Dec 08, 2022  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Hospitality, Culinary & Management

  
  •  

    HCM 110 - Baking (lab)

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course offers instruction in baking fundamentals and procedures as applied to bread, rolls, cakes, pastries and cake decorating. Practical experience in sanitation, safety and the use of large equipment is also emphasized.
    Prerequisite: HCM 143 , HCM 144  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate tools and equipment used in baking.  
      1. Identify equipment and utensils used in baking and discuss proper use and care
      2. Discuss food safety and sanitation requirements.
      3. Practice utilizing tools and equipment safely.
      4. Demonstrate how to operate baking equipment and utensils for specific applications.
    2. Assess ingredients used in baking.
      1. Identify baking ingredients and mixing methods under instructor’s supervision.
      2. Describe properties and list functions of various ingredients.
      3. Demonstrate proper scaling and measuring techniques.
      4. Practice basic math skills to recipe conversions.
      5. Describe bakers’ percentages, desired dough temperatures and formula yields.
    3. Assess various yeast leavened breads
      1. Define and describe the basic steps in yeast dough production.
      2. Explain the importance of batch weighing and precise measurement in baking.
      3. Prepare straight, rich, sponge and levain doughs
      4. Evaluate various types of yeast breads and discuss crumb and crust
    4. Critique quick breads
      1. Define and describe quick breads and the mixing methods utilized to prepare them.
      2. Prepare a variety of quick breads.
      3. Evaluate the quality of a variety of quick breads.
    5. Assess various pastries
      1. Explain the process of lamination as it applies to doughs.
      2. Prepare a variety of laminated dough products.
      3. Evaluate the quality of prepared laminated dough products.
    6. Evaluate a variety of pies and tarts
      1. Discuss the properties of different types of pastry dough.
      2. Define and describe the different types of pie, pastry and tart fillings and the mixing methods utilized to produce them.
      3. Prepare a variety of pies and tarts.
      4. Evaluate the quality of prepared pies and tarts.
    7. Critique a variety of cakes
      1. Discuss and define the different types of cakes and the mixing methods utilized to prepare them. 
      2. Prepare a variety of cakes.
      3. Discuss types of icing, frostings and buttercreams.
      4. Demonstrate basic icing and decorating techniques.
      5. Evaluate the quality of iced and decorated cakes.
    8. Evaluate nutritional concerns as they apply to baking
      1. Discuss nutritional concerns and identify issues of concern
      2. Discuss recipe modification to create more nutritionally beneficial baked goods and desserts.
      3. Evaluate recipes with modifications and discuss textures, tastes and their differences.

  
  •  

    HCM 116 - Fundamentals of Baking

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course introduces basic theory and preparation of baked items. The focus of the learning is on basic bakery skills, equipment use, recipes, terms, and measuring skills. Products include yeast products, quick breads, pies, fillings, cakes, and cookies.
    Competencies
    1. Categorize baking ingredients
      1. Define ingredients used in baking
      2. Explain purposes for ingredients
      3. Assess quality of ingredients
      4. Examine new and unusual ingredients
    2. Assess mixing methods
      1. Select proper equipment for mixing
      2. Explain various mixing methods
      3. Show proper mixing techniques
    3. Examine scientific reactions of baked goods
      1. Discuss fermentation
      2. Explain browning and caramelization
      3. Review the staling process
      4. Describe molecular gastronomy
    4. Evaluate baking formula experiments
      1. Prepare a variety of baked goods using omissions and substitutions
      2. Perform experiments
      3. Conclude acceptable substitutions
    5. Design a formula binder
      1. Identify baking formulas
      2. Prepare baked goods
      3. Create high quality formulas
      4. Record formulas in a binder
    6. Evaluate careers in the baking field
      1. Describe different positions in baking
      2. Assess pay scale, benefits, and rewards
      3. Choose a career path
      4. Identify specifics of a career path

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 124 - Advanced Baking

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Advanced principles and procedures of producing baked goods, decorative work and display pieces.
    Prerequisite: HCM 110 , HCM 270  
    Competencies
    1. Assess custards and custard-type desserts
      1. Define and describe the various types of custards.
      2. Prepare a variety of custards such as cheesecake, crème caramel, flan, crème brûlée pots de crème, budino and pastry cream.
      3. Demonstrate the versatility of custards as a component to other desserts.
      4. Evaluate the quality of prepared custards.
    2. Critique elaborate tortes
      1. Review types of cakes 
      2. Prepare layered tortes and cakes, recognizing good construction techniques
      3. Define and discuss appropriate fillings
      4. Review icing, frostings and buttercreams
      5. Evaluate a variety of elaborate tortes and layered cakes
    3. Evaluate high-end plated desserts and plated pastries.
      1. Define and discuss the components of a plated dessert.
      2. Define and discuss garnishes for plated desserts.
      3. Review types of pastry, tarts and pâte à choux.
      4. Prepare a variety of dessert sauces.
      5. Critique the quality of dessert sauces
      6. Evaluate the quality of plated desserts and plated pastries.
    4. Assess various meringue-based items.
      1. Review the methods for preparing meringues.
      2. Define uses for meringue-based items such as toppings for pies and tarts, icings, pavlovas, floating islands, cookies and mignardise.
      3. Evaluate the quality of cooked meringues.
    5. Assess chocolates, ganache, petite fours, candies and mignardises or friandises
      1. Define and describe the types of mignardises or friandises
      2. Discuss methods of handling chocolate
      3. Explain varieties of ganache and fondant
      4. Prepare candies and truffles
      5. Evaluate a variety of chocolates, truffles, petite fours, candies and mignardises or friandises
    6. Critique a show piece utilizing chocolate, sugar (isomalt), pastillage or bread dough
      1. Demonstrate tempering chocolate.
      2. Explain sugar and isomalt and functions of caramelization.
      3. Discuss pastillage and bread dough sculptures.

  
  •  

    HCM 130 - Plated Desserts

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides experience in the preparation of fine dining style-plated desserts. Students rotate through different dessert components making sauces, pastries, mousses, fillings, cakes, and ice creams. Students learn how to work with chocolate, pastillage, cooked sugar and pastry garnishes, adding extra dimension to desserts. Each week the class focuses on new desserts, learning how to plate and serve sweet works of art.
    Prerequisite: HCM 116 , HCM 224  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss components of a plated dessert
      1. Describe a well-planned dessert
      2. Identify flavor, texture and temperature contrasts
      3. Define proper portions of components
    2. Evaluate Entremets and Souffles
      1. Prepare main item desserts and hot and frozen souffles
      2. Produce individual pies and tarts
      3. Discuss a production schedule
      4. Review proper handling and storage methods
    3. Analyze dessert sauces
      1. Select a variety of sauces
      2. Use different production methods
      3. Compare sauces for proper consistency
    4. Critique intricate garnishes
      1. Define a theme for a dessert
      2. Select a garnish
      3. Prepare garnishes
    5. Evaluate frozen desserts
      1. Prepare ice-creams, sorbet, and granite
      2. Compare different methods for freezing
      3. Contrast textures of finished product
    6. Create artistic dessert presentations
      1. Compose plate designs
      2. Compare artistic desserts
    7. Critique plated desserts
      1. Examine plated desserts
      2. Distinguish between well-planned desserts and not
      3. Develop a dessert menu

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 143 - Food Preparation I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Introduces the student to the scientific principles used in food preparation. Involves preparation procedures and techniques to be used with fruits, vegetables, starch products, cheese, eggs, meat, poultry and fish. Establishes criteria needed to produce a standard product.
    Corequisite: HCM 144  
    Competencies
     

    1. Compare & Contrast the fundamentals of good personal hygiene. 

      1. List the fundamentals of good personal hygiene.
      2. Practice good personal hygiene.
    2. Evaluate kitchen equipment and knives. 

      1. Use utensils, pots and pans and demonstrate safe practices using stoves, mixers and     ovens, etc.
      2. Identify types of knives, and their uses.
      3. List proper safety techniques.
      4. Demonstrate proper knife techniques.
    3. Summarize garnishes. 

