Present accurate pivot tables and calculate net present values.
      6. Develop accurate Excel functions and formulas and display data in Excel spreadsheets.
    11. Apply insurance issues from the perspective of a variety of stakeholders.
      1. Explain and evidence the impact of insurance from various lenses
      2. Explore the role of human empathy within the profession.
      3. Demonstrate understanding of relevant ethical and legal principles.
      4. Respect and practice ethics.
      5. Prepare a needs analysis and recommendation of insurance products based on data.
      6. Apply the concepts of actuarial skills to a variety of scenarios.
    12. Evaluate complex communication within the context of the professional environment.
      1. Negotiate processes that generate mutually satisfactory solutions.
      2. Manage and resolve conflicts.
      3. Interact effectively with people of different cultures.
      4. Select and integrate various communication processes.
      5. Integrate appropriate forms of information communication technology.
      6. Describe the interactions among modes of communication.
      7. Evidence meaningful and engaging interactions.
      8. Analyze situations in a critical manner and ask appropriate questions focused on refining the process and/or correcting mistakes.
    13. Create an inquiry project within an actuarial setting.
      1. Identify and propose an actuarial project to explore.
      2. Follow written and oral instructions given by instructor or actuarial colleagues.
      3. Adapt and be flexible within the learning environment.
      4. Participate in all required activities.
      5. Cooperate and collaborate with others involved in the project.
      6. Communicate effectively with others involved in the project.
      7. Present a final communication of project learnings.


Medical Assistant

  
  • MAP 106 - Medical Office Essentials

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is an entry-level course consisting of the basics of medical terminology, HIPAA, and front office protocol. It is intended for the individual with little or no prior medical office background. Course will include lecture and practice via front office simulation software.
    Competencies
    1. Introduce Medical Terminology
      1. Identify and define components of medical terms (prefixes, suffixes, combining forms, and roots)
      2. Identify directional terms, body regions, and body cavities
      3. Construct common medical terms for medical body systems
      4. Correctly spell and pronounce common medical disorders
    2. Introduce Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
      1. Explain the need to maintain privacy and confidentiality of patient’s health records
      2. Identify the challenges of maintaining electronic health record confidentiality
      3. Explain the concept of “need to know.”
      4. Define Protected Health Information (or PHI) and identify what information is covered by HIPAA
      5. Cite the penalties to the organization and/or individual for noncompliance
    3. Introduce medical office protocol
      1. Identify proper procedures in greeting patients including those with challenging characteristics and behaviors
      2. Prioritize and manage demands which occur in a hectic front office
      3. List ways a front-office employee can provide a non-judgmental, welcoming environment
      4. Exhibit appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication etiquette
    4. Perform one or more job shadows of at least three hours each.
    5. Introduce office accountability
      1. Provide examples which exemplify the expectation of being a productive team member
      2. Distinguish the scope of a job description in terms of responsibilities and boundaries
      3. Exhibit appropriate dress and conduct

  
  • MAP 110 - Medical Office Management I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Course emphasizes administrative responsibilities. Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains including written communications, records management, bookkeeping, banking, emergency preparedness and protective practices.In addition, this course includes computer skills in word processing, medical reports and business correspondence; professional applications of e-mail and internet research, introduction to computerized medical office and HIPAA requirements.
    Competencies
    1. Manage medical records
      1. Demonstrate proper procedure for making a correction in a medical record
      2. Differentiate between active files, inactive files, and closed files
      3. Arrange a list of names in indexing order
      4. Arrange a list of names in alphabetical order for filing
      5. State four basic systems of filing
      6. Define types of information contained in the patient’s medical record
      7. Identify methods of organizing the patient’s medical record based on: problem-oriented medical record (POMR) and source-oriented medical record (SOMR)
      8. Identify equipment and supplies needed for medical records in order to: create, maintain, and store.
      9. Create, organize, and file patient medical records.
      10. Describe filing indexing rules.
      11. Differentiate between electronic medical records (EMR) and a practice management system.
      12. Utilize the EMR.
      13. Input patient data utilizing a practice management system.
      14. Explain the importance of data back-up.
      15. Explain meaningful use as it applies to EMR.
    2. Perform banking procedures
      1. Prepare a bank deposit
      2. Define accounts receivable and accounts payable
      3. Describe banking procedures as related to the ambulatory care setting
      4. Identify precautions for accepting cash, check, credit card and debit card payments
    3. Computer Application
      1. Prepare letters and medical reports using word processing software
      2. List safety precautions to follow when using computer hardware and software
      3. Use terms associated with computer hardware
      4. Format documents, margins, tabs, line spacing and font
      5. Proofread, edit, save, print documents
      6. Identify standard letter parts
      7. Type from a rough draft utilizing proofreader marks
      8. Prepare memos and agendas
      9. Use computer storage devices (e.g., flashdrive)
      10. Discuss applications of electronic technology in professional communication
      11. Compose professional correspondence utilizing electronic technology
      12. Identify Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act
      13. Send, receive, open and print e-mail with attachments
      14. Utilize internet search engines
    4. Process mail
      1. Address envelope for OCR scanning
      2. Differentiate certified mail from registered mail.
    5. Protective Practices
      1. Identify safety signs, symbols and labels
      2. Discuss fire safety issues in an ambulatory healthcare environment
      3. Describe fundamental principles for evacuation of a healthcare setting
      4. Describe the purpose of Safety Data Sheets (SDS) in a healthcare setting
      5. Discuss protocols for disposal of biological chemical materials
      6. Identify and use principles of body mechanics and ergonomics
      7. Identify critical elements of an emergency plan for response to a natural disaster or other emergency
      8. Participate in a mock exposure event with documentation of specific steps
      9. Evaluate the work environment to identify unsafe working conditions
      10. Recognize the physical and emotional effects on persons involved in an emergency situation
      11. Demonstrate self-awareness in responding to an emergency situation
    6. Communication
      1. Recognize elements of fundamental writing skills
      2. Coach patients regarding office policies
      3. Demonstrate sensitivity to patient rights
    7. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking.
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Examine the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgement
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 118 - Medical Office Management II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Study of health insurance, HMOs, Workers’ Compensation, Medicare, Tri-care and Medicaid. Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains including insurance filing, CPT, ICD and HCPCS coding, posting of charges/payments both manually and with computer applications, telephone techniques, fax machine, appointment scheduling and chart audits. Students keep financial records and utilize both EMR and traditional charts to manage patient records. Psychomotor skills include inventory control, purchasing, quality control, quality improvement and management of facility, equipment and supplies. Students utilize policy, procedure and safety manuals.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAP 110  
    Competencies
    1. Obtain Medicare reimbursement
      1. Define the four parts of Medicare Part A,B, C & D
      2. Identify coverage of Medicare A, B, C & D
      3. State deductible for Medicare Part B
      4. Explain co-insurance requirements for Medicare Part B
      5. Identify eligibility requirements for Medicare Part A & B
      6. Interpret the information on a Medicare Remittance Summary
      7. Adhere to the Requirements of Participating Physicians
      8. Follow Medicare guidelines for completing a CMS 1500 form manually and electronically
      9. State where to mail forms to the fiscal intermediary for Medicare Part B in Iowa
      10. Recognize circumstances that make Medicare the secondary payer
      11. Explain use of an advance beneficiary notice
      12. Explain concept of RBRVS & DRGS
    2. Obtain Medicaid (Title XIX) reimbursement
      1. List eligibility requirements for Medicaid recipients
      2. Transfer information foe eligibility care to CMS 1500 form manually and electronically
      3. Follow Medicaid guidelines for completing the CMS 1500 form
      4. Differentiate the Medipass program from the Medicaid program
      5. Identify fiscal intermediary for Medicaid
      6. Interpret the information on a Medicaid Explanation of Benefits Form
    3. Obtain other Third Party reimbursement
      1. Differentiate between managed care plans and indemnity plans
      2. Transfer information from identification cards to insurance form
      3. Follow guidelines for obtaining reimbursement
      4. Obtain precertification/referrals, and verify eligibility for managed care
      5. Define terms associated with managed care/insurance plans
      6. Explain billing options and payment options
      7. Explain Fair Debt Collection Act
      8. Explain requirements of Truth In Lending Act
      9. Utilize sensitivity when collecting accounts
      10. Explain Tricare/Chapva guidelines
      11. Explain Worker’s Compensation reimbursement
      12. Complete an insurance claim form
      13. Identify types of third party plans, information required to file a third party claim, the steps for filing a thirs party claim
    4. Accurately code diagnoses with appropriate ICD-10 codes
      1. Apply knowledge of medical terminology
      2. Apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology
      3. Demonstrate knowledge on how to use the current ICD-10-CM diagnostic coding system
    5. Code procedures and medical services with the current edition Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and HCPCS codes
      1. Apply knowledge of procedural terminology
      2. Apply knowledge of procedural terminology
      3. Utilize the terminolgy associated with CPT’s evaluation and management code guidelines
      4. Identify correct codes for services and procedures provided
      5. Use appropriate HCPCS codes
      6. Explain the effects of upcoding and downcoding
    6. Establish/maintain insurance files
      1. State purpose of professional liability insurance
      2. State types of catastrophic insurance coverage available
      3. Explain purpose of accounts receivable insurance coverage
      4. Explain utilization review principles
    7. Electronic Medical Records
      1. Differentiate between electronic medical records (EMR) and a practice management system
      2. Utilize an EMR
      3. Input patient data utilizing a practice management system
      4. Protect the integrity of the medical record
    8. Handle incoming telephone calls to the medical office
      1. Demonstrate professional telephone techniques
      2. Document telephone messages accurately
      3. Interact professionally with third party representatives
    9. Prepare and manage patient accounts
      1. Post financial data to patient’s accounts manually and electronically
      2. Prepare an age analysis of accounts receivable
      3. Collect delinquent accounts
      4. Follow up on accounts assigned to a collection agency
      5. Post entries to ledger card and computerized patient account system, and describe function of daysheet
      6. Run patient statements and monthly accounting reports
      7. Differentiate between accounting and bookkeeping
      8. Describe types of adjustments made to patient accounts including non-sufficient funds (NSF) check, collection agency transaction, credit balance, third party
      9. Identify types of information contained in patient’s billing record
      10. Explain patient financial obligations for services rendered
      11. Perform accounts receivable procedures to patient accounts including posting charges, payments, adjustments
      12. Obtain accurate patient billing information
      13. Inform patient of financial obligations for services rendered
      14. Interpret information on an insurance card
      15. Demonstrate professionalism when discussing patient’s billing record
      16. Display sensitivity when requesting payment for services rendered
    10. Appointment scheduling
      1. State three guidelines for scheduling appointments
      2. Interview patient to obtain appropriate data
      3. Differentiate routine appointments from emergency appointments
      4. Apply time management techniques of wave scheduling, modified wave and grouping procedures
      5. Document missed or failed appointments
      6. Schedule outpatient diagnostic tests
      7. Apply triage criteria
      8. Schedule appointments electronically and manually
      9. Identify different types of appointment scheduling methods
      10. Identify advantages and disadvantages of manual and electronic appointment systems
      11. Identify critical information required for scheduling patient procedures
      12. Manage appointment schedule using established priorities
      13. Schedule a patient procedure
      14. Display sensitivity when managing appointments
    11. Prepare a resume and cover letter
    12. Use a fax machine
    13. Facility and equipment management
      1. Describe methods of inventory management including storage of supplies
      2. Complete purchase order and compare to invoice
      3. Define warranty, service agreement, contract, instruction manual and maintenance agreement
      4. Identify measures to ensure facility safety and to monitor equipment repair, replacement, and maintenance including trouble shooting techniques
      5. State goals of a policy manual, safety manual and procedure manual
      6. Define chart audit and list examples of how this is utilized in the medical office
      7. Identify procedures for ADA compliance in the medical office
      8. Describe quality control/quality assurance resources for the medical office
      9. Explain general office policies
      10. List steps in completing an inventory
      11. Perform an inventory with documentation
    14. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Examine the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgement
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes
      9. Show sensitivity when communicating with patients regarding third party requirements

  
  • MAP 129 - Medical Terminology

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic prefixes, suffixes and root words related to all body systems are studied. Spelling, pronunciation and definitions are included.
    Competencies
    1. Define the word parts that relate to anatomical structures in each body system
      1. Identify prefixes used in anatomical terminology related to each body system
      2. Recognize root words used in anatomical terminology related to each body system
      3. Identify prefixes used in anatomical terminology related to each body system
      4. Break medical terms into component parts and diagram each part
    2. Build diagnostic, surgical, and pathologic terms related to each body system
      1. Combine word parts to form diagnostic medical terms related to each body system
      2. Consolidate word parts to form surgical medical terms related to each body system
      3. Merge word parts to form medical terms related to pathological conditions for each body system
    3. Analyze diagnostic, surgical, and pathologic terms related to each body system.
      1. Interpret diagnostic terms related to each body system
      2. Analyze surgical terms related to each body system
      3. Evaluate medical terms related to pathological conditions for each body system
    4. Define diagnostic, surgical and pathologic terms related to each body system
      1. Define diagnostic terms related to each body system
      2. Define surgical terms related to each body system
      3. Define medical terms related to pathological conditions for each body system
    5. Pronounce diagnostic, surgical, and pathologic terms related to each body system
      1. Pronounce diagnostic terms related to each body system
      2. Pronounce surgical terms related to each body system
      3. Pronounce medical terms related to pathological conditions for each body system
    6. Spell diagnostic, surgical, and pathologic terms related to each body system
      1. Spell diagnostic terms related to each body system
      2. Spell surgical terms related to each body system
      3. Spell medical terms related to pathological conditions for each body system

  
  • MAP 141 - Medical Insurance

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course emphasizes the revenue cycle process.  The ten steps of revenue cycle management are identified and discussed to assist with successfully managing the medical insurance claims process.  This course covers both outpatient physician and inpatient/outpatient hospital situations.  The different types of medical insurance and requirements will be discussed.  Emphasis will be placed on procedural and diagnostic coding used to facilitate proper claim submission.   
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: HSC 114  with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the revenue cycle management process
      1. Explain the ten steps in the revenue cycle
      2. Examine billing processes and procedures
      3. Discuss the role of utilization review as it applies to the revenue cycle
      4. Use electronic medical records to streamline the revenue cycle
    2. Examine diagnostic codes according to current guidelines
      1. Describe the purpose and organization of ICD
      2. Summarize the structure, content, and key conventions of the Alphabetic Index and Tabular List
      3. Assign correct diagnostic codes
      4. Differentiate between CM and PCS
    3. Examine procedure codes according to current guidelines
      1. Describe the purpose and organization of CPT
      2. Apply the six steps for selecting procedure codes to patient scenarios
      3. Describe modifiers
      4. Contrast Category II and Category II codes
      5. Discuss the purpose of the HCPCS code set
    4. Compare and contrast the different types of medical insurance
      1. Define the three major types of medical insurance payers
      2. Describe the major features of health plans including eligibility, portability, and required coverage
      3. Identify the four major government health care programs: Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE, and CHAMPVA
      4. Distinguish between major insurers: Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, Worker’s Compensation, and disability insurance
    5. Interpret HIPAA-compliant health care claims
      1. Discuss the content of the CMS-1500 claim
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of filing rules and regulations
      3. Demonstrate medical necessity and code linkage
      4. Process health insurance claim forms for private payers
      5. Process health insurance claim forms for government health care plans
    6. Examine HIPAA/HITECH, legal, and ethical considerations with emphasis on confidentiality, protected health information and fraud related to insurance
      1. Compare the intent of HIPAA, HITECH, and ACA laws
      2. Discuss the benefits of a compliance plan
      3. Explain the importance of accurate documentation within medical records
    7. Evaluate patient encounters, billing information, processing of payers’ remittance advices, and patient billing/collections
      1. Discuss information required for a new patient
      2. Explain the process for updating established patient information
      3. Describe the fee schedules created for services provided
      4. Summarize coordination of benefits
      5. Calculate RBRVS payments under the Medicare Fee Schedule
      6. Interpret a remittance advice
      7. Identify the purpose and steps of the appeal process
      8. Describe the content found within a patient statement
      9. Compare cycle billing and guarantor billing
    8. Demonstrate professionalism, ethics, and etiquette for career growth
      1. Discuss the importance of professional certification
      2. Review professional organizations

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • MAP 150 - Adv. Medical Billing/Coding

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides students with advanced knowledge of accurately reporting diagnoses and procedure codes through the application of official coding guidelines. The student will apply prior learning of CPT, HCPCS, and ICD concepts to accurately code patient medical records and reports. Coding applications are considered by specialty and body system, utilizing medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, and pathologies. Complex cases will be presented within the course to provide the student with the opportunity to coordinate the classification systems needed to code visits to the applicable healthcare setting.
    Prerequisite: MAP 141 , HIT 233  and HIT 280  with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Apply coding guidelines of ICD
      1. Identify the characteristics and conventions of ICD CM/PCS
      2. Understand how to code to the highest level of specificity and why this is important
      3. Select the primary diagnosis, condition, problem or reason for the medical service or procedure
      4. Assign the highest code level of specificity to describe the diagnosis, symptom, complaint, condition, or other reason for the patient encounter
    2. Apply coding guidelines of CPT and HCPCS
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the proper use of the CPT manual
      2. Discuss the use of CPT guidelines format, symbols, index, and terminology
      3. Apply appropriate procedure code(s) to medical records
      4. Utilize modifiers appropriately
    3. Evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic and procedural coding
      1. Apply the principles of diagnostic grouping
      2. Apply the principles of procedural groupings
    4. Analyze current regulations and established guidelines in clinical classification systems
      1. Interpret severity of illness systems and present on admission codes
      2. Apply UHDDS guidelines
    5. Analyze the documentation in the health record to ensure it supports the diagnosis and reflects the patient’s progress, clinical findings, and discharge status
      1. Apply medical knowledge when reviewing patient medical records to validate medical necessity of services
      2. Identify discrepancies between supporting documentation and coded data
      3. Discuss clinical outcome measurement tools
      4. Develop appropriate physician queries to resolve data and coding discrepancies
      5. Review the AHIMA CDI toolbox
      6. Demonstrate professional communication skills
    6. Assess accuracy of computer assisted coding assignment and corrective action
      1. Demonstrate application of coding specialty systems
      2. Demonstrate use of automated encoder and grouper software
      3. Define common coding terminology
    7. Comply with ethical standards of practice
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of AHIMA’s Code of Ethics
      2. Explain professionalism as a medical coder
      3. Demonstrate integrity during the coding process
      4. Discuss compliance with state and federal regulations

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MAP 155 - Medical Coding Certification Preparation

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This advanced course is designed to prepare an experienced medical coder to sit for a national certification. Students will assign CPT, ICD, and Level II (HCPC codes to a wide range of original source medical documents.
    Prerequisite: MAP 150   with C or better or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Incorporate Fundamental Coding Guidelines
      1. Evaluate coding as a career and identify the value of becoming certified
      2. Review ICD-CM coding formats and guidelines
      3. Examine CPT coding formats and guidelines
      4. Identify the proper use of modifiers
      5. Recall and demonstrate knowledge of anatomy and medical terminology
    2. Demonstrate Correct Coding for Evaluation /Management (E/M), Anesthesia, and Surgery
      1. Assign correct codes to evaluation and management scenarios, anesthesia, and general surgery.
      2. Apply specific guidelines and understand the rationale of the various coding formats and guidelines
    3. Demonstrate Correct Coding for Surgical Procedures on Digestive, Urinary, Male and Female Reproductive Systems, Maternity Care, Nervous System, Eyes, Ears, Adnexa, and Endocrine Stystem
      1. Apply knowledge of anatomy and medical terminology throughout the overview of Urinary Male and Female Reproductive, Nervous, and Endocrine Systems
      2. Select the proper CPT and ICD-CM codes for medical cases from the Urinary, Male and Female Reproductive, Nervous, and Endocrine Systems
      3. Apply knowledge of anatomy and medical terminology throughout the overview of Digestive, Ear, Eyes, and Adnexa Systems
         

  
  • MAP 160 - HIPAA Exam Preparation

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to prepare the student for the Certified HIPAA Profession (CHP) certification exam. CHP is an international certification addressing HIPAA requirements in the area of transaction, privacy, and security for all covered entities - providers (hospitals, laboratories, and pharmacies), clearinghouses, and payers.
    Competencies
    1. Understand HIPAA requirements
      1. Identify changes to policies, procedures and processes within the organization in handling of patient records.
    2. Examine HIPAA Implementation
      1. Determine effect on how healthcare entities organize and staff to achieve and monitor compliance with patient privacy/confidentiality needs.
    3. Qualifications and Position Strategies
      1. Identify the role of the Chief Privacy Officer and Chief Security Offices.
    4. Step through how to plan and prepare for HIPAA compliance
      1. Recognize the pivotal areas of awareness, assessment, and action focused on gaps identified.

  
  • MAP 225 - Med Lab Procedures I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to the medical laboratory. Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains during practice of giving patient instructions, obtaining specimens, following ethical guidelines, performing routine urinalysis, immunology testing, microbiologic testing and quality control procedures. Adhering to standard precautions, disposing of biohazardous materials, performing routine maintenance of clinical equipment (microscope and centrifuge) and using methods of quality control are also covered. Includes study of OSHA, CLIA, MSDS sheets, warning labels, the metric system and laboratory personnel.
    Corequisite: MAP 347  
    Competencies
    1. State ethical and legal guidelines as they relate to patient care
      1. Demonstrate sensitivity to patient rights
      2. Protect the integrity of the medical record
    2. Describe criteria for releasing laboratory test results
    3. Adhere to the ethical guidelines of the medical laboratory
    4. Comply with OSHA regulations related to the medical laboratory
      1. Identify safety techniques that can be used in responding to accidental exposure to: blood, other body fluids, needle sticks, chemicals
      2. Comply with safety signs, symbols and labels
      3. Demonstrate proper use of sharps disposal containers
      4. Define the principles of standard precautions
      5. Define personal protective equipment (PPE) for: all body fluids, secretions and excretions; blood; non-intact skin; mucous membranes
      6. Participate in bloodborne pathogen training
      7. Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment (PPE)
      8. Perform handwashing
      9. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material: sharps; regulated wastes
    5. Comply with CLIA regulations
      1. Identify CLIA waived tests associated with common diseases
      2. List three levels of C:IA testing
      3. Define POL
    6. Quality Assurance Practices
      1. Describe 4 requirements for patient specimen testing
      2. Identify quality assurance practices in healthcare
      3. Perform quality control measures
      4. Perform quality control tests on chemical strips
      5. Complete quality control charts
      6. Label specimens properly
      7. Reassure a patient of the accuracy of the test results
      8. Report relevant information concisely and accurately
    7. Identify laboratory personnel by levels of responsibility
      1. Recognize the duties and responsibilities of the pathologist
      2. Describe the duties and responsibilities of the medical technologist/clinical laboratory scientist
      3. Recognize the duties and responsibilities of the Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT).
    8. Examine specimens using the binocular microscope
      1. Identify the components of a compound microscope
      2. Name the objective lenses
      3. Use the adjustment control knobs to focus specimen
      4. Demonstrate 3 ways to adjust the light intensity
      5. Calculate total magnification
      6. Adjust for optical distance and optical difference
    9. Clean the microscope and perform routine maintenance
    10. Define parfocal, optical distance, and optical difference
    11. Microbiology
      1. Obtain specimen and perform CLIA waived microbiology test
      2. Identify bacterial morphology of cocci, bacilli and spirilla
      3. Dispose of biohazardous waste in accordance with OSHA guidelines
      4. Identify between a simple stain and a differential stain
      5. Gram stain a bacterial slide
      6. Define aerobe, anaerobe, and facultative anaerobe
      7. List 5 factors that influence the growth of bacteria
      8. Define normal flora
      9. Identify beta hemolysis from alpha hemolysis on a blood agar plate
    12. Explain causative organisms of common infectious diseases
      1. State morphological characteristics of fungi, protozoa and viruses
      2. Identify two diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses
    13. Obtain a throat swab
      1. Procure material for obtaining specimen
      2. Identify appropriate area for specimen collection
      3. Obtain specimen without contaminating swab
    14. Obtain specimen and perform CLIA waived immunology test
      1. Perform rapid Strep A test
      2. Execute test according to test kit instructions
      3. Record results on patient chart
      4. Document in CLIA log
    15. Obtain specimen and perform CLIA waived urinalysis
      1. State normal colors of urine
      2. Identify possible causes of abnormal colors
      3. Perform chemical analysis of urine by reagent strip and reagent tablet methods
      4. Define components tested
      5. State expected normal findings for blood, glucose,protein, bilirubin,urobilinogen, nitrites, leukocytes, ketones, pH and specific gravity
      6. Describe changes that occur in chemical constituents if specimen is left at room temperature
      7. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results
    16. Perform urine pregnancy test
      1. Define human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)
      2. List three conditions other than pregnancy that will cause an elevated HCG level
      3. Obtain the type of urine specimen that is best for testing for HCG concentration
      4. Identify 3 technical errors that could affect test results
      5. Interpret test results accurately
      6. Record test results properly
    17. Correlate chemical findings with microscopic findings
    18. Relate abnormal chemical urinalysis results to renal physiology, extrarenal disorders, and urinary tract infections
    19. Explain the difference between specific and nonspecific tests for urine sugar
      1. State morphological characteristics of fungi, protozoa, viruses and rickettsia
      2. List 2 diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and rickettsia
    20. Perform microscopic analysis of normal and pathological urine
      1. Prepare specimen for microscopic analysis
      2. Identify red blood cells, white blood cells, bacteria,casts, crystals and parasites by microscopic analysis
    21. List 6 (six) changes that take place in microscopic elements if urine specimen is not preserved
      1. Perform rapid Strep A test
      2. Execute test according to test kit instructions
      3. Record results on patient chart
    22. Relate abnormal microscopic findings to renal physiology, extrarenal disorders and urinary tract infections.
    23. Use laboratory equipment
      1. Balance centrifuge
      2. Monitor incubator temperature
      3. Choose appropriate equipment for procedures being performed
    24. Applied mathematics
      1. Use appropriate metric units for weight, volume and distance measurements
      2. State the value of metric prefixes: milli, centi, deci, kilo, nano and micro
    25. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Examine the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgement
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 228 - Med Lab Procedures II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains during skill development in venipuncture, capillary puncture, hematology testing, blood chemistry analysis, EKG acquisition, patient education activities, compliance with OSHA, CLIA and quality control requirements including use and routine maintenance of standard laboratory equipment.
    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in MAP 225 .
    Corequisite: MAP 348  
    Competencies
    1. Comply with OSHA regulations and protective practices
      1. List safety items that should be available in the medical laboratory
      2. Follow Standard Precaution guidelines when handling laboratory specimens
      3. Explain terms relating to OSHA guidelines
      4. Select appropriate barrier/personal protective equipment
      5. Perform handwashing
      6. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazardous material: sharps and regulated wastes
      7. Recognize the implications for failure to comply with CDC regulations in healthcare settings
      8. Comply with: safety signs, symbols and labels
    2. CLIA and Quality Assurance
      1. Identify CLIA waived tests
      2. Obtain specimens and perform: CLIA waived hematology test; CLIA waived chemistry test; CLIA waived immunology test
      3. Identify quality assurance practices in healthcare
      4. Perform a quality control measure
      5. Follow CLIA regulations for performing controls run on automated laboratory equipment
      6. Determine acceptable ranges for control specimens
      7. Analyze control specimens
      8. Record control results on quality control logs
      9. Graph control results on quality control graphs
      10. Interpret results for accuracy, precision, and reliability
    3. Blood collection: perform venipuncture
      1. Follow identified safety precautions when drawing blood
      2. Select appropriate needle gauge for venipuncture
      3. Select appropriate vacutainer tube for tests ordered
      4. Select appropriate site for venipuncture
      5. Obtain blood using proper technique
      6. Label specimen properly
      7. Dispose of used equipment according to OSHA regulations
      8. Document procedure
      9. Take appropriate measures if patient becomes faint during procedure
      10. Obtain specimen using a butterfly needle
      11. Obtain specimens for testing on whole blood, serum and plasma
    4. Blood collection: perform capillary puncture
      1. Follow safety precautions when performing a capillary puncture
      2. Select appropriate site for capillary puncture on an adult
      3. Obtain specimen using a lancet
      4. Properly fill required collection device for test ordered
    5. Perform microhematocrit testing
      1. Use appropriate terminology related to hematocrit testing
      2. State pathological conditions that will increase the hematocrit
      3. State pathological conditions that will decrease the hematocrit
      4. Follow guidelines to prevent technical errors that could affect hematocrit
      5. Fill microhematocrit properly
      6. Read hematocrit using the readocrit scale
      7. Chart hematocrit results
      8. State normal range for hematocrit values
    6. Perform automated white blood cell (WBC)counts
      1. Record the WBC count properly
      2. State normal range for WBC counts in adults
      3. Use appropriate terms related to WBC testing
      4. State 3 conditions that could cause an increase in the total WBC count
      5. State 3 conditions that could cause a decrease in the total WBC count
    7. Perform a white blood cell differential count on a normal blood smear
      1. Identify the five types of white blood cells
      2. Recognize the morphological characteristics of neutrophils (segmented and bands), basophils, eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes
      3. State the normal percentages for each of the 5 types of white blood cells
      4. Count 100 normal white blood cells on a blood cell differential slide
      5. Apply terms related to red blood cell morphology
      6. Identify normal red blood cell morphology
      7. Apply terms that relate to differential blood smears
      8. State pathological conditions that could affect the differential count
    8. Perform an automated hemoglobin test
      1. Perform daily start-up procedures for analyzer
      2. Run controls
      3. Apply terms related to hemoglobin determinations
      4. Perform tests following manufacturer’s instructions
      5. Explain three basic causes of anemia
      6. State two primary functions of hemoglobin
      7. Identify normal hemoglobin values for adult male and female
      8. Calibrate hemopoint hemoglobinometer
    9. Perform Blood Chemistry Analyses
      1. Determine if specimen is acceptable for blood chemistry testing
      2. Apply terms related to blood chemistry testing
      3. Recognize normal values for fasting blood sugars, cholesterol and triglycerides
      4. Explain significance of testing for glycosolated hemoglobin (Hb AIC).
      5. List the 4 primary electrolytes
      6. Explain the difference between direct and indirect bilirubin
      7. Explain the significance of testing for low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL)
      8. Explain the purpose of tests for blood urea nitrogen and creatinine
      9. Explain the significance of elevated results in blood chemistries for Aspartate Transaminase (AST), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) and Troponin levels
      10. Perform blood chemistry tests
      11. Chart results of blood chemistry tests in proper format
    10. Perform immunology tests for infectious mononucleosis
      1. Obtain appropriate specimen for testing
      2. Perform tests according to manufacturer’s instructions
      3. Identify sources of technical errors when performing tests for infectious mononucleosis
      4. Define heterophile antibody
      5. Recognize symptoms of infectious mononucleosis
      6. Run positive and negative controls
      7. State changes that would be seen on a differential count on a patient with infectious mononucleosis
      8. Interpret and record results properly
      9. State the causative organism of infectious mononucleosis
    11. Perform electrocardiography
      1. Apply terms associated with electrocardiography
      2. Recognize the P,Q,R,S and T waves on the ECG
      3. Standardize the electrocardiograph
      4. Identify the standard rate that the ECG paper moves through the machine
      5. Place sensors on limbs and chest in proper positions
      6. Differentiate somatic interference from AC interference
      7. Correct problems caused by AC interference and somatic tremor
      8. Instruct the patient on steps involved in preparation for taking the ECG
      9. Record appropriate patient information on the ECG
    12. Perform Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR).
      1. Apply terminology associated with ESR testing
      2. Recognize normal values for ESR for males and females
      3. Explain the significance of the finding of an increased level of ESR
      4. Take precautions to ensure the ESR results are accurate
      5. Set up an ESR tube accurately
      6. Obtain reading from ESR tube
      7. Record the ESR results
    13. Perform coagulation tests
      1. Define Prothrombin
      2. State the purpose of Prothrombin
      3. Define warfarin
      4. State 2 conditions that require coumadin therapy
      5. Define INR
      6. State the therapeutic range for INR
      7. State the procedure for using capillary puncture specimens in INR testing
    14. Perform Hemoccult testing
      1. Define Hemoccult blood
      2. Define guaiac test
      3. State causes for blood in a stool specimen
      4. Describe the appearance of stool specimens that contain blood from the upper GI vs. lower GI system
      5. Instruct patient on dietary restrictions to be followed prior to collecting specimen for Hemoccult blood testing
      6. Instruct patient on proper collection of stool sample for Hemoccult testing
      7. Accurately develop and read the Hemoccult test
      8. Document results in patient chart and CLIA log
    15. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Examine the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgement
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes
      9. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
      10. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care
      11. Demonstrate knowledge of basic math computations
      12. Perform patient screening using established protocols
      13. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results
      14. Document patient care accurately in the medical record
    16. Communication and Diversity
      1. Report relevant information concisely and accurately
      2. Show awareness of a patient’s concerns related to the procedure being performed
      3. Reassure a patient of the accuracy of the test results
      4. Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or a treatment
      5. Demonstrate: empathy; active listening and nonverbal communication
      6. Demonstrate the principles of self-boundaries
      7. Demonstrate respect for individual diversity, including: gender, race, religion, age, economic status and appearance
      8. Explain to a patient the rationale for performance of a procedure
      9. Demonstrate sensitivity to patient rights
      10. Protect the integrity of the medical record
      11. Apply HIPAA rules in regard to: privacy and release of information

  
  • MAP 255 - Diagnostic Radiography I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course builds the foundation of knowledge and skills necessary to qualify as a candidate for the Iowa state permit examination in Limited Radiography. Students will be introduced to and form a reasonable understanding of the scientific basis of radiography. Students will journey to a full understanding of x-ray production, exposure factors, photographic and geometric factors of image formation, digital radiography as well as radiation biology and safety. As students work through principles of radiography they will be encouraged to build critical thinking skills that will require psychomotor as well as affective domains to assess patients, evaluate images, resolve processing issues and utilize concepts of radiation safety in the areas of occupational practice as well as patient care.
    Prerequisite: MAP 544   with a C or better
    Competencies
    1. Define the role and scope of the Limited Radiographer as defined in the State of Iowa Administrative Code
      1. Identify the Scope of Practice for Limited Radiography as defined by the State of Iowa.
      2. Cite the legal requirements for obtaining a Permit to Practice Limited Radiography in the State of Iowa.
      3. Identify providers/practitioners who are licensed to order radiographic examinations.
      4. Identify who is responsible for image interpretation.
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of rules of confidentiality as well as the role that HIPAA plays in custody of images.
    2. Examine basic principles of electricity and electromagnetic energy, students will develop knowledge and understanding of x-ray production
      1. Identify components of x-ray production; source of electrons; acceleration of electrons; focusing of electrons; deceleration of electrons.
      2. Identify interactions that produce x-rays: bremsstrahlung, characteristic.
      3. Identify properties of the x-ray beam: frequency and wavelength; beam characteristics; inverse square law; fundamental properties.
      4. Describe photon interactions with matter: Compton effect; photoelectric absorption, coherent scatter; attenuation by various tissues.
      5. Describe the relationships of wavelength and frequency, including the relationship to beam characteristics.
    3. Devlop skills that pertain to the performance of radiographic examinations included in the Scope of Practice
      1. Identify the location of anatomical structures using direction and orientation terms.
      2. Indicate where various planes lie in relation to the body.
      3. Demonstrate the use of topographical landmarks to locate internal structures.
      4. Identify and locate the bones of the upper extremity (head of the humerus to the distal tip of the digits)
      5. Identify and locate the bones of the lower extremity (head of the femur to the dital tip of the pedal digits)
      6. Identify and locate the bones, organs and structures found in the chest cavity.
      7. Identify and compare classifications of body habitus.
      8. Demonstrate standard positioning and procedure terminology.
      9. Demonstrate body and radiographic positions.
      10. Demonstrate proper use of anatomic relationships and locations.
      11. Apply the proper use of body planes when positioning patients for radiographic examinations.
      12. Demonstrate proper use of positioning aids.
    4. Assess skills that pertain to the performance of radiographic examinations included in the Scope of Practice 
      1. Identify the structures demonstrated on routine radiographic images.
      2. Simulate radiographic procedures on a person, phantom, or simulator application.
      3. List and explain the routine and special projections for radiographic examinations included in the Scope of Practice.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to fully explain radiographic procedures to patients and family.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to modify directions when patients present with communication challenges.
      6. Apply general radiation safety and protection practices associated with radiographic examinations.
      7. Define basic terms related to pathology that are used to classify and identify diseases.
      8. Discuss general procedural considerations for radiographic examinations and demonstrate the ability to adapt these considerations to specific clinical settings

  
  • MAP 256 - Diagnostic Radiography II

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Continuation of Diagnostic Radiography I.  Course emphasizes the use of critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of radiographic studies. These studies are conducted under the direct supervision of a prescriber, as defined by the State of Iowa. Diagnostic Radiography II will familiarize the student with the principles of pediatric and geriatric radiography. Diagnostic Radiography II will discuss common workplace issues including, but not confined to ethics, social media, cultural challenges and critical thinking skills. This course does NOT contain the content or hours necessary for a student to apply for the additional permit categories of shoulder and/or pediatrics (younger than 36 months). Each of these special categories has specific didactic and practical requirements. During the practicum segment of this course, students will have an opportunity to perform actual patient imaging studies. These studies will be reviewed and evaluated by a designated onsite clinical instructor. Upon successful completion of Diagnostic Radiography I and II, with a minimum grade of 80%, student will be eligible to submit application to the State of Iowa to sit for the Limited Scope Permit Test. A passing grade on this multiple module test clears the way for student to apply for a Limited Scope Permit to Practice through the Iowa Department of Public Health.
    Prerequisite: MAP 255  
    Competencies
    1. Utilizing various methods (role-playing, simulation) demonstrate proficiency in pediatric imaging as defined by the Iowa Scope of Practice.
      1. Explain the special considerations necessary when performing radiographic procedures on an infant or child.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate with children of any age within the defined scope of practice (36 months and older).
      3. Exhibit proper immobilization methods for children within the age defined by scope of practice.
      4. Compare the characteristics of the developing skeletal system with that of the mature skeleton.
      5. Ability to adapt radiographic exposure factors to a pediatric patient and identify radiographic examinations that may vary from standard methods used for adult patients.
      6. Have knowledge of and be alert to signs that may suggest pediatric injuries are of a non-accidental nature.
      7. Be aware of certain pathological conditions that may impact formulation of pediatric radiographic exposure factors.
    2. Utilizing various methods (role-playing, simulation) demonstrate skills necessary to adapt standard imaging studies to the geriatric patient.
      1. List considerations that improve communication and compliance when dealing with elderly patients
      2. Adapt standard instructions to the particular needs of the geriatric patient.
      3. Demonstrate concern for the comfort of the geriatric patient.
      4. Describe changes to the skeleton and soft tissue as a result of the aging process.
      5. Adjust radiographic exposures appropriately in the case of age related pathology in the geriatric patient.
    3. Demonstrate understanding and proficiency in formulating X-ray techniques, interpreting technique charts as well as manipulating exposure factors as necessary in special circumstances.
      1. Demonstrate appropriate steps to correct failure of technique chart to provide an appropriate exposure.
      2. Calculate changes to exposure factors as they relate to patient part size.
      3. Calculate the technique change necessary when an image is either too dark or too light.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of technique changes necessary to adjust scale of contrast.
      5. Ability to compute change in exposure factors relating to variation in source image distance.
    4. Using principles learned to date, student will demonstrate the ability to apply said principles to image evaluation.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to systematically review an image for diagnostic, technical and esthetic quality.
      2. Recognize artifacts and technical errors, state the cause as well as the correction.
      3. Knowledge of criteria used to determine the necessity of a repeat exposure.
      4. Describe the processing and post processing of a digital image.
    5. Students will demonstrate understanding of ethics, legal considerations and professionalism as they relate to healthcare and specifically to their role as a Limited Radiologic Technologist.
      1. Apply ethical concepts to situations that arise in health care.
      2. Explain the importance of patient confidentiality and the methods used to maintain confidentiality.
      3. Demonstrate communication strategies that promote teamwork.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of patients’ rights.
      5. Knowledge of specific acts of misconduct and malpractice that can typically occur within the scope of practice of the Limited Radiologic Technologist.
      6. Awareness of the impact of social media on professional conduct.

  
  • MAP 347 - Medical Office Procedures I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an introduction to medical office clinical skills. Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains during practice of: patient communication, obtaining vitals, measurements, vision and hearing screening exams, pulmonary function testing, patient preparation, assisting physician, patient histories, medical record documentation, medical and surgical asepsis, sterilization techniques and minor surgical procedures. Patient education will include wellness, stress reduction, preventative medicine and treatment compliance with adaptations according to patient needs. Students will define and incorporate role as patient coach, navigator and application of meaningful use. Critical thinking skills incorporated with patient assessment and patient care. This course includes medical terminology and abbreviations, compliance: OSHA, HIPAA, CDC, ADA.
    Corequisite: MAP 225  
    Competencies
    1. Assess a patient’s vital signs
      1. Explain the physiology pertaining to temperature, pulse, respiration, blood pressure and pulse oximetry
      2. State adult and pediatric normal ranges for each vital sign
      3. List variables affecting each of the vital signs
      4. Describe characteristics for each vital sign
      5. Locate arteries on the body where pulse rate can be obtained
      6. Explain factors that determine arterial blood pressure
      7. Identify organs affected by hypertension
      8. Perform proper technique for measurement of each vital sign
      9. Describe methods for care of equipment used in measuring vital signs
      10. Obtain and record temperature, pulse, respiration, blood pressure and pulse oximetry
      11. Recognize and report age specific normal and abnormal vital signs
    2. Use appropriate mensuration techniques
      1. Weigh a patient on a balance scale and a digital scale, adult and pediatric
      2. Measure circumference of the chest on inspiration and exhalation
      3. Measure the circumference of the head and chest of an infant
      4. Measure patient height and infant length
      5. Correctly document measurements on patient chart and growth chart
      6. Define and perform BMI
      7. Compute and analyze BMI from patient measurements
      8. Prepare and analyze growth charts
    3. Complete a patient history for patient intake
      1. Differentiate between subjective and objective information
      2. State three reasons for obtaining a medical history
      3. Define the six components of a patient history
      4. Relate the importance of maintaining an ongoing record of physical problems for each patient
      5. Correlate the importance of correct documentation and confidentiality of the patient medical record
      6. Prepare patient chief complaint, history of present illness, past history, family history, and social and occupational history
      7. Perform a review of the body systems
      8. Adapt communications to patient ability to understand
      9. Use effective and correct verbal and written communications
      10. Recognize and respond to verbal and non-verbal communications
      11. Use medical terminology correctly and pronounced accurately to communicate information to providers and patients
      12. Coach patients appropriately considering: cultural diversity,developmental life stage and communication barriers
      13. Report relevant information to others concisely and accurately
      14. Use feedback techniques to obtain patient information including: reflection; restatement and clarification
      15. Demonstrate use of components of documentation: factual, timely, legible, dated, signed
    4. Prepare a medical record
      1. List components included in the source oriented medical record (SOMR)
      2. Identify the components of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR).
      3. State three advantages of the Problem Oriented Medical Record
      4. Compare and contrast the differences between the Problem Oriented Medical Record and the traditional medical record
      5. Demonstrate how to change an entry in the medical record
      6. Differentiate purpose and advantages of advanced directives; living will, power of attorney and treatment preferences
      7. Describe where patients obtain necessary forms for advance directives. State who needs to witness these forms, and where should they be stored
      8. Discuss the stages of grief, death and dying
      9. Document accurately in patient record
      10. Document patient care, patient response and patient education
      11. Incorporate HIPAA, NPP, meaningful use, consent and Patient Self Determination Act in patient record.
    5. Prepare a patient for a physical examination
      1. List the purposes for the general physical examination
      2. Classify six categories of diagnoses used by the physician
      3. Describe six major methods of examination used by the physician
      4. Describe the role of diagnostic testing as a component of the physical examination process
      5. Summarize the purposes for positioning, gowning, and draping a patient for a physical exam
      6. Identify procedures associated with specialty exams
    6. Assist with a physical examination
      1. Determine the equipment used in the physical examination
      2. Demonstrate positions used during a physical examination
      3. Describe the sequence of a comprehensive physical examination
      4. Discuss the role of the Medical Assistant when assisting with the physical examination
      5. Demonstrate care of equipment used during the physical examination
      6. Discuss and give examples of guidelines to use in preparing and providing patient education in areas of treatment, preventative care, health and wellness
      7. Demonstrate effective patient teaching skills
      8. Identify community resources for health care information and patient referrals
      9. Explain the rationale for performance of a procedure to the patient
      10. Show awareness of patient concerns regarding their perceptions related to the clinical procedure being performed
      11. Analyze healthcare results reported in  a.) graphs and b.) tables
      12. Instruct and prepare a patient for a procedure or treatment
    7. Explain methods of infection control
      1. Identify five classifications of microorganisms capable of causing disease
      2. List six factors essential for the development of an infectious process
      3. Compare direct/indirect modes of transmission of an infectious disease
      4. Describe the body’s natural defense mechanisms to control or prevent infection
      5. Define the following as practiced within an ambulatory care setting: medical asepsis; surgical asepsis
      6. Describe procedures used to accomplish medical/surgical asepsis
      7. Differentiate between sanitization, disinfection, and sterilization
      8. Discuss the procedures employed when working with contaminated equipment and supplies
      9. Explain the role of hand washing in the prevention of the spread of infectious disease. Distinguish hand hygiene with handwashing and alcohol based hand rub
      10. Identify methods of controlling the growth of micro organisms
      11. Demonstrate the proper procedures for hand washing using soap and water and alcohol based hand rub
    8. Prepare items for sterilization
      1. Describe five methods of sterilization
      2. Explain the importance of sanitization prior to sterilization
      3. Explain why instruments and supplies are sterilized before use in a specific procedure
      4. Describe materials appropriate for wrapping materials for sterilization in the autoclave
      5. Demonstrate packaging procedures for instruments and supplies prior to sterilization
    9. Perform sterilization procedures
      1. Describe the process of sterilization using the autoclave
      2. Describe the structure of the autoclave
      3. List the components of the sterilization cycle to assure items are sterile
      4. Demonstrate proper use of sterilization indicators
      5. Demonstrate proper technique for loading the autoclave, completing a cycle, unloading/storing sterile materials
      6. Describe process of using chemical sterilant
      7. Transfer sterile items from chemical sterilant to sterile field
      8. Explain the importance of quality control measures to be used with sterilization of instruments and supplies
      9. Perform autoclave QC testing with biological indicators and proper documentation of results
    10. Assist with surgical procedures
      1. Identify and state purpose of the following instruments and equipment used in a surgical procedure: forceps; hemostats; needle holder; suture scissors; tissue scissors; probe; retractor; towel clamp; scalpel and suture
      2. Describe the use of cryotherapy, electrosurgery, laser surgery and cautery in the clinical office
      3. List pre-operative and post-operative issues to be addressed with the patient and care giver to include the use of consent forms and patient education procedures
      4. Obtain informed consent forms
    11. Set up a surgical tray using correct aseptic techniques for various sterile procedures preformed in an office
      1. Differentiate between medical and surgical asepsis used in ambulatory care settings, identifying when each is appropriate
      2. Demonstrate a medical aseptic hand washing and the surgical scrub
      3. Demonstrate the use of sterile transfer forceps to maintain a sterile field
      4. Demonstrate the process for setting up a tray using a pre-packaged set of surgical instruments, and by using the transfer forceps and multiple use containers
      5. Demonstrate the technique for opening sterile packages
      6. Demonstrate the technique for pouring sterile solutions
      7. List the instruments and supplies needed for various surgical procedures performed in the office
      8. Explain the purpose of correct placement of instruments on the surgical tray
    12. Assist the physician with surgical or other sterile procedures
      1. Demonstrate the techniques and principles of hand washing, sterile gloving, and handling sterile supplies
      2. Describe the Medical Assistant role in assisting with a surgical procedure
      3. Demonstrate donning and removing sterile gloves
      4. Demonstrate the position of instruments in handing to the physician
      5. Demonstrate the ability to use proper techniques in a simulated surgical procedure
      6. Describe various types of anesthesia used in the medical office
    13. Instruct patients on physical therapy
      1. Describe the use of moist and dry applications of heat and cold
      2. List the effects that occur from local application of heat and cold
      3. List contraindications for application of heat or cold
      4. Describe the general use of ultrasound
      5. Describe the general use of diathermy
      6. List the guidelines for safe crutch use
      7. Identify conditions that would warrant use of a cane and/or walker
      8. Explain to patients how to care for and use special equipment
      9. Provide written and verbal instructions for patient education
      10. Demonstrate proper use of assisting patient with wheel chair, walker, single cane,quad cane, crutches and gait belt
    14. Assist with specialty exams and procedures
      1. Identify materials and equipment needed for female pelvic exam and Pap smear,both traditional and liquid pap, and wet mount
      2. Explain purpose and procedure to assist with a sigmoidoscopy
      3. Demonstrate how to instill ear and eye drops
      4. Demonstrate how to irrigate the eye and ear
      5. Set up and perform pulmonary function testing,spirometry and peak flow rate
      6. Explain purpose and procedure for urinary catheterization in male,female and pediatric patients for urine collection
      7. Demonstrate proper use of emergency oxygen equipment
      8. State the purpose and procedure for special testing and screening as in PKU, lead poisoning,occult blood, PSA and FAS
      9. Perform and document calibration of PFT
    15. Assist patients with special needs
      1. Describe ways to help children cope with the fear of medical procedures
      2. Discuss appropriate ways of interaction and dealing with patients with special needs
      3. Discuss appropriate ways of interaction and dealing with elderly patients, patients with physical, mental and emotional disabilities
      4. Instruct patient according to their needs to promote health maintenance and disease prevention
      5. Describe methods of coordinating care and optimizing rehabilitation for patient with chronic disease or condition
      6. Discuss how the medical assistant can serve as a patient advocate for the patient with chronic pain, chronic and terminal illness
      7. Identify tools to enhance patient education
      8. Discuss techniques in patient education that will encourage patient compliance
      9. Name symptoms and conditions associated with alcohol and drug abuse
      10. Identify alcohol and drug abuse treatment and prevention methods
      11. Discuss the impact of stress on health and wellness
      12. Identify mechanisms for coping with stress and stress reduction
    16. Develop patient education material
      1. Discuss techniques in patient education that will encourage patient compliance
      2. Identify examples of patient education to include treatment, prevention,compliance and health and wellness
      3. Instruct patients according to their needs and abilities
      4. Identify techniques for overcoming communication barriers
      5. Define coaching a patient as it relates to health maintenance; disease prevention, compliance with treatment plan, community resources and adaptations relevant to individual patient needs
    17. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Examine the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes
      9. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
      10. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care

  
  • MAP 348 - Medical Office Procedures II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will use critical thinking skills to incorporate cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domains during practice of giving patient education with adaptations according to patient needs. Students will define and incorporate role as patient coach, navigator, scribe, and application of meaningful use. Critical thinking skills incorporated with patient assessment and patient care including wellness, disease prevention, preparing and maintaining treatment areas, assisting with minor surgical procedures, wound care,scheduling procedures using insurance referral information,administering oral and parenteral (excluding IV) medications and vaccines, vaccine storage and handling, immunization schedules and TB skin testing. Course includes medical terminology and abbreviations. Procedures for emergency preparedness xx applied to clinical setting. Compliance: OSHA, HIPAA, CDC.
    Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in MAP 347  
    Corequisite: MAP 228  
    Competencies
    1. Prepare the patient physically and psychologically for a minor surgery procedure
      1. Explain the purpose of surgical procedures performed in the office
      2. Describe surgical procedures in terms the patient can understand
      3. Describe informed consent and the Medical Assistant’s role in obtaining this consent
      4. Prepare sterile field
      5. Demonstrate the process for a surgical skin prep and draping
      6. Perform a simulated surgical prep and draping
      7. Instruct patient regarding post-operative care
    2. Explain the uses of various bandages and dressings used in an office
      1. Differentiate between bandages and dressings
      2. List the purposes for using dressings
      3. List the purposes for using bandages
      4. Describe roller bandages, elastic bandages, triangular bandages, tube gauze, and various types of adhesive tape
    3. Demonstrate proper application techniques of bandages and dressings
      1. Describe the use of medical or surgical asepsis in application of bandages and dressings
      2. Select the type of bandages and dressings appropriate for use in various types of wounds or injuries
      3. Demonstrate the following bandaging techniques: circular turn, spiral turn, spiral reverse, figure eight, and recurrent turn
      4. Demonstrate the application of tube gauze
      5. Distinguish between a sterile and clean dressing change
      6. Describe proper technique for disposing of contaminated dressings and bandages
      7. Prepare the instructions to the patient for home care following application of bandages
    4. Describe types of wounds and the healing process
      1. Explain the difference between an open and a closed wound
      2. List and describe four types of open wounds
      3. Describe a type of closed wound and give example
      4. Describe three classifications of healing
      5. List factors that affect the healing process
      6. Differentiate the three stages of healing
      7. Characterize factors that affect the type and rate of healing
      8. Perform wound care
      9. Obtain wound culture, complete lab request form, lab log, and chart follow-up of lab results
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of principles of pharmacology and drug therapy appropriate for a Medical Assistant
      1. Explain the difference between administering, prescribing, and dispensing drugs
      2. Describe the legal standards for drug administration
      3. Describe the classification of controlled substances according to schedules 1-5
      4. List eight routes for administration of medication
      5. Identify classifications of medications including desired effects, side effects and adverse reactions
      6. Identify factors that affect the action of drugs in the body
      7. Define terms related to drug side effects
      8. Define and give examples of nonprescription, prescription, and controlled drugs
      9. Utilize the major pharmacological reference books for drug information
      10. Identify generic and trade names of drugs in specified classifications
      11. Explain the procedures for proper storage, dispensing, and disposal of drugs
    6. Prepare prescriptions as directed by the physician
      1. List the seven parts of a completed prescription
      2. Use appropriate abbreviations and symbols in preparing a prescription
      3. Translate drug orders to be able to clarify the order to patients
      4. Record all new and renewed prescriptions on the patient’s chart
      5. Identify basic units of measurement in metric, apothecary and household systems
      6. Perform metric conversion
    7. Prepare and administer drugs via various routes of administration
      1. List the routes by which medications may be administered
      2. Name the “six rights” for preparing and administering medication
      3. State the advantages and disadvantages of using the parenteral route of administration
      4. Demonstrate the procedure for administration of an oral medication
      5. Reconstitute a powdered drug for parenteral administration
      6. Describe the various types of needles and syringes used in administering parenteral medication
      7. Demonstrate withdrawing medication from a vial and an ampule using aseptic technique
      8. Explain which tissue layers are used for an intradermal, a subcutaneous, and an intramuscular injection, correct documentation
      9. Identify appropriate sites for subcutaneous injection
      10. Administer a subcutaneous injection and record the procedure
      11. Identify appropriate sites for an intramuscular injection
      12. Administration of an intramuscular injection, documentation of procedure
      13. Demonstrate the Z-track technique to administer medication
      14. Administer an intradermal injection
      15. Complete immunization records to include patient chart, injection log and patient record, and IDPH Immunization Record
      16. Obtain patient consent forms.
      17. Give patient appropriate vaccine information sheet
      18. Perform dosage calculations and convert among measurement systems
      19. Identify both abbreviations and symbols used in calculating medication dosages
      20. Verify ordered dosage, strength, and route prior to administration of medication
      21. Administer intra-dermal injection
      22. Demonstrate how to interpret PPD results and document accurately
    8. Develop patient education material
      1. Coach patients regarding; office policies,health maintenance, disease prevention and treatment plan.
      2. Coach patients appropriately considering; cultural diversity, developmental life stage and communication barriers
      3. Show awareness of patient’s concerns regarding dietary change
    9. Management Clinical Office
      1. State goals of office policy manual
      2. State goals of procedure manual
      3. Prepare a patient chart for audit
      4. Complete forms for managed care and prior certification
      5. Schedule inpatient and out patient testing using reference material in classroom/lab
      6. Document follow-up patient test results
      7. Use computerized charting to prepare a chart note, referral, letter, prescriptions, and patient instruction sheet
      8. Identify the role of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and JCAHCO regulations in healthcare settings
      9. Describe the importance of coordination through cooperation of health care professionals and proper documentation for patient care, referrals, outpatient and inpatient care
    10. Maintain safety in the medical office
      1. List precaution to be observed in storing supplies, equipment, and meds for a medical office
      2. Evaluate the work environment identify safe vs. unsafe working conditions
      3. List items on a crash cart, state where crash cart is stored, and when to inventory crash cart
      4. Maintain a current list of community resources for emergency preparedness
      5. Discuss critical elements of an emergency plan for response to a natural disaster or other emergency
    11. Vaccine Administration
      1. Describe proper procedure for the storage and handling of vaccines
      2. State recommended temperature for storage of vaccines for freezer and or refrigerator storage and type of thermometers to use in monitoring
      3. List effects of temperature range on stored vaccinations
      4. Demonstrate recording/monitoring of refrigerator/freezer temperature log
      5. State the effects of light on stored vaccines and how damage from a light source can be prevented
      6. List preventative measures to be taken to insure vaccine efficacy
      7. Identify qualifications of a valid certificate for recording immunizations
      8. Identify Certificate of Immunization provisional enrollments
      9. Identify Certificate of Immunization Exemption for medical and religious exemptions
      10. Define IDPH, IRIS system for the immunization registry in Iowa
      11. Define the federally mandated entitlement program VFC and the requirements for health care providers? vaccine accountability with this program
      12. List four different resources available to health care personnel for vaccine administration and the current recommendations and guidelines
      13. For each recommended vaccination, identify the disease immunity given by the vaccine
      14. List vaccination requirements for infants, pediatric 12 months thru 18 years and adult
      15. Identify proper route and site for all vaccinations including needle length for infant, pediatric and adult patients receiving vaccination injections
      16. State procedure to follow in an administration error
      17. Identify those vaccinations requiring revaccination schedules
      18. Identify VIS for vaccinations and state where current forms may be obtained
      19. List information to be recorded in a vaccination log record and state how long the records are to be kept including temperature logs of vaccinations
      20. Define cold chain for receiving and storing vaccinations and list procedures to accomplish the cold chain
      21. Describe an emergency storage plan for vaccines and list procedures for this safeguard plan for implementation in a medical office
      22. State procedure to follow for out-of-range log reading for refrigerator and freezer

  
  • MAP 423 - Professional Development

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    General competencies including professional behavior, responsibilities of the certified medical assistant in identifying and responding to issues of confidentiality as governed by HIPAA, serving as a patient advocate, performing within legal and ethical boundaries, and demonstrating knowledge of federal and state healthcare regulations. Students will incorporate critical thinking skills based on knowledge of medical specialties, basic first-aid principles, medical law and ethics. Competencies include the ability to recognize and respond to verbal and nonverbal communication and to respect individual diversity.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the scope of practice of a certified medical assistant
      1. State requirements for certification/recertification
      2. List the responsibilities of a certified medical assistant
      3. Explain requirements for limited radiography license
      4. State recertification requirements for AAMA credentials and radiography license
      5. Identify the three levels of the American Association of Medical Assistants
      6. Differentiate between scope of practice and standards of care for medical assistants
      7. Compare and contrast provider and medical assistant roles in terms of standard of care
      8. Discuss licensure and certifications as they apply to healthcare providers
      9. Locate a state’s legal scope of practice for medical assistants
    2. Correlate medical specialty areas with diseases/conditions most frequently treated
      1. Summarize educational requirements of physicians and selected health care paraprofessionals
      2. State licensure or certification requirements of physicians and paraprofessionals
      3. Summarize educational requirements for physicians and selected health care paraprofessionals
      4. State licensure or certification requirements for physicians and selected health care paraprofessionals
    3. Administer First Aid.
      1. Describe basic principles of first aid as they pertain to the ambulatory healthcare setting
      2. Describe procedures for controlling bleeding
      3. List signs and symptoms of shock
      4. Demonstrate appropriate steps for treatment of shock
      5. State location and phone number of poison control center
      6. State accepted first aid procedures to follow when a person has ingested, inhaled, injected, or absorbed a poison
      7. Explain first aid procedures for dealing with the three classifications of thermal burns
      8. Describe first aid treatment for individuals suffering from heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke
      9. Describe first aid treatment for individuals suffering from frostbite, general body cooling (hypothermia)
      10. Identify open wounds including laceration, avulsion, amputation and incision
      11. Explain first aid procedures for individuals who are experiencing seizures, diabetic coma/shock, cerebrovascular accident, and head injuries
      12. Perform first aid procedures for bleeding, diabetic coma or insulin shock, fractures, seizures, shock and syncope
      13. Demonstrate self awareness in responding to an emergency situation
      14. Define Good Samaritan laws
    4. Adhere to legal requirements and ethical requirements
      1. State the origin of medical ethics
      2. Explain ethical guidelines relating to confidentiality in the medical office
      3. Define medical practice acts.
      4. List 4 requirements of a valid contract
      5. Explain why the physician - patient relationship is a contractual relationship
      6. Compare criminal and civil law as they apply to the practicing medical assistant
      7. Define: negligence, malpractice, statute of limitation, Good Samaritan Act, Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, living will/advanced directives, medical durable power of attorney, Patient Self Determination Act (PSDA) and risk management
      8. Define the following medical legal terms: informed consent; implied consent; expressed consent; patient incompetence; emancipated minor; mature minor; subpoena duces tecum; respondent superior, res ipsa loquitor; locum tenens, defendant-plaintiff; deposition and arbitration-mediation
      9. Define ethics and morals
      10. Differentiate between personal and professional ethics
      11. Identify the effect of personal morals on professional performance
      12. Apply HIPAA rules in regard to privacy and release of information
      13. Apply the Patients’ Bill of Rights as it relates to: choice of treatment; consent for treatment; refusal of treatment
      14. Develop a plan for separation of personal and professional ethics
      15. Demonstrate appropriate response(s) to ethical issues
      16. Recognize the impact personal ethics and morals have on the delivery of healthcare
      17. Describe components of the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA)
      18. Summarize the Patient Bill of Rights
    5. Summarize the criteria for a civil act for medical negligence
      1. Define tort
      2. List 4 requirements for a tort of negligence
      3. Explain the concept of direct cause
    6. Summarize the requirements for informed consent
      1. Define battery
      2. List 4 requirements that must be met for informed consent to be valid
    7. Comply with local, state and federal regulations
      1. Define the role of the medical examiner
      2. Describe the following types of insurance: liability; professional (malpractice); personal injury
      3. Describe the process in compliance reporting of: unsafe activities; errors in patient care; conflicts of interest
      4. Describe compliance with public health statutes as they relate to: communicable diseases; abuse, neglect and exploitation; wounds of violence
      5. Perform compliance reporting based on public health statutes
      6. Report an illegal activity in the healthcare setting following proper protocol
      7. Protect the integrity of the medical record
    8. Behave in a professional manner
      1. Apply techniques for maintaining a positive mental attitude
      2. Explain how patient perceptions influence attitudes about care received
      3. Maintain professional standards for dress and grooming
      4. Define the principles of self-boundaries
      5. Define patient navigator
      6. Describe the role of the medical assistant as patient navigator
      7. Discuss examples of diversity: cultural; social and ethnic
      8. Coach patient appropriately considering cultural diversity, developmental life stage and communication barriers
      9. Demonstrate the principles of self-boundaries
      10. Demonstrate respect for individual diversity including: gender, race, religion, age, economic status and appearance
      11. Demonstrate sensitivity to patient rights
    9. Apply communication skills
      1. Explain keys to active listening
      2. List requirements of effective communication
      3. Identify nonverbal communication behaviors
      4. Explain valuing diversity as it relates to communication
      5. Describe guidelines for dealing with an angry patient
      6. Identify styles and types of verbal communication
      7. Identify types of nonverbal communication
      8. Recognize barriers to communication
      9. Identify techniques for overcoming communication barriers
      10. Recognize the elements of oral communication using a sender-receiver process
      11. Relate the following behaviors to professional communication: assertive, aggressive and passive
      12. Differentiate between adaptive and non-adaptive coping mechanisms
      13. Discuss the theories of: Maslow, Erikson and Kubler-Ross
      14. Use feedback techniques to obtain patient information including: reflection, restatement and clarification
      15. Respond to nonverbal communication
      16. Demonstrate: empathy, active listening and nonverbal communication
    10. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Exam the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 532 - Human Body-Health & Disease