      1. Explain characteristics of garnishes.
      2. Recall procedures for garnish preparations.
    4. Interpret salad preparation. 

      1. Identify a variety of common salad greens.
      2. Identify and identify a main dish salad, accompaniment salad and composed salad.
      3. Identify, describe, and prepare a variety of main dish salad, accompaniment salad and composed salad.
      4. Distinguish between plain gelatins and flavored gelatins and describe how to prepare them.
    5. Assess the types of salad dressings. 

      1. Describe the purpose of salad dressing.
      2. Compare types of salad dressing and describe the preparation process.
      3. Define emulsion and viscous.
    6. Evaluate a variety of fruits, vegetables, starches, legumes and grains. 

      1. Compare fruits, vegetables, starches, legumes and grains.
      2. Recall cleaning procedures.
      3. State color pigments, flavor categories and texture differences.
      4. Define oxidation.
      5. State fruit, vegetable, starches, legumes and grain food preparation.
    7. Critique starch cookery. 

      1. Identify parts of wheat kernel.
      2. Define starch terms.
      3. List thickening agents and how to use in preparation of sauces, soups and puddings.
      4. Analyze starch thickened products.
      5. Categorize rice and pasta.
      6. List characteristics of different rice and pastas.
      7. Calculate rice or pasta and water amounts in recipes.
      8. Compare and analyze cooked rice and pasta dishes.
    8. Evaluate baking ingredients. 

      1. List types of flour.
      2. Explain role of baking ingredients.
      3. Compare types of leavening agents.
    9. Identify quick breads. 

      1. Define and describe pate choux, its uses, methods of preparation, baking and finishing.
      2. Describe method of preparation for muffin, pastry, cream puff and biscuits.
      3. Analyze baked quick bread products.
    10. Recognize yeast bread preparation. 

      1. Define baking terms.
      2. State procedure for yeast bread preparation.
      3. Identify shapes and characteristics of rolls and breads.
    11. Assess cheese. 

      1. List cheese families.
      2. State varieties and characteristics of each cheese family.
      3. Explain processing of cheese making.
      4. Contrast baked and stirred custard preparation and characteristics.
      5. Explain procedure for preparation of hollandaise sauce.
    12. Compare and contrast egg cookery. 

      1. Define egg terms.
      2. List grades of eggs.
      3. Identify the parts of an egg.
      4. Recall methods of preparation of eggs.
      5. Contrast baked and stirred custard preparation and characteristics.
      6. Contrast preparation and characteristics of egg foams, nondairy foams and gelatin foams.
    13. Categorize milk and dairy products. 

      1. List types of milk and dairy products.
      2. Discuss characteristics and uses of milk and dairy items.
    14. Appraise structure, composition and age of meat. 

      1. Describe meat grading and meat inspection.
      2. State tenderization techniques for meat.
      3. Identify primal cuts for beef and pork.
      4. Identify 20 retail cuts of beef, pork, lamb and veal.
      5. Recall methods of preparation for protein items.
      6. Select proper cooking procedure.
      7. Discuss how to carve meat.
      8. Compare processed meats.
    15. Evaluate types of poultry. 

      1. List grades of poultry.
      2. Discuss handling and storage and inspection of poultry.
      3. Differentiate between cooking methods of poultry products.
      4. Discuss how to break down whole poultry products.
      5. State how to carve poultry products.
    16. Interpret types of fin fish and shell fish. 

      1. Define translucent and opaque.
      2. List market forms.
      3. Discuss handling, storage and inspection of fish.
      4. State how to select fresh and frozen fish.
      5. Compare methods of preparation.

  
  •  

    HCM 144 - Food Preparation I Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Preparation of small servings of salads, starch, cheese, egg, meat, poultry and fish products using the techniques studied in lecture. Oral and written evaluation of each product.
    Corequisite: HCM 143  
    Competencies
    1. Practice the fundamentals of good personal hygiene. 
      1. List and define the fundamentals of good personal hygiene.
      2. Demonstrate good personal hygiene.
    2. Evaluate basic knowledge in food preparation. 
      1. Demonstrate proper weighing and measuring techniques.
      2. Explain the function and use of different knives.
      3. Perform knife skills, hand tool and equipment operation, emphasizing proper safety techniques.
      4. Identify food production knives.
      5. Demonstrate knife techniques.
      6. Perform the use of utensils, pots and pans and demonstrate safe practices using stoves, mixers, ovens, etc.
      7. Define the sautéing process.
      8. Describe the processes of pan-frying and deep-frying.
      9. Define the roasting and baking processes.
      10. Describe the stewing and braising process.
      11. Define the poaching and steaming process.
    3. Compare plate garnishes. 
      1. Select ingredients for fruit and vegetable plate garnishes.
      2. Prepare garnishes.
      3. Discuss characteristics of plate garnishes.
    4. Assess factors related to gelatin. 
      1. Identify ingredients that retard or prevent gelation.
      2. Prepare gelatin products.
    5. Critique salads and salad dressings. 
      1. Identify temporary and permanent emulsions.
      2. Identify a variety of common salad greens.
      3. Prepare an accompaniment salad.
      4. Prepare a variety of salad dressings and evaluate the quality of each.
      5. Prepare a main dish salad.
      6. Prepare and dress greens for a salad.
      7. Evaluate the quality of properly prepared and dressed green salad.
      8. Identify, describe and prepare a variety of composed salads.
      9. Evaluate the quality of composed salads.
    6. Compare and contrast varieties of vegetables and fruits. 
      1. Identify different varieties of fruits and vegetables.
      2. Prepare vegetables.
      3. Analyze differences in cooked varieties.
      4. Prepare a variety of fruits, vegetables, starches, using basic cooking methods.
      5. Evaluate the quality of prepared fruits, vegetables, potatoes.
    7. Assess sauce & soup cookery. 
      1. Demonstrate the proper procedure for preparing white sauces.
      2. Differentiate the types of sauces.
      3. Prepare a cream soup.
      4. Analyze the quality of the cream soup.
    8. Compare puddings. 
      1. Prepare different types of pudding.
      2. Explain factors important in pudding preparation.
    9. Critique starch cookery. 
      1. Identify types of rice and pastas.
      2. Prepare rice dishes.
      3. Prepare a pasta dish.
      4. Analyze cooked rice and pastas.
    10. Compare bread products. 
      1. Define baking terms.
      2. Prepare quick breads.
      3. Prepare steam leavened product.
      4. Define and describe pate choux, its uses, method of preparation, baking and finishing.
      5. Prepare a paté à choux product.
      6. Prepare yeast breads.
      7. Discuss the procedure for each type of bread prepared.
    11. Categorize cheeses and their use. 
      1. Identify kinds of cheeses.
      2. Prepare cheese dishes.
      3. Explain characteristics of cheese cookery.
    12. Compare and contrast egg cookery. 
      1. Explain egg cookery.
      2. Prepare an omelet.
      3. Compare baked and stirred custards.
      4. Prepare foams.
      5. Summarize foam preparation.
    13. Compare and contrast meat cookery. 
      1. Identify retail cuts of meat.
      2. Select cuts of meat to be prepared.
      3. Prepare cuts of meat using dry heat method and moist heat method to achieve tenderness.
      4. Evaluate the quality of prepared meats, and variety meats.
    14. Compare and contrast poultry cookery. 
      1. Identify types of poultry.
      2. Demonstrate procedure for cutting up whole chickens.
      3. Prepare a poultry dish using moist heat cookery and dry heat cookery.
      4. Summarize poultry cooking procedures.
      5. Evaluate the quality of prepared poultry.
    15. Compare and contrast fish cookery. 
      1. Identify market forms of fish.
      2. Identify types of fish.
      3. Explain the principles of fish and shellfish cookery.
      4. Prepare a shell fish dish. Using the basic cooking methods, prepare seafood to the proper doneness.
      5. Evaluate the quality of prepared seafood.

  
  •  

    HCM 152 - Food Preparation II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The study of the principles and procedures of quantity food production as they apply to salads, soups, vegetables, entrees and desserts. Emphasis on organization and recipe standardization.
    Prerequisite: HCM 143 , HCM 144 , any AAS Core Math .
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: HCM 153  
    Competencies
    1. Assess basic knowledge in food preparation.
      1. Practice proper safety and sanitation.
      2. List proper weighing and measuring techniques.
      3. Perform basic math functions.
      4. Analyze measurement conversions.
      5. Explain recipe conversions.
      6. Demonstrate recipe conversions.
    2. Critique the function and use of different knives.
      1. Identify food production knives.
      2. List proper safety techniques.
      3. Identify proper knife techniques.
    3. Compare classical knife cuts.
      1. List classical knife cuts.
      2. Discuss characteristics and uses of classical cuts.
    4. Compare varieties of vegetables.
      1. Identify different varieties of vegetables.
      2. Analyze differences in cooked vegetables.
    5. Evaluate basic stock production.
      1. Identify white and brown stocks.
      2. List fish and shellfish stocks.
      3. Identify vegetable stocks.
      4. Explain the qualities of a stock.
    6. Assess sauce cookery.
      1. Identify the proper procedure for preparing the five Grand sauces.
      2. Differentiate types of non-grand/classical sauces.
      3. List each Grand sauce.
      4. List non-grand/classical sauce.
      5. Explain the quality of the each sauce.
    7. Evaluate starch cookery.
      1. Identify types of rice, pasta and potatoes.
      2. List rice dishes.
      3. List pasta dishes.
      4. List potato dishes.
      5. Explain the quality of each starch dish.
    8. Critique preparation of breakfast items and egg cookery.
      1. Identify a variety of breakfast batter products.
      2. List the quality of prepared breakfast batter products.
      3. Identify a variety of breakfast meats.
      4. Explain the quality of prepared breakfast meats.
      5. Identify egg cookery.
      6. Explain the quality of prepared egg products.
    9. Evaluate meat cookery.
      1. Identify retail cuts of meat.
      2. Compare & Contrast cuts of meat using dry heat method and moist heat method to
      3. Achieve tenderness.
    10. Assess poultry cookery.
      1. Identify types of poultry.
      2. Explain procedure for cutting up whole chickens.
      3. Identify a poultry dish using moist heat cookery and dry heat cookery.
      4. Explain poultry cooking procedures.
    11. Compare fish cookery.
      1. Identify market forms of fish
      2. Identify types of fish.
      3. Explain the principles of fish cookery.
    12. Critique and explain Sustainability in the food service industry.
      1. Discuss through purchasing/procurement.
      2. Explain through waste control.
      3. Identify through energy conservation.
      4. Discuss in fabrication.
      5. Assess community centered purchasing.
      6. Explain through water conservation.
      7. Identify purchasing “Cents”.
      8. Discuss through recycling.
      9. Assess equipment energy use. 
      10. Discuss being a leader in sustainable practices.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 153 - Food Preparation II Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An intermediate study of the principles and procedures of food production as they apply to vegetables, stocks, sauces, starch products, eggs, meats, poultry, and fish cookery. Emphasis on organization and recipe conversions and standardization. Involves preparation procedures and techniques to be used with vegetables, stocks, sauces, starch products, eggs, meats, poultry and fish. Establishes criteria needed to produce a standard product.
    Prerequisite: HCM 143 , HCM 144  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: HCM 152  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate basic knowledge in food preparation.
      1. Practice proper safety and sanitation.
      2. Demonstrate proper weighing and measuring techniques.
      3. Discuss recipe conversions.
      4. Demonstrate proper recipe conversions.
    2. Assess the function and use of different knives.
      1. Identify food production knives.
      2. List proper safety techniques.
      3. Demonstrate knife techniques.
    3. Decide proper plate garnishes.
      1. Select ingredients for vegetable garnishes.
      2. Prepare garnishes.
      3. Discuss characteristics of garnishes
    4. Evaluate varieties of vegetables.
      1. Identify different varieties of vegetables.
      2. Prepare vegetables using blanch and shock method.
      3. Analyze differences in cooked vegetables.
    5. Assess basic stock production.
      1. Demonstrate and prepare white and brown stocks
      2. Demonstrate and prepare fish and shellfish stocks.
      3. Demonstrate and prepare vegetable stocks.
      4. Analyze the qualities of a stock.
    6. Critique sauce cookery.
      1. Demonstrate the proper procedure for preparing the Grand sauces.
      2. Differentiate types of non-grand/classical sauce.
      3. Prepare each Grand sauce.
      4. Prepare a non-grand/classical sauce.
      5. Analyze the quality of the each sauce.
    7. Evaluate starch cookery.
      1. Identify types of rice, pasta and potatoes.
      2. Prepare rice dishes.
      3. Prepare a pasta dish.
      4. Prepare a potato dish.
      5. Analyze a rice dish.
      6. Analyze the quality of each starch dish.
    8. Compare and contrast preparation of breakfast items and egg cookery.
      1. Identify and prepare a variety of breakfast batter products.
      2. Evaluate the quality of prepared breakfast batter products.
      3. Identify and prepare a variety of breakfast meats.
      4. Evaluate the quality of prepared breakfast meats.
      5. Explain egg cookery.
      6. Prepare an omelet.
      7. Prepare fried, poached and basted egg products.
      8. Analyze the quality of prepared egg products.
    9. Evaluate and explain meat cookery.
      1. Identify retail cuts of meat.
      2. Select cuts of meat to be prepared.
      3. Prepare and analyze cuts of meat using dry heat method and moist heat method to
      4. Achieve tenderness.
    10. Assess and demonstrate poultry cookery.
      1. Identify types of poultry.
      2. Demonstrate procedure for cutting up whole chickens.
      3. Prepare a poultry dish using moist heat cookery and dry heat cookery.
      4. Evaluate poultry cooking procedures.
    11. Evaluate and demonstrate fish cookery.
      1. Identify market forms of fish
      2. Identify types of fish.
      3. Prepare a fin fish dish.
      4. Explain the principles of fish cookery.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 167 - Culinary Skills Development

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Students produce and serve meals for the public in an actual restaurant experience. Emphasis is on the various management functions required to serve quality foods efficiently and intermediate culinary preparation techniques.
    Prerequisite: HCM 152 , HCM 153  
    Competencies
    1.  Assess proper tool technique.

    1. Demonstrate ease in knife techniques.
    2. Use kitchen equipment.

    2.  Evaluate how food production line is set up and run. 

    1. Draw a set up for weekly menus.
    2. Prepare checklists for preparation of weekly menu items.

    3.  Critique techniques for Buffet set-up and servicing of quantity food products.

    1. Select and place proper table needs.
    2. Determine type and style of hot holding equipment. 
    3. Produce food items needed for Buffet.
    4. Perform duties of lead buffet communicator between guests and back of house.

    4.  Assess sanitation and safety with food and equipment.

    1. Use good food sanitation at all times.
    2. Demonstrate caution when using equipment.

    5.  Evaluate management skills.

    1. Determine weekly buffet theme menus.
    2. Determine static a la carte menu for line service.
    3. Determine station production needs for line service.
    4. Perform labor division for buffet food needs.
    5. Organize recipes needed for line and buffet service.
    6. Oversee food production of co-student.     

    6.  Purchase foodstuffs

    1. Extend recipes for areas of food production based on forecasted needs.
    2. Compile recipes extensions to develop separate purchase orders for line and buffet.
    3. Communicate with purchasing agent specific needs and choose acceptable products.
    4. Obtain food products through approved purveyors.

    7.  Perform inventory count and cost control methods.

    1. Take a physical count of inventory.
    2. Determine needs based on foods previously in production and forecasted business.
    3. Develop food preparation methods to minimize food leftovers and waste.

    8.  Perform speed and ease in food production.

    1. Demonstrate the ability to prepare menu items in limited time.
    2. Show the ability to work in an organized fashion.