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Designed to provide specialized knowledge of the human body relating to disease processes and possible methods of treatment. Drug terminology is added, as well as basic knowledge of symbols and abbreviations.
    Prerequisite: HSC 114  with a “C” or better
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the mechanism of disease
      1. Define general disease terminology
      2. Discuss patterns of disease
      3. Describe the categories of pathogenic organisms
      4. Identify body defense mechanisms against disease
      5. Outline the events of the inflammatory response
      6. Explain the effects of aging on the human body
    2. Examine terminology used in the study of neoplasms
      1. Distinguish between benign and malignant tumors
      2. Identify common carcinogenic substances
      3. Describe the pathogenesis of cancer
      4. Discuss curative, palliative, and preventive methods utilized for cancer treatment
    3. Interpret signs and symptoms of common diseases
      1. Review basic anatomy and physiology
      2. Discuss the effects of trauma to the body
      3. Compare and contrast acute and chronic
      4. List factors which influence how pain is experienced
    4. Explain the etiology of common diseases, disorders and syndromes.
      1. Discuss disorders of the integumentary system
      2. Explain diseases that impact the musculoskeletal system
      3. Describe mental health and disorders of the nervous system
      4. Discuss diseases that impact special senses
      5. List disorders of the endocrine system
      6. Identify pathologies of the circulatory system
      7. Discuss disorders that impact immunity and the lymphatic system
      8. Describe diseases of the respiratory system
      9. Explain digestive system pathologies
      10. Discuss disorders of the male and female reproductive systems
      11. Describe diseases of the urinary system
      12. Explain disorders relevant to genetics, development and growth
    5. Recognize diagnostic procedures and treatments of common diseases, disorders, and syndromes.
      1. Describe diagnostic procedures and treatments options for the integumentary system
      2. List diagnostic procedures and treatments used for the musculoskeletal system
      3. Explain diagnostic procedures and treatment options for mental health and the nervous system
      4. Discuss diagnostic procedures and treatment options used for special senses
      5. Describe procedures and treatment modalities for the endocrine system
      6. Identify diagnostic procedures and treatment options for the circulatory system
      7. Describe procedures and treatments for the lymphatic system
      8. List procedures and treatment options for the respiratory system
      9. Explain diagnostic procedures and treatments of the digestive system
      10. Discuss procedures and treatments utilized for the male and female reproductive systems
      11. List diagnostic procedures and treatments of the urinary system
      12. Explain procedures utilized for diagnosis and available treatment options for genetic, developmental, and childhood disorders.
    6. Discuss the prognosis of common diseases
      1. Discuss typical prognoses of diseases associated with the integumentary system
      2. Describe outcomes of diseases related to the musculoskeletal system
      3. Explain the prognosis of diseases related to mental health and the nervous system
      4. Describe the prognosis of pathologies associated with special senses
      5. Identify disease outcomes for the endocrine system
      6. List typical prognoses of pathologies related to the circulatory system
      7. Explain disease outcomes for immunity and the lymphatic system
      8. Discuss common prognoses for respiratory pathologies
      9. Identify typical prognoses for pathologies of the digestive system
      10. Explain prognoses of disorders of the male and female reproductive systems
      11. List common pathology outcomes of the urinary system
      12. Describe typical prognoses of disorders related to genetics, development, and growth
    7. Evaluate complementary medicine and use of alternative therapies
      1. Examine prevalent alternative medical treatments
      2. Identify risks and benefits associated with alternative medicine

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MAP 544 - Human Body-Health & Disease I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will incorporate critical thinking skills based on knowledge of course competencies to identify human anatomy and physiology, including the interrelationship of organ systems and homeostasis in the healthy body. Also covered will be common pathology, diagnostic aids and treatment options, including pharmacology related to each body system. Study of the interaction that occurs between systems and changes to the structure and function that occur across the life span as well as patient education procedures. Safety procedures will be reviewed with each unit. Internet research will be used for a variety of health topics. Units studied are structural organization, disease process and integumentary, skeletal, muscular, blood and circulatory. Remaining systems studied in MAP 554 .
    Competencies
    1. Discuss basic biological principles that relate to anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis
      1. Discuss the order of increasing complexity the levels of organization of the body
      2. Identify structures of the axial and appendicular subdivisions of the body
      3. List the nine abdominal regions and the abdominal quadrants
      4. List the principal directional terms and section (planes) used in describing the body and the relationship of body parts to one another
      5. List the major cavities of the body and the subdivisions of each
      6. Define homeostasis and metabolism
      7. Discuss the basic structure and function the three major components of a cell
      8. List the functions of the primary cellular organelles
      9. Discuss the stages of mitosis and explain the importance of cellular reproduction
      10. Identify the major passive and active transport processes that act to move substances through cell membranes
      11. Describe the four basic types of tissue
      12. List the 11 major organ systems of the body
      13. Describe the basic functions of each major organ system
    2. Identify the basic mechanisms of disease and oncology
      1. Describe five categories of pathogenic organisms
      2. List methods of entry for pathogenic organisms into the body
      3. List common methods used to prevent the spread of pathogens
      4. Identify body defense mechanisms against disease
      5. Discuss six predisposing conditions or risk factors that might promote diseases in an individual
      6. Distinguish between the terms benign and malignant as they apply to tumors
      7. Describe effects of disease on homeostasis
      8. Describe the pathogenesis of cancer
      9. List predisposing factors that increase the risk of developing cancer
      10. List methods of diagnosing cancer
      11. List common methods of treatment for cancer
      12. List variables in prognosis for cancer
      13. Outline the stages of the inflammatory response
      14. Explain the role of the inflammatory response in the disease process
    3. Identify the structures of the integumentary system
      1. List the types of membranes in the body
      2. Describe the structure and function of the body membranes
      3. Describe the structure and function of the layers of the skin
      4. Describe the structure and function of each accessory organ of the skin
      5. Discuss the three primary functions of the integumentary system
    4. Explain the major skin disorders and infections
      1. Recognize symptoms of common skin disorders
      2. Explain etiological factors for common skin disorders
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for skin disorders
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing skin disorders and infections
      5. Explain the classification of burns
      6. Discuss prognosis for skin disorders or diseases
    5. Identify the structures and functions of the skeletal system
      1. Explain how bones are formed, how they grow, and how they are remodeled
      2. Describe the microscopic structure of bone and cartilage
      3. List the classifications of bones according to shape
      4. Identify the major anatomical structures found in a typical long bone
      5. Discuss bone formation and growth
      6. Identify the two major subdivisions of the skeleton
      7. List the bones of the two major subdivisions of the skeleton
      8. Describe the structure of the major types of joints in the body
      9. List examples of each of the major types of joints in the body
      10. Identify all bones of human skeleton using diagrams and skeletal models
      11. Identify nutrients required for bone growth
      12. Name hormones and their function, involved in bone growth and maintenance
    6. Outline the major disorders of the bones and joints
      1. Recognize symptoms of common bone and joint disorders
      2. Explain etiological factors for common bone and joint disorders
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for common bone and joint disorders
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing common bone and joint disorders
      5. State the prognosis for disorders of the bones and joints
    7. Identify the structures and functions of the muscular system
      1. Compare the structure of the three basic types of muscle tissue
      2. Locate the three major types of muscle tissue in the body
      3. Discuss the microscopic structure of a skeletal muscle
      4. Discuss how a muscle is stimulated
      5. Compare the major types of muscle contractions
      6. Identify the major muscles of the body
      7. Explain the common types of movement produced by skeletal muscles
    8. Identify major disorders of the muscular system
      1. Recognize symptoms of major muscular disorders
      2. Explain etiological factors for major muscular system disorders
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for muscular system disorders
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing muscular system disorders
      5. State the prognosis for muscular system disorders
    9. Describe the structures and functions of the circulatory and lymphatic system
      1. Discuss the location, size, and position of the heart in the thoracic cavity
      2. Identify the heart chambers, sounds, and valves
      3. Trace the pathway of blood through the heart, pulmonary and systemic circulatory system
      4. Identify components of the heart conduction system
      5. Explain how the conduction system regulates rate of heartbeat
      6. Discuss the structure and function of the major blood types of blood vessels
      7. Trace the path of blood through the portal, and fetal circulation
      8. Discuss the factors involved in generation of blood pressure
      9. Locate the major pulse points on the body
      10. Describe the primary functions of blood
      11. List the formed elements of blood, and components of plasma
      12. Describe function of elements in blood and plasma
      13. Describe the general functions and the organs of the lymphatic system
      14. Discuss the various types of immunity
    10. Identify disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic system
      1. Recognize symptoms of disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic systems
      2. Explain etiological factors for disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic systems
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic systems
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic systems
      5. State the prognosis for disorders of the circulatory and lymphatic systems
    11. Describe interaction that occurs between systems and changes to the structure and function that occur across the life span
      1. Describe the inter-relationships among the organ systems and the inter-relationship of each organ system to homeostasis
      2. Describe the effects of illness to the inter-relationships of the organ systems and this effect on homeostasis
    12. Identify common pharmaceuticals prescribed for each system studied
      1. Identify common pharmaceuticals prescribed for each body system
    13. Access patient education material
      1. Locate varieties of patient education materials in areas of wellness, preventative and treatment care
      2. Explain the benefits of patient routine care, physical exams, regular diagnostic testing and screening to wellness and preventative care
      3. Use appropriate internet search for information on assigned Health and Disease conditions, treatments and or patient education materials throughout this course
    14. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear.
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Exam the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 554 - Human Body-Health & Disease II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will incorporate critical thinking skills based on knowledge of course competencies to identify human anatomy and physiology, including interrelationship of organ systems. Common pathology, diagnostic aids, and treatment options and prognosis including pharmacology related to each body system. Study of interaction that occurs between systems and changes to the structure and function that occur across the life span. Patient education procedures, wellness and prevention reviewed with each unit. Internet research will be used for a variety of health topics.Build medical terminology, definition and pronunciation with key terms for each unit of study. Units studied: lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, nutrition, dietary needs of special populations, nervous, sensory, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, common childhood diseases and end of life care.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAP 544  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the structures and functions of the respiratory system
      1. Identify the organs of the respiratory system
      2. Discuss the generalized functions of the respiratory system
      3. Explain the exchange of gases that occurs during internal and external respiration
      4. Discuss the volumes of air exchanged during pulmonary ventilation
      5. Identify the mechanisms that regulate respiration
    2. Explain disorders of the respiratory system
      1. Recognize symptoms of disorders of the respiratory system
      2. Explain etiological factors for disorders of the respiratory system
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for disorders of the respiratory system
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing disorders of the respiratory system
      5. State the prognosis for disorders of the respiratory system
      6. Identify health risks of smoking and methods available for smoking cessation
    3. Explain the structures and function of the nervous system
      1. List the divisions of the nervous system and the organs of each division
      2. Describe the generalized function of the system as a whole
      3. Identify the major types of cells in the nervous system
      4. Describe the function of the major types of cells in the nervous system
      5. Identify the anatomical and functional components of a reflex arc
      6. Describe electrical nerve impulse and describe impulse transmission at synapses
      7. Identify the major anatomical components of the brain and spinal cord
      8. Discuss the function of the anatomical components of the brain and spinal cord
      9. Identify the coverings and fluid spaces of the brain and spinal cord
      10. Identify cranial and spinal nerves
      11. Discuss the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system
    4. List the disorders of the nervous system
      1. Specify the symptoms of nervous system disorders
      2. Discuss the etiological factors for nervous system disorders
      3. Identify the possible methods of treatment for nervous system disorders
      4. List the procedures used in diagnosing nervous system disorders
      5. State the prognosis for nervous system disorders
    5. Explain the structures and functions of the sensory system
      1. List the major senses and the primary organ for each sense
      2. Discuss the structures of the eye and the function of each structure
      3. Discuss the structures of the ear and the function of each structure
      4. Describe the function of the ear in its sensory function in hearing and in equilibrium
      5. Discuss the general sense organs and their functions
    6. List the disorders of the sensory system
      1. Recognize symptoms of disorders of the sensory system
      2. Explain etiological factors for sensory system disorders
      3. Discuss possible methods of treatment for sensory system disorders
      4. Describe procedures used in diagnosing sensory system disorders
      5. State the prognosis for sensory system disorders
    7. Explain the structures and functions of the endocrine system
      1. Distinguish between exocrine and endocrine glands
      2. Identify the primary endocrine glands and the major hormones secreted by each gland
      3. Discuss the mechanisms of steroid and protein hormone action
      4. Explain how negative and positive feedback mechanisms regulate the secretion of endocrine hormones
      5. Identify the principal functions of each major endocrine hormone
      6. Discuss the result of hypersecretion or hyposecretion of each major hormone
    8. Identify the disorders of the endocrine system
      1. Specify the symptoms of endocrine system disorders
      2. Discuss the etiological factors for endocrine system disorders
      3. List the possible methods of treatment for endocrine system disorders
      4. Name the procedures used in diagnosing endocrine system disorders
      5. State the prognosis for endocrine system disorders
    9. Identify the structures and function of the digestive system
      1. List in sequence the organs or segments of the alimentary canal from mouth to anus
      2. Name the structure and primary function of each of the organs
      3. Identify the accessory organs of digestion and their primary function
      4. Recognize the basics of protein, fat, and carbohydrate digestion and give the end products of each process
      5. Make a distinction between mechanical and chemical digestion
      6. Identify the peritoneum and its extension
      7. Describe dietary nutrients including: carbohydrates, fat, protein, minerals, electrolytes, vitamins, fiber and water.
      8. List the dietary guidelines for healthy children and adults
      9. Describe absorption in the small intestine
      10. Identify structure, function, vessels and ducts of biliary system
    10. Identify disorders of the digestive system
      1. Recognize symptoms of digestive system disorders
      2. Specify the etiological factors for digestive system disorders
      3. Name the possible methods of treatment for digestive system disorders
      4. List the procedures used in diagnosing digestive system disorders
      5. State the prognosis for digestive system disorders
      6. Describe the functions of the different types of nutrients
      7. Describe the concept of the Recommended Daily Dietary Allowances
      8. List the dietary guidelines using My Plate
    11. Explain the structures and function of the urinary system
      1. List each of the organs or the urinary system
      2. State the general function of each of the organs.
      3. Name the parts of a nephron
      4. Describe the role of each part of the nephron in the formation of urine
      5. Explain the importance of filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion in urine formation
      6. Explain how the kidneys act as vital organs in maintaining homeostasis
    12. Identify disorders of the urinary system
      1. Recognize symptoms of urinary system disorders
      2. Specify etiological factors for urinary system disorders
      3. Name possible methods of treatment for urinary system disorders
      4. List the procedures used in diagnosing urinary system disorders
      5. State the etiology for urinary system disorders
    13. Explain the structures and function of the reproductive system
      1. List the essential and accessory organs of the male and female reproductive system
      2. Give the general function of each essential and accessory organ
      3. Describe the gross and microscopic structure of the gonads in both sexes
      4. Explain the developmental steps in spermatogenesis and oogenesis
      5. Identify the structures that constitute the external genitals in both sexes
      6. Discuss the phases of the menstrual cycle
      7. Correlate each phase of the menstrual cycle with its occurrence in a typical 28-day cycle.
      8. Discuss the major developmental changes characteristic of the prenatal stage of life from fertilization to birth
      9. Discuss three stages of labor that characterize a normal, vaginal birth
      10. Discuss various methods of birth control
    14. Identify the disorders of the reproductive system
      1. Recognize symptoms of disorders of the reproductive system
      2. List the etiological factors for disorders of the reproductive system
      3. Specify the possible methods of treatment for disorders of the reproductive system
      4. Name the procedures used in diagnosing disorders of the reproductive system
      5. State the prognosis for disorders of the reproductive system
      6. Define the term sexually transmitted infections and describe major types
      7. Describe methods of prevention for sexually transmitted infections
      8. Describe treatment and prognosis of sexually transmitted diseases
    15. List the common childhood diseases
      1. Etiology, treatment, and prognosis
      2. Identify vaccines available for prevention of childhood diseases
    16. Describe interaction that occurs between systems and changes to the structure and function that occur across the life span
      1. Describe the inter-relationships among the organ systems and the inter-relationship of each organ system to homeostasis
      2. Describe the effects of illness to the inter-relationships fo the organ systems and this effect on homeostasis
      3. Describe normal developmental milestones
    17. Identify common pharmaceuticals prescribed for each system studied
      1. Identify common pharmaceuticals prescribed for each body system
    18. Access patient education material
      1. Locate varieties of patient education materials in areas of wellness, preventative and treatment care
      2. Explain the benefits of patient routine care, physical exams, regular diagnostic testing and screening to wellness and preventative care.
      3. Use appropriate internet search for information on assigned health and disease conditions, treatments and or patient education materials throughout this course

  
  • MAP 603 - Employment Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students identify job opportunities, update resumes, compose cover letters and complete paper and online employment applications. Mock interviewing, guest speakers and application processes assist students in securing employment. Mandatory reporter training is also included.
    Corequisite: MAP 624  
    Competencies
    1. Report names of certifying/licensing entities for medical assistants
      1. State documentation needed for applying for certification/licenses
      2. Accurately fill out applications
      3. Describe continuing education requirement for CMA(AAMA) as well as Limited Radiography permits.
    2. Categorize steps involved in a job analysis and job search
      1. Identify the role of the CMA in medical specialty settings
      2. Research medical specialists currently hiring CMAs
      3. Identify skills that match job requirements
      4. Adjust resume and cover letter specific to hiring specialty
    3. Compose updated resume
      1. Write a clear and concise resume including all necessary information
      2. Select 3 professional references to include with resume
      3. Ensure resume is free from errors and that information is not repeated
      4. Target resume to specific job opportunity
    4. Create a cover letter
      1. State the required elements of a cover letter.
      2. Demonstrate appropriate format for a cover letter
    5. Construct a follow-up thank you letter
      1. State the benefits of writing a follow-up letter
      2. State appropriate information to be included in letter
      3. Explain who should receive the follow-up letter
    6. Demonstrate interviewing skills
      1. State appropriate appearance for an interview
      2. Demonstrate an appropriate hand shake and greeting
      3. Answer questions without hesitations or disclaimers
      4. Identify strengths and areas of improvement
      5. State 3 questions that are not legal for an interviewer to ask
      6. Develop 3 questions to ask the interviewer
    7. Obtain certification as a mandatory reporter for child and dependent adult abuse
      1. Participate in mandatory reporter training prior to summer term classes.
      2. Define dependent adult
      3. Define dependent adult abuse
      4. Define dependent child
      5. Define dependent child abuse
      6. Identify mandatory reporters
      7. Discuss issues of confidentiality relating to dependent adult and child abuse

  
  • MAP 606 - Professional Development III

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Course provides an opportunity for students to discuss situations that arise in the practicum experience. Weekly time sheets and activity reports are reviewed by the practicum coordinator to ensure that the student has adequate opportunity to utilize cognitive knowledge in the application of psychomotor and affective skills while working in all areas of the clinic. Oral reports are given by the students to incorporate critical thinking skills. Students are made aware of a wide variety of community services available to patients.
    Corequisite: MAP 624  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate increased understanding and ability in dealing with procedures and office situations during clinical affiliation
    2. Demonstrate awareness of related health care services available in the community
    3. Recognize differences in methodology in the clinical setting that will not detract from patient care
    4. Identify factors in dealing with patients from various ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds that may require special attention and assistance to fully comprehend their condition
    5. Utilize critical thinking skills
      1. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      2. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      3. Double check all facts
      4. Exam the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      5. Assess the situation for reason and logic
      6. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      7. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      8. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 624 - Practicum

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 21
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides the student a supervised practicum in an ambulatory healthcare setting. A minimum of 280 hours is obtained. Onsite supervision is provided by an individual who has knowledge of the medical assistant profession. Students will not receive compensation/payment, monetary or otherwise, from the practicum site. The practicum experience allows the student to demonstrate critical thinking by incorporating cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domain skills in the administrative, clinical and laboratory areas.
    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in all MAP courses in first two terms
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in medical office procedures acquired in the classroom and laboratory to patient care in a clinical setting
      1. Prepare patients for physical examination, treatment, and assist provider with exam
      2. Obtain vital signs
      3. Assist with minor surgical procedures
      4. Instruct patients regarding proper preparation for tests ordered by the physician
      5. Calculate proper doses of medication
      6. Administer parenteral and oral medications
      7. Perform sterilization procedures
      8. Maintain sterile equipment and supplies
      9. Dispose of contaminated, disposable, or outdated items
      10. Perform designated diagnostic radiography procedures
      11. Obtain and record information obtained from the patient related to their physical condition
      12. Maintain exam rooms to provide a safe, sanitary environment for patient care at all times
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in laboratory procedures acquired in the classroom and laboratory to patient care in a clinical setting
      1. Obtain venous and capillary blood samples
      2. Perform hematology procedures using manual and/or automated techniques
      3. Perform physical, chemical, and microscopic urinalysis
      4. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results
      5. Prepare a wet mount for parasitology study
      6. Test stool specimen for occult blood
      7. Perform electrocardiograms
      8. Perform procedures essential to quality control in the laboratory
      9. Instruct patients on collection of specimens to be brought to the office or taken to a laboratory (stool and urine).
      10. Perform other laboratory procedures that may include pregnancy test, mono test and rapid strep test
      11. Document on graphs and flow sheets
      12. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazard materials, sharps and regulated
    3. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in office management acquired in the classroom and laboratory to management procedures in a clinical setting
      1. Prepare patient files for day’s appointments
      2. Obtain accurate information for office record from new and returning patients to include address, phone, insurance, etc
      3. Schedule appointments according to office policy
      4. Obtain patient’s signature on permission forms
      5. Obtain precertification or prior authorization for outpatient testing
      6. Arrange hospital admissions and/or laboratory and x-ray outpatient procedures as directed by the physician
      7. Schedule hospital surgical procedures
      8. Handle incoming and outgoing correspondence
      9. Use appropriate techniques for information received and given out over the phone
      10. Deal with representatives of pharmaceutical companies, equipment manufacturers, other physicians, family member and other non-patient individuals on the phone and in person
      11. Maintain the reception area in a neat, attractive, and sanitary condition at all times
    4. Adapt to the routine of assigned clinics
      1. Demonstrate understanding of basic principles
      2. Recognize limitations in performing unfamiliar procedures
      3. Demonstrate retention of knowledge pertaining to office procedures
      4. Organize work for efficient use of time
      5. Follow verbal instructions
      6. Follow written instructions
      7. Participate in EMR training and applications per clinic policy
    5. Interact with patients, peers, and physicians in an acceptable professional manner
      1. Present a professional appearance and manner
      2. Acquire appropriate information regarding patient’s current condition and symptoms
      3. Demonstrate a caring attitude with patients: empathy, active listening, non-verbal communication and sensitivity
      4. Communicate information to co-workers in a succinct manner
      5. Present a courteous and friendly attitude with patients and staff
      6. Seek additional experience and information when dealing with unfamiliar situations
      7. Ask appropriate questions at an appropriate time
      8. Accept constructive criticism
      9. Demonstrate skill in making patient’s feel as comfortable as possible during various office procedures
    6. Assist with various procedures performed in providing patient care on an individual basis
    7. Apply ethical principles to behavior in the medical office
    8. Maintain patient confidentiality
      1. Follow all HIPPA requirements
    9. Utilize critical thinking skills.
      1. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
      2. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care
      3. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      4. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      5. Double check all facts
      6. Exam the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      7. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      8. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      9. Evaluate outcomes

  
  • MAP 650 - Industry Specific Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides the student a supervised practicum in an ambulatory healthcare setting. A minimum of 180 hours is obtained. Onsite supervision is provided by an individual who has knowledge of the medical assistant profession. Students will not receive compensation/payment, monetary or otherwise, from the practicum site. The practicum experience allows the student to demonstrate critical thinking by incorporating cognitive knowledge in the performance of psychomotor and affective domain skills in the administrative, clinical and laboratory areas.
    Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all courses in the first two terms.  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in medical office procedures acquired in the classroom and laboratory to patient care in a clinical setting
      1. Prepare patients for physical examination, treatment, and assist provider with exam
      2. Obtain vital signs
      3. Assist with minor surgical procedures
      4. Instruct patients regarding proper preparation for tests ordered by the physician
      5. Calculate proper doses of medication
      6. Administer parenteral and oral medications
      7. Perform sterilization procedures
      8. Maintain sterile equipment and supplies
      9. Dispose of contaminated, disposable, or outdated items
      10. Perform designated diagnostic radiography procedures
      11. Obtain and record information obtained from the patient related to their physical condition
      12. Maintain exam rooms to provide a safe, sanitary environment for patient care at all times
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in laboratory procedures acquired in the classroom and laboratory to patient care in a clinical setting
      1. Obtain venous and capillary blood samples
      2. Perform hematology procedures using manual and/or automated techniques
      3. Perform physical, chemical, and microscopic urinalysis
      4. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results
      5. Prepare a wet mount for parasitology study
      6. Test stool specimen for occult blood
      7. Perform electrocardiograms
      8. Perform procedures essential to quality control in the laboratory
      9. Instruct patients on collection of specimens to be brought to the office or taken to a laboratory (stool and urine).
      10. Perform other laboratory procedures that may include pregnancy test, mono test and rapid strep test
      11. Document on graphs and flow sheets
      12. Demonstrate proper disposal of biohazard materials, sharps and regulated
    3. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills in office management acquired in the classroom and laboratory to management procedures in a clinical setting
      1. Prepare patient files for day’s appointments
      2. Obtain accurate information for office record from new and returning patients to include address, phone, insurance, etc
      3. Schedule appointments according to office policy
      4. Obtain patient’s signature on permission forms
      5. Obtain precertification or prior authorization for outpatient testing
      6. Arrange hospital admissions and/or laboratory and x-ray outpatient procedures as directed by the physician
      7. Schedule hospital surgical procedures
      8. Handle incoming and outgoing correspondence
      9. Use appropriate techniques for information received and given out over the phone
      10. Deal with representatives of pharmaceutical companies, equipment manufacturers, other physicians, family member and other non-patient individuals on the phone and in person
      11. Maintain the reception area in a neat, attractive, and sanitary condition at all times
    4. Adapt to the routine of assigned clinics
      1. Demonstrate understanding of basic principles
      2. Recognize limitations in performing unfamiliar procedures
      3. Demonstrate retention of knowledge pertaining to office procedures
      4. Organize work for efficient use of time
      5. Follow verbal instructions
      6. Follow written instructions
      7. Participate in EMR training and applications per clinic policy
    5. Interact with patients, peers, and physicians in an acceptable professional manner
      1. Present a professional appearance and manner
      2. Acquire appropriate information regarding patient’s current condition and symptoms
      3. Demonstrate a caring attitude with patients: empathy, active listening, non-verbal communication and sensitivity
      4. Communicate information to co-workers in a succinct manner
      5. Present a courteous and friendly attitude with patients and staff
      6. Seek additional experience and information when dealing with unfamiliar situations
      7. Ask appropriate questions at an appropriate time
      8. Accept constructive criticism
      9. Demonstrate skill in making patient’s feel as comfortable as possible during various office procedures
    6. Assist with various procedures performed in providing patient care on an individual basis
    7. Apply ethical principles to behavior in the medical office
    8. Maintain patient confidentiality
      1. Follow all HIPPA requirements
    9. Utilize critical thinking skills.
      1. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient assessment
      2. Incorporate critical thinking skills when performing patient care
      3. Formulate questions to determine if important information is lacking
      4. Reject information that is not accurate, relevant, precise or clear
      5. Double check all facts
      6. Exam the situation and evaluate the problem without bias or judgment
      7. Determine and state the goal to be accomplished
      8. Follow steps for implementation/problem solving
      9. Evaluate outcomes


Medical Lab Technology

  
  • MLT 115 - Clinical Lab Fundamentals

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A course designed to acquaint the student with the field of laboratory medicine. Basic lab math, testing methods and quality control are presented. This course also incorporates an introduction to blood collection and the study of common blood cells and blood cell disorders.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Laboratory Technology program
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the clinical laboratory.
      1. Discuss the roles of Medical Laboratory Technicians and other laboratory personnel.
      2. Summarize the general functions of a clinical laboratory, as well as the functions of each main area in the lab.
    2. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Identify government agencies regulating laboratory results.
      9. Explain the use of quality control in the lab.
      10. Define accuracy and precision.
      11. Calculate standard deviations and coefficient of variation.
      12. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    3. Calculate laboratory math, measurements, apparatus and principles.
      1. Name different types of glass, containers and receivers.
      2. Perform pipetting techniques.
      3. Perform unit conversions in standard and metric.
      4. Convert temperature from degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit and vice versa.
    4. Demonstrate absorbance spectrophotometry.
      1. Describe the principles of spectrophotometry.
      2. Operate the spectrophotometer to calculate unknown concentrations.
      3. Graph curves illustrating % transmittance v. concentration and absorbance v. concentration.
      4. Discuss the absorbance and transmittance of light and how it relates to Beer’s Law.
      5. Apply Beer’s Law in the calculations of solution concentrations.
      6. Convert % transmittance to absorbance using a conversion chart.
      7. Given a standard line, determine if the procedure follows Beer’s Law.
      8. State two methods which are used to determine if a procedure follows Beer’s Law.
      9. Define the following types of specimens used when performing procedures using the spectrophotometer: standard solutions, blank, and control specimen.
      10. Use a common procedure to determine the concentration of glucose in a specimen.
      11. Give the normal values for glucose levels in blood and other body fluids.
      12. Define diabetes mellitus; contrast Type I and Type II diabetes.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of quality assurance in blood collection.
      1. Recognize the importance of correct blood collection techniques in total patient care.
      2. List the factors that influence the integrity of a blood specimen.
      3. Describe the quality assurance of blood collection.
    6. Examine equipment used in blood collection.
      1. Describe the purposes of various pieces of equipment and supplies.
      2. Differentiate among the various needle sizes as to gauge and purpose
      3. Discuss methods to safely dispose of contaminated needles.
      4. Identify the types of tubes by color code, and state the anticoagulant and additives present, mechanism of action, and special characteristics, and the purposes of each
      5. List the correct order of draw.
      6. Differentiate between serum and plasma.
      7. Define coagulation; and, state when an anticoagulant is used in blood collection.
    7. Perform venipuncture techniques.
      1. List the required information on a requisition form.
      2. Describe correct patient identification.
      3. Describe patient preparation and the variables that can affect some lab tests
      4. Assemble venipuncture equipment and supplies.
      5. Process specimens for analysis
      6. Discuss post-venipuncture care of patient, labeling, and delivery of specimens to the lab.
      7. Collect blood from student-patients and donors using various methods of collection
      8. Identify the most common venipuncture sites; and, identify alternative sites and describe when they would be used.
      9. Explain how to determine site selection and the cleaning process.
      10. Describe proper needle position for a successful venipuncture.
      11. List reasons blood would be collected using a syringe or butterfly rather than collection it via venipuncture using evacuated tubes.
      12. List the steps in performing a venipuncture using a syringe or butterfly.
    8. Perform dermal puncture techniques.
      1. State reasons for performing a dermal puncture.
      2. Identify acceptable and unacceptable sites for dermal puncture in adults, children, and babies.
      3. List the steps in performing dermal puncture.
      4. List the order of collection for dermal puncture specimens.
      5. Describe correct labeling of microspecimens.
      6. Describe the commonly used skin puncture devices for both finger sticks and heel sticks.
      7. Explain why the first drop of blood is wiped away when performing a dermal puncture.
    9. Assess complications and trouble-shooting in blood collection.
      1. List steps taken when collecting blood from a patient with an intravenous (IV) line in place.
      2. Define the following: syncope, hematoma, petechiae, sclerosed veins.
      3. Discuss causes and prevention of the following complications in phlebotomy: fainting, bruising, petechiae, excessive bleeding, seizures, allergies, infections, pain, damaged veins.
      4. Discuss causes and solutions for: failure to obtain blood, equipment failure, needle positions, and collapsed veins.
    10. Evaluate specimen handling and processing.
      1. List factors that can cause a patient’s lab results to appear abnormal.
      2. Discuss appropriate handling of laboratory specimens.
      3. State the acceptable time between specimen collection and separation of cells from plasma or serum, and explain why this is necessary.
      4. Describe how to transport specimens to the lab when they must be kept warm, kept chilled, or are light-sensitive.
      5. List common reasons for specimen rejection; and, explain why the specimens are unable to be tested.
    11. Discuss hematopoiesis.
      1. Describe the common blood cells, serum, and plasma, and their functions.
      2. Explain hemoglobin synthesis and structure.
      3. Identify forms of hemoglobin and derivatives.
      4. Describe methods of measurement and reference values.
      5. State the ratio of red marrow to yellow marrow.
      6. Discuss the role bone marrow plays in cells production from fetal life throughout adulthood.
      7. State the total adult blood volume in liters.
      8. State the life span of a red blood cell in days.
      9. State names, amino acid chains, and percentages in blood of normal adult hemoglobin.
      10. Define hemoglobinopathies, and list at least one (1) example of a hemoglobinopathy.
      11. List reasons for an increased and decreased hemoglobin value.
    12. Explain hematocrit.
      1. Identify specimens to be used and methods of measurements.
      2. List reference values.
      3. List reasons for an increased and decreased hematocrit.
      4. State the reason for obtaining duplicate tubes for microhematocrit readings.
      5. State the ‘rule of 3’ as it pertains to RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit.
    13. Assess cell counts and RBC indices.
      1. Calculate Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV), Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH), and Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC).
      2. List reference values for indicies.
      3. Relate indices to red blood cell morphology.
      4. Perform red blood cell, white blood cell and platelet counts.
      5. Calculate red blood cell, white blood cell and platelet counts.
      6. List reference values for cell counts.
      7. List reasons for increased and decreased numbers of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
      8. Define polycythemia, leukocytosis, leukopenia, absolute leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, thrombocytemia, and thrombocytopenia; and, list causes for these conditions.
    14. Perform microscopic examination of peripheral blood.
      1. Prepare blood smears.
      2. Stain blood smears.
      3. Perform leukocyte differentials, including red blood cell morphology.
      4. Perform platelet estimate.
      5. Calculate corrected white blood cell count.
      6. List reference values.
      7. Define anisocytosis; and, correlate the red cell distribution width (RDW) with the amount of anisocytosis.
    15. Evaluate hematological diseases states.
      1. Define anemias and leukemias.
      2. Recognize cell morphology in health and diseased states.
      3. Identify red cell and white cell disorders based on the differential, red cell indicies, and cell counts.
    16. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    17. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Evaluate laboratory findings to take corrective action.
      3. Analyze laboratory findings to check for sources of errors.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.

  
  • MLT 120 - Urinalysis

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course includes the study of urine formation and the methodology of determining the physical, chemical and
    microscopic properties of urine in normal and abnormal states. Basic lab skills, safety and quality control in urinalysis
    are presented. An overview of body fluid analysis will also be covered.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Laboratory Technology program
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs
      2. Disinfect work area
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Identify government agencies regulating laboratory results.
      9. Explain the use of quality control in the lab.
      10. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    2. Perform Brightfield Microscopy.
      1. Identify the parts of the Brighfield Microscope
      2. Demonstrate cleaning, care, and storage of the Brightfiled microscope.
      3. Practice trouble-shooting problems with the microscopes.
      4. Determine the final magnification for objects appearing under low power field (lpf), high power field (hpf, also known as “high dry”), and oil immersion (oif).
    3. Assess the urinary system.
      1. Identify the parts of the urinary tract, kidney, and nephron; and, explain their functions.
      2. Describe formation and composition of urine.
      3. Define filtration, reabsorption, secretion, excretion, and renal blood flow in terms of base mechanisms and net results.
      4. Define anuria, oliguria, uremia, polyuria.
    4. Discuss urine specimens collected for routine urinalysis.
      1. List and describe types of urine specimens.
      2. State normal and abnormal daily urine volumes, and terms defining those volumes.
      3. Discuss proper specimen collection, handling and preservation of urine.
      4. List changes in unpreserved or incorrectly preserved urine specimens.
      5. Explain proper sample identification and its significance.
      6. Identify the two substances that have the greatest impact on urine specific gravity, and how to compensate for their presence.
    5. Describe the physical urinalysis.
      1. State common terminology used to report normal urine color.
      2. Discuss the significance of abnormal urine colors.
      3. State the significance of urine clarity.
      4. List pathologic and non-pathologic causes of urine cloudiness.
      5. Discuss specific gravity as it relates to normal and abnormal urine specimens.
    6. Assess the chemical urinalysis.
      1. Discuss the importance of timing when using reagent test strip testing
      2. Discuss the principle of each of the ten chemical analyses performed on urine specimens: pH, protein, glucose, ketones, blood, bilirubin, urobilinogen, nitrites, leukocyte esterase, and specific gravity.
      3. Correlate chemical results with physical and microscopic results.
      4. Correlate chemical results with the presence or absence of disease.
    7. Evaluate the microscopic urinalysis.
      1. Compare and contrast automated and manual methods of viewing urine sediment.
      2. Describe the recommended methods for standardizing specimen preparation and volume, centrifugation, sedimentation preparation, examination, and reporting of results.
    8. Perform routine urinalyses.
      1. Perform physical, chemical, and microscopic testing of urine.
      2. Perform specific gravity using a refractometer.
      3. Perform confirmatory testing based on results of chemical analysis.
      4. Identify and quantify urinary sediment.
      5. Identify artifacts and state why they may be present in urine.
      6. Operate and maintain instrumentation used in routine urinalysis.
      7. Perform and document quality control and maintenance of supplies and equipment.
    9. Assess renal diseases and metabolic disorders affecting the kidney.
      1. Describe etiology and frequency of disorders.
      2. Discuss confirmatory lab tests used for diagnosis.
      3. Correlate urinalysis results with diseases and disorders. 
    10. Evaluate bodily fluids.
      1. State routine laboratory tests performed on bodily fluids, including the rationale and department in which the tests are typically performed.
      2. Identify normal locations, functions, and volume of each fluid: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), pleural, peritoneal, pericardial, synovial, seminal, and amniotic fluid.
      3. Discuss collection, transport, and analysis of bodily fluids.
      4. Differentiate transudates from exudates.
      5. Define xanthochromic.
      6. Describe the microscopic identification of crystals using polarized and compensated polarized light.
      7. Perform cell counts on bodily fluids.
      8. Perform a routine semen analysis.
      9. Correlate cellular and other microscopic findings in bodily fluids with pathologic and non-pathologic conditions.
      10. Differentiate among bacterial, viral, mycobacterial, and fungal meningitis.
      11. Discuss fecal analysis and define steatorrhea.
      12. Perform occult blood and/or fecal fat testing.
    11. Evaluate clinical laboratory operations.
      1. Define the roles and level of training required for Clinical Laboratory personnel.
      2. Discuss the purpose(s) of the major disciplines of clinical laboratory science to include their approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and health maintenance roles of the clinical laboratory.
      3. Identify basic lab tests performed in each department.
      4. Differentiate clinical laboratory settings in terms of primary mission, levels of service and personnel standards: hospital, reference, state health, and physician office laboratories.
    12. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills
      11. Create team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    13. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Take corrective action.
      3. Check for sources of error.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.

  
  • MLT 180 - Clinical Practicum I

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Open
    Students report to a local hospital to join the phlebotomy team to practice patient approach and to draw blood specimens.
    Prerequisite: MLT 115  
    Competencies
    1. Collect blood specimens from patients
      1. Demonstrate proper patient identification
      2. Follow recommended isolation techniques
      3. Select appropriate collection apparatus
      4. Perform venipucture or skin puncture
      5. Choose tube types
      6. Communicate appropriately with patient
      7. Assess patient reactions
    2. Perform post-blood collection procedures
      1. Dispose of biological waste
      2. Perform post-donation care of the patient
      3. Transport specimen to lab
    3. Operate laboratory information system, if applicable.
      1. Print patient sample labels
      2. Enter laboratory data.
      3. Use the computer system with integrity.
    4. Assess laboratory safety and quality control
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs
      2. Disinfect collection area
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique
      5. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease
      6. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation
      7. Determine factors that affect procedures and results
    5. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    6. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Trouble-shoot common procedural and technical phlebotomy problems.
      2. Perform corrective action.
      3. Check for sources of errors.
      4. Evaluate findings to recognize and report the need for additional collection procedure.

  
  • MLT 232 - Adv. Hematology & Coagulation

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A review of basic procedures followed by a study of normal and abnormal blood and bone marrow smears as they relate to anemias and leukemias. Hematology instrumentation, quality control, coagulation and body fluid analysis are studied. This course includes an in-depth study of various anemias, leukemias and other hematological and coagulation disorders.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in both MLT 115  and MLT 120  
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
    3. Perform Basic Hematology Skills
      1. Identify proper specimen collection and transport techniques/methods.
      2. List types of transport containers and medias and their rationales.
      3. Demonstrate correct use of the microscope.
      4. Demonstrate good dexterity in use of hematology lab equipment.
      5. Perform automated cell counts.
      6. Perform quality control and maintenance procedures.
      7. Perform HCT and SRT
      8. Identify sources of error in HCT and SRT.
    4. Perform and assess manual cell counts
      1. Describe diluting fluid and dilution rations.
      2. Describe hemacytometer chambers used to perform counts.
      3. Calculate manual cell counts per uL and per L.
      4. Identify sources of error in the calculations of manual cell counts.
      5. Discuss cellular counts on body fluids and calculations
      6. Demonstrate Upper-left rule and good cell distribution on the hemacytometer.
    5. Perform and assess peripheral blood differentials
      1. State the normal number of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets in the body.
      2. State basic cell structure and functions of each.
      3. List the five (5) main types of leukocytes found in peripheral blood and list the normal range for each type.
      4. Describe factors affecting acceptability of a blood smear.
      5. Prepare and stain manual blood smears.
      6. Perform cell differential counts.
      7. Perform Platelet and WBC estimation and correlate with automated counts.
      8. Identify correct objectives in performing the differential and estimates.
    6. Incorporate Hematopoietic theory with cell lines maturation
      1. Contrast the Monopoietic theory vs. the Pluripoietic theory of cell development.
      2. Describe the role of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on the production of specific cell types.
      3. Describe the development of cells from the stem cell level to the blast form of a cell.
      4. List the sites of hematopoiesis from the early embryonic stage of development until fully established in adults.
      5. Contrast medullary hematopoiesis vs. extramedullary hematopoiesis
      6. Explain stages of cell maturation.
      7. Identify stages of cell maturation.
      8. Compare the nuclear characteristics and cytoplasmic features in cell maturity.
    7. Describe Erythrocytic Life Cycle
      1. Describe the production and function of erythropoietin.
      2. List the sites of erythropoiesis from the early embryonic stage of development until fully established in adults.
      3. Distinguish the various stages of erythrocyte maturation.
      4. State the normal number of red blood cells in the body and the lifespan of a red blood cell in days.
      5. Describe the function of Red Blood Cells.
    8. Incorporate Hemoglobin Structure, Metabolism and Degradation into the erythrocytic life cycle
      1. Describe the structure of the hemoglobin molecule.
      2. Identify normal fetal and adult hemoglobin with respect to globin chains.
      3. State percentages of normal hemoglobin concentrations.
      4. State how iron is transported through the body and stored.
      5. Discuss the physiological functions of hemoglobin, the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve and the Bohr Effect.
      6. Name the main organ in the body that breaks down red blood cells.
      7. Briefly explain extravascular and intravascular destruction of red blood cells; and, list common chemistry tests used to measure hemolysis.
      8. Recognize abnormal forms of hemoglobin.
    9. Interpret Red Blood Cell Tests and Evaluate Indicies, Morphology and Inclusions
      1. State the normal hemoglobin and hematocrit values, reasons for and increases and decreases and sources of error.
      2. State the normal value for ESR, general cause of an increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and sources of error.
      3. Calculate RBC indices and correlate size and hemoglobin content.
      4. Apply the ‘Rule of 3.
      5. Correlate red cells distribution with (RDW) with anisocytosis.
      6. Relate reticulocyte count to bone marrow activity.
      7. Explain a shift reticulocyte or stress reticulocyte.
      8. Perform a retic stain and count.
      9. Explain why reticulocyte stains are considered supravital staining.
      10. Calculate reticulocyte counts, corrected reticulocyte count and reticulocyte production index (RPI) and know normals.
      11. Perform and calculate corrected WBC count.
      12. Classify Red blood cell morphology and describe red blood cell inclusions.
    10. Evaluate red cell anomalies
      1. Explain anemia and state morphologic classification of anemias.
      2. Correlate anemias with red cell indicies.
      3. List major characteristics of and laboratory identification of anemias and classify according to cause.
      4. Correlate red blood cell morphology with pathologic and non-pathologic conditions.
      5. Define anemia and discuss the physiologic changes occurring as result of anemia.
      6. Discuss symptoms of anemia in order of progressing severity.
    11. Evaluate Hemoglobinopathies and Thalassemias
      1. Explain genetic inheritance of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias.
      2. Describe hemoglobinopathies with respect to the globin chain variations, peripheral blood picture, clinical effects and treatment.
      3. Distinguish the definitive test for Sickle Cell Anemia and the sickle cell trait from the screening tests.
      4. Describe unstable hemoglobin disease and describe Hereditary Persistence of Fetal Hemoglobin (HPHF).
      5. Differentiate the ’ and ’ Thalassemias with respect to, peripheral blood picture, clinical symptoms and treatment.
      6. Briefly describe Hemoglobin H and Hemoglobin Barts.
      7. Integrate classifications, severity, and treatment of anemias.
      8. Given any patient with signs of anemia, recommend an initial battery of test to be performed.
      9. For any suspected type of anemia, recommend additional tests useful in confirmation.
      10. Briefly explain the use and methodology of hemoglobin electrophoresis.
    12. Evaluate microcytic anemias
      1. List four (4) types of microcytic, hypochromic anemias.
      2. Compare and contrast microcytic anemias by cause and iron studies.
      3. Compare and contrast symptoms in microcytic anemias.
      4. Evaluate blood picture and view slides of microcytic anemia.
      5. Interpret lab tests and recommend treatment.
    13. Evaluate macrocytic anemias
      1. List at least four (4) types of macrocytic, normochromic.
      2. Compare and contrast macrocytic anemias by cause and nutritional studies.
      3. Discuss Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Folate/Folic Acid Deficiency, Pernicious Anemia and Pure Red Blood Cell Aplasia.
      4. Compare and contrast symptoms in macrocytic anemias.
      5. Evaluate blood picture and view slides of macrocytic anemia.
      6. State common inclusions and WBC appearance.
      7. Interpret lab tests and recommend treatment.
    14. Evaluate and categorize normocytic normochromic anemias
      1. List the stages of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) in order of progression.
      2. Classify hemolytic anemias due to intrinsic and extrinsic defects.
      3. Describe the Hereditary RBC membrane defects of normocytic anemias and Non-hereditary Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemaglobinuria.
      4. Perform and discuss an osmotic fragility test.
      5. Discuss the RBC enzyme defects of Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Deficiency.
      6. Evaluate blood picture and view slides of normocytic normochromic anemias
      7. Compare and contrast normocytic anemias by cause and reticulocyte results.
      8. Interpret lab tests and recommend treatment.
      9. Discuss causes of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and identify RBC morphology and lab.
      10. Discuss pathology of Aplastic Anemia and bone marrow expectations.
      11. Discuss Relative Polycythemia, Absolute Polycythemia (Secondary), and Polycythemia Vera Rubra.
      12. Explain why Polycythemia Vera is called a myeloproliferative disorder.
    15. Evaluate Granulocytic maturation and abnormalities
      1. Describe the developmental changes that occur in granulocytic cells as the cells mature.
      2. List the stages of development from most immature to most mature cell in the granulocytic series.
      3. State the functions of neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils.
      4. Distinguish absolute from relative cells counts.
      5. Explain why an automated WBC count is corrected for nucleated RBCs.
      6. Calculate the WBC count when corrected for nucleated RBCs.
      7. Identify immature WBC’s and NRBC’s.
      8. State the causes of quantitative disorders of granulocytes.
      9. Explain ‘left shift’.
      10. State the causes of quantitative disorders of granulocytes.
    16. Evaluate Monocytic maturation and abnormalities
      1. List the stages of development from most immature to most mature cell in the monocytic series.
      2. State the functions of monocytes.
      3. Calculate the absolute monocyte count and correlate with abnormality.
      4. State the causes of quantitative disorders of monocytes.
      5. State the causes, possible symptoms (if given) and lab evaluations of qualitative disorders of monocytes.
      6. List traits and cell morphology in infectious mononucleosis.
      7. Perform differential and identify immature monocytes.
    17. Evaluate lymphoid maturation and abnormalities
      1. List the stages of development from most immature to most mature cell in the lymphoid series.
      2. Describe reactive lymphocytes, and when they might be found on a blood smear.
      3. State where T lymphs and B lymphs are produced.
      4. State the functions of T lymphs and B lymphs.
      5. State the causes and laboratory evaluation of quantitative disorders of lymphocytes.
      6. State the causes of qualitative disorders of lymphocytes.
      7. Name the cell that is considered to be the same cell as a plasma cell.
      8. State the causes and laboratory evaluation of an increase in plasma cells.
      9. State the causes and laboratory evaluation of qualitative disorders of plasma cells.
      10. Perform differential and identify immature lymphocytes or plasma cells.
    18. Assess cytochemical stains (cytochemistry)
      1. Explain what types of specimens and fixatives are acceptable for cytochemical studies.
      2. State where the enzyme, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), is commonly found, as well as when it is a useful lab test.
      3. Suggest additional stains in identifying cells.
    19. Categorize and evaluate Leukemias
      1. Classify leukemias with respect to cell age and cell type.
      2. List characteristics of acute leukemias.
      3. List characteristics of chronic leukemias.
      4. State the frequency, symptoms and prognosis of ALL, AML, CLL, CML.
      5. List the FAB classification of ALL and AML.
      6. Define the M:E ratio; and, state the normal value.
      7. Define absolute leukocytosis.
      8. State the frequency, symptoms, prognosis, blood picture, bone marrow picture and special identifying characteristics of Hairy Cell Leukemia.
      9. Explain why CML is a myeloproliferative disorder.
      10. Differentiate CML from a leukemoid reaction.
      11. Perform differentials of leukemias and identify key characteristics of each category.
    20. Categorize and evaluate the Myelodysplastic and Myeloproliferative Disorders
      1. List the general cause of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).
      2. Describe the five stages of the FAB classification of the MDS.
      3. List four myeloproliferative disorders (MPD).
      4. Describe the symptoms, lab results and treatment of the MPD’s.
    21. Categorize and evaluate the lymphoproliferative Disorders
      1. Describe the incidence, symptoms, cause and lab results for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.
      2. State the feature present on the peripheral blood smear used to diagnose Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.
      3. Briefly describe the four histologic (Rye) classifications of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.
      4. Briefly describe the incidence, symptoms, cause and lab results for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.
      5. Differentiate the Internal Working Formulation classifications.
      6. Describe the incidence, symptoms, cause and lab results for Sézary Syndrome/Mycosis fungoides.
      7. Describe the incidence, symptoms, cause and lab results for the plasma cell dyscrasias.
      8. Perform differentials of lymphoproliferative Disorders and identify key characteristics of each category.
    22. Perform automation and explain methodologies of automated differentials and cell counts
      1. Explain why an automated WBC count is corrected for nucleated RBCs.
      2. State the purpose of a histogram.
      3. Explain the term “shift to the left” as it relates to the WBC histogram.
      4. State the purpose of the red cell distribution width (RDW), the reference range, and when it may be increased.
      5. Explain the mean platelet volume (MPV), expected results, and when it may be increased on decreased.
      6. Recognize specified areas of cytograms or scattergrams covered in class, and interpret normal and abnormal results.
      7. Recognize a “flag” on a print-out of automated results.
      8. Perform daily quality control (QC) on the automated cell counter.
    23. Discuss Hemostasis process
      1. List and briefly describe the four (4) systems involved in hemostasis.
      2. State and briefly describe the four (4) functions of platelets in hemostasis.
      3. State the roles of plasminogen and plasmin in hemostasis.
    24. Assess Platelet Maturation, function and Disorders
      1. List the maturation sequence for platelets.
      2. State the length of time platelets circulate in the blood (in vivo).
      3. State the length of time platelets can survive outside of the body (in vitro).
      4. State the normal range for a platelet count.
      5. Discuss causes of qualitative and quantitative Platelet disorders.
      6. Differentiate immune thrombocytopenia from non-immune thrombocytopenia.
      7. Contrast acute ITP from chronic ITP.
      8. Distinguish between primary thrombocytosis, secondary thrombocytosis, and thrombocytosis as a myeloproliferative disorder.
      9. Differentiate between Bernard-Soulier Syndrome and Glanzmann’s Thrombasthernia.
      10. Name the coagulation screening test that tests platelet function.
    25. Compare and contrast between the coagulation factors
      1. List the coagulation factors by name and number.
      2. List the coagulation factors in the intrinsic, extrinsic and common pathways.
      3. Demonstrate which factors are missing and present in fresh plasma, aged plasma, adsorbed plasma, serum and adsorbed serum.
      4. State which factors are lost in storage.
      5. State which factors are Vitamin K dependent.
      6. State which factors are used up in coagulation.
      7. Demonstrate coagulation mixing studies.
      8. Name two adsorbing salts.
      9. Name the coagulation screening test that evaluates function of the extrinsic, intrinsic and common pathways.
      10. Name the drug(s) the PT test monitors and the PTT test monitors.
      11. Perform Pt and PTT tests.
    26. Evaluate Fibrinolysis system
      1. State the roles of plasminogen and plasmin in hemostasis.
      2. Briefly describe and diagram the fibrinolytic mechanism.
      3. Describe how and from what fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) are formed.
      4. List common plasminogen activators and inhibitors and state their general role.
      5. Differentiate between hypofibrinolysis and hyperfibrinolysis, and state causes for each.
    27. Categorize Hemostasis Laboratory Tests
      1. State the most common anticoagulant for blood specimens collected for coagulation tests and the ratio for blood to anticoagulant.
      2. Calculate to correct for the anticoagulant volume.
      3. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for vasoconstriction.
      4. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of platelet Adhesion and Aggregation.
      5. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of coagulation factors.
      6. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of fibrinogen.
      7. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of D-dimers.
      8. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of Plasminogen.
      9. State the principle, purpose, normal values and abnormal values for tests of Circulating and Lupus Anticoagulants.
      10. Perform semi-automated and automated PT and PTTs.
      11. Calculate the International Normalized Ration(INR).
      12. Perform D-dimers.
    28. Compare and contrast Hereditary Coagulation disorders
      1. State the mode of inheritance, alternate name (if any), cause, symptoms, lab results, special diagnostic lab tests performed and treatment for hereditary coagulation disorders.
      2. Differentiate Hemophilia A from von Willebrand’s disease.
      3. State the mode of inheritance, alternate name (if any), cause, symptoms, lab results, special diagnostic lab tests performed and treatment for factor deficiencies.
      4. Contrast Afibrinogenemia, Hypofibrinogenemia and Dysfibrinogenemia.
    29. Evaluate Consumptive coagulation disorders
      1. List four (4) main reason for acquired factor deficiencies.
      2. Describe Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) with Secondary Fibrinolysis, DIC only (Chronic DIC), and Primary Fibrinolysis.
      3. Explain why DIC with Secondary Fibrinolysis is life-threatening and difficult to manage.
      4. Describe common causes, consumption of factors and platelets, presence of fibrin, lab results blood picture and treatment for acute DIC (or DIC with Secondary Fibrinolysis).
      5. Differentiate Chronic DIC from DIC with Secondary Fibrinolysis (acute DIC).
      6. State the cause, physiology, lab results and treatment of Primary Fibrinolysis (Hyperfibrinolysis).
    30. Evaluate Decreased Production, Circulating Anticoagulants and Massive Transfusions and appropriate treatments in coagulation disorders
      1. List three (3) reasons for a decreased production of factors leading to acquired factor deficiencies.
      2. Correlate PT, PTT, fibrinogen, TT and platelet count with liver diseases.
      3. State the lab results in renal diseases for the following tests: PT, APTT, fibrinogen, TT, platelet count, FDP.
      4. List at least three (3) causes of acquired Vitamin K deficiency.
      5. State when a circulating anticoagulant is suspected.
      6. Describe the lupus anticoagulant.
      7. Briefly explain why receiving massive blood or blood product transfusions can lead to factor deficiencies.
      8. State the four (4) goals of treating coagulation disorders.
      9. List “pro’s” and “con’s” of components used to treat coagulation disorders.
      10. Differentiate between factor deficiencies and circulating anticoagulants.
      11. Interpret data provided in case studies, including mixing studies.
    31. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Evaluate laboratory findings to take corrective action according to predetermined criteria.