    9.  Evaluate intermediate level soups.

    1. Prepare a soup of the day.
    2. Understand the different ingredients used in soup making.

    10.  Evaluate intermediate level sauces.

    1. Determine the different sauces needed for daily production.
    2. Prepare the sauces needed for daily production.

    11.  Evaluate intermediate level entrees.

    1. Produce all subassemblies needed for each entrée.
    2. Prepare each entrée as needed when ordered.

    12.  Evaluate intermediate level salads.

    1. Produce all subassemblies needed for each salad.
    2. Prepare each salad as needed when ordered.

    13.  Evaluate intermediate level bakery products.

    1. Demonstrate the ability to produce bakery items following a formula.
    2. Present desserts for individual services.

    14.  Evaluate intermediate level vegetables.

    1. Produce all subassemblies needed for each vegetable.
    2. Prepare each vegetable as needed when ordered.

    15.  Store foods in proper place at completion of the day.

    1. Demonstrate the ability to place item in safe and proper storage.
    2. Label, date, and initial all stored items.

  
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    HCM 168 - Advanced Culinary Cuisine

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Discussion of the more intricate and difficult cooking principles and techniques of classical cuisine, along with planning for advanced culinary cuisine.
    Prerequisite: HCM 167  
    Corequisite: HCM 170  
    Competencies
    1. Interpret and define classical cooking terminology including cooking techniques, ingredients and equipment.

    1. Reinforce advanced methods of stewing and braising.
    2. Explain advanced methods of roasting and grilling.
    3. Restate advanced methods of sautéing and stir-frying.
    4. Reinforce advanced methods of deep-frying and pan-frying.
    5. Explain advanced methods of deep poaching and shallow poaching.
    6. Restate advanced methods of preparing soups, stocks and sauces.
    7. Define common temperature ranges both for cooking style preparation and or finished internal temperatures.

    2. Interpret classical French brigade terminology and relate it to the modern American Kitchen.

    1. Propose examples of dishes prepared at each modern American station or classical French brigade station.
    2. Discuss the historical impact of the French brigade system.

    3. Assess meat and game preparations.

    1. Categorize varieties of muscle and game meat.
    2. Show proper preparations and proper use of equipment.

    4. Critique poultry and game poultry preparations.

    1. Categorize poultry by size, game and ratites.
    2. Show proper preparations and proper use of equipment.

    5. Evaluate offal preparations.

    1. Categorize offal by animal and use.
    2. Show proper preparations and proper use of equipment.

    6. Assess fish and shellfish preparations.

    1. Categorize flat fish and round fish. 
    2. Categorize varieties of shellfish, crustaceans and mollusks.
    3. Show proper preparations and proper use of equipment.

    7. Compare and contrast advanced culinary methods of molecular gastronomy.

    1. Explain sous vide techniques.
    2. Reinforce varied starch and thickeners.
    3. Define methods of modifying textures and viscosity.

    8. Compare and contrast commercial and niche pork and beef production.

    1. Discuss farm-to-table, sustainability and modern farming practices.
    2. Assess information presented by the Iowa Beef and Pork industry councils.

    9. Examine alumni connections to local industry.

    1. Show opportunities to relate class content to local connections and invite discussions.
    2. Discuss industry trends.

    10. Compare finishing techniques and flavor profiles as well as spices, herbs, salts, vinegars and oils.

    1. Discriminate flavor qualities of spices, herbs, salts, vinegars and oils
    2. Practice sensory taste test evaluations.

  
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    HCM 170 - Culinary Cuisine Lab

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Preparation of intricate and difficult classical cuisine dishes. Students will rotate through the cooking stations of the traditional brigade kitchen and then prepare food for service to the public. A la carte preparation is emphasized.
    Prerequisite: HCM 167  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: HCM 168  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate a variety of basic stocks.

    1. Describe the functions of the ingredients in stock preparation.
    2. Produce stocks needed for soups and sauces.
    3. Evaluate the quality of a properly made stock.

    2. Critique a variety of grand sauces and small sauces needed for restaurant service.

    1. Produce grand sauces.
    2. Evaluate the quality of a properly made grand sauce.
    3. Produce small sauces.
    4. Evaluate the quality of a properly made small sauce.

    3. Assess a variety of soups.

    1. Understand the application needed for each soup production.
    2. Produce soups needed for restaurant service.
    3. Evaluate the quality of a properly made soup.

    4. Decide on a variety of salads and salad dressings needed for restaurant service.

    1. Produce and dress greens for a salad.
    2. Evaluate the quality of a properly prepared and dressed salad.
    3. Produce a variety of composed salads.
    4. Evaluate the quality of composed salads.
    5. Prepare a variety of salad dressings and evaluate the quality of each.

    5.    Assess a variety of sautéed foods using the sauté techniques.

    1. Demonstrate the ability to sauté foods using the flipping motion.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to cook food to the proper doneness by sautéing.
    3. Evaluate the quality of sautéed items. 

    6. Critique a variety of food products by roasting or baking.

    1. Roast meats, poultry, and fish to the correct doneness to develop the best flavor and texture in the finished dish.
    2. Evaluate the quality of roasted items.

    7.  Assess a variety of grilled or broiled food products.

    1. Grill or broil foods to the proper doneness.
    2. Evaluate the quality of grilled or broiled items.

    8.  Critique the process of stewing and braising various food products noting similarities and differences.

    1. Braise and stew foods to the proper doneness.
    2. Evaluate the quality of braised and stewed items.

    9. Evaluate the process of shallow-poaching, poaching and simmering various food items.

    1. Prepare shallow-poached foods properly and produce a sauce that incorporates the cooking liquid.
    2. Prepare a court bouillon for poaching various food items.
    3. Poach and simmer foods to the proper doneness.
    4. Evaluate the quality of poached and simmered foods.

    10. Judge protein cookery

    1. Perform basic fabrication tasks with various meats, poultry, fin fish and   shellfish.
    2. Demonstrate proper roast meat carving and slicing techniques.

    11. Assess duties of the boulangerie station.

    1. Produce a variety of breads and bread products for table bread service.
    2. Evaluate bread products via standard quality product specifications.

    12. Perform duties of the dessert station. 

    1. Produce a signature dessert for restaurant service.
    2. Construct high-end plate presentation for all desserts.
    3. Decorate and garnish desserts.

    13. Manage wheel/expediter duties for restaurant service.

    1.  Report new ticket received from printer.
    2.  Communicate food item needs from ticket to station leaders.
    3.  Prioritize items based on timing of service. 
    4.  Assist plating all food items.
    5.  Organize completed ticket food items in window for service.
    6.  Prepare a variety of vegetables, starches, legumes ,and grains using basic cooking techniques.

    14. Evaluate sanitation and safety.

    1. Demonstrate good personal hygiene and health habits in a laboratory setting.
    2. Demonstrate acceptable procedures when preparing potentially hazardous foods to include time/temperature principles.

    15. Assess ordered items for service to the public.

    1. Produce all subassemblies (mise en place) for on-line menu item production.
    2. Produce all items to order in an on-line setting in a timely fashion.
    3. Finish products by taste, smell, and appearance as needed for standard quality product.
    4. Plate and present all complete on-line ordered menu items. 
    5. Use with ease all kitchen equipment.