  
  • MLT 242 - Clinical Chemistry

    Credits: 8
    Lecture Hours: 6
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study and analysis of electrolytes, proteins, lipids, enzymes, hormones, drugs and various other biochemical compounds found in the human body. Test results are correlated with patients’ conditions. Laboratory math, statistics and quality control are presented.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MLT 115  and MLT 120 . Successful completion of the following courses: BIO 164  or equivalent; CHM 122  or equivalent and CHM 132  or equivalent
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      8. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      9. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    3. Evaluate proper specimen collection and transport.
      1. List types of transport tubes and preservatives.
      2. List special transport conditions
      3. State rationale for each type
      4. Identify criteria for specimen collection.
    4. Choose laboratory equipment typical of the clinical chemistry area.
      1. Perform pipetting.
      2. Demonstrate good dexterity in use of clinical laboratory equipment.
      3. Follow procedure.
      4. Prepare reagents and controls for tests.
      5. Calibrate instruments to perform tests.
    5. Perform laboratory math.
      1. Convert units for laboratory values.
      2. Convert temperatures from one to another using Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin.
      3. Prepare solutions of a given molarity.
      4. Perform calculations using molarity, normality, percent weight/volume, and percent volume/volume.
      5. Calculate the dilution facto(s) for simple and serial dilution schemes.
      6. Perform simple, serial and doubling dilutions.
      7. Calculate results from supplied data.
      8. Calculate results from obtained data.
    6. Compare and contrast instrumentation methods.
      1. Compare four basic categories of measurement technics with examples of methods for each category.
      2. Describe the principle of various lab instrumentation.
    7. Perform Spectrophotometry.
      1. Describe the principle of absorbance spectrophotometry and define Beer’s law.
      2. Name the observed colors of visible spectrum and the corresponding wavelenths.
      3. Graph standard curve as absorbance and transmittance.
      4. Calculate concentration using Beer’s Law.
      5. Given lab exercise correctly use spectrophotometer by setting wavelength and identifying transmittance and absorption.
    8. Evaluate Quality Assurance in daily laboratory functions.
      1. Define the Key terms for Quality Control and Quality Assurance.
      2. Define calibration, linearity, and control parameters.
      3. List possible sources of error and differentiate between random error and systemic error.
      4. State methods used to obtain patient reference ranges.
      5. Evaluate findings and clinical data to asses test results and procedures.
      6. Evaluate laboratory findings and quality control data to assess test results and procedures.
      7. Calculate the mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation.
      8. Differentiate between specificity and sensitivity.
      9. Evaluate the statistical significance of accuracy and precision.
      10. Prepare Levey-Jennings and quality control charts.
      11. State what percentages are associated with 1SD, 2SD and 3SD in a normal frequency curve.
      12. Recognize Westgaard’s Rules on controls, and state when a run should be rejected.
    9. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Evaluate laboratory findings to take corrective action according to predetermined criteria.
      3. Analyze laboratory findings to check for sources of error.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.
    10. Categorize Lab Operations.
      1. Discuss regulatory agencies and their impact on lab operations.
      2. Recognize common lab information system formats and uses.
      3. Differentiate between internal and external quality assurance and give examples of each.
      4. Define sources of error as pre-analytical, analytical, or post-analytical.
      5. State methods used to obtain patient reference ranges.
    11. Asses water balance and osmolarity.
      1. Describe how water balance is maintained in the body including negative and positive water balances.
      2. Define a situation where there would be an increased or decreased osmolality, and describe the body’s compensation for it.
      3. Discuss the influences of water and mineral metabolism on the pH and electrolyte balance in the body.
      4. Define a situation where there would be an increased osmolality, and describe the body’s compensation for it.
      5. Define a situation where there would be a decreased osmolality, and describe the body’s compensation for it.
      6. Given the concentration of sodium, glucose and blood urea nitrogen, calculate the osmolality.
      7. Describe principles and perform osmometry
    12. Asses Electrolytes and anion gap.
      1. Discuss the principle of tests used to measure electrolytes.
      2. Identify the primary extracellular cation and the primary extracellular cation.
      3. Identify the electrolyte that plays a major role in the regulation of water balance.
      4. State how hemolysis affects the potassium concentration.
      5. Identify major functions of the following electrolytes: sodium, potassium and chloride.
      6. Define chloride shift and discuss the mechanisms involved.
      7. Recognize the reference ranges for sodium, potassium and chloride.
      8. For each of the main electrolytes (sodium, potassium and chloride), list conditions in which there would be an increase or decrease in the electrolyte.
      9. List conditions in which there would be an increase or decrease in the anion gap.
      10. State the principles of the tests used to measure sodium, potassium and chloride.
      11. Describe the condition of cystic fibrosis and state the methods of lab evaluation.
    13. Evaluate Blood Gasses.
      1. Contrast acids and bases in terms of pH and hydrogen ions.
      2. Mathematically define pH.
      3. State the body’s major buffering systems and describe their function.
      4. Write the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation.
      5. State the normal ratio of carbonic acid to bicarbonate.
      6. Describe how CO2 is eliminated from the body.
      7. Describe the significance of the hemoglobin-oxygen dissociation curve
      8. Define a left shift and right shift on the hemoglobin-oxygen dissociation curve.
      9. Discuss methodology and instrumentation for performing blood gas determinations.
      10. Describe the patient conditions and compensatory mechanisms.
      11. List normal values of pH, PCO2, pO2, and Bicarbonate, and recognize sources of error.
    14. Evaluate Body fluids.
      1. Identify the source, physiologic purpose and clinical use of testing of body fluids.
      2. Differentiate between and transudate and an exudate.
      3. Discuss the diagnostic use for gastric analysis.
      4. Discuss amniotic fluid function and testing.
      5. State lab methods for evaluating Body fluids and correlate lab values to common disorders or conditions.
    15. Incorporate kidney structure and function with tests of Renal disease and disorders.
      1. Identify the anatomy of the kidney.
      2. List main renal functions.
      3. Describe the process of glomerular filtration and concentration of urine with conservation of water and salt.
      4. Describe the different hormonal processes that promote the concentration of urine and conservation of water and salt.
      5. State conditions in which an increased or decreased osmolality is seen and compensatory mechanisms.
      6. State the principle of the test, reference ranges, and significance of abnormal values for renal tests.
      7. Discuss the metabolism of Creatinine, BUN, and uric acid.
      8. List pre-renal, renal and post-renal causes of acute/chronic renal failure.
      9. Discuss EPO and its role in renal diseases.
      10. Identify methodology and reference ranges for microalbumin and explain its relationship to protein/creatinine ratio in diabetes.
      11. Perform creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and uric acid procedures, calculate the creatinine clearance, corrected creatinine clearance, and give significance.
      12. Match each test to the appropriate methodology.
    16. Explain enzyme theory.
      1. Discuss the equation: E+ S « ES « P + E.
      2. Classify enzymes according structure and the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB).
      3. Recognize the Michaelis-Menton calculation.
      4. Discuss the different factors affecting the rate of an enzymatic reaction.
      5. Discuss zero-order kinetics.
      6. Explain how enzymes are used to evaluate body function.
      7. Discuss the effect of cofactors, activators, inhibitors and coenzymes on reactions.
      8. Describe specimen collection for tests of enzyme analysis.
      9. Describe enzymatic methods differentiating between fixed time assays and continuous monitoring assays.
      10. Perform enzyme methods.
      11. Define international unit of enzyme activity.
    17. Describe the functions and assesment of the liver.
      1. List metabolic functions of the liver.
      2. Discuss the basic disorders of the liver and what laboratory tests may be performed to diagnose them.
      3. Outline the formation and catabolism of bilirubin.
      4. State the normal values for total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin and unconjugated bilirubin.
      5. Explain the principle of bilirubin tests.
      6. Describe the disorders of hyperbilirubinemia.
      7. Calculate Bilirubin values using T Bilirubin, Conjugated, and Uncojugated.
      8. Perform and explain the principles and reference ranges for liver enzymes.
      9. Recognize source of error.
      10. Differentiate the various types of Hepatitis.
    18. Evaluate Porphyrins, Iron, and Myoglobin in associated disease and disorders.
      1. Outline the biochemical pathway of porphyrin and heme synthesis.
      2. Correlate the porphyrin disease states with clinical laboratory data.
      3. Discuss the structure and clinical significance of myoglobin in the body.
      4. List the physiological functions of iron and describe its absorption and transport in the body.
      5. Describe changes in the analytes: ferritin, serum iron, and IBC in correlation with pathological conditions.
    19. Asses Proteins and Amino Acids in function and associated disorders.
      1. List functions of proteins.
      2. Name the primary and secondary sites of synthesis of proteins.
      3. List normal values and sources of error in protein measurements.
      4. Describe the principle of electrophoresis.
      5. List the five (5) main categories (or bands) on cellulose agarose gel using electrophoretic methods.
      6. Identify the bands of protein separated in protein electrophoresis.
      7. Discuss general causes of abnormal serum protein concentrations and aminoapathies.
      8. Describe and compare methodologies used in the analysis of total protein and albumin.
      9. Differentiate the types of proteinuria and describe methods of identification.
      10. Describe the diseases associated with alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins.
      11. Perform albumin and total serum proteins.
    20. Compare and Contrast Cardiac and Muscle diseases.
      1. Discuss myocardial infarction and the events of acute coronary syndrome.
      2. List proteins and enzymes that are routinely measured in serum to assess myocardial disease, and state the time periods for the expected enzyme elevations following myocardial infarction.
      3. List proteins and enzymes that are routinely measured to assess striated muscle tissue damage.
      4. Recognize reference ranges and test methodology for cardiac markers
      5. Calculate a CK relative index.
      6. Describe the use of BNP in CHF.
      7. Discuss re-perfusion and the role of thrombolytic agents in treating MI patients.
      8. Recognize normal and abnormal LDH isoenzyme patterns.
      9. Describe the mechanisms of plaque formation in arteries.
      10. Discuss causes and symptoms of other cardiac disorders.
      11. Perform CK and LD tests
      12. Recognize appropriate specimens for cardiac markers and time intervals.
    21. Evaluate the metabolism of Lipids and relationship to disease and disorders.
      1. List the four (4) major classifications of lipoproteins and state the main constituent of each of the four (4) major classifications of lipoproteins.
      2. Explain briefly the metabolism of lipids including absorption, esterification, transport, and storage.
      3. List the four (4) major classifications of lipoproteins from smallest to largest, and from the most dense to least dense.
      4. Describe how lipids are transported in both the endogenous and exogenous pathways.
      5. State the desirable, borderline and high risk ranges for lipoproteins.
      6. List instances in which an increased or decreased concentration lipids will be found.
      7. Discuss the incidence and types of lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities.
      8. Explain principle of cholesterol procedures including sources of error and normal values.
      9. Perform cholesterol, HDL, LDL procedures and calculation.
    22. Discuss chemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids and secretions.
      1. Describe the formation and function of Cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids and secretions.
      2. Discuss the diagnostic use for gastric analysis.
      3. Differentiate between transudates and exudates and list two tests performed on the each.
      4. Discuss amniotic fluid function and testing.
    23. Describe clinical toxicology.
      1. List the functions of a toxicology lab
      2. Explain pharmokinetics.
      3. Explain the reason for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).
      4. Describe the principles of immunologic, chromatography and spectrophotometric techniques.
    24. Discuss disorders of carbohydrate metabolism.
      1. Explain normal carbohydrate metabolism.
      2. Describe the roles of insulin, glucagon, epinephrine, cortisol, somatotropin, thyroxine and growth hormone in regulating extracellular glucose concentration.
      3. List diseases associated with hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.
      4. Name main ketones; list those normally found in blood.
      5. Provide examples of “fasting” and “reactive” hypoglycemia.
      6. Briefly describe diabetes insipidus.
      7. State the reference range for a fasting blood glucose level.
      8. Perform chemical and enzymatic glucose procedures.
      9. Perform analysis of glycosylated hemoglobin.
      10. State the diagnostic importance, patient preparation, procedure, and normal and abnormal values of the glucose tolerance test.
      11. Describe the other glucose tests: urine glucose, two-hour postprandial and glycosylated hemoglobin.
    25. Assess Pancreatic and GI functions and lab tests.
      1. Describe the anatomy of pancreas and characterize the endocrine and exocrine functions.
      2. List the major disease groups and correlate them with lab measurements.
      3. Outline the functions and anatomy of a normal digestive tract.
      4. List major pathological conditions and causes for these conditions.
      5. Describe diagnostic tests used for diagnosis of GI pathological conditions.
      6. Recognize reference ranges and methodologies for amylase and lipase.
      7. Preform amylase and lipase test.
    26. Evaluate Bone Disease and lab results.
      1. List three (3) forms of plasma calcium.
      2. Describe calcium regulation.
      3. List three (3) organs that play a major role in calcium regulation.
      4. List three (3) hormones that play a major role in calcium regulation.
      5. List the normal values, causes for decreased values and causes for increased values for calcium phosphate and magnesium.
      6. Discuss the relationship between alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium and phosphate and bone disorders.
      7. Correlate laboratory results for the trace elements, hormones and enzymes with osteoporosis, osteomalacia, Rickets and Paget’s disease.
      8. Perform Calcium, Phosphorous and Magnesium.
    27. Discuss Trace elements and vitamins.
      1. List the trace elements and state their clinical significance.
      2. Discuss serum iron, total iron binding capacity, ferritin and transferrin.
      3. Relate the tests that can be used to evaluate iron status.
      4. Discuss iron deficiency disorders.
      5. Correlate the disease state or patient status with a trace element excess or deficit.
      6. Perform Iron and calculate TIBC.
      7. List the biochemical parameters used to monitor nutritional status.
      8. Recognize reference ranges and methodologies for nutritional markers.
    28. Categorize Endocrinology and Thyroid Function with Target organs and lab results.
      1. State the functions of the endocrine system.
      2. Describe the location of the major hormones produced endocrine glands.
      3. List sources, functions and targets of assigned hormones.
      4. Discuss the difference between primary and secondary hormone disorders.
      5. Explain the mechanism of hormone action and control.
      6. Relate the expected laboratory results associated with disease states.
      7. Discuss the laboratory evaluation of infertility.
    29. Evaluate Cancers by their Tumor markers.
      1. Describe an ideal tumor marker.
      2. List commonly used chemical and cellular markers. State their clinical significance.
      3. Recognize methodologies for performing tumor markers.
    30. Structure toxicology by class, method and antidote.
      1. Explain the purpose of drug screening and pharmacokinetics.
      2. Name the classes and examples of drugs.
      3. Name some of the antidotes used in drug-overdose management.
      4. Discuss the difference between qualitative and quantitative tests in toxicology.
      5. Perform and explain procedure for multiple drug screening for trauma.
      6. Perform and explain procedure for alcohol method.
    31. Describe clinical therapeutic drug monitoring(TDM).
      1. Explain pharmokinetics.
      2. Explain the reason for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).
      3. Describe three (3) routes of drug administration and the disposition of a drug in the body.
      4. Describe first-pass elimination.
      5. Describe the various drug classification.
      6. Relate when peak and trough drug levels should be drawn.
      7. Describe the principles of immunologic and spectrophotometric techniques.

  
  • MLT 251 - Clinical Microbiology

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A study of clinically important microorganisms. Students learn and practice techniques used to isolate and identify pathogenic bacteria, parasites and fungi.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MLT 115  and MLT 120 . Successful completion of the following courses: BIO 164  or equivalent; BIO 732  or equivalent; CHM 122  or equivalent and CHM 132  or equivalent
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Identify government agencies regulating laboratory results.
      9. Explain the use of quality control in the lab.
      10. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    2. Practice sterile technique.
      1. Explain the difference between sterilization and disinfection; and, provide examples of physical and chemical methods of both.
      2. Differentiate among the biohazard safety levels.
      3. State the principle of an autoclave and state the standards (temperature, psi, time) for decontamination of most microbiological materials.
      4. Operate the biological safety cabinet (hood).
    3. Evaluate specimen collection and processing.
      1. List types of transport containers and media, and their rationales.
      2. Identify criteria for specimen collection based on body site.
      3. Determine acceptability of a specimen for culturing; and, select corrective action if specimen is unacceptable.
      4. Calculate a colony count for a urine specimen.
      5. Define the Bartlett classification for sputum specimens.
      6. Differentiate among the following types of media: non-selective, differential, broths, selective, antibiotic; and provide examples of each.
      7. State the purpose for commonly-used plating media.
      8. Select appropriate media for plating when given a specimen from a specific body site.
      9. Demonstrate proper plate-streaking techniques for a given specimen.
      10. Accurately identify the types of hemolysis shown on 5% sheep blood agar.
      11. Describe how specimen alterations, inoculation; and incubation temperature, atmosphere and length affect growth on media.
      12. Differentiate obligate aerobe, facultative aerobe, microaerobe, obligate anaerobe, and capnophile.
    4. Perform microscopic examination of infected materials.
      1. State the purpose of direct methods of examination: saline mount, iodine mount, potassium hydroxide, and India ink.
      2. Prepare smears from the following sources: swab, clear liquid, non-viscous fluids, granular material (e.g., tissue or bone).
      3. State the purpose of centrifuging non-viscous fluid prior to preparing a smear.
      4. Name the stains used to stain Mycobacterium.
      5. Differentiate among staining methods: Gram stain, Fluorescent, Kinyoun, Calcafluor white, Lactophenyl blue, antibody-conjugated.
      6. Perform Gram staining procedure.
      7. List examples of Gram positive and Gram negative cocci and bacilli.
      8. Identify Gram positive and Gram negative organisms, bacterial morphology, cells, and artifacts.
    5. Examine colony morphology.
      1. Explain the reason growth of an organism on several plates is compared to one another, as well as to an initial Gram stain.
      2. List the colony characteristics that are used for differentiation of microorganisms.
      3. Correlate growth on plates with Gram stain results.
      4. Describe growth on plates with regard to size, color, amount, and special selective or differentiating characteristics (lactose/non-lactose fermenter, Gram positive on CNA, Gram negative on MAC, etc.).
      5. Relate colony morphology to organism identification
      6. Identify normal and pathogenic growth based on specimen site.
      7. Discuss how a Clinical Microbiologist determines the final identification of an organism.
    6. Perform organism identification of Gram positive cocci, Gram negative cocci, Gram negative bacilli (fermenters and non-fermenters), Gram positive bacilli, and anaerobic organisms.
      1. State Gram stain morphology of organism.
      2. List media used to isolate organism.
      3. Correlate growth on media with organism.
      4. Select appropriate follow-up testing.
      5. Perform and interpret biochemical tests, including kits and multi-test systems.
      6. Discuss automated identification methods.
      7. Differentiate among species of an organism.
      8. Identify unknown organisms.
    7. Correlate microorganism with related diseases or infections.
      1. Differentiate true pathogens from opportunistic pathogens.
      2. List examples of direct and indirect routes of infection.
      3. Define nosocomial infection; and, state examples of each type: community-acquired, endogenous, exogenous.
      4. Discuss signs of microbial infections, as well as laboratory procedures that are used to identify infectious disease.
      5. List the clinically significant species of organisms; and, state epidemiology of each.
      6. List and describe both common and severe infections caused by specific organisms.
    8. Relate organism identification to body site.
      1. Define normal flora and discuss its role in the: mouth/oral cavity, nasopharynx, stomach and small intestines, and colon.
      2. Distinguish between sterile and non-sterile sites; and, list normal flora found in non-sterile sites.
      3. Describe how the presence or absence of normal flora impacts interpretation of lab results.
      4. List pathogens associated with body sites.
      5. List diseases that are acquired by adults, children, and neonates; and, discuss modes of transmission diagnosis and treatment.
    9. Evaluate susceptibility testing.
      1. List considerations when selecting antimicrobial agents.
      2. Differentiate between bacteriocidal and bacteriostatic antimicrobials, and provide examples of each.
      3. Differentiate between narrow-spectrum and broad-spectrum antimicrobials, and provide examples of each.
      4. Define the minimum bacteriocidal concentration (MBC) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC).
      5. Perform titrations of antibiotics to determine the MIC and MBC.
      6. Discuss susceptibility testing using principles of immunology, serology, and automation.
      7. Explain the role of beta-lactamase in the treatment of various bacterial infections.
      8. Describe the mode of action and list examples of common antimicrobials.
      9. Describe autonomous, antagonistic, additive, and synergistic antimicrobial reactions.
      10. Discuss the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method.
      11. Explain the serum bacteriocidal test and its use in treatment.
      12. Differentiate between peak and trough levels as they pertain to therapeutic drug monitoring.
    10. Discuss clinically-significant spirochetes.
      1. State the etiology of Syphilis, Yaws, Pinta, Lyme Disease, Relapsing Fever, Leptospirosis.
      2. List and describe the stages of syphilis.
      3. Compare and contrast treponemal and non-treponemal tests for syphilis.
      4. Discuss the symptoms and treatment of Lyme Disease.
    11. Assess viruses clinically-significant to humans.
      1. Explain the infection process of viruses.
      2. Differentiate viruses based on structure, nucleic acid composition, and special characteristics.
      3. Describe collection, processing and transport of specimens for viral testing.
      4. Describe methods of viral detection.
      5. Discuss the important characteristics, route of infection, and identification of viruses.
      6. State the structure of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).
      7. State immunologic markers of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).
      8. List common opportunistic infections seen in patients AIDS.
      9. Perform testing for viruses.
    12. Evaluate mycobacteria.
      1. Define acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and state why mycobacteria are considered acid-fast.
      2. List general characteristics of mycobacteria.
      3. List species of Mycobacterium in the Tuberculosis complex.
      4. Define MOTT; and, list common species of Mycobacterium that are included in this group.
      5. Describe specimen collection, decontamination, digestion, and concentration of mycobacteria.
      6. Recall common media and special requirements for isolating mycobacteria.
      7. Describe methods of direct examination and identification of mycobacteria.
      8. Differentiate among the Runyon classification of mycobacteria; and, name common species found in each category.
      9. Describe the etiology, symptoms, infections, laboratory identification, and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other clinically-significant Mycobacterium species.
      10. Describe the purified protein derivative (PPD) test.
      11. Observe acid fast smears.
    13. Discuss medically-important parasites.
      1. Discuss etiology and clinical significance of parasites.
      2. Identify stages in the malarial life cycle.
      3. Identify collection, transport, and processing of specimens for ova and parasite testing.
      4. Identify clinically-significant parasites.
      5. Describe methods of direct examination of parasites.
      6. Differentiate among Protozoa, Nemotodes, Cestodes, and Trematodes.
      7. Differentiate cysts and trophozoites (trophs).
    14. Assess clinical manifestations of human mycoses.
      1. Describe specimen collection and transport.
      2. Discuss the clinical laboratory’s approach to diagnosis of fungal infections.
      3. Describe macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of clinically-significant mycotic organisms.
      4. Identify clinically-significant mycotic organisms.
      5. Correlate mycotic organisms with disease states (mycoses).
      6. Differentiate between yeast and mold phases.
      7. Define dimorphic fungi.
      8. Identify mycelium, conidia, macroconidia, microconidia, and blastoconidia.
    15. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    16. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Perform corrective action.
      3. Check for sources of error.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.

  
  • MLT 261 - Immunohematology

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Principles of immunohematology with the practices of blood banking are presented. ABO grouping, Rh typing and transfusion testing procedures are performed. Blood group antigens and antibodies are studied.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MLT 232 ; MLT 270  must be taken prior to or concurrently & Serology must be taken prior to or concurrently with MLT 261. Successful completion of the following courses: BIO 164   or equivalent; BIO 732  or equivalent; CHM 132  or equivalent
    Competencies
    1. Apply genetics to blood banking.
      1. Define genotype, phenotype, dominant, recessive, codominant, amorph, and haplotype.
      2. State the Mendelian Laws.
      3. State the reason most blood groups are considered codominant.
      4. Determine an individual’s possible genotype and phenotype.
      5. Describe the dosage effect, including single dose and double dose genes and antigens, and explain its significance in testing.
      6. Differentiate direct exclusion, indirect exclusion, and non-exclusion in paternity testing.
      7. Explain gene linkage and haplotypes relating to blood groups system alleles.
      8. Select screening cells homozygous and heterozygous for various antigens.
    2. Evaluate basic principles of immunology in blood banking.
      1. Describe the type of immune response associated with blood banking.
      2. Distinguish in vivo antigen-antibody reactions from in vitro antigen-antibody reactions.
      3. Name the two stages in agglutination; and, list and describe factors affecting those stages.
      4. Describe the different enhancement media used in antibody detection.
      5. Describe complement-mediated antigen-antibody reactions and hemolysins.
      6. Describe the principle of the antiglobulin test and how anti-human globulin is produced.
      7. Name the two major components of polyspecific anti-human globulin.
      8. List the different antiglobulin reagents used in the blood bank.
      9. Discuss the test methodology and application for direct and indirect antiglobulin testing.
      10. List causes of a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) and the mechanisms responsible.
    3. Demonstrate basic immunologic techniques.
      1. Make an accurate and estimated 4% suspension of red blood cells.
      2. Manually wash red blood cells.
      3. Perform antigen-antibody testing.
      4. Interpret various strengths of positive reactions, negative reactions, and mixed field reactions.
      5. Perform indirect and direct antiglobulin testing.
    4. Assess the ABO (ABH) blood group system.
      1. State Landsteiner’s Rule.
      2. Explain the inheritance and frequencies of the ABO blood groups.
      3. Discuss the biochemistry of the A, B, and H genes and how they relate to Lewis and Secretor genes and antigens.
      4. Describe the antigens and antibodies of the ABH system (A, B, H, anti-A, -B, -H), as well as development of antibodies, immunoglobulin class and clinical significance.
      5. State the reason the ABO group is considered the most significant blood group, and why blood groups must be matched for transfusion.
      6. Explain the Bombay phenotype, including: genetics, antigens on red blood cells, antibodies in serum, and transfusion options.
      7. Discuss subgroups of A, and acquired A- and B-like antigens.
      8. Name which ABO blood group is considered the universal donor and which is considered the universal recipient.
      9. Describe the selection of ABO-compatible red blood cells.
      10. Define type-switching; and list the rationales.
      11. Perform and interpret forward and reverse ABO grouping.
      12. Resolve ABO discrepancies.
    5. Examine the Rh blood group system.
      1. Explain the Fisher-Race and current (ISBT) Rh nomenclatures and the applicable genetic theory.
      2. Discuss the common Rh antibodies (Anti-D, -C, -E, -c, -e) specifically to include: immunoglobulin class, phase of reactivity, usual form of stimulation, inability to bind complement and clinical significance.
      3. Explain the weak D phenotype, including clinical significance in donors and recipients.
      4. Perform and interpret Rh (D) typing.
      5. Perform ABORh testing.
    6. Assess the other major blood groups: Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, P, Lutheran, and I.
      1. Discuss the antigens of each blood group with regard to development, immunogenicity and frequency.
      2. Summarize the antibodies of each blood group to include: immunoglobulin class, phase of reactivity, and clinical significance.
      3. Identify special characteristics and clinical significance for each blood group.
    7. Perform antibody identification.
      1. Define unexpected antibodies.
      2. Describe antibody identification techniques, including the use of enhancement methods.
      3. State the three rules of antibody identification, as well as exceptions to the rules.
      4. Interpret single and multiple specificity antibody panels utilizing the elimination method.
      5. Discuss the auto control test and its significance in antibody identification.
      6. Discuss the use of selected cells (or selected cell panels).
      7. Summarize adsorption and elution techniques.
      8. Select blood for a recipient with one or more antibodies and calculate the number of unit of blood that must be screened.
      9. Perform antigen testing.
      10. Discuss and/or perform techniques used in the detection and identification of various warm and cold antibodies.
      11. Discuss and/or perform techniques used in the detection and identification of anti-I, -i, and IH including the use of adult cells, cord cells and the pre-warming technique.
    8. Perform compatibility testing.
      1. List the information that MUST appear on transfusion request forms and patient samples.
      2. Describe pre-transfusion compatibility testing procedures, including: positive identification of recipient and sample, review of patient history, ABO and Rh testing, appropriate selection of blood components, antibody detection, routine crossmatch procedures, labeling and issuing blood components.
      3. Differentiate between a major and minor crossmatch.
      4. Explain the expected outcomes of a crossmatch, as well as what a crossmatch cannot detect or do.
      5. Distinguish among immediate spin, antiglobulin, and electronic crossmatches.
      6. Discuss release of blood in emergency situations, massive transfusions and neonatal transfusions.
      7. Discuss non-type specific transfusion including selection of blood type for various products.
      8. Select blood for a recipient with one or more antibodies and perform crossmatching.
    9. Evaluate donor blood collection, testing, and component preparation.
      1. Discuss donor selection criteria.
      2. Summarize the mini-physical; and, state acceptable ranges for donor regarding hemoglobin or hematocrit level, pulse, blood pressure, and temperature.
      3. Describe donor phlebotomy technique including preparation of site, method of collection and amount collected.
      4. State the purpose of confidential donor self-exclusion.
      5. Contrast autologous from allogeneic blood donations.
      6. Summarize apheresis donations with respect to donor selection and products.
      7. List the tests that must be performed on allogeneic donor blood and the methodology for each test.
      8. List the information included on a donor unit label.
      9. Compare internal and external controls in testing.
    10. Assess component preparation and transfusion therapy.
      1. Discuss CPD and CPDA-1 anticoagulants and optional additive systems (CPD-ADSOL plus others) for collection of whole blood.
      2. Describe the storage lesion with regard to ATP, pH, 2, 3-DPG and K+.
      3. Discuss method(s) of preparation, modifications, temperature and length of storage, and quality control for red blood cell, plasma, platelet, and cryoprecipitate products.
      4. Explain the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) and AABB?s roles in regulation and accreditation issues regarding blood components.
      5. Describe the requirements and methods for shipping blood products.
      6. Calculate the amount the hemoglobin and hematocrit are raised upon transfusion on one unit of packed RBCs.
      7. Discuss the indications for transfusing: red blood cells random platelets, apheresed platelets, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), cryoprecipitate (cryo), and plasma derivatives.
      8. State the rationale for transfusing leukocyte-reduced products and gamma irradiated components.
      9. Define massive transfusion.
      10. Explain emergency release and transfusion of blood components.
    11. Evaluate transfusion reactions.
      1. Distinguish among the following types of transfusion reactions: hemolytic vs. non-hemolytic, acute vs. delayed, immune-mediated vs. non-immune-mediated, and infectious vs. non-infectious.
      2. State the most common cause of fatal transfusion reactions.
      3. Describe the clinical and laboratory features and treatment of transfusion reactions.
      4. Discuss the work-up in the blood bank investigation of reactions.
    12. Perform Direct Antiglobulin Testing (DAT).
      1. State the relationship of the DAT autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).
      2. List the main types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).
      3. Discuss disease association, DAT results, autoantibody class and specificity, diagnostic testing, and transfusing blood for patients with Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria (PCH), Cold Agglutinin Syndrome (CAS), and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA).
      4. Describe the basic mechanisms for drug induced hemolytic anemia and list at least one drug implicated in each mechanism.
      5. For each drug mechanism, describe typical clinical and laboratory features including: method of red cell destruction, DAT results, other pre-transfusion testing results, and treatment.
      6. Perform an acid elution and/or heat (freeze-thaw) elution.
    13. Perform prenatal and post-partum testing.
      1. Describe the physiology of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN).
      2. Describe the use of paternal antigen testing, amniotic fluid, and percutaneous umbilical blood analysis in prenatal investigation.
      3. Describe routine prenatal testing, including ABO and Rh typing, weak D testing, antibody screening and identification, titrations and follow-up.
      4. Describe post-natal/postpartum investigation of the mother and infant, including ABO and Rh testing on cord blood, DAT testing and elutions and appropriate use of hemoglobin and bilirubin tests.
      5. List three instances in which RhIG is NOT issued postpartum.
      6. Discuss treatment of ABO and Rh HDFN, including requirements for intrauterine and neonatal exchange transfusions.
      7. List special characteristics of blood used for intrauterine and exchange transfusions.
      8. State the purpose of Rh Immune Globulin (RhIG).
      9. Calculate the dosage of Rhogam after birth or to prevent maternal alloimmunization.
      10. Perform RhIG and antibodies titers, cord blood testing, the fetal blood screen, and the Kleihauer-Betke test; and, state the purpose of each.
    14. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Identify government agencies regulating laboratory results.
      9. Explain the use of quality control in the lab.
      10. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    15. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    16. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings to trouble-shoot common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Perform corrective action.
      3. Check for sources of error.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.

  
  • MLT 270 - Immunology & Serology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Immune reactions of the body will be studied. Reactions between antigen and antibodies will be used as a means to detect diseases such as hepatitis, infectious mononucleosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MLT 232  
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment.
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, student-patient, and clinical patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    2. Perform immunology/Serology testing.
      1. Identify proper specimen collection and transport techniques/methods.
      2. Choose appropriate medical terminology for immunology/serology skills.
      3. Demonstrate good dexterity in use of immunology/serology lab equipment.
      4. Calculate various types of dilutions.
      5. Perform serial dilutions using micro pipettes and serologic.
      6. Describe how antibody titer is determined and reported.
      7. Perform dilutions, describe detection and disease association of cold agglutinins.
    3. Evaluate basic immunologic procedures.
      1. Discuss basic principles, use of and perform precipitation tests.
      2. Discuss basic principles, use of and perform agglutination tests.
      3. List factors affecting sensitization and lattice formation in agglutination reactions.
      4. Discuss basic principles, use of and perform flocculation tests.
      5. State the reagents used in flocculation testing; and, list two (2) commonly-used flocculation tests.
      6. Briefly describe neutralization assays and labeled immunoassays.
      7. Interpret direct and indirect ‘sandwich’ techniques.
      8. Briefly describe the complement fixation test, inclucing interpretation of expected positive and negative results.
    4. Discuss immunoglobulins.
      1. Differentiate between humoral and cellular immunity.
      2. Describe the cells involved in specific immunity, including T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes; differentiate between T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes.
      3. Explain the fundamental reaction between antigen and antibody, and the type of immunologic reactions.
      4. Discuss the physical properties of antibodies, structure and function.
      5. Differentiate the five (5) main classes of immunoglobulins.
      6. Discuss immunizations, specifically factors affecting immunization, primary and secondary antibody response and antibodies involved in primary and secondary responses.
    5. Assess serological Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases.
      1. Describe and perform venereal syphilis testing and include causative agent, disease progression, congenital transmission, and diagnostic tests.
      2. Describe and perform Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A strep) testing including: causative agents (exoantigens), complications, and diagnostic tests.
      3. Differentiate among Hepatitis A, B and C by mode of transmission, type of virus, and diagnostic tests.
      4. List the four (4) DNA viruses in the Herpesvirus group.
      5. Describe Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus CMV, Varicella-zoster (VZV) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and II by mode of transmission, disease progression, and diagnostic tests.
      6. Describe Rubella including: type of virus, alternate names, congenital transmission, most commonly tested populations, and diagnostic tests.
      7. Describe Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) including: causative agent, modes of transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic tests.
      8. Name at least two (2) types of fungi tested for serologically.
      9. Briefly describe Toxoplasma gondii including: host, mode of transmission, and diagnostic tests.
    6. Evaluate immune disorders.
      1. Differentiate among the four types of hypersensitivity reactions.
      2. Differentiate between organ-specific and systemic autoimmunity. provide examples of each type.
      3. Describe systemic lupus erythmatosus (sle or lupus).
      4. State the clinical significance of antinuclear antibodies (ana).
      5. Describe and perform rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
      6. Differentiate among the various types of grafts (transplants).
      7. Explain the importance of the MHC in transplantation.
    7. Formulate an understanding of the nature of the immune system.
      1. Contrast active and passive immunity; and, natural and artificial immunity.
      2. List at least three (3) natural external and internal defenses.
      3. Briefly describe the role of inflammation in an immune reaction.
      4. Define acute phase reactants; and, name the most commonly one tested in the lab.
      5. Differentiate tolerance from self tolerance.
      6. Describe the process of vaccination, including primary and secondary responses, antibodies involved, and antibody levels.
      7. Name the primary and secondary lymphoid organs.
      8. State how T-lymphs and B-lymphs are differentiated from each other, as well as within their own cell lines.
      9. List some common MHC HLAs that are associated with specific diseases.
      10. Describe Class I and II genes coding.
      11. Briefly describe the role of an antigen presenting cell (APC).
      12. State the triggering mechanism(s) and end result(s) for the classical and alternative complement pathways.
    8. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate clothing and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership and time management.
      8. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      9. Create team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
    9. Demonstrate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Analyze laboratory findings and recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      2. Evaluate laboratory findings and take corrective actions.
      3. Analyze laboratory findings to check for sources of errors.
      4. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing. 

  
  • MLT 289 - Advanced Clinical Lab Practicum

    Credits: 9
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 36
    Course Type: Open
    Students rotate through the clinical laboratory departments of Hematology, Chemistry, Microbiology, Blood Bank, Immunology, and Urinalysis, applying knowledge and skills learned in class.
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite MLT 242  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 242  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 261  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 270  with a Grade ‘C’ or above: MLT 232  with a Grade ‘C’ or above.
    Corequisite: Co-requisite: MLT 292  with a Grade ‘C’ or above.
    Competencies
    1. Assess laboratory safety and quality control.
      1. Identify safety and precaution labels and signs.
      2. Disinfect work area.
      3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
      4. Practice correct hand-washing technique.
      5. Dispose of biohazardous waste.
      6. Protect self, Teaching Techs, and patients from transmission of infectious disease.
      7. Perform appropriate error correction and documentation.
      8. Identify government agencies regulating laboratory results.
      9. Explain the use of quality control in the lab.
      10. Define accuracy and precision.
      11. Calculate standard deviations and coefficient of variation.
      12. Determine factors that affect procedures and results.
    2. Evaluate specimen collection, transport, and processing.
      1. State criteria for evaluating specimen quality and corrective action to resolve problems.
      2. Label specimens accurately.
      3. Centrifuge STAT tubes as soon as they arrive in the lab.
      4. Centrifuge clot tubes after at least 20 minutes of clotting or as per lab policy.
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of the laboratory information system (LIS).
      6. Perform phlebotomy.
    3. Perform quality control (QC).
      1. Monitor QC.
      2. Record QC data.
      3. Evaluate QC records.
      4. Take corrective action should QC fall outside of established limits.
      5. Prepare controls and calibrators to use in testing.
    4. Operate equipment.
      1. Identify the primary operating components.
      2. Select reagents.
      3. Describe reagent reactions.
      4. Demonstrate reagent handling.
      5. Process samples.
      6. Program and/or calibrate the instrument or equipment.
      7. Produce valid patient results. 
    5. Perform equipment maintenance.
      1. Identify functioning and non-functioning instrument or equipment.
      2. Troubleshoot problems on the instrument or equipment.
      3. Return the instrument or equipment to online use.
    6. Perform testing in the Clinical Chemistry lab.
      1. Perform an osmolality assay and evaluate results.
      2. State principles of procedures.
      3. Identify special sample types and requirements.
      4. List reagent requirements.
      5. Discuss special handling procedures.
      6. Discuss the appropriateness of ordering specific tests.
      7. Explain the pathophysiological significance of results.
      8. Discuss the clinical usefulness of chemistry profiles.
      9. Identify the chemical tests comprising profiles.
    7. Perform Hematology and Coagulation analyses.
      1. Perform abnormal differentials in 20 ± 5 minutes.
      2. Correlate possible pathological conditions with abnormal cell types.
      3. Evaluate cell histograms and/or scattergrams, and predict pathophysiological causes of abnormalities.
      4. Discuss cytochemical staining procedures and results.
      5. Perform erythrocyte sedimentation rate tests.
      6. Perform reticulocyte counts.
      7. Assist in in the collection, preparation, and staining of a bone marrow aspirate.
      8. Perform manual cell counts.
      9. Discuss the principles of the procedures, reagents used, and pathophysiological significance of coagulation tests.
    8. Perform Immunohematology testing.
      1. Prepare red blood cell suspensions.
      2. Read and grade agglutination reactions.
      3. Perform routine Type & Screens in 30 ± 5 minutes (or per hospital requirements).
      4. Perform routine Type & Crossmatches in 45 ± 5 minutes (or per hospital requirements).
      5. Perform prenatal and postpartum testing.
      6. Identify unexpected antibodies.
      7. Perform antigen typing.
      8. Investigate transfusion reactions.
      9. Prepare blood components needed for transfusion for adults, children, and neonates.
      10. Inventory and order blood products.
      11. Receive and process blood products from collection facilities.
      12. Issue blood components and Rh immune globulin.
    9. Perform Immunology and Serology testing.
      1. Perform manual testing kit procedures.
      2. Discuss and/or perform automated and molecular testing techniques.
    10. Perform testing in the Clinical Microbiology lab.
      1. Perform various staining procedures (e.g., Gram stain, acid-fast), and interpret results.
      2. Read and report Gram stains results within 5 minutes.
      3. Select media specific to specimen site.
      4. Demonstrate inoculation and isolation procedures.
      5. Identify colony characteristics of pathogens and normal flora from various body sites.
      6. Identify clinically-significant isolates.
      7. Perform antibiotic susceptibility testing.
    11. Perform Urinalyses and Body Fluid analyses.
      1. Perform and report microscopic urinalyses within 5 minutes.
      2. Perform confirmatory tests and interpret results.
      3. Perform cell counts, differentials, crystal identification, and chemical test on body fluids; and, interpret results.
    12. Report results.
      1. Call critical values to designated health care professionals.
      2. Report troponin results within 30 minutes of collection or per lab policy.
      3. Report STAT results within 60 minutes of collection or per lab policy.
      4. Report routine tests within 90 minutes of collection or per lab policy.
      5. Follow lab criteria for record keeping.
      6. Maintain patient reports.
    13. Evaluate judgment and decision making skills.
      1. Follow Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).
      2. Analyze laboratory findings to recognize common procedural and technical problems.
      3. Take corrective action.
      4. Check for sources of errors.
      5. Evaluate laboratory findings to recognize and report the need for additional testing.
    14. Assess professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate attire and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.

  
  • MLT 292 - Clinical Lab Professionalism & Review

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Students review medical laboratory subject areas, discuss clinical experiences, and present case studies. Professionalism, certification, continuing education, and legal responsibilities are discussed. A mock certification exam is given.
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite MLT 242  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 251  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 261  with a Grade ‘C’ or above; MLT 270  with a Grade ‘C’ or above: MLT 232  with a Grade ‘C’ or above
    Corequisite: Co-requisite: MLT 289  with a Grade ‘C’ or above.
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast clinical lab areas.
      1. Discuss hospital lab organization and arrangement of departments.
      2. Review contents of and practices within the different departments of the clinical lab.
      3. Practice simulated lab exercises.
      4. Practice exam questions for each clinical lab department.
    2. Create professional documents.
      1. Write and revise a resume.
      2. Identify personal skills and abilities.
      3. Construct a cover letter for an entry-level MLT position.
    3. Practice interviewing skills.
      1. Identify possible interview questions.
      2. Practice responses to questions.
      3. Prepare sample questions to ask a potential employer.
      4. Select attire.
      5. Discuss the impact of behaviors and non-verbal communication.
    4. Evaluate professional lab organizations.
      1. Compare and contrast ASCP, ASCLS, AMT, and other professional clinical lab groups.
      2. Discuss membership options.
      3. Attend a state or regional meeting.
    5. Promote the clinical lab profession.
      1. Design a clinical lab service learning activity or event.
      2. Participate in a promotional event or meeting.
      3. Interact with and educate non-lab personnel about the clinical lab profession.
    6. Evaluate case studies and/or clinical topics.
      1. State expected lab values.
      2. Correlate laboratory data in case studies and determine disease process.
      3. Use a variety of visual aids.
      4. Create a quiz or other evaluation over material presented.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of medical laboratory technology consistent with an entry-level Medical Laboratory Technician.
      1. Review current national exam requirements and contents.
      2. Pass a mock certification exam.
      3. Discuss application requirements for national exams.
    8. Assess post-certification options.
      1. Discuss advanced degree options and routes.
      2. Meet with Laboratory Managers and Directors.
      3. Examine leadership roles for first-year lab professionals.
      4. Discuss continuing laboratory education and re-certification procedures.
    9. Assess professional conduct.
      1. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills with patients, other health care professionals, and the public.
      2. Practice confidentiality.
      3. Follow written and verbal instructions.
      4. Demonstrate ethical time management.
      5. Choose workplace-appropriate attire and jewelry.
      6. Recognize the responsibilities of other laboratory and health care personnel, interacting with them with respect to their jobs and patient care.
      7. Recognize the need for continuing education as a function of growth and maintenance of professional competence.
      8. Maintain professional growth and competence through involvement in continuing education.
      9. Demonstrate workplace basic skills of listening, writing, leadership, and time management.
      10. Practice written and oral communication skills.
      11. Create a team atmosphere in laboratory functions.
      12. Discuss liability and malpractice.


Mortuary Science

  
  • MOR 215 - Funeral Law I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A survey of the basic principles of business law as they relate to funeral service. Especially stressed are the bodies of law and the judicial system found in the United States including contracts, sales, bailment (including carriers), commercial paper, agency, employment and business organization.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Mortuary Science or Funeral Services program, or admission to the Liberal Arts AA - Pre-Mortuary Science concentration.
    Competencies
     

    1. Examine the American system of jurisprudence;
      1. Explain common law as a historical foundation of United States law.
      2. List the various sources of law in the American legal system; state and federal.
      3. Define judicial review and jurisdiction of the court systems.
      4. Differentiate between trial courts and appellate court procedures.
      5. Describe the role of small claims courts and its limited access
      6. Discuss Alternative and Online Dispute Resolution such as negotiation, mediation, and arbitration.
    2. Distinguish between torts and crimes;
      1. Identify differences between civil law and criminal law.
      2. List and describe intentional torts against persons.
      3. List and explain the elements necessary to prove negligence.
      4. Describe and apply the doctrine of strict liability.
      5. List and describe the essential elements of a crime.
      6. Summarize criminal procedure, including arrest, indictment, arraignment, trial.
      7. Identify major white-color crimes such as embezzlement, bribery, and criminal fraud.
      8. Define trademarks (service marks), copyrights, and patents.
      9. List the items that can be copyrighted and demonstrate an understanding of the Fair Use Exception.
    3. Analyze the requirements of a valid contract and identify litigation issues relating to contracts;
      1. List the elements necessary to form a valid contract.
      2. Describe special forms of offers, including Internet actions.
      3. Identify contracts that lack consideration such as those involving illegal consideration, an illusory promise, a pre-existing duty, or past consideration.
      4. Define and describe the infancy doctrine.
      5. Contrast legal insanity and intoxication and how they affect capacity.
      6. Describe covenants-not-to-compete and exculpatory clauses and their legality.
      7. Contrast genuineness of assent, mistake, fraud, duress, and undue influence.
      8. List the contracts that must be in writing under the Statute of Frauds, formality of writing contracts, and the parole evidence rule.
      9. Compare assignments, delegations, and third party rights.
      10. Distinguish between conditions and impossibility or impracticability of contracts.
      11. Explain performance and remedies for each side of a contract.
    4. Evaluate the Uniform Commercial Code regarding the sale/lease of goods;
      1. Categorize the performance and remedies of sellers and buyers with regard to sales and lease contracts.
      2. Contrast the controlling bodies of contract law: Article 2 of the UCC and common law of contracts.
      3. Interpret when title to goods and the risk of loss pass from seller to buyer.
      4. Categorize the performance and remedies of sellers and buyers with regard to sales and lease contracts.
    5. Describe the requirements for negotiable instruments;
      1. Explain how negotiable instruments are transferred.
      2. Define key terms regarding negotiable instruments.
      3. List the requirements of negotiability.
      4. Explain the requirements of issuance and delivery of a negotiable instrument.
    6. Contrast agency and employment relationships;
      1. Define the nature of an agency relationship, as well as the creation and termination of an agency.
      2. List the duties and responsibilities of agents and principals.
      3. Distinguish between an agent, independent contractor, and employee.
      4. Discuss the employee-at-will doctrine and the exceptions based on public policy and anti-discrimination statutes.
      5. Describe the protections provided employees under Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 301 - Intro to Funeral Service

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will trace the history of funeral service from ancient times with emphasis on the development of funeral practices in the United States, to include current practices in funeral service and contemporary issues affecting funeral services.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Mortuary Science Advanced Standing Diploma Program or completion of General Education courses required for the Funeral Services AAS program.
    Competencies
    1. Develop an active vocabulary of words, terms and concepts associated with funeral services.
      1. Use funeral service related words and terms and concepts properly.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of concepts relating to funeral service.
      3. Collaborate with fellow classmates in discussions of contemporary issues.
    2. Describe the history of funeral services
      1. Recall ancient Egyptian burial customs.
      2. Identify the burial customs of the ancient Greeks.
      3. State the ancient Roman and Christian burial customs that are still in practice today.
      4. Describe the Viking burial customs.
    3. Report on the impact of historical events on funeral services.
      1. Describe President Lincoln’s Gettysburg address and general order 39
      2. Paraphrase the beginning of chemical embalming with attention to the role of the American Civil War.
      3. Describe the origins of classical music, and funeral requiems in the Middle Ages.
    4. Examine the professional organizations of funeral services.
      1. List professional local, state and national organizations for funeral services.
      2. Participate in activities of a funeral director association in your location.
      3. Identify the primary role each of the associations play in funeral services.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 302 - Cremation Services

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will thoroughly review the legal requirements and process of cremation, and is designed to equip the student to perform a cremation upon graduation. This course will also explore various contemporary disposition issues affecting funeral services.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Competencies
    1.  Explain contemporary trends in disposition
      1.  Describe the elements of Green Burial.
      2.  Recognize emerging disposition techniques, including alkaline hydrolysis and cryogenics.
      3. Describe the role of Anatomical Donations in contemporary culture.
    2.  Describe an identification process prior to disposition
      1.  Explain how the process meets the emotional needs of the family.
      2. Cite the legal requirements in the state of practice.
      3. Summarize the forms needed for meet the legal requirements.
    3. Outline the process of preparing a body for cremation
      1. Determine which medical devices must be removed.
      2. Describe the process of removing medical devices.
      3. Describe the disposal of those medical devices.
      4. Discuss the container required to safely place the deceased into the retort.
    4. Outline the cremation process
      1. Describe proper retort operations.
      2. Describe safe methods to remove cremated human remains from a retort.
      3. Discuss methods of insuring the identity of the deceased.
      4. Describe the remains processor used following the retort.
    5. Distinguish between the different methods of disposition of cremated human remains
      1. Research methods for disposal of cremated human remains.
      2. Describe methods used for disposal of cremated human remains.
      3. Discuss the legal ramifications of scattering cremated human remains.
      4. Discuss the legal and practical implications of families retaining cremated human remains at home.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 315 - Funeral Law II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Deals with the statutory laws and practices pertaining to funeral services. The student will study the laws that govern the funeral director, the embalmer and their legal responsibilities to the consumer.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Competencies
    1. Paraphrase foundational principles of mortuary laws
      1. Define terminology associated with funeral service laws
      2. Identify sources of funeral service law
      3. Explain legal definitions of death
    2. Summarize principles of mortuary law relating to the funeral home/funeral director
      1. Identify torts involving a dead body
      2. Explain control and liability of disposition
      3. Describe funeral establishment regulations
      4. Explain cemetery and crematory regulations
      5. Describe the laws pertaining to funeral service practices
      6. Explain funeral director obligations of disposition
    3. Demonstrate funeral director responsibilities according to professional licensing requirements
      1. State the limitations imposed upon the practice of funeral director/embalmer
      2. Identify the responsibilities of the funeral director to the families that called him/her to serve
      3. Identify the responsibilities of the funeral director to other professionals
    4. Apply laws and rules related to probate law
      1. Define the laws which govern the disposition of an estate
      2. Explain wills
      3. Describe the procedures of a person dying intestate
      4. Explain the administration of an estate
    5. Examine the Federal Trade Commission Funeral Rule
      1. List the requirements of the Funeral Rule
      2. Summarize the Misrepresentations which are identify the by the Federal Trade Commission
      3. Utilize forms to complete the requirements of the Funeral Rule for given scenarios.
    6. Summarize federal regulations
      1. Describe the Environmental Protection Agency rules that relate to funeral services
      2. Relate the wage and hour laws to funeral service situations
      3. Summarize federal codes such as the ADA and Civil Rights Act.
    7. Determine the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration as it relates to funeral directors/embalmers
      1. Generalize of the formaldehyde standards
      2. Communicate the elements of the Blood borne pathogen standards
      3. Initiate a plan to accomplish a Hazard Communication standard
      4. List the requirements of the Medical records standards

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 320 - Thanatology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is a survey of the basic principles of psychology, sociology and counseling as they relate to funeral service.  The course stresses the psychological concepts in the areas of grief, bereavement, mourning, aftercare, and crisis intervention with emphasis on the roles of the funeral director, as well as the family and social structures and their relationship to funeral service.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Competencies
    1. Show the values and purposes of the funeral rite for family and friends 
      1. Demonstrate the application of general psychology to funeral service
      2. List common needs of the bereaved
      3. Define and apply bereavement, mourning and grief
    2. Apply the following theories of grief in a grief scenario
      1. Explain Lindemann’s Grief Syndrome
      2. Describe Bowlby’s Attachment Theory
      3. Explain Kubler-Ross’ Five Stages of Death
      4. Paraphrase Worden’s Tasks of Mourning
      5. List and describe Wolfelt’s Mourning (reconciliation) Needs
    3. Compare typical responses to death and their variation based on developmental levels and cultural differences
      1. Summarize terminology related to grief
      2. Describe normal grief reactions
      3. List common determinants of grief
      4. Explain how grief affects the family
    4. Examine when to make referrals to the appropriate community or professional resources
      1. Identify the factors which may complicate grief
      2. Classify types of complicated grief reactions
      3. Describe personal resources for coping with loss and stress
    5. Describe issues relating to children and death
      1. Paraphrase a child’s understanding of death by age development
      2. Explain what not to say and what to say when explaining death to children
    6. Differentiate between the types and styles of counseling therapy
      1. Describe the major goals of counseling as well as the functions of the counselor
      2. Differentiate between directive and non-directive styles of counseling
      3. Recognize the pre-need, at-need and post funeral counseling opportunities
      4. Utilize the basic counseling skills and techniques
    7. Determine various community resources which are available to families in grief
      1. Describe the role of hospice
      2. Compile a listing of grief support groups available in the community
      3. Summarize palliative care
    8. Evaluate the elements associated with social function and culture to funeral service
      1. Define sociology and its relationship to funeral service practices
      2. Identify the family governing systems found in contemporary society
      3. Classify contemporary social factors affecting funeral rites
      4. Describe changing social factors which affect funeral rites and families in grief
      5. List ways in which technology has affected funeral service

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 323 - Funeral Directing I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Surveys the principles related to funeral directing including human relations, relations with clergy, and the professional behavior required of funeral directors. In addition, this course will cover the principles of the operations of a funeral home, including funeral service forms and vital statistics.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Corequisite: MOR 324  
    Competencies
    1. Assess the value of funeralization.
      1. Identify similarities and differences between funeralization and memorialization.
      2. Describe the various aspects of funeralization.
      3. State how funeral components meet the needs of the bereaved.
    2. Summarize the interpersonal functions of a funeral director from first call to last service rendered to the family.
      1. Identify proper procedures for notification of death.
      2. Summarize the procedures to follow for a removal.
      3. Paraphrase items usually included in the arrangement conference.
      4. List necessary information to obtain from the family during the arrangement conference.
      5. Explain the related professions used in arranging a funeral service.
    3. Prioritize the items which must be completed by the funeral director.
      1. Identify and explain the necessary forms and legal documents associated with making funeral arrangements.
      2. Illustrate the organization required in preparation of each funeral.
      3. Explain the professional and ethical practices of a funeral director.
      4. Explain the death benefits available to surviving families.
    4. Differentiate between at-need and pre-need funeral procedures.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of available means of pre-arranging of a funeral.
      2. Identify the differences in arranging at-need from pre-need.
      3. Explain the legal limits of a pre-need arrangement.

  
  • MOR 324 - Funeral Home Operations I

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will provide the student opportunities to simulate the standard operations of a funeral home. Activities will include simulated funeral arrangement conferences, completing standard funeral service forms, creating memorialization products (e.g. register books, folders, etc.) using funeral service software programs, and simulating technical tasks such as transfers of remains, dressing/casketing, and preparation for ID/cremation viewings.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Corequisite: MOR 323  
    Competencies
    1. Outline the various forms and documents which must be completed by funeral directors.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of death benefits available to families by completing standard forms.
      2. Produce the necessary governmental forms, such as a death certificate, burial transit permit, disinterment permit, and cremation permit.
      3. Utilize funeral service software programs by creating funeral/memorial documents.
    2. Organize a simulated funeral arrangement conference.
      1. Gather the necessary information (e.g. biographical data, vital statistics, and service details.)
      2. Present various service options relevant/appropriate to family’s requests
      3. Present various merchandise options relevant/appropriate to family’s request
      4. Demonstrate adherence to any/all applicable FTC considerations
    3. Demonstrate simulated technical tasks common to funeral service establishments.
      1. Trace the steps in completing a transfer of remains.
      2. Prepared human remains for viewing by dressing and casketing the deceased.
      3. Demonstrate proper procedures for preparing human remains for identification viewing.
      4. Prepare human remains for limited service calls such as forwarding of remains to another funeral home.

  
  • MOR 331 - Funeral Home Management

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to management concepts which will affect funeral directors to include personnel management, risk management, facilities management, funeral home marketing and basic accounting principles.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Mortuary Science or Funeral Services program, or admission to the Liberal Arts AA - Pre-Mortuary Science concentration.
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate fundamentals of small business management as applied to funeral home operations.
      1. Discuss the role of small business in the economy.
      2. Explain why management in a small firm may be more demanding than management in a large firm.
      3. Describe personal and personnel requirements needed for the success of a self-employed funeral home owner.
      4. Describe the elements of sound business management; including credit and collections; costs and capital investments; location and expansions of funeral homes; buying or building a funeral home; reducing risks and advertising.
    2. Examine the functions of management for a funeral home.
      1. Define management and identify the four functions.
      2. List the objectives of funeral service.
      3. Relate the functions of management to funeral service practices.
      4. Define the areas of management.
      5. Explain the concepts of management related to funeral services.
    3. Evaluate federal regulations affecting recruitment and selection of personnel.
      1. List considerations for job recruitment.
      2. Explain federal regulations affecting recruitment.
      3. Explain pre-employment interviewing regulations.
    4. Describe human relations management.
      1. Identify purpose and contents of a personnel manual.
      2. State responsibilities of the manager.
    5. Characterize basic accounting concepts and procedures.
      1. Describe the functions of accounting.
      2. Record transactions in the basic accounting equation.
      3. Expand the basic accounting equation using revenue, expense, and withdrawal transactions.
      4. Analyze simple accounting transactions as to their effect on the basic accounting equation.
      5. Prepare simplified financial statements.
      6. Define basic accounting terms, concepts and principles.
    6. Perform basic accounting transactions.
      1. Develop a chart of accounts.
      2. Record transactions in T-account utilizing the rules of debit and credit.
      3. Prepare a simple trial balance.
      4. Prepare financial statements from a trial balance.
      5. Identify the normal balance of an account.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 333 - Funeral Directing II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various products available through funeral homes and competing industries. Topics of study will include merchandising and pricing techniques, casket components and construction, outer burial containers, urns and cemetery components. In addition, this course will cover the principles of making funeral arrangements and will include detailed information on various funeral rites with emphasis on religious customs but also including non-religious, military, and fraternal rites.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Corequisite: MOR 334  
    Competencies
    1. Categorize different styles of caskets.
      1. Describe the materials used to construct caskets.
      2. Identify component parts of a casket.
      3. Explain the various styles of casket interiors and exteriors.
      4. Explain the reasons for differences in prices of caskets.
      5. Describe closure methods, casket styles and sizes.
    2. Classify the materials and construction of outer burial containers and cemetery merchandise.
      1. Identify types of grave liners.
      2. Identify materials used in construction of outer burial containers.
      3. Describe various methods of closure of outer burial containers.
      4. Discuss methods of selling vaults and outer burial containers.
      5. Identify the various types of structures commonly found in a cemetery.
      6. Identify the various styles of monuments and cremation merchandise.
    3. Incorporate merchandising concepts in the funeral home setting.
      1. Determine merchandise availability.
      2. Distinguish between costs and expenses.
      3. Explain methods of determining a selling price for merchandise.
      4. Explain financial aspects of cost of operations.
      5. Explain arrangement consideration in the selection room.
      6. Differentiate between selling price and price quotation.
      7. Describe the various methods of merchandise display.
    4. Demonstrate the skills used in making pre-need and at-need funeral arrangements.
      1. Describe making pre-need funeral arrangements.
      2. Explain financial consideration for pre-need funeral arrangements.
      3. Describe making at-need funeral arrangements.
      4. Describe selection room procedures both direct and indirect selling.
    5. Summarize the various religious funeral rites.
      1. Explain the traditional and non-traditional funeral rite.
      2. Explain the procedure for conducting funerals for specific religions.
      3. Define the terminology of specific religions listed above.
    6. Summarize the various non-religious funeral rites.
      1. Explain a traditional and non-traditional no-religious funeral rite.
      2. Explain the role of the celebrant in a non-religious funeral rite.
      3. Define the terminology associated with a non-religious funeral rite.
    7. Discuss the various fraternal and military funeral rites.
      1. Identify the contact person of a specific fraternal organization with whom to coordinate the funeral ceremony.
      2. Explain the American Legion funeral rite.
      3. Explain the military funeral rite.
      4. State the requirements for eligibility for veteran’s benefits.

  
  • MOR 334 - Funeral Home Operations II

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will provide the student opportunities to observe and assemble various religious funeral rites and simulate standard funeral home activities relating to merchandise display and presentation. The student will also create and present a non-religious simulated funeral service.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Corequisite: MOR 333  
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast the funeral and visitation customs of veterans, active military, and various religions.
      1. Assess the items which are needed during various religious and military visitations and funerals.
      2. Describe funeral rites for various religions and veteran services.
      3. Construct visitation setups based on religious, military, and fraternal customs.
    2. Formulate the appropriate presentations to families regarding their merchandise chooses as part of the funeral process.
      1. Explain funeral-related merchandise to consumers.
      2. Create a merchandise display based on techniques common to funeral service.
      3. Demonstrate the various presentation techniques common to funeral service.
    3. Organize and conduct a non-religious funeral/memorial ceremony
      1. Articulate the need for non-religious ceremonies in today’s culture
      2. Observe examples of non-religious ceremonies
      3. Organize and present a non-religious funeral/memorial ceremony
      4. Organize and present a non-religious committal ceremony

  
  • MOR 335 - Embalming I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic techniques of embalming through disinfection, preservation and restoration of deceased human remains. Included are instruments, treatment planning and the practical application of modern embalming theory.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301   and either BIO 733  or BIO 164 .
    Corequisite: MOR 336  
    Competencies
    1. Identify basic terminology, concepts, and classifications of embalming.
      1. Define embalming terminology.
      2. Identify social, psychological, ethical, and regulatory embalming considerations.
      3. Recall four classifications of embalming.
    2. Memorize regulatory considerations related to embalming.
      1. Recall role of Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and Federal Trade Commission.
      2. Identify elements of Hazard Communication Standard, Formaldehyde Standard, and Bloodborne Pathogen Standard.
    3. Identify basic Chemistry concepts as applied to the embalming process.
      1. Recall elements of biochemistry, embalming chemistry, organic and inorganic chemistry.
      2. List concepts of mixtures and solutions.
      3. Recall concepts of organic chemistry and organic compounds related to embalming.
      4. Identify concepts of biochemistry related to embalming.
    4. Analyze uses of embalming chemicals and recall their components.
      1. Identify four main categories of embalming fluids.
      2. Define components of arterial fluid.
      3. Distinguish between three types of arterial fluids.
      4. Recall uses of each component in arterial fluid.
      5. Identify specific examples of each component in arterial fluid.
      6. Define cavity fluid and identify its uses.
      7. Recall examples and uses of supplemental fluids.
      8. Recall examples and uses of accessory chemicals.
      9. Define primary dilution.
      10. Define secondary dilution.
      11. Demonstrate use of primary dilution equation (C x V = C’ x V’).
      12. Compare hypertonic and hypotonic arterial solutions.
    5. Discuss the general processes associated with death (both ante-mortem and post-mortem) and define the post-mortem changes that occur.
      1. Recall agonal changes.
      2. Define post-mortem physical changes.
      3. Define post-mortem chemical changes.
      4. Identify effects of post-mortem changes on embalming process.
      5. Define terms associated with death.
    6. Identify concepts associated with vascular anatomy used in embalming.
      1. Define linear guide, anatomical guide, and anatomical limits.
      2. Recall linear guide, anatomical guide, and anatomical limits of all major vessels used in embalming process.
      3. Identify accompanying veins of major arteries used in embalming.
      4. Identify considerations and precautions of each major vessel.
      5. List common incision sites and types for each major vessel.
      6. Identify techniques for raising vessels.
      7. Identify suture techniques for closing incisions.
    7. Analyze common concepts of embalming case analysis.
      1. Distinguish embalming significance of post-mortem physical changes.
      2. Distinguish embalming significance of post-mortem chemical changes.
      3. Recall embalming treatments for common body conditions.
    8. Examine concepts of body preparation prior to arterial injection.
      1. Recall necessary legal authorizations for embalming procedure.
      2. Identify common techniques in transferring a body.
      3. Recall initial treatments of the body.
      4. List common techniques for positioning of the body.
      5. Recall commonly-used feature-setting techniques.
      6. Identify techniques to deal with invasive devices.
      7. Recall common pre-embalming conditions and corresponding treatments.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • MOR 336 - Embalming I Clinical

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is a study of basic techniques of embalming through disinfection, preservation and restoration of deceased human remains. Included are instruments, treatment planning and the practical application of modern embalming theory.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301   and either BIO 733  or BIO 164 .
    Corequisite: MOR 335  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate a technical understanding of the preparation room, its design, health and safety standards, equipment, and instruments.
      1. Explain and demonstrate OSHA requirements.
      2. Identify construction materials and design of the preparation room.
      3. Identify necessary equipment.
      4. Identify necessary instruments.
      5. Identify necessary accessory materials (e.g. embalming chemicals.)
      6. Explain uses of equipment, instruments, and accessory materials.
    2. Analyze an embalming case.
      1. Explain acceptable case analysis procedures
      2. Recall the legal implications that are noted during an embalming analysis.
      3. Contrast various embalming cases which have different pre-embalming considerations
    3. Execute the embalming procedure.
      1. Set the facial features as a normal part of the embalming process.
      2. Locate the vessels of the vascular system that will be used for injection.
      3. Inject embalming chemicals to accomplish the embalming process.
      4. Treat the viscera of the thoracic and abdominal cavities.
    4. Complete the procedures required of an embalmed body.
      1. Demonstrate appropriate post-embalming procedures of terminal disinfection.
      2. Conduct a post-embalming analysis of the case to determine any further treatments (if necessary.)
      3. Complete the necessary/required documentation regarding the embalming process.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • MOR 340 - Embalming II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech

    The student will study: concepts of cavity treatments and embalming; post-injection embalming treatments; effects of age of embalming analysis; autopsied and tissue donation cases; considerations of delayed embalming; various post-mortem conditions (e.g. discolorations, vascular and moisture considerations, etc.) and respective treatments; the effects of drugs on the embalming process; and a variety of other selected conditions that impact the embalming procedure.
    Prerequisite: MOR 335 , MOR 336  and either BIO 733  or BIO 164 .
    Corequisite: MOR 341  
    Competencies

    1. Identify commonly-used procedures of arterial injection and drainage.
      1. Define one-point injection.
      2. Define split injection.
      3. Define multi-point injection.
      4. Define restricted cervical injection.
      5. Define sectional embalming.
      6. Define six-point injection.
      7. Identify commonly-used drainage techniques and concepts.
    2. Examine various movements of arterial solution throughout the body.
      1. Define delivery.
      2. Define distribution.
      3. Differentiate between arterial distribution and diffusion.
      4. Identify common sources of intravascular resistance.
      5. Identify common sources of extravascular resistance.
      6. Recall the need for resistance during embalming process.
      7. Identify concepts of rate of flow and pressure relative to embalming.
      8. Identify concepts of ideal pressure and ideal rate of flow.
      9. Recall center of distribution in human body.
      10. Identify signs of arterial solution distribution and diffusion.
      11. Compare concepts of osmosis and dialysis relative to embalming process.
    3. Examine the various aspects of aspiration and cavity treatment/embalming.
      1. Recall the purpose of cavity treatment.
      2. Identify the two common theories of cavity treatment.
      3. Recall the abdominal regions and their contents by the two systems of nomenclature.
      4. Recall the common trocar guides.
      5. Identify equipment use for aspiration.
      6. Identify aspiration methods for the cranial, abdominal, thoracic, and pelvic cavities.
      7. Define purge and identify the characteristics of the various types.
    4. Identify treatments commonly employed after arterial injection.
      1. Identify the two types of supplemental embalming.
      2. Recall the different techniques for surface embalming.
      3. Recall the different techniques for hypodermic embalming.
      4. Identify common methods and directions of incision closure.
      5. Recall techniques for the removal of various invasive devices.
      6. Identify the post-embalming treatments for distension.
      7. Identify the various techniques for re-setting features when necessary.
    5. Identify the various embalming issues predicated on the age of the deceased.
      1. Recall the embalming considerations for infants and children.
      2. List the embalming considerations for the 4-12 year old decedent.
      3. Recall the embalming considerations for the adolescent and adult.
      4. Recall the process of a pre-injection.
      5. Identify the embalming considerations for the elderly.
    6. Distinguish the embalming implications of an autopsied case.
      1. Compare the two types of autopsies.
      2. Recall the purpose of each type of autopsy.
      3. List the general considerations of autopsy treatment.
      4. Identify autopsy embalming considerations. 
      5. Differentiate between a partial and complete autopsy.
      6. Identify specific treatments involved in embalming the autopsied body.
      7. Identify the various types of partial autopsies.
    7. Examine the embalming implications of an organ/tissue donor case.
      1. Identify tissue and organs being recovered for transplantation.
      2. Recall the two common embalming options for an organ donor.
      3. Identify common embalming treatments for an eye donor.
      4. Identify the three methods of embalming the legs of a long bone donor.
      5. Identify major embalming concerns associated with skin donors.
    8. Identify common problems associated with delayed embalming.
      1. Recall common injection techniques used with delayed embalming.
      2. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for rigor mortis.
      3. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for refrigerated bodies.
      4. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for bodies with decomposition.
    9. Identify discolorations and the embalming considerations and general treatments.
      1. Identify ante-mortem blood discolorations.
      2. Identify post-mortem blood discolorations.
      3. Identify intravascular blood discolorations.
      4. Identify extravascular blood discolorations.
      5. Recall embalming considerations for carbon monoxide poisoning.
      6. Identify the concept and process of instant tissue fixation.
    10. Identify moisture considerations relating to the body during the embalming process.
      1. Define edema.
      2. Identify types of edema by location.
      3. Identify effects of edema on the embalming process.
      4. Recall various embalming techniques to treat edema.
      5. Identify various chemical solutions used to treat edema.
    11. Analyze vascular considerations in the embalming process.
      1. Define arteriosclerosis.
      2. Identify the different types of gangrene.
      3. Define atheroma.
      4. Identify the embalming concerns and treatments of selected intravascular conditions.
      5. Differentiate between intravascular and extravascular resistance.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • MOR 341 - Embalming II Clinical