  
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    HCM 172 - International Cuisine (lab)

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will provide the student with the experience of cooking through actual quantity preparation of multiple course international dinners.  Three evening gourmet dinners will be prepared and served during the semester. 
    Prerequisite: HCM 152 , HCM 153 .
    Corequisite: HCM 173  
    Competencies
    1. Assess food quality
      1. Perform HACCP guidelines during all stages of food handling and food preparation to prevent spoilage and contamination.
      2. Demonstrate appropriate personal hygiene.
      3. Uses established procedures to prevent accidents.
      4. Incorporate clean work habits and the prevention of cross-contamination.
    2. Critique knife skills
      1. Demonstrate industry standard techniques when using knives, hand tools and other utensils or operating equipment.
      2. Prepare proper cuts, trims and bones meat prior to cooking.
      3. Show proper handling of food by washing, peeling, cutting and shredding to prepare for use.
    3. Critique international cooking styles and equipment
      1. Define and apply cooking styles and techniques unique to each cuisine.
      2. Use food preparation and production equipment, utensils and tools appropriate to each cuisine.
      3. Practice international cooking techniques unique to each cuisine.
    4. Assess international cuisine
      1. Define the culinary elements that influence regional cuisine, including geography climate, history, religion and socio - economic factors.
      2. Compare and contrast characteristics of the major cuisines of the world in Asian, Mediterranean, Italian, French, Latin and American Regional.
      3. Prepare national dishes.
    5. Evaluate international components
      1. Assess ingredients and food products specific to each cuisine.
      2. Use culinary terminology unique to each cuisine.
      3. Describe the qualities and properties of ingredients, including baked goods, pastries and desserts.
    6. Assess multicultural cooking
      1. Evaluate food items representing a variety of cuisines
      2. Construct food by using the correct techniques and procedures specified in recipes.
      3. Integrate baked goods, pastries, and desserts by using correct techniques, procedures, and various finishing techniques.
    7. Assess proficiency in preparation of large quantity food products.
      1. Identify greens, fruits, vegetables, cheeses, starch products, sauces, poultry, fish, and meats.
      2. Prepare assigned recipes of large quantity foods.
      3. Demonstrate organization and team work.
      4. Analyze and evaluate large quantity food production.
    8. Demonstrate professionalism
      1. Work independently and collaboratively.
      2. Communicate effectively and appropriately.
      3. Perform reliably and responsibly.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 173 - International Cuisine

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Students research and plan international dinners. Emphasis is on menu and production planning for eight-course gourmet dinners. The lecture will also focus on the pronunciation and definition of French terms.
    Prerequisite: HCM 152 , HCM 153 .
    Corequisite: HCM 172  
    Competencies
    1. Examine a given country from each unit.

    1. Outline a report focusing on food, drink and dining culture.
    2. Discuss food, drink and dining culture from different countries.
    3. Relate cultural and historical factors affecting food and drink.

    2. Discuss national dishes.

    1. Discuss national drinks.
    2. Discuss cooking vessels and equipment.
    3. Identify indigenous ingredients.

    3. Compare and contrast the cuisines of different cultures.

    1. Show similarities and differences in regionality
    2. Discuss regionality and diversity in cuisine from each country.
    3. Discuss historical factors and religions which contributed to the food, drink and dining culture of each country.

    4. Discuss produce, spices and herbs from each country.

    1. Identify produce.
    2. Explain how spices are manipulated.
    3. Identify key spices and herbs.

    5. Evaluate cheeses from each country.

    1. Differentiate animal milk and discuss tradition in cheese making.
    2. Compare cheese styles from one country to another.
    3. Identify different cheese styles

    6. Assess cured meats from each country.

    1. Compare curing and preservation process with other countries traditional meats.
    2. Demonstrate styles of meat preservation within each country.
    3. Identify cured meats.

    7. Perform the pronunciation of French culinary terminology.

    1. Demonstrate ability to memorize and adapt French culinary terminology in classroom discussion.
    2. Demonstrate correct spelling and utilization of French culinary terms.
    3. Practice pronunciation of French culinary terminology.
    4. Practice identifying French culinary terminology in menus.

  
  •  

    HCM 175 - International Cuisine Lab II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will provide the student with the experience of cooking through actual quantity preparation of multiple course international dinners.  Application of French culinary terms, French communication and conversion of English measurements to metric. Three evening gourmet dinners will be prepared and served during the semester. 
    Prerequisite: HCM 172 , HCM 173  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate international components
      1. Assess ingredients and food products specific to each cuisine.
      2. Use culinary terminology unique to each cuisine.
      3. Describe the qualities and properties of ingredients, including baked goods, pastry and desserts.
    2. Assess multicultural cooking
      1. Evaluate food items representing a variety of cuisines.
      2. Construct food by using the correct techniques and procedures specified in recipes.
      3. Integrate baked goods, pastries, and desserts by using correct techniques, procedures, and various finishing techniques.
    3. Perform written French
      1. Explain definitions of French words.
      2. Read and write culinary terms in French.
      3. Execute recipes written in French with assistance.
    4. Perform verbal French communication
      1. Pronounce French words.
      2. Understand verbal commands in French.
      3. Translate English to French dialogue.
      4. Communicate in the French language.
    5. Examine French culture
      1. Explain dining differences between United States and French cuisine.
      2. Point out sustainability and total usage of food in the kitchen.
      3. Review culinary preparations specific to French culture.
    6. Perform mathematical measurements
      1. Measure using standard & metric measuring equipment.
      2. Convert between standard and metric communication.
      3. Communicate Fahrenheit and Celsius conversions.
    7. Critique international cooking styles and equipment
      1. Define and apply cooking styles and techniques unique to each cuisine.
      2. Use food preparation and production equipment, utensils and tools appropriate to each cuisine.
      3. Practice international cooking techniques unique to each cuisine.
    8. Assess international cuisine
      1. Define the culinary elements that influence regional cuisine, including geography climate, history, religion and socio economic factors.
      2. Compare and contrast characteristics of the major cuisines of the world including Asian, Mediterranean, Italian, French, Latin and American Regional.
      3. Prepare national dishes.
    9. Demonstrate professionalism
      1. Work independently and collaboratively.
      2. Communicate effectively and appropriately.
      3. Perform reliably and responsibly.
    10. Demonstrate safe food preparation
      1. Use established procedures to prevent accidents.
      2. Choose proper equipment.
      3. Incorporate clean work habits and the prevention of cross contamination.
    11. Assess proficiency in preparation of large quantity food products.
      1. Identify greens, fruits, vegetables, cheeses, starch products, sauces, poultry, fish, and meats.
      2. Prepare assigned recipes of large quantity foods.
      3. Demonstrate organization and team work.
      4. Analyze and evaluate large quantity food production.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 200 - Dining Room Service

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    To perform dining room service functions using a variety of types of service, and to demonstrate an understanding of quality customer service.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the functions of the dining service personnel
      1. Explain Manager Duties
      2. Describe Server Duties
      3. Explain Hostess Duties
      4. Describe Busperson Duties
      5. Explain Dishroom Procedures
    2. Develop serving strategies.
      1. Explain the training of dining room personnel.
      2. Demonstrate proper dining room service standards.
      3. Describe American, French, Russian and English Service
      4. Discuss different service methods such as Banquet, Buffet, Catering, A la Carte
      5. Compare and contrast new food serving trends
    3. Describe the necessary side-work for the restaurant operation.
      1. Explain service staff opening and closing duties.
      2. Discuss staffs running side work & procedures.
    4. Demonstrate the necessary staff training procedures.
      1. Define the training involved for each dining service position
      2. Demonstrate requirements for each service position
      3. Evaluate the performance each position
      4. Discuss the importance of teamwork skills
    5. Demonstrate proper sanitation techniques in the dining room and dish room.
      1. Explain the importance of sanitation
      2. Define a clean work environment.
    6. Describe and implement procedure for guest service and guest relations
      1. Perform Check processing and working on the POS system or current technology.
      2. Discuss sales techniques for service personnel.
      3. Illustrate the importance of menu knowledge.
      4. Discuss ways of suggestive selling.
    7. Describe possible difficult situations that could develop in the dining room
      1. Explain proper handling of guest dissatisfaction
      2. Discuss possible accommodations for the disabled
      3. Explain proper way of handling guest with dietary restrictions and special needs
      4. Discuss how these affect the overall dining operations
      5. Define how these influences the customers’ experience.

  
  •  

    HCM 210 - Dining Management

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    To evaluate styles of leadership and develop skills in human relations and personal management. To prepare for the transition from employee to supervisor.
    Prerequisite: HCM 152 , HCM 153  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the dynamics of leadership

    1. Explain ways in which leadership and management differ.
    2. Review basic leadership qualities.
    3. Discuss basic management activities and management styles.
    4. Explain factors to consider to help ensure that decisions are ethical.
    5. Explain that managers have professional responsibilities.
    6. Identify key elements in an effective time management plan.
    7. Explain procedures that are helpful when delegating work tasks.
    8. Review professional development planning and career-building activities.
    9. Describe the need for restaurant and foodservice managers to be active in their business communities.

    2. Prioritize how leaders facilitate the planning process.

    1. Explain basic principles of planning with an emphasis on how employees can assist, and procedures useful in managing planning information.
    2. Describe how a value statement, vision statement, and mission statement are developed and implemented.
    3. State the importance of SMART goals in the planning process.
    4. Review procedures for conducting a SWOT analysis.
    5. Identify how restaurant and foodservice managers use long range, business, and marketing plans and operating budgets, and explain the relationship among these planning tools.
    6. Explain the need to consider employees’ abilities and use an organized process in implementing effective plans.

    3.  Compare and contrast how leaders are effective communicators.

    1. Explain why it is important for restaurant and foodservice managers to use effective communication skills.
    2. Provide an overview of the communication process.
    3. Discuss common communication challenges.
    4. Review basic principles useful for business speaking, using the telephone, listening, writing and controlling nonverbal communication.
    5. Identify strategies that enhance interpersonal communication.
    6. Explain practices for developing effective messages and for managing internal and external communication procedures.

    4. Analyze how leaders facilitate employee performance.

    1. Explain principles to help employees become motivated.
    2. Review procedures for planning and implementing employee development programs.
    3. State procedures helpful in maintaining a positive workplace.
    4. Describe basic coaching practices.
    5. Identify ways to manage conflict.
    6. Explain procedures for conducting effective performance appraisals.

    5. Assess how leaders facilitate teamwork. 

    1. Explain why teamwork is important to the success of restaurant and foodservice operations.
    2. Review common types of restaurant and foodservice teams.
    3. Describe the five stages of team growth and development.
    4. Discuss basic principles helpful in building and maintaining effective teams.
    5. Explain basic procedures for setting team goals.
    6. Identify procedures for effectively managing team projects. 

    6. Critique how leaders manage employee work schedules.

    1. Explain the need for effective work schedules.
    2. Discuss basic procedures for determining budgeted labor cost.
    3. Describe how to create a master schedule.
    4. Explain how to develop a crew schedule.
    5. Describe procedures for distributing and adjusting the crew schedule.
    6. Identify common practices helpful for monitoring employees during work shifts.
    7. Explain methods for analyzing after-shift labor information.
    8. Review basic concerns in developing work schedules for managers.

    7. Evaluate how leaders manage daily operations.

    1. Describe how restaurant and foodservice managers should establish priorities.
    2. Describe procedures used by restaurant and foodservice managers to develop and use two important operating tools: policies and procedures.
    3. Explain a basic approach that managers can use to resolve operating problems.
    4. Describe how restaurant and foodservice managers should develop and submit reports to upper management.
    5. Review procedures that restaurant and foodservice managers should use to plan for and manage emergencies.

    8. Assess how leaders manage meetings.

    1. Explain the need for meetings to be effectively managed.
    2. Describe procedures for planning effective meetings.
    3. Explain procedures for conducting effective meetings.
    4. Suggest procedures required to evaluate and follow up on meetings.

    9.  Compare and contrast the way leaders manage compensation programs.

    1. Explain how managers must balance the concerns of owners, employees, and themselves as they develop and manage compensation programs.
    2. Describe the three major components of compensation: wages, salaries, and benefits.
    3. Describe major requirements of federal and state compensation laws.
    4. Describe several of the most important factors that affect an operation’s compensation cost.
    5. Identify basic procedures for developing and controlling restaurant and foodservice compensation policies and procedures.
    6. Explain how performance appraisals relate to compensation.
    7. Review procedures for processing payroll-related information and other information required for employee files.

    10. Interpret employee retention and terminations.

    1. Describe leadership strategies to enhance employee retention and productivity.
    2. Explain common procedures used in progressive discipline programs.
    3. Describe procedures for voluntary and involuntary termination.
    4. Explain the basics of unemployment compensation.

  
  •  

    HCM 215 - Fine Dining Experience 2 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course will provide the student with experience in advanced table side service from a fine dining perspective. Pairing foods and beverages. Dish room operations.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the historical overview of service.

    1. Differentiate the chronological times of fine dining service.
    2. Discuss a historical overview of fine dining service.

    2. Assess professional dining room service. 

    1. Define professional attire for a dining room server.
    2. Describe the demeanor and attitude of successful dining room servers.
    3. Identify the skills needed for a dining room server.
    4. Discuss the importance of product knowledge.
    5. Summarize the importance of being organized.
    6. Explain how to manage guest complaints.
    7. Differentiate how to serve guests with special needs.

    3. Demonstrate Mise en Place. 

    1. Complete preparations needed to set up for service.
    2. Complete preparations for set up for dish room.
    3. Show proper technique for clearing and resetting tables.

    4. Evaluate the different types of service in Industry. 

    1. Assess Banquet Service.
    2. Discuss service for Specific Meals.
    3. Critique Buffet Service.
    4. Discuss other types of Service.

    5. Compare and contrast the classic service styles. 

    1. Discuss French Service, Russian Service, American Service, and English Service.
    2. Characterize the differences between the types of service.

    6. Demonstrate the general rules of table service. 

    1. Practice table service.
    2. Discuss Uniform, Shoes, Jewelry, Hands and Nails, and Attitude.
    3. Practice professional attire and attitude.

    7. Evaluate the functions of dining room and dish room personnel. 

    1. Identify the functions of dining room personnel.
    2. Identify the functions of dish room personnel.

    8. Describe training procedures for the dining room and dish room. 

    1. Discuss setting table.
    2. Review resetting table.
    3. Discuss steps in serving.
    4. Review coffee and tea service.
    5. Discuss addressing guest complaints.
    6. Discuss dish room duties.
    7. Review end of meal duties for dish room and dining room.

    9. Demonstrate procedures for the dining room. 

    1. Practice setting table.
    2. Demonstrate resetting table.
    3. Practice steps in serving.
    4. Demonstrate coffee and tea service.
    5. Practice addressing guest complaints.

    10. Evaluate the functions of serving a meal. 

    1. Discuss steps in serving.
    2. Review greeting and seating guests.
    3. Explain general rules and procedures for serving.
    4. Discuss serving the guests.
    5. Explain clearing the table.
    6. Assess formal dining.
    7. Discuss dining room arrangement.
    8. Summarize proper dish room techniques.

    11. Assess the functions of serving a meal. 

    1. Practice steps in serving.
    2. Demonstrate greeting and seating guests.
    3. Assess general rules and procedures for serving.
    4. Practice serving the guests.
    5. Demonstrate clearing the table.
    6. Practice formal dining.
    7. Show dining room arrangement.
    8. Demonstrate proper dish room techniques.

    12. Critique table etiquette. 

    1. Discuss the history of table etiquette.
    2. Differentiate principles of public dining etiquette.
    3. Explain tipping.
    4. Distinguish etiquette of various cultures.

  
  •  

    HCM 220 - Chocolate and Sugar

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Chocolate and Sugar focuses on chocolate and confectionery technology, ingredient function, and the production of chocolates and confections in an artisan setting. Vital concepts in both theory and practice include controlling crystallization of fats and sugars, manipulating water and free water in centers, and understanding the mechanics of emulsions. Ingredient function focuses on fats, nutritive sweeteners, dairy products, binding agents, and chocolate.
    Prerequisite: HCM 116 , HCM 224 , HCM 347 , HCM 130  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate chocolate tempering
      1. Discuss tempering methods
      2. Compare methods for efficiency
      3. Evaluate tempering chocolate
    2. Produce chocolate truffles and bon bons
      1. Create a variety of truffle fillings
      2. Demonstrate molded chocolates
      3. Demonstrate enrobing chocolates
    3. Construct a chocolate showpiece
      1. Select a variety of molds
      2. Design a well-balanced showpiece
      3. Create a showpiece
    4. Produce cooked sugar
      1. Discuss caramelization of sugar
      2. Use sugar to make croquant, nougat, and marshmallow
      3. Create garnishes using cooked sugar
    5. Incorporate uses for Isomalt
      1. Contrast between dry and wet method
      2. Create garnishes using Isomalt
    6. Critique an Isomalt showpiece
      1. Select a variety of molds
      2. Prepare blown, pulled and poured isomalt
      3. Construct showpieces
    7. Evaluate a pastillage showpiece
      1. Explain the process of mixing pastillage dough
      2. Prepare pastillage dough
      3. Use a template to cut, dry and royal icing to glue pieces together
      4. Produce finished showpieces

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 221 - Cake Decorating

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Cake Decorating introduces students to advanced decorating techniques. Students refine their skills with a variety of icings including butter cream, royal icing, and fondant.
    Prerequisite: HCM 116 , HCM 224 , HCM 347 , HCM 130  
    Competencies
    1. Compare a variety of cakes and icings
      1. Identify buttercreams
      2. Select sponge cakes
      3. Prepare cakes and icings
    2. Incorporate icing techniques
      1. Reinforce icing procedures
      2. Show icing results
      3. Show efficiency in icing cakes
    3. Use rolled fondant to cover a cake
      1. Discuss the uses and benefits of rolled fondant
      2. Demonstrate the enrobing process
      3. Show techniques of decorating with fondant
    4. Create flowers and decorations with gum paste and marzipan
      1. Examine gum paste and marzipan as mediums
      2. Produce decorations for cakes
      3. Use an airbrush to color flowers
    5. Construct a wedding cake
      1. Explain the structure of wedding cakes
      2. Discuss the pricing and consulting
      3. Reinforce piping techniques
    6. Create a theme cake
      1. Discuss three dimensional cakes
      2. Show process of sculpting cake
      3. Design a custom cake

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 224 - Artisan Breads

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to further enhance students’ advanced level of baking breads.
    Competencies
    1. Examine a variety of yeast dough formulas
      1. Classify different types of yeast doughs
      2. Discuss steps in yeast dough production
      3. Compute accurate baking formulas
    2. Prepare yeast breads
      1. Identify baking ingredients
      2. Use large scale equipment
      3. Show techniques in make-up of breads
    3. Create a commercial production schedule
      1. Outline production needs of businesses
      2. Choose a timeline for production
      3. Prepare breads and rolls using production schedule
    4. Examine the quality of yeast breads
      1. Differentiate between high and low quality breads
      2. Examine factors for quality
      3. Discuss proper methods for high quality breads
    5. Demonstrate proper shaping techniques
      1. Define shaping methods
      2. Name different loaf shapes
      3. Produce a variety of shaped breads
    6. Critique bread displays
      1. Develop a sketch of a bread display
      2. Prepare salt dough
      3. Construct a buffet bread display

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 231 - Nutrition

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    An overview of nutrition-related topics including the psychology of eating and evaluation of food intake.
    Competencies
    1. Assess what constitutes good nutrition. 

    1. Define nutrition.
    2. Discuss factors that influence food selection.
    3. Summarize the function of the recommended Dietary Reference Intakes.

    2. Classify nutrients. 

    1. List macronutrients.
    2. List micronutrients.
    3. Discuss essential nutrients.
    4. List six classes of nutrients.

    3. Evaluate the USDA My Plate.

    1. Identify numbers of servings.
    2. List nutrients contributed by each food group.
    3. Outline serving size variations.
    4. Show how My Plate encourages variety and moderation.

    4. Compare & Contrast the characteristics of carbohydrates. 

    1. Discuss the importance of carbohydrates.
    2. Contrast complex carbohydrate, simple carbohydrates, and fiber & foods that contain them.
    3. Show the role of carbohydrates in the body.
    4. Identify the importance of fiber in the diet and the difference between soluble and insoluble.
    5. Compare Whole Grains vs Refined Grains.
    6. Discuss the function of sugars.

    5. Compare & Contrast the characteristics of protein. 

    1. Discuss the importance of protein.
    2. Distinguish sources of protein.
    3. Contrast vegetable protein and animal protein.
    4. Determine the importance of amino acids.
    5. Identify daily needs.
    6. Explain protein cookery as it relates to nutrition.

    6. Compare & Contrast the characteristics of fat. 

    1. Discuss how the body uses fat.
    2. Identify foods and the various types of fat they contain.
    3. Contrast saturated, Monounsaturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans fats.
    4. Explain the daily intake of fat.
    5. Discuss cholesterol.
    6. Examine the preparation of food using fats.

    7. Compare & Contrast vitamins, minerals, and water.

    1. List water soluble and fat soluble vitamins.
    2. List major minerals.
    3. Identify daily needs and excess amounts.
    4. Identify the function of each.
    5. Contrast artificial and natural sources.
    6. Evaluate health fraud.

    8. Breakdown digestion and absorption. 

    1. Describe the process of human digestion.
    2. Identify the different absorption rates of the macronutrients.
    3. Discuss BMR and energy expenditure. 

    9. Outline specific health conditions, which relate to diseases.

    1. Discuss diabetes.
    2. Explain heart disease.
    3. Review osteoporosis.
    4. Discuss anemia.
    5. Explain Celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
    6. Identify food allergies.
    7. Discuss weight control.

    10. Evaluate nutritional labeling.

    1. Identify the components of nutritional labeling.
    2. Explain percentage of daily value.
    3. Discuss required nutrients on a label.
    4. Analyze food according to its nutritional label.

    11. Evaluate diets and menus. 

    1. Discuss diets throughout the life cycle.
    2. Prepare a computerized analysis report.
    3. Analyze planned menus.
    4. Write nutritionally balanced menus.
    5. Discuss cooking and storage techniques for nutrient retention.

  
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    HCM 240 - Menu Planning & Design

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course applies the principles of menu planning and layout to the development of menus for a variety of types of facilities and service.
    Prerequisite: Any AAS Core Math  
    Competencies
     

    1. Analyze basic menu planning principles.
      1.  Discuss marketing and delivering quality products.
      2. Compare marketing and delivering quality services.
      3. Explain branding.
    2. Evaluate principles of menu layout and design.
      1. Identify the purpose of the menu.
      2. Compare the relationship of the menu design to marketing.
      3. Discuss selecting menu items.
      4. Explain internal operational concerns when designing a menu.
    3. Assess menu item descriptions following established truth-in-menu guidelines.
      1. Describe menu layout and design principles. 
      2. Identify menu psychology.
      3. Identify layout and design principles.
    4. Apply principles of nutrition to menu development.
      1. Discuss factors influencing food selection.
      2. Explain nutritional cooking methods.
      3. Identify types of special diets and food allergies.
    5. Determine menu prices, utilizing proper cost controls and appropriate technology.
      1. Discuss the use of pricing strategies in menu design.
      2. Explain the impact of external environments on pricing.
      3. Identify pricing strategies.
      4. Describe and discuss labor costs and percentages.
      5. Discuss pricing and gross profit margins.
      6. Discuss and review profit and loss statements.
    6. Classify a variety of menus, a la carte, cycle, ethnic, holiday, banquet, reception, beverage and buffet.
      1. Discuss each type of menu.
      2. Discuss and analyze beverage costs and percentages.
      3. Review samples of each type of menu.
    7. Critique importance of product mix, check average and their impact on profit.
      1. Identify sales evaluation measures.
      2. Discuss profitability evaluation measures.
      3. Explain other measures used to evaluate menus.
      4. Identify the purpose of a sale mix analysis.
    8. Examine the availability of food and seasonal menus.
      1. Identify seasonal foods.
      2. Discuss changes with a seasonal menu.
    9. Critique menu-planning resources (internet, professional and venders).
      1. Identify internet and professional resources.
      2. Identify food vendors, local and nationwide.
    10. Create a menu layout for foodservice operation.
      1. Demonstrate menu mechanics and business plan.
      2. Write menu items and descriptions.
      3. Design menu cover.
      4. Identify the process of recipe costing.
      5. Calculate menu costs and food cost percent.
      6. Identify and analyze selling price of menu items.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 250 - Purchasing

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Principles and methods of food purchasing with emphasis on specifications and grading of various food products. Includes financial procedures and controls used in the food service industry.
    Prerequisite: Any AAS Core Math  
    Competencies
    1. Propose purchasing goals and objectives and the impacts of effective purchasing
      1. Show how the purchasing function is organized in small- and large-volume operations
      2. Describe formal and informal purchasing methods
      3. Discuss the flow of goods in a food service operation
      4. Explain how HACCP practices are addressed in the purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing procedures
      5. Describe procedures for requisition and issuing of product
    2. Justify the importance of understanding foodservice mathematics and its application to real-world scenarios
      1. Explain weight and volume measurements in standard and metric units
      2. Show how to perform basic conversions among various units of measure
      3. Discuss as purchased quantities, edible portion costs, yield percentages, and perform make-or-buy analyses of varying scenarios
    3. Assess legal and ethical considerations of purchasing and vendor relations
      1. Evaluate the importance of professional vendor relationships
      2. Examine how business practice involved in the handling and marketing of goods are affected by governmental legislation
      3. Explain regulations for inspecting and grading of meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, fruits, and vegetables
      4. Outline yield and quality grades and National Association of Meat Purveyors (NAMP)
    4. Justify the importance of selecting the right products and vendors
      1. Describe the procedures for evaluating vendors
      2. Define different forms of value and its relationship to quality and price
      3. Explain the importance of consistently purchasing products of the proper quality
      4. Describe how the establishment of quality standards is an important first step in defining quality needs
      5. Explain the role of properly constructed product specifications in communicating product quality needs to vendors
      6. Write a bid specification
      7. Discuss distribution channels for non-food items, beverages, and FF&E
    5. Conclude why purchasers must carefully consider the quantities of products to purchase
      1. List important factors that affect the forecasting of product needs and the quantity of products purchased
      2. Define and describe par stock and other systems used to calculate purchase quantities
      3. Explain how product yields affect purchase quantities
      4. Conduct a yield and cost comparison test of pre-fabricated products and on-premises prepared products
      5. Conduct yield and quality tests on items such as canned, fresh, frozen, and prepared products
    6. Defend why purchasers must carefully choose which products to purchase
      1. Assess the basic steps in the ordering process
      2. Demonstrate how to read and interpret an order guide and discuss related terminology and standard packaging sizes
      3. Explain the factors that affect product pricing
      4. Analyze market fluctuations and product cost
      5. Explain the necessary documentation and procedures that should be followed to pay vendors for product purchases
    7. Assess the receiving and storage of fresh, frozen, refrigerated, and staple goods
      1. Describe the importance of receiving and inspecting product as it enters the facility
      2. Evaluate received goods to determine conformity with user specifications
      3. Explain proper receiving and storing of cleaning supplies and chemicals
      4. Explain the procedures for rotation of stock and for costing and evaluating, including FIFO and LIFO
      5. Inventory food and non-food items using current technology
      6. Describe current computerized systems for purchasing and inventory control
      7. Discuss the importance of implementing internal controls for tracking inventory and minimizing loss

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  •  

    HCM 270 - Garde Manger

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application of techniques used in preparation of hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, smoking and preserving foods, decorative food displays, and ice carvings. Emphasis placed on curing, brining, smoking, forcemeats, and buffet presentations.
    Prerequisite: HCM 143 , HCM 144  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate tools and equipment used in garde manger, emphasizing safety and sanitation procedures.
      1. Demonstrate how to operate modern garde manger equipment (food processor, blenders, grinders and emulsifiers, buffalo chopper, sausage stuffer, electric chain saw and carving tools).
      2. Discuss food safety and sanitation requirements.
      3. Practice utilizing tools and equipment safely.
    2. Assess decorative centerpieces (i.e. fruit, vegetable carvings, salt dough, tallow, pastillage, butter, cheese or ice carvings).
      1. Produce a variety of decorative centerpieces.
      2. Practice garnishing weekly projects with carving skills obtained.
    3. Critique forcemeat and its various forms including paté, terrine, galantine, mousseline, and sausage.
      1. Prepare and present a variety of forcemeat products.
      2. Discuss aspic gelée and demonstrate classical sauces and garnishes.
      3. Evaluate the quality of prepared plates, platters, and trays.
    4. Evaluate cheese categories.
      1. Discuss how various cheeses are made and their uses.
      2. Taste various cheeses and evaluate their quality.
      3. Prepare a fresh cheese and use cheese as an ingredient in recipes.
    5. Critique sandwich types
      1. Prepare sandwich varieties.
      2. Explain international and American regional sandwiches.
      3. Discuss types of sandwiches, fillings, garnishes, and spreads.
      4. Evaluate the quality of sandwiches, fillings, garnishes, and spreads.
    6. Assess salad types
      1. Prepare salad varieties.
      2. Evaluate the quality of salads and dressings.
      3. Review preparing hot and cold emulsions.
    7. Produce various buffet items.
      1. Define and describe hors d’oeuvres, appetizers, amuse bouche, and canapés.
      2. Explain the importance of presentation and garnishing for hors d’oeuvres, appetizers, and canapés.
      3. Prepare a variety of hors d’oeuvres.
      4. Demonstrate how to set up a buffet.
    8. Critique smoking & barbeque processes.
      1. Select and prepare meats and seasonings and barbeque them to the appropriate doneness.
      2. Discuss smoking mediums.
      3. Review time and temperature safety.
      4. Evaluate the quality of barbecued items.
    9. Assess various methods in which food is preserved (i.e. brining, salting, curing, dehydration and smoking).
      1. Prepare foods for preservation and prepare smoked and preserved foods.
      2. Evaluate the quality of smoked and preserved foods.
      3. Discuss HACCAP requirements.
    10. Evaluate cold sauces and emulsions.
      1. Prepare cold sauces and emulsions.
      2. Evaluate cold sauces and emulsions.
      3. Discuss alternative thickeners.
    11. Evaluate condiments, crackers, and pickles.
      1. Discuss safety and preservation techniques for pickles and preserved foods.
      2. Evaluate condiments, crackers, and pickles.
      3. Practice preparing condiments and pickles through weekly assignments.
    12. Perform professionalism
      1. Discuss and practice time management.
      2. Practice multi-tasting.
      3. Practice meeting deadlines.
      4. Demonstrate attention to detail.

  
  •  

    HCM 300 - Beverage Management

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course will familiarize the student with all aspects of beverage service including wine and alcohol laws. The basic mechanics of beverage preparation, sales and promotion will be covered.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss alcohol laws, the implementation of federal laws at the state level, and the dram shop act.

    1. Identify alcohol laws and how they affect Iowa residents.
    2. Identify Federal laws and how they pertain to Iowa citizens.
    3. Discuss the fundamentals and importance of responsible alcohol service.
    4. Identify levels of intoxication and methods to control excessive consumption by guests.

    2. Examine wine in the beverage operation.

    1. Discuss the basic production process of fermentation 
    2. Distinguish wines by grape and/or other fruit variety, country, growing regions and production process.

    3. Critique the presentation and non-alcoholic and de-alcoholic beverages.

    1. Discuss the brewing of coffee.
    2. Evaluate the brewing of tea.
    3. Assess the new trends in coffee making.
    4. Identify non-alcoholic beers.
    5. Compare and contrast non-alcoholic wines and other beverages new to the market.

    4. Judge alcoholic beverages and learn the preparation of them.

    1. Discuss the basic production process for distillation
    2. Evaluate the process in the preparation of these drinks.
    3. Critique the different types of mixed drinks available.

    5. Assess business operations of a beverage operation.

    1. Discuss opening and closing procedures of a beverage operation.
    2. Identify equipment and glassware used for beverage preparation and service.
    3. Evaluate the relationships of beverages to food.

  
  •  

    HCM 320 - Intro to Hospitality Industry

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Course introduces students to the broad world of hospitality and tourism while preparing them for careers in the field.  To become familiar with the organizational structure and basic functions of departments within hospitality and foodservice establishments