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an advanced study of embalming techniques. Included in the study will be the embalming of difficult cases.
    Prerequisite: MOR 335 , MOR 336  and either BIO 733  or BIO 164 .
    Corequisite: MOR 340  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze an embalming case.
      1. Explain acceptable case analysis procedures.
      2. Recall the legal implications that are noted during an embalming analysis.
      3. Contrast various embalming cases which have different pre-embalming considerations.
    2. Execute the embalming procedure.
      1. Set the facial features as a normal part of the embalming process.
      2. Locate the vessels of the vascular system that will be used for injection.
      3. Inject embalming chemicals to accomplish the embalming process.
      4. Treat the viscera of the thoracic and abdominal cavities.
    3. Complete the procedures required of an embalmed body.
      1. Demonstrate appropriate post-embalming procedures of terminal disinfection.
      2. Conduct a post-embalming analysis of the case to determine any further treatments (when necessary.)
      3. Complete the necessary/required documentation regarding the embalming process.
    4. Complete the procedures required of an autopsied body.
      1. Treat the viscera of the body.
      2. Locate the proper vessels for embalming the autopsied case.
      3. Inject embalming chemical into the various areas of the body.
      4. Embalm the tissue of the cavity utilizing surface applications.
    5. Complete the embalming procedure required by a difficult case.
      1. Describe the proper procedure for the difficulty.
      2. Execute the proper embalming procedure for the difficulty, which may include: burn victims, decomposition cases, infants, drowning victims, or decedents to be transported to other funeral home (specifically those to board a common carrier.)
    6. Identify the effects of various types of drugs on the embalming process.
      1. Recall the embalming considerations of chemotherapy.
      2. Identify the embalming considerations of corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory drugs.
      3. Identify the embalming considerations of radioactive materials.
    7. Identify proper embalming techniques for special cases.
      1. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for purge.
      2. List the embalming considerations and treatments for gases.
      3. Identify the embalming considerations and treatments for facial trauma.
      4. Name the embalming considerations and treatments for renal failure.
      5. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for obesity.
      6. List the embalming considerations and treatments for re-embalming.
      7. Identify the embalming considerations and treatments for delayed viewing.
      8. Name the embalming considerations and treatments for shipping human remains.
    8. Recall the embalming considerations and treatments for deformities and malformations.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • MOR 345 - Restorative Art

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will develop knowledge of anatomical modeling, facial expressions, color, cosmetics, display lighting, instruments and materials and techniques necessary to rebuild the human face that has been destroyed by traumatic and/or pathological conditions.
    Prerequisite: MOR 335 , MOR 336  and either BIO 733  or BIO 164 .
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of theories and principles of restorative art.
      1. Explain the psychological reasons for restorative art
      2. Describe characteristics of the normal face
      3. Define major and minor restorations
      4. Describe terms, forms and position/direction of facial features.
    2. Describe the anatomical structures which influence facial features
      1. Identify the following cranial bones and major landmarks by including occipital, parietal, temporal, frontal
      2. Identify the following facial bones, their location, and landmarks by including nasal, zygomatic, maxilla, mandible.
      3. Describe the restorative significance of each of these bones.
    3. Locate the muscles of cranium, face, and neck which influence surface form and expression
      1. Identify the origin and insertion of each facial muscle.
      2. Describe the muscles which effect facial expression of the mouth and eyes.
      3. Discuss how facial muscles would be used for a reconstructive procedure
    4. Analyze the human face by using physiognomical terms and descriptions.
      1. Relate physiognomical terms in descriptions of facial markings.
      2. List and classify facial marking as natural or acquired
      3. Determine which muscles will give rise to each of the facial markings.
    5. Interpret facial proportions for use in a reconstruction
      1. Determine when it is appropriate to use the Canon of facial proportions.
      2. Interpret the facial proportions theory
      3. Explain both frontal and profile forms using correct terminology.
    6. Describe general modeling techniques for restorations
      1. Identify types of waxes.
      2. Identify conditions for deep and surface restorations.
      3. Select an appropriate armature to be used in a given reconstruction.
    7. Describe general restorative art treatments for trauma and pathological conditions.
      1. Identify cases requiring restorative art.
      2. List treatments and procedures for specific cases
      3. Identify sutures used in restoration
      4. Select materials used for procedures.
    8. Examine general color and cosmetology theory of restorative art.
      1. Classify and explain the principles of color theory.
      2. Relate their application to cosmetic compounds
      3. Explain the principles of the Prang System of pigmentary colors.
      4. Assess the effects of color illumination on objects.
      5. Identify the pigments of the skin and the necessary cosmetics to match that skin.
      6. Explain application of color and cosmetology in the funeral home setting.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 365 - Survey of Infectious Diseases

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides a survey of infectious disease processes, nonspecific and specific defense mechanisms, and principles of infection control and epidemiology. Safe handling of infectious materials and personal protective equipment are emphasized.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Competencies
    1. Acquire knowledge of disease agents for infectious diseases.
      1. Discussing types of microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites.
      2. Describing how microorganisms are named and classified
      3. Discussing how major groups of microorganisms can be separated from one another
      4. Discussing normal flora.
      5. Defining and discussing pathogens and opportunistic organisms.
      6. Explaining virulence
      7. Explaining how microorganisms are grown and identified in the laboratory.
    2. Acquire understanding of the body’s defenses to infectious diseases.
      1. Discussing normal how resistance to infectious diseases.
      2. Discuss host factors that decrease resistance
      3. Discuss immunocomprosied hosts
      4. Discuss the processes that occur in acute and chronic infection and identify manifestations of infectious diseases
      5. Discussing vaccines and measures to prevent infectious diseases.
      6. Identify antimicrobial agents
      7. Explaining the terms ‘hypersensitivity’ and ‘autoimmunity’.
    3. Acquire knowledge of the epidemiological aspects of infection control.
      1. Defining morbidity and mortality
      2. Defining prevalence and incidence
      3. Discussing portals of entry and exit
      4. Describing modes of transmission
      5. Explaining the chain of infection
      6. Explaining nosocomial infections.
      7. Discussing surveillance of emerging ‘new’ and drug resistant pathogens.
    4. Acquire understanding of infection control procedures and safe handling of infectious materials
      1. Comparing and contrasting sterilization, disinfection, pasteurization, bactericide, germicide, sporicide, and antiseptic
      2. Stating specifications for aseptic techniques and steam, dry heat, ethylene oxide, cold chemical, boiling, filtration, and radiation methods of sterilization and disinfection.
      3. Discussing methods of sterilization and disinfection used for hospital/surgical/funeral equipment
      4. Discussing handling and disposal of biological hazards.
      5. Discussing OSHA’s occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens rules.
      6. Explaining Universal precautions
      7. Describing principles of disease prevention and handling.
    5. Demonstrate and understanding of the embalming implications of various diseases.
      1. Determing the infection that may be present in the dead human body.
      2. Describing the risk embalmers encounter with each of those diseases.
      3. Describing transportation techniques needed to control the infection.
      4. Discussing an appropriate embalming treatment for that disease.
      5. Describing any special treatments needed to protect the general public following the embalming of a human body with that particular disease.

  
  • MOR 366 - Funeral Pathology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will be introduced to the study of the cause, course and effects of diseases upon the human body, with stress on ways in which tissue changes affect the embalming process. Pathologic conditions that require special treatment and terminology associated with the causes of death.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: MOR 301  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of terminology which will enable competent communication with members of health professions and the public:
      1. define descriptive terminology related to disease
      2. explain etiology of diseases
      3. apply knowledge of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes to build and define medical terms
    2. Describe general pathology and how disease affects the human body:
      1. explain the divisions of pathology
      2. explain the nature of disease
      3. explain the inflammation process
      4. explain cellular reaction to injury
      5. define structural abnormalities
    3. Identify special pathology and how disease affects particular organs and organ systems by defining and giving examples of:
      1. disturbances in the circulatory system
      2. diseases of the blood
      3. diseases of the heart and blood vessels
      4. neoplasms and cysts
      5. diseases of digestive system
      6. diseases of respiratory tract
      7. diseases of urinary system
      8. diseases of nervous system
      9. diseases of male and female reproductive system
      10. diseases of the bone and joints
      11. diseases of the endocrine glands 
    4. Recognize problems presented prior to and during embalming caused by the disease process:
      1. relate tissue changes caused by injury to case analysis
      2. relate tissue changes caused by diseases of the circulatory system to the embalming process
      3. explain infectious disease considerations for the embalmer
    5. Articulate the role of the coroner and medical examiner in forensic pathology:
      1. explain the jurisdiction and responsibilities of the coroner and medical examiner
      2. list the types of death for investigation
      3. identify the general features of specific injuries
      4. explain the purpose of the autopsy
    6. Describe disease agents for infectious diseases:
      1. discuss types of microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites
      2. describe how microorganisms are named and classified
      3. discuss how major groups of microorganisms can be separated from one another
      4. discuss normal flora
      5. define pathogens and opportunistic organisms
      6. explain virulence
      7. explain how microorganisms are grown and identified in the laboratory
    7. Identify the body’s defenses to infectious diseases:
      1. discuss normal host resistance to infectious diseases
      2. discuss host factors that decrease resistance
      3. discuss immuno-compromised hosts
      4. discuss the processes that occur in acute and chronic infection and identify manifestations of infectious diseases
      5. discuss vaccines and measures to prevent infectious diseases
      6. identify antimicrobial agents
      7. explain the terms ‘hypersensitivity’ and ‘autoimmunity’

  
  • MOR 390 - Professional Review

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will study the professional standards and ethics to which funeral directors adhere. Students will also be exposed to test-taking strategies for the National Board Exam and discover the licensure process for funeral directors.
    Prerequisite: Completion of all Mortuary Science courses and consent of program and chairperson.
    Corequisite: MOR 940   and MOR 941  
    Competencies
     

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the licensure process, functions of the funeral director/embalmer and related funeral service professions.
      1. Describe the duties and responsibilities of the funeral director, embalmer, cemeterian, and direct disposer.
      2. Explain the licensure process for funeral directors and embalmers.
    2. Examine strategies and techniques for successful test taking.
      1. Read literature regarding test-taking strategies.
      2. Analyze test-taking strategies.
      3. Complete computerized questions for test-taking strategies.
    3. Assess present level of funeral directing knowledge and critical thinking.
      1. Conduct self-assessment of Public Health and Technical curricular areas.
      2. Summarize the curricular area of Legal and Regulatory.
      3. Conduct self-assessment of the Business Management and Professional curricular areas.
      4. Summarize the curricular area of Social Sciences.
    4. Utilize a variety of resources to increase funeral service knowledge and critical thinking.
      1. Identify resources to utilize for preparation of the National Board Exam
      2. Identify resources to utilize for licensure in the state of practice.
      3. Implement plans to increase funeral service knowledge, critical thinking and test-taking strategies.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 940 - Funeral Capstone

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This lab course will survey essential aspects of the funeral service profession.  Students will be on campus to demonstrate the various tasks required of a funeral director to include:  technical embalming skills, restorative art techniques for cosmetic applications, dressing, casketing and placing in state, funeral arrangement opportunities, setting up visitations, writing obituaries, planning services, and demonstrating verbal and written communication skills.
    Prerequisite: Completion of all other Mortuary Science courses and consent of the Program Chair.
    Corequisite: MOR 390  and MOR 941  
    Competencies
    1. Interpret how federal, state, and local laws apply to funeral service in order to ensure compliance.
      1. Utilize Federal Trade Commission-required price lists to present to families.
      2. Utilize Federal Trade Commission-required Statement of Goods and Services Selected to present to families.
      3. Present legal descriptions of the merchandise available to families.
    2. Apply principles of public health and safety in the handling and preparation of human remains.
      1. Utilize appropriate equipment to perform a transfer of remains.
      2. Utilize appropriate OSHA-approved steps to complete a transfer of remains.
      3. Perform OSHA-approved steps during handling and embalming of deceased human remains.
    3. Incorporate technical skills in embalming that are necessary for the preparation and handling of human remains.
      1. Analyze an embalming case.
      2. Execute the embalming procedure.
      3. Complete the procedures required to embalm a body.
    4. Demonstrate technical skills in restorative art that are necessary for the preparation and handling of human remains.
      1. Demonstrate accurate knowledge of reconstructive procedures for restoring facial features.
      2. Demonstrate appropriate application of cosmetics to a deceased human remains.
      3. Utilize appropriate techniques for placing a decedent in state for identification or for public viewing.
    5. Demonstrate skills required for conducting arrangement conferences, visitations, services, and ceremonies.
      1. Present merchandise options available to families.
      2. Present service options available to families.
      3. Demonstrate appropriate displays of religious equipment for various religious visitations.
    6. Apply the requirements and procedures for burial, cremation, and other accepted forms of disposition of human remains.
      1. Prepare an identification viewing for a decedent.
      2. Present appropriate disposition options to include, burial, cremation, green burial and alkaline hydrolysis.
    7. Demonstrate verbal and written communication skills needed for funeral service practice.
      1. Prepare an obituary for a decedent.
      2. Demonstrate appropriate funeral service terminology.
      3. Demonstrate appropriate professionalism skills including professional attire.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • MOR 941 - Practicum

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 12
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students will be assigned to a college-approved funeral home to learn procedures and policies and perform duties directly relating to the practice of funeral service as assigned by the preceptor, licensed funeral home staff and faculty members.
    Prerequisite: Completion of all Mortuary Science courses and consent of the program chairperson.
    Corequisite: MOR 390  and MOR 940  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of conducting funeral services.
      1. Observe funeral arrangement conference with a licensed funeral director.
      2. Complete arrangement forms for funeral arrangements observed.
      3. Demonstrate active participation in a minimum of 5 funeral services by completing a Funeral Service Report for each service.
    2. Model principles and basic techniques of embalming a dead human body.
      1. Explain the conditions which impact the embalming cases.
      2. Plan the steps to complete the Embalming cases.
      3. Demonstrate active participation in a minimum of 5 embalming cases by completing an Embalming Report for each case.
    3. Model principles and basic techniques of cosmetizing and restoring of a dead human body.
      1. Explain the conditions which impact the restoration cases.
      2. Plan the steps to complete the Restoration cases.
      3. Demonstrate active participation in a minimum of 5 restorative/cosmetic cases by completing a Restorative Art Report for each case.
    4. Apply the laws and regulations governing funeral services.
      1. Present and explain the General Price List, Casket/Urn Price List, and Outer Burial Container Price List during the mock funeral arrangement conference.
      2. Complete and present a Statement of Goods & Services Selected form at the conclusion of the mock funeral arrangement conference.
      3. Prepare a death certificate.
    5. Perform essential tasks involved in basic funeral home operations.
      1. Simulate the funeral arrangement process in the presence of a faculty member.
      2. Complete an arrangement form during the mock funeral arrangement conference.
      3. Organize the tasks to be completed following the arrangement conference.
    6. Examine the services options available to families being served by a funeral director.
      1. Explain the various types of services (e.g. burial, cremation, etc.) offered by a funeral home.
      2. Show the various types of merchandise (e.g. caskets, urns, outer burial containers) offered in a selection room.
      3. List the various service location options for families.
    7. Perform duties and tasks as assigned by the licensed funeral director.
      1. Create an obituary.
      2. Create memorial products (e.g. register book, memorial folder, etc.)
      3. Simulate a minimum of two Notifications of Death and complete a report for each notification of death.
      4. Prepare a minimum of 2 visitations and complete a Visitation Report for each visitation.
      5. Show active participation in a minimum of 2 Transfers of remains by completing a Transfers of Remains report for each transfer.
    8. Create appropriate services for a family in a given scenario.
      1. Interview a faculty member to determine the information needed for a funeral.
      2. List the steps needed to complete the
      3. Develop a plan to complete the appropriate services for the family.
      4. Summarize the steps to be taken to complete the service.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

Music-applied

  
  • MUA 101 - Applied Voice

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is for individual instruction in singing. Students receive weekly half-hour lessons during the Fall and Spring semesters and longer lessons during the shorter Summer semester. Students are accepted at all levels of experience. Students will study tone production, breath control, diction, literature, stage presence and general musicianship. When registering, students pay the cost of one DMACC credit plus a music lesson fee. There is no limit on the number of times a student may register for this course. However, only the most recent four semesters’ credits may be used as elective credit when applying for a DMACC degree.
    Competencies
    1. Identify proper technique for vocal performance
      1. Demonstrate proper posture
      2. Show use of proper breath support
      3. Demonstrate appropriate diction
    2. Learn the fundamentals of music theory
      1. Demonstrate ability to match pitches
      2. Demonstrate understanding of dynamics
      3. Demonstrate understanding of rhythm
      4. Demonstrate understanding of phrasing
    3. Perform vocal literature suitable to the experiential level of the student.

  
  • MUA 120 - Applied Piano

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is for individual instruction in playing piano. Students receive weekly half-hour lessons during the Fall and Spring semesters and longer lessons during the shorter Summer semester. Students will study all aspects of piano technique, literature, stage presence and general musicianship. Students are accepted at all levels of experience. When registering, students pay the cost of one DMACC credit plus a music lesson fee. There is no limit on the number of times a student may register for this course. However, only the most recent four semesters’ credits may be used as elective credit when applying for a DMACC degree.
    Competencies
    1. Identify proper technique for piano performance
      1. Demonstrate proper posture
      2. Demonstrate proper arm and hand position
    2. Learn the fundamentals of music theory
      1. Demonstrate understanding of music notation.
      2. Provide evidence of an understanding of dynamics.
      3. Substantiate an understanding of rhythm
      4. Demonstrate understanding of melody
      5. Verify an understanding of phrasing
    3. Perform piano literature suitable to the experiential level of the student.

  
  • MUA 147 - Applied Instrumental

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is for individual instruction in brass, woodwind, string, percussion instruments and in guitar. There is a separate course section for each instrument area; students must be sure to register in the section that is designated for the instrument they want to study. Students may register for more than one section, but a Drop/Add slip that is signed by the instructor must be used when registering for more than one section. Students receive weekly half-hour lessons during the Fall and Spring semesters and longer lessons during the shorter Summer semester. Students are accepted at all levels of experience. Students will study all aspects of technique, breath control (when applicable), literature, stage presence and general musicianship. When registering, students pay the cost of one DMACC credit plus a music lesson fee. There is no limit on the number of times a student may register for this course. However, only the most recent four semesters’ credits may be used as elective credit when applying for a DMACC degree.
    Competencies
    1. Identify proper technique for instrumental performance.
    2. Demonstrate proper posture
      1. Demonstrate proper position for the instrument.
      2. Demonstrate appropriate embouchure (wind instrumentalists).
      3. Demonstrate proper breath support
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the following fundamentals of music theory
    4. Apply knowledge of the above fundamentals (3.0) to the interpretation of music.
    5. Perform literature suitable to the experiential level of the student


Music-general

  
  • MUS 100 - Music Appreciation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core


    A survey of the development of western arts music through study of representative compositions of many periods and styles. Includes definitions of musical terminology and a major emphasis on listening.
    Competencies
    1. Define human emotional responses to basic music concepts
      1. Discuss the affective domain in relationship to music.
      2. Define the aesthetic experience generally
      3. Relate the aesthetic experience personally
    2. Compare differences in the elements of music
      1. Show differences in pitch regarding highness and lowness.
      2. Compare dynamic changes between loudness and softness.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of timbre via use of specific instruments and voices.
      4. Define rhythm: particularly level of rhythmic involvement and tempo.
    3. Develop listening skills to discern varieties
      1. Identify changes in melody with regard to movement by steps and leaps; degrees of repetition, phrases, and cadences
      2. Contrast levels of harmony particularly with regard to consonance and dissonance, as well as harmonic changes
      3. Define musical texture: polyphonic, homophonic, monophonic.
      4. Interpret musical form
    4. Categorize appropriate musical vocabulary
      1. Identify musical terms commonly found in music
      2. Apply definitions in relationship to styles and types of music
    5. Interpret and identify musical characteristics prevalent during various eras including the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, the 20th Century and Contemporary. This includes the following but is not limited to:
      1. Analyze the development of the musical elements
      2. Identify significant musical involvement
      3. Determine qualities and characters of specific composers.
      4. Categorize representative works of each style period,
      5. Compare the relationship of music to society and the other arts.
    6. Create written assignments as a culmination of course objectives
      1. Utilize elements of music knowledge by attending a musical performance
      2. Determine listening elements regarding a musical performance
      3. Combine musical terms and vocabulary appropriately in written assignments

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

  
  • MUS 102 - Music Fundamentals

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course introduces students to the elements of music as they are taught in music classes from preschool through middle school. Basic information regarding the teaching of music and an introduction to using a piano as a teaching aid are included. This course includes a significant amount of student participation both in teaching music concepts to classmates and in being students who are being taught by classmates.
    Competencies
    1. Read the pitches of music
      1. Identify the pitches accurately in bass and treble clefs
      2. Play the pitches on the piano
      3. Play simple pieces on the piano
      4. Play simple pieces on the piano
      5. Play simple pieces on the recorder
    2. Read the rhythms of music
      1. Identify common meters.
      2. Label rhythmic patterns numerically
      3. Take rhythmic dictation.
      4. Perform common rhythms accurately
      5. Create rhythmic patterns.
    3. Recognize the harmonic aspects of music
      1. Investigate chord structure
      2. Perform basic chord progressions on the piano.
      3. Perform basic chordal accompaniments on the piano.
    4. Learn the vocabulary of music
    5. Learn to play the piano
      1. Identify the placement of common pitches.
      2. Play with appropriate hand position
      3. Utilize accurate fingering
      4. Practice for continued dexterity
    6. Learn basic conducting patterns.
      1. Conduct patterns
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of patterns when others are conduct¬ing
      3. Utilize appropriate breath control
      4. Practice for continued dexterity
    7. Learn the principles of good vocal technique.
      1. Breathe appropriately.
      2. Support the tone.
      3. Utilize appropriate diction techniques. 
    8. Learn about music education.
      1. Investigate the child development theories of Piaget
      2. Relate the theories of Piaget to elementary school music
      3. Describe the music education methodology of Zoltan Kodaly.
      4. Describe the music education methodology of Carl Orff.
      5. Describe the music education methodology of Jacques Dalcr¬oze 
    9. Learn about the elements of music.
      1. Utilize harmony as a tool for classroom instruction
      2. Utilize melody as a tool for classroom instruction
      3. Utilize form as a tool for classroom instruction
      4. Utilize rhythm as a tool for classroom instruction
      5. Utilize the elements of expression as tools for classroom instruction

  
  • MUS 106 - Music Theory I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    All aspects of music theory will be introduced and explored with the experienced music student. Activities will include ear training, sight singing, keyboard training and written theory assignments.
    Competencies
    1. Review music notation
      1. Read pitch notation
      2. Read rhythmic notation
      3. Accurately interpret dynamic markings
    2. Study scales, tonality, key, and modes
      1. Identify specific tonalities
      2. Define specific tonalities
      3. Trace the historic development of musical tonality
      4. Perform in specific tonalities
    3. Learn intervallic relationships
      1. Identify intervals
      2. Define specific intervals
      3. Trace the historic development of intervals
      4. Play intervals
    4. Recognize chords
      1. Identify specific chords
      2. Define specific chords
      3. Study the historical development of musical harmony.
      4. Play a variety of chords
    5. Analyze music of specific style periods
      1. Define style analysis
      2. Trace the stylistic development of music.
      3. Study specific analytical procedure
    6. Study instrumental and vocal timbre
      1. Define instrumental and vocal range
      2. Trace the historical development of musical ensembles
      3. Apply methods of instrumental and vocal transposition
    7. Study harmony
      1. Identify specific cadence qualities
      2. Identify nonharmonic tones
      3. Analyze harmonic rhythm
      4. Trace the historic development of the harmonic aspect of music.
      5. Identify specific harmonies.
      6. Play specific harmonies at the piano
    8. Study melody
      1. Identify specific melodic organization
      2. Trace the historic development of melody
      3. Perform specific melodies
    9. Identify melodic structure
      1. Define melodic analysis
      2. Trace the historic development of melodic analysis
      3. Analyze melodies
    10. Learn the principles of rhythm
      1. Identify specific rhythmic aspects of music
      2. Study the historical development of rhythmic principles
      3. Perform specific rhythms
    11. Study musical textures
      1. Define the various aspects of musical texture
      2. Trace the historical development of musical texture
      3. Analyze specific musical textures

  
  • MUS 107 - Music Theory II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    As a sequel to Music Theory I, this course will examine music theory in greater complexity and will emphasize the harmonic aspects of music. Activities will include ear training, sight singing, keyboard skills and written theory assignments.
    Prerequisite: MUS 106  
    Competencies
    1. Learn voice leading in four-part chorale writing
      1. Define voice leading in four-part chorale writing
      2. Trace the historic development of voice leading in four-part chorale writing through study of the chorales of J.S. Bach
      3. Apply knowledge of voice leading in four-part chorale writing to musical analysis
      4. Generate examples of stylistic four-part chorale writing
    2. Learn the principles of harmonic chord progressions
      1. Define harmonic chord progression
      2. Trace the historical development of harmonic chord progression
      3. Play harmonic chord progressions.
      4. Learn to harmonize a tonal melody
    3. Study the dominant seventh chord
      1. Define the dominant seventh chord
      2. Trace the historical development of the dominant seventh chord
      3. Identify the dominant seventh chord.
      4. Play the dominant seventh chord
      5. Utilize knowledge of the dominant seventh chord in harmonic analysis
    4. Study the leading-tone seventh chord
      1. Define the leading-tone seventh chord
      2. Trace the historical development of the leading-tone seventh chord
      3. Identify the leading-tone seventh chord.
      4. Play the leading-tone seventh chord
      5. Utilize knowledge of the leading-tone seventh chord in harmonic analysis.
    5. Study nondominant seventh chords.
      1. Define the nondominant seventh chord
      2. Trace the historical development of the nondominant seventh chord
      3. Identify the nondominant seventh chord.
      4. Play the nondominant seventh chord
      5. Utilize knowledge of the nondominant seventh chord in harmonic analysis
    6. Study harmonic modulation
      1. Define harmonic modulation
      2. Trace the historical development of harmonic modulation.
      3. Play traditional harmonic modulations.
      4. Perform harmonizing melodies that modulate
    7. Study secondary dominant chords
      1. Define secondary dominant chords
      2. Trace the historical development of secondary dominant chords
      3. Identify secondary dominant chords.
      4. Play secondary dominant chords
      5. Utilize knowledge of secondary dominant chords in harmonic analysis.
    8. Study leading-tone chords
      1. Define leading-tone chords
      2. Trace the historical development of leading-tone chords
      3. Identify leading-tone chords
      4. Play leading-tone chords
      5. Utilize knowledge of leading-tone chords in harmonic analysis.
    9. Study two-part (binary) form.
      1. Define two-part (binary) form.
      2. Trace the historic development of two-part (binary) form
      3. Apply knowledge of two-part (binary) form to musical analysis
    10. Study three-part (ternary) form.
      1. Define three-part (ternary) form
      2. Trace the historic development of three-part (ternary) form
      3. Apply knowledge of three-part (ternary) form to musical analysis.

  
  • MUS 143 - Concert Choir

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Concert choir is open to all students; however, it is expected that those who register for this course will be able to learn the choral part to which they are assigned and to sing it correctly when singing with the whole choir. At the start of the student’s first enrollment in this course, he/she must sing alone during an interview with the conductor. The goals of the interview are: 1. to start becoming acquainted; 2. to allow the conductor to hear the student’s voice; 3. to allow the student and conductor to agree on the voice part to which the student will be assigned. The choir sings a wide variety of choral literature, chosen to expand the student’s choral music background. Performances serve as the midterm and final exams. Registration in Concert Choir may be repeated indefinitely, but only the most recent 12 credits apply toward a DMACC degree.
    Competencies
    1. Identify proper technique for vocal performance
    2. Demonstrate the proper technique for vocal performance
      1. Demonstrate appropriate relaxation techniques.
      2. Demonstrate proper posture
      3. Demonstrate proper breath support
      4. Demonstrate appropriate diction
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the following fundamentals of music theory
    4. Match pitches
      1. Demonstrate understanding of dynamics
      2. Demonstrate understanding of rhythm
      3. Demonstrate understanding of phrasing
    5. Perform choral literature suitable to the experiential level of the group
      1. Perform literature from all historic periods
      2. Perform with historic perspective
      3. Perform literature from a variety of styles
    6. Cooperate as part of a social group
      1. Participate as a leader
      2. Participate as a member
    7. Accept the social differences of others
    8. Cooperate as a part of a musical performance group
      1. Sing a particular voice part while other parts are being sung
      2. Watch the director.
      3. Appreciate the musical gifts of all people
      4. Perform in a variety of settings
      5. Perform for a variety of people
    9. Represent the school in a variety of situations
      1. Exemplify a model of appropriate behavior on stage
      2. Model appropriate behavior off stage.
      3. React with poise to an audience

  
  • MUS 202 - World Music

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course is a survey of musical styles from countries whose music is primarily based on concepts that are not part of the Western culture music tradition. The list of cultures whose music will be studied includes, but is not limited to, African, Chinese, Japanese, Indian, cultures from the Near East, and indigenous cultures from the Americas.
    Competencies
    1. Learn, for the purpose of reference, Western Civilization music generalities.
      1. Know what countries the Western Civilization includes.
      2. Know what the tonal system is and what its importance is.
      3. Know what the metric system is and what its importance is.
      4. Know and be able to sue in writing and in conversation other basic music terms that are appropriate to the basic understanding of Western Civilization musical styles.
      5. Learn global geography.
    2. Locate on a global map the countries that are included in Western Civilization culture.
      1. Locate on a global map the countries that are outside the Western Civilization culture.
      2. Learn about the geography of the Non-Western civilization cultures that are included in this course so as to be prepared to understand how musical styles can be related to the geography of the environments in which they were created.
    3. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to India.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    4. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to the Middle East.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    5. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to China.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    6. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to Japan.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    7. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to Indonesia
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    8. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to Sub-Saharan Africa.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      3. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      4. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      5. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      6. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music
    9. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to Latin America.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    10. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to the Caribbean.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    11. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to native American Music.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    12. Identify musical characteristics of the music generic to Ethnic North America.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.
    13. Identify characteristics of the music generic to other parts of the world as is appropriate to the focus of this course.
      1. Study the culture and how music fits into it.
      2. Learn about the timbres that are generic to this culture.
      3. Learn about the notational system, if one exists.
      4. Learn what are the major sources of music.
      5. Learn who are the major persons involved in the creation, performance, and promotion of music.

  
  • MUS 204 - History of Rock and Roll

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    “A study of Rock and Roll from the mid 1950s to the present.  Designed to create critical listeners of popular culture music through analysis of song forms, rock band instrumentation, and the political, cultural, and social significance of song lyrics.”
    Competencies

    1. Compare differences in the elements of music.
      1. Identify difference in pitch: highness/lowness of sound.
      2. Identify dynamic changes: loudness/softness of volume.
      3. Differentiate timbre: how instruments and voices sound different.
      4. Demonstrate beat and rhythm: how they are different.
      5. Describe melodic characteristics: movement by steps and leaps;
        repetition, phrases, cadences, and repetition.
    2. Examine the roots of Rock and Roll music.
      1. Illustrate music styles that impacted on the development of Rock and Roll music.
      2. Compare the composers who wrote music in the music styles that lead to
        Rock and Roll.
      3. Compare representative songs from the music styles that lead to
        Rock and Roll.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music in the music styles that lead to Rock and Roll.
    3. Categorize Rock and Roll styles from its start through the early 1960’s.
      1. Classify music styles in Rock and Roll from its start through the early 1960’s.
      2. Compare the composers who wrote Rock and Roll music from its start
        through the early 1960’s.
      3. Compare representative Rock and Roll songs from its start through the
        early 1960’s.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music in the music styles that lead to Rock and Roll.
    4. Examine Rock and Roll styles during the first British Invasion.
      1. Classify the music styles of groups that were part of the first British Invasion.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs from the first British Invasion.
      3. Compare representative songs from the first British Invasion.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music of the first British Invasion.
    5. Examine Rock and Roll styles during the second British Invasion.
      1. Classify the music styles of groups that were part of the second British Invasion.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs from the second British Invasion.
      3. Compare representative songs from the second British Invasion.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music of the first British Invasion.
    6. Differentiate between Folk Rock, Soul and Motown, and San Francisco music styles.
      1. Identify the music styles in Folk Rock, Soul and Motown, and San Francisco.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs in Folk Rock, Soul and Motown,
        and San Francisco styles.
      3. Compare representative songs from the Folk Rock, Soul and Motown,
        and San Francisco styles.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music of the Folk Rock, Soul and Motown, and San Francisco styles.
    7. Contrast Mainstream Rock and Roll styles in the 1970’s, the 1980’s and beyond.
      1. Identify the music styles in Mainstream Rock and Roll from the 1970’s, the 1980’s.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs in Mainstream Rock and Roll from
        the 1970’s, the 1980’s.
      3. Compare representative songs in Mainstream Rock and Roll from
        the 1970’s, the 1980’s.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on the music in Mainstream Rock and Roll from the 1970’s, the 1980’s.
    8. Contrast Heavy Metal, Jazz Rock/Fusion, Dance Music, Rap and Hip-Hop styles.
      1. Identity the music styles in Heavy Metal, Jazz Rock/Fusion, Dance Music, Rap and
        Hip-Hop.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs in Heavy Metal, Jazz Rock/Fusion,
        Dance Music, Rap and Hip-Hop.
      3. Compare representative songs in Heavy Metal, Jazz Rock/Fusion,
        Dance Music, Rap and Hip-Hop.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on Heavy Metal, Jazz Rock/Fusion, Dance Music, Rap and Hip-Hop.
    9. Differentiate between Alternative Rock and Roll styles.
      1. Identify the music styles in Alternative Rock and Roll.
      2. Compare the composers of the songs in Alternative Rock and Roll.
      3. Compare representative songs in Alternative Rock and Roll.
      4. Discuss the relationship of music to society and the implications that relationship
        had on Alternative Rock and Roll styles.

  
  • MUS 205 - Jazz History and Appreciation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course is a survey of the development of American jazz from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on its ethnic origins, cities where jazz developed, styles that evolved and the influential composers and performers who created the various jazz styles.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of jazz characteristics
      1. Discuss the use of musical elements in jazz
      2. Identify musical instruments as used in jazz
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of forms
      4. Understand the importance of improvisation in jazz performances
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the roots of jazz
      1. Discuss the music styles on which jazz is based
      2. Know the areas of the United States in which jazz developed
      3. Know how jazz fits into the culture of the areas where it was developed
      4. Know the important jazz composers
      5. Know the important jazz performers
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of New Orleans Style jazz
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know the relationship between Blues and the New Orleans Style of jazz
      3. Identify its stylistic traits
      4. Know its important composers
      5. Know its important performers
      6. Identify representative compositions by sound
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of jazz as it developed in New York City
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the Swing style of jazz
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of Bop
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of Cool Jazz
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    8. Demonstrate knowledge of Fusion
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of Jazz Rock
      1. Discuss its history
      2. Know its stylistic traits
      3. Know its important composers
      4. Know its important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound
    10. Demonstrate knowledge of other jazz styles as are appropriate to the focus of this course
      1. Discuss their history
      2. Know their stylistic traits
      3. Know their important composers
      4. Know their important performers
      5. Identify representative compositions by sound

  
  • MUS 275 - Chamber Ensemble

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This choral ensemble is open by audition to all DMACC students. Students who want to sing in this ensemble must arrange an audition time with the choral conductor at the start of the semester. Registration in Chamber Ensemble may be repeated indefinitely, but only the most recent 12 credits apply toward a DMACC degree. The Chamber Ensemble performs a variety of choral music, which is generally more difficult than the music performed by the Concert Choir. Prior choral performance experience is recommended, but not required for participation. Singers are required to sing in two performances per semester, which serve as the midterm and final exams.
    Prerequisite: Audition with the conductor
    Competencies
    1. Identify proper technique for vocal performance.
      1. Demonstrate the proper techniques for a vocal performance.
      2. Demonsttrate appropriate relaxation techniques.
      3. Demonstrate proper breath support.
      4. Demonstrate appropriate diction.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the following fundamentals of music theory.
      1. Match pitches.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of dynamics.
      3. Demonstrate understanding of rhythm.
      4. Demonstrate understanding of phrasing.
    3. Perform choral literature suitable to the experiential level of the group.
      1. Perform literature from all historic periods.
      2. Perform with historic perspective.
      3. Perform literature from a variety of styles.
    4. Work cooperatively as part of a social group.
      1. Participate as a leader.
      2. Participate as a member.
      3. Develop an appreciation for the musical gifts of all people. 
    5. Work cooperatively as part of a musical performance group.
    6. Represent the school in a variety of situations.
      1. Exemplify appropriate behavior on stage.
      2. Model appropriate behavior off stage.
    7. Perform literature which is more difficult than that of the Concert Choir.
      1. Audition for places in the Chamber Choir.
      2. Demonstrate vocal technique.
      3. Demonstrate pitch matching ability.
      4. Demonstrate harmonizing ability.

  
  • MUS 329 - Medieval-Renaiss. His/Theory

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    As a part of the music history/theory sequence, this course examines the theoretical foundations and historical structure of music before 1600. Topics include chant, modal theory, text underlay, liturgy, historical notation, choral and instrumental music, patronage, and musical forms related to this time period. Ear Training and Sight-singing are also continued.
    Prerequisite: MUS 107  
    Competencies
    1. Interpret music in antiquity

    1. Analyze the earliest music

    2. Discover the role of music in ancient Greek life and thought.

    3. Discuss the role of music in ancient Rome

    2. Examine the Christian Church in the first millennium

    1. Explain the role of music in the early church

    2. Distinguish the divisions in the church and dialects of chant

    3. Trace the development of musical notation

    4. Demonstrate comprehension through theoretical analysis

    3.  Integrate Roman Liturgy and chant

    1. Outline the parts of the Mass

    2. Break down the characteristics of chant

    3. Classify genres and forms of chant

    4. Characterize Hildegaard of Bingen

    4. Categorize song and dance music to 1300

    1. Summarize European society, 800-1300

    2. Compare and contrast Latin and Vernacular song

    3. Describe minstrels, troubadours, and trouvères

    4. Outline early musical forms

    5. Give examples of secular music

    5. Assess polyphony through the thirteenth century

    1. Explain organum

    2. Analyze aquitanian polyphony

    3. Explain Notre Dame polyphony

    4. Define motet

    5. Name examples of English polyphony

    6. Examine new musical developments in the fourteenth century

    1. Generalize European society in the fourteenth century

    2. Summarize the Ars Nova in France

    3. Illustrate the innovations in writing and rhythm

    4. Analyze the formes fixes.

    5. Discuss the contributions of Guillaume de Machaut

    6. Review fourteenth century music in performance

    7. Integrate music and the Renaissance

    1. Summarize elements of European society from 1400-1600

    2. Paraphrase the role of the Renaissance on culture and art

    3. Identify music in the Renaissance

    4. Predict the legacy of the Renaissance

    8. Evaluate the music from England and Burgundy in the fifteenth century

    1. Describe English music

    2. Describe music in the Burgundian Lands

    3. Discuss the contributions of Guillaume du Fay

    4. Examine the polyphonic Mass

    9. Assess Franco-Flemish composers, 1450-1520

    1. Outline political change and consolidation

    2. Discuss Josquin Desprez

    10. Interpret sacred music in the era of the reformation

    1. Discuss the reformation

    2. Compare and contrast music in the Lutheran church and the Catholic Church

    3. Summarize music in Calvinist churches

    4. Discuss church music in England

    5. Discuss Palestrina and his role in musical evolution

    6. Compare and contrast music in Spain, the new world, Germany, and Eastern Europe

    7. Examine Jewish music

    8. Predict the legacy of sixteenth century sacred music

    11. Evaluate the madrigal and secular song in the sixteenth century

    1. Compare and contrast the music of Spain, Italy, France, Germany, and England

    2. Examine the Italian madrigal

    3. Classify the madrigal and its impact

    12. Point out the rise of instrumental music

    1. List the instruments used during this era

    2. List the types of instrumental music

    3. Explain the role of dance music

    4. Describe Venetian music

    5. Predict the impact of instrumental music on future musical eras

    13. Incorporate and refine music literacy through aural theory and applied theory

    1. Demonstrate competency in sight-reading

    2. Demonstrate competency in ear training by way of dictation

    3. Construct composition(s) using period techniques.

     

  
  • MUS 337 - 20th Century Music His/Theory

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    As a component of the music theory/music history sequence, this course examines both the theoretical underpinnings and historical framework of music in the 20th century.  Topics include chromatic harmony, atonal and aleatoric music, serial theory-composition, set theory, non-western influences, musique concrete, and minimalism.  Ear training and sight-singing are also continued.  
    Prerequisite: MUS 107  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate modern music in the Classical tradition
      1. Differentiate between German modernism and French modernism
      2. Discuss Avant-Garde
      3. Compare late Romantic and early Modern music
    2. Generate names of and describe the key modernist composers
      1. Summarize the contributions of Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Anton Webern, Igor Stravinsky, Béla Bartók, and Charles Ives. 
      2. Describe the correlation in 20th century compositional techniques
      3. Predict the continued influence of these composers
    3. Conclude which important concepts led to the development of the Post-Romantic style
      1. Identify examples of tonal instability as they relate to 20th century music
      2. Learn how composers utilize nonfunctional harmony
      3. Define the use of omnibus progression and blurred cadence
      4. Label the utilization of the augmented triad
    4. Correlate the principles of Impressionism and related styles
      1. Give examples of how scales, chords, and cadences are used in this era.
      2. Identify and define scales
      3. Identify and define chords
      4. Use knowledge of theoretical concepts in specimen analysis
    5. Outline musical evolution in the early 20th century
      1.  Name the major styles of early 20th century music
      2. Describe the distinctive characteristics of harmony and rhythm
      3. Use knowledge of theoretical concepts in specimen analysis
    6.  Interpret pitch-class set theory
      1. Define set theory
      2. List set types
      3. Demonstrate comprehension by way of theoretical analysis
    7. Organize the principals of the twelve-tone technique
      1. Explain the principles of the twelve-tone compositional method
      2. Trace the historical significance of the twelve-tone compositional method
      3. Produce, solve and label twelve-tone matrixes
    8.  Assess musical developments since 1945
      1. Make sense of serialism
      2. Explain indeterminacy
      3. Describe the use of improvisation
      4. Give examples of electronic and computer music
    9. Incorporate and refine music literacy through aural theory and applied theory
      1. Demonstrate competency in sight-reading
      2. Demonstrate competency in ear training by way of dictation
      3. Construct composition(s) using modernist techniques. 

     


Optometric/Ophthalmic Assistant

  
  • OPT 110 - Ophthalmic Pretesting

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the relationships between optometry, ophthalmology and opticianry and various paraprofessional careers in vision care. The course involves the study of and practical experience in patient pretesting, i.e., case history, visual acuity, color vision, pupil evaluation, depth perception, and the specialized testing procedures of keratometry and blood pressure measurement.
    Competencies
    1. Operate the refracting unit
      1. Perform patient positioning in refracting chair
      2. Operate the manual projector
      3. Identify instruments in the exam lane
      4. Explain usage of instruments in exam lane
    2. Analyze case histories
      1. Differentiate amongst different components of a case history
      2. Practice performing case history
      3. Design a case history form
      4. Determine functions of the case history
      5. Assess appropriate follow-up questions for specific chief complaints
      6. Define and explain types of headaches and their symptoms
    3. Perform blood pressure measurement
      1. Identify parts of sphygmomanometer
      2. Define systolic and diastolic pressure
      3. Measure patient’s blood pressures
      4. Define blood pressure referral criteria
      5. Explain the five Korotkoff sounds
      6. Interpret the blood pressure finding
      7. Identify possible procedure errors during blood pressure measurement including but not limited to arm position and cuff size
    4. Analyze visual acuity and procedures
      1. Define Snellen fraction
      2. Analyze factors affecting visual acuity
      3. Measure a patient’s visual acuity and accurately record
      4. Explain visual acuity findings in layman?s terms
      5. differentiate amongst the various charts.
      6. Explain the pinhole test
    5. Analyze entrance tests
      1. Measure pupillary distance manually and with a pupillometer
      2. Differentiate among different color testing instruments and measure color vision
      3. Explain and perform unilateral and alternating cover tests at distance and near
      4. Explain, perform and interpret dictions testing
      5. Determine a patient’s eye dominance and explain to patient in layman?s terms
      6. Perform stereopsis testing
      7. Explain, perform and interpret pupil evaluation
      8. Differentiate among
    6. Summarize uses and results of keratometry
      1. Identify parts of a keratometer
      2. Define keratometry
      3. Measure a patient?s corneal curvature and interpret findings
      4. Perform routine keratometer calibration and maintenance.
      5. Identify types of corneal astigmatism
      6. Calculate amount of corneal astigmatism
      7. Calculate total ocular astigmatism
    7. Summarize the three ophthalmic professions (The Three O’s)
      1. Define Optometrist, ophthalmologist and Optician.
      2. Explain educational requirements for each of the three professions
      3. Explain the professional relationship among the three professions
      4. Differentiate among dispensing optician and manufacturing optician
      5. Identify state and national organizations for the three O’s.
    8. Summarize ophthalmic paraprofessionals
      1. Differentiate the ophthalmic paraprofessions
      2. Define optometric/ophthalmic technician
      3. Analyze certifications associated with paraprofessionals

  
  • OPT 112 - Ophthalmic Specialty Testing

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides the student experience and knowledge in the areas of special vision care procedures: subjective refraction, tonometry (noncontact and Goldmann), visual field testing, slit lamp, basic concepts of orthoptics, and the treatment of eye diseases. This course also prepares the technician to assist the doctor in advanced office techniques in the area of ultrasound and in-office surgical procedures. Also covered are medications commonly prescribed for systemic conditions. Patient instruction and assistance are emphasized in laboratory sessions.
    Prerequisite: OPT 110 , OPT 120 , OPT 123  
    Competencies
    1. Characterize tonometers and demonstrate tonometry
      1. Analyze tonometer types
      2. Explore application tonometry principles
      3. Perform non-contact tonometry
      4. Perform tonopen applanation tonometry
      5. Perform Goldmann applanation tonometry 
    2. Differentiate glaucoma
      1. Explore glaucoma risk factors
      2. Distinguish amongst various types of glaucoma
      3. Analyze glaucoma signs and symptoms
      4. Classify glaucoma medications
    3. Examine the visual pathway
      1. Summarize visual field terminology
      2. Analyze components of the visual pathway
      3. Characterize general and focal visual field defects
      4. Compare different field vision testing techniques including manual, automated, kinetic, static, screening, and diagnostic perimetry
      5. Measure the visual field by using the above techniques
    4. Examine subjective and objective refraction
      1. Summarize subjective refraction goals
      2. Explain subjective refraction complications
      3. Calculate spherical equivalent
      4. Practice retinopathy on patients
    5. Find patient’s distance subjective refraction endpoint
      1. Perform best sphere testing
      2. Perform cylinder testing
      3. Practice binocular balance techniques
      4. Compute subjective endpoint
    6. Characterize non-ocular emergencies
      1. Summarize first aid treatment for open wounds
      2. Review first aid treatment for fainting.
      3. Examine first aid treatment for shock
      4. Become certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and perform automated difibrillation techniques
      5. Explore first aid treatment for stroke
      6. Examine first aid treatment for seizure
      7. Perform infection cotnrol protocols after receiving bloodborne pathogen training
    7. Examine ocular emergencies
      1. Analyze common ocular conditions.
      2. Review common bacteria that affect the eye
      3. Examine emergency ocular situations
      4. Analyze high priority situations
    8. Analyze and demonstrate slit lamp examination procedures
      1. Review ocular anterior segment anatomy
      2. Explore slit illumination techniques
      3. Distinguish three corneal layers
      4. Examine anterior segment of the eye
      5. Estimate anterior chamber using Von Herrick technique
    9. Classify ocular pharmaceuticals and common systemic pharmaceuticals.
      1. Summarize ocular diagnostic pharmaceutical agents.
      2. Examine ocular therapeutic pharmaceutical agents
      3. Analyze potential side effects from ocular medications
      4. Explore ocular side effects from systemic medications
    10. Examine binocularity
      1. Analyze amblyopia
      2. Discuss strabismus
      3. Differentiate heterophorias and heterotopias
    11. Examine other specialty ocular examination techniques
      1. Explore ultrasonic testing
      2. Perform instrument sterilizations
      3. Analyze in-office surgical procedures
      4. Explore emerging technologies

  
  • OPT 120 - Basic Optical Concepts/Optics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the properties of light and the function of a lens in vision correction. This course begins the study of the neutralization and verification of spectacle lens powers, to include spherical, cylindrical and prism lenses.
    Competencies
    1. Review mathematical principles
      1. Solve positive/negative number problems
      2. Solve simple algebraic equations
      3. Perform metric conversions
    2. Investigate the principles of light
      1. Examine electromagnetic light spectrum
      2. Explore the laws of reflection and solve simple reflection problems
      3. Analyze Snell’s Law of Refraction
      4. Discuss index of refraction and solve simple refraction problems
    3. Analyze refraction of multiple light rays
      1. Examine different distortions found in lenses
      2. Explore concept of pantoscopic tilt
      3. Analyze lens designs to correct distortions
      4. Solve simple vergence problems
    4. Explore curved refracting surfaces
      1. Differentiate between convex and concave curvatures
      2. Distinguish between spherical and cylindrical lenses
      3. Perform hand neutralization of concave and convex lenses
      4. Measure front and back lens surfaces with a lens clock.
    5. Analyze lens formulas
      1. Transpose plus to minus lens formula and vice versa
      2. Draw a power cross from a lens formula
      3. Calculate a lens formula from a power cross
      4. Solve power cross problems
    6. Investigate optical properties of the eye
      1. Examine the function of the eye
      2. Explore the optical properties of the eye
      3. Identify refractive errors including emmetropia, hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism, presbyopia, aphakia, pseudophakia
      4. Describe types of optical correction for refractive error correction
    7. Examine and practice using a lensometer
      1. Identify parts of a manual lensometer
      2. Practice focusing eyepiece
      3. Explain the difference between the optical center of a lens and the geometric center of a lens
      4. Identify the major reference point of a lens
      5. Examine the power adjustment of the lensometer
    8. Analyze and practice neutralization of lenses
      1. Determine power of spherical, spherocylindrical and multifocal lenses
      2. Mark optical center of above lens types using a lensometer.
      3. Measure the distance between optical centers of the three lens types
      4. Measure the distance between near optical centers of multifocal lenses.
    9. Analyze accepted lens tolerances and standards
      1. Determine a lens base curve
      2. Calculate minimum lens thickness.
      3. Apply ANSI standards chart
      4. differentiate between neutralization and verification
      5. Differentiate methods of hardening glass lenses
      6. Explain the drop ball test
      7. Explore FDA lens requirements for dress and safety lenses
    10. Analyze prism power and practice neutralization of prism power
      1. Explore the uses of prism in lenses
      2. Measure horizontal and vertical prism using lensometer
      3. Explore concepts of decentration and jump.
      4. Identify prismatic effect and vertical imbalance
    11. Demonstrate verification of lenses
      1. Verify lens orders using lensometer
      2. Apply ANSI standards
      3. Calculate induced prism

  
  • OPT 123 - Ocular Anatomy and Physiology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is intended to familiarize the technician with the form and function of the human eye. The foundation of the lecture material is the anatomy of the eye, but we will discuss the physiology and function of the eye as much as possible. We will also discuss the actions and uses of diagnostic pharmaceutical agents, as their function is based on interference with normal ocular physiology. This course also covers optometric terminology.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze basic ocular structures and functions
      1. Explain basic structures of the eye
      2. Explore primary functions of each structure
      3. Identify basic fundus landmarks
    2. Explore outer adnexa and lacrimal system
      1. Identify protective and orientation structures of outer adnexa
      2. Discuss functions of the external ocular structures.
      3. Examine the anatomy of the lacrimal apparatus
      4. Analyze composition and function of tear film
      5. Observe characteristics of conjunctiva
      6. Perform tear analysis
      7. Perform lid eversion
      8. Discuss conjunctivitis symptoms and causes
    3. Analyze outer tunic of the eye
      1. Distinguish the layers of the cornea
      2. Explain functions of the cornea
      3. Explore corneal physiology
      4. Compare and contrast characteristics of sclera compared to cornea
      5. Summarize organizational anatomy at posterior pole.
      6. Distinguish corneal pathologies
      7. Classify and instill ocular anesthetics
    4. Examine limbus and anterior angle and chamber
      1. Review limbal structures
      2. Analyze anterior chamber and aqueous fluid drainage system
      3. Conclude how aqueous fluid is involved with intraocular pressure
      4. Explain narrow angle glaucoma
      5. Explain open angle glaucoma
    5. Analyze iris component of uveal layer
      1. Identify iris muscles and innervations
      2. Assess iris functions
      3. Explain papillary reflexes of miosis and mydriasis
      4. Explain how iris pigment is involved with iris color
    6. Analyze ciliary body, lens and accommodation
      1. Examine structures and functions of the ciliary body
      2. Identify how lens is suspended from ciliary body
      3. Define aphakia, pseudophakia, cataract, presbyopia
      4. Explain the function of accommodation and structures affected during this process
      5. Describe the accommodative triad
      6. Identify structural characteristics of lens and how they relate to lens function
      7. Analyze age-related changes to these structures
    7. Explore common ocular drugs
      1. Identify diagnostic pharmaceutical agents and ocular structures affected by these agents
      2. Examine parasympathomimetic drugs
      3. Analyze parasypathlytic drugs
      4. Explain sympathomimetic drugs
      5. Verify written ocular drug prescriptions
      6. Practice protocol to use when calling a doctor’s prescription into a pharmacy
    8. Analyze choroid, vitreous and retina.
      1. Describe anatomical organization of the choroid and how it relates to function
      2. Identify location and composition of the vitreous
      3. Describe general organization of the retina
      4. Examine different neuron types of the retina
      5. Differentiate between locations of rod and cone photoreceptors
      6. Identify macula lutea, fovea centralis and optic disk/blind spot
      7. Examine retinal diseases
    9. Identify bones of the skull and orbit
      1. Describe the cranial and facial bones
      2. Label major orbital openings
      3. Describe major orbital landmarks
      4. Locate orbital sinuses
    10. Demonstrate color vision knowledge
      1. Identify the different cone pigments
      2. Perform color vision testing
      3. Describe color vision genetics
    11. Identify and analyze extraocular muscles and eye movements
      1. Identify the location, innervations and action of the six extraocular muscles
      2. Discuss saccades, smooth pursuit movements and reflex eye movements
      3. Examine disorders involving the extraocular muscles
      4. Analyze both monocular movements and binocular movements
    12. Analyze the visual pathway
      1. Outline the visual pathway from optic nerve to the visual cortex
      2. Describe the decussation of fibers in the optic chiasm
      3. Describe the projections found in the cerebrum.
      4. Investigate how the visual pathway arrangement relates to the visual field

  
  • OPT 130 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers frame definition, parts and types of frames, measurement of frames and lenses, alignment of frames, inserting and removing lenses, and an introduction to dispensing of eyewear and frame repairs.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze eyewear components
      1. Accurately describe different frame materials
      2. Identify frame materials
      3. Discriminate among different frame types
      4. Be able to examine and identify frame components
    2. Measure frames in optical standards of measure.
      1. Differentiate between different systems for frame measurement
      2. Demonstrate accuracy in measuring eyesize, B measurement, DBL, temple length, c-size, minimum blank size
      3. Calculate the frame difference
    3. Insert and remove lenses from eyewear
      1. Insert lenses into frames of different materials
      2. Remove lenses from frames of different materials
      3. Shrink plastic and metal frames
      4. Stretch a plastic frame
      5. Identify and use appropriate tools when needed to insert and remove lenses
    4. Identify and use adjustment tools
      1. Distinguish amongst the different adjustment tools
      2. Demonstrate adjustment tool usage
      3. Identify situations when different tools are used
    5. Manipulate frames to demonstrate eyewear alignment procedures
      1. Perform adjustments on frames of different materials
      2. Demonstrate correct tool usage in adjustment process
      3. Practices proper eyewear handling techniques
      4. Uses proper eyewear cleaning techniques
    6. Identify and explain frame styling techniques
      1. Describe different face shapes
      2. Demonstrate basic frame styling techniques
      3. Practice frame styling by role playing exercise
      4. Describe frame inventory systems
      5. Outline frame buying procedures

  
  • OPT 132 - Ophthalmic Dispensing II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course assists the student in developing a mastery of the alignment, adjustment of eyewear and lensometry. It also covers the various lens materials, multifocal styles and lens tints. This class also addresses general office procedures, maintaining patient records and learning about third party billing.
    Prerequisite: OPT 130 , OPT 120  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate eyewear dispensing skills
      1. Practice by participating in dispensing lab activities
      2. Calculate lens neutralization at a minimum 80% accuracy
      3. Complete frame adjustment at minimum 80% accuracy
      4. Identify patient eyewear needs
      5. Accurately complete eyewear sales order including cost calculations
      6. Practice ordering eyewear via internet and verbally
      7. Use frame catalog
    2. Identify lens materials
      1. Differentiate different lens materials
      2. Student will explain uses of different materials
      3. Discriminate amongst different indices of refraction amongst materials
      4. Determine patient lens material needs
    3. Identify progressive addition lenses (PAL’s
      1. Differentiate amongst various progressive addition lenses
      2. Neutralize PAL’s
      3. Identify frame styling considerations for PAL’s
      4. Perform patient education about PAL’s
      5. Measure height of PAL’s
      6. Practice troubleshooting techniques with progressive addition lenses
    4. Identify other multifocals
      1. Differentiate different multifocal types and styles
      2. Neutralize and verify multifocal parameters (height, width, power).
      3. Determine patient multifocal needs
    5. Recognize different lens tints
      1. Discriminate amongst different lens tints
      2. Explain uses of lens tints to patients
      3. Recognize patient lens tint needs
    6. Compare and contrast special lens treatments
      1. Identify special lens treatments
      2. Explain uses of special lens treatments
      3. Recognize patient special lens treatment needs
    7. Demonstrate frame repair abilities
      1. Replace temple screws in spring hinge and non-spring hinge frames
      2. Replace eyewire screws and nosepad screws
      3. Remove a broken frame screw
      4. Replace nylon cording in semi-rimless frame
      5. Install lens liner in frame
      6. Replace adjustable nose pads
      7. Locate loaner frame to match a lens shape
    8. Perform general office procedures
      1. Use proper telephone etiquette
      2. Schedule appointments and manage recall system
      3. Maintain patient records including EMR
      4. Maintain confidentiality and applicable ethical and legal standards
      5. Perform financial transactions including ordering eyewear
      6. Introduce third part reimbursement processes and practice using different reimbusement types

  
  • OPT 140 - Contact Lenses

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course gives the student in-depth exposure to the technical aspects of a clinical contact lens practice. Lecture and laboratory experiences emphasize lens verification, patient education and evaluation.
    Prerequisite: OPT 120 , OPT 110 , OPT 123  
    Competencies
    1. Identify role of optometric/ophthalmic technician in contact lens practice.
      1. Review contact lens terminology
      2. Explain contact lens terminology to patient
      3. Observe basic contact lens examination and fitting
    2. Analyze rigid contact lenses (RGP’s
      1. Discuss optical principles of RGP’s
      2. Review patient instructions and education regarding RGP’s
      3. Perform RGP lens verification
      4. Apply troubleshooting techniques to assess RGP fitting problems
      5. Practice RGP modification techniques
    3. Analyze soft contact lenses
      1. Differentiate between hydrogel versus silicone-hydrogel lenses
      2. Review patient instructions and education regarding soft contact lenses
      3. Identify differences amongst daily wear, flex wear and extended wear schedules
      4. Discuss therapeutic contact lens use.
    4. Relate how anatomical and physiological characteristics of a patient’s eyes affect contact lens fitting options
      1. Analyze corneal topography usage and results
      2. Distinguish amongst spherical, toric and presbyopic contact lens options
      3. Examine cosmetic and prosthetic contact lens options
      4. Identify ocular complications of contact lens usage
      5. Review corneal pathologies
      6. Discuss contact lens fitting after refractive surgery
    5. Review contact lens fitting procedures
      1. Perform contact lens preliminary measurements
      2. Observe contact lens fitting procedures
      3. Practice fitting techniques
      4. Explain importance of tear film evaluation in fitting process.
    6. Perform basic office procedures relating to contact lenses
      1. Write contact lens orders with accurate parameters
      2. Identify troubleshooting techniques to correctly triage patients with contact lens issues
      3. Verify contact lens orders
      4. Discuss basics of insurance relating to contact lens examinations and materials ordering
      5. Identify parameters used to sort contact lenses in the diagnostic inventory

  
  • OPT 803 - Preclinical

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 3
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course prepares the student for clinical affiliation by having them complete vision screenings on patients. Discussions are held analyzing the results of the screening as well as the student’s performance. Also included in this course will be an introduction to office management techniques including appointment setting and triage, HIPAA, and insurance claim processing.
    Prerequisite: OPT 110 , OPT 120  
    Corequisite: OPT 112  
    Competencies
    1. Use skills learned in OPT 112 in a coordinated manner to complete vision screenings
      1. Perform assigned tests on scheduled patients
      2. Maintain safety and welfare of the patients
      3. Practice patient communication
      4. Interpret vision screening results 
    2. Perform limited duties of a receptionist/front desk worker
      1. Greet patients
      2. Prepare the necessary forms for the technician
      3. Maintain examination area neatness
      4. Make sure examination area is properly equipped
      5. Assists as otherwise instructed
    3. Analyze results of vision screening
      1. Discuss results with instructor
      2. Complete screening reports
      3. Analyze written summary given by instructor to improve skills for next screening

 

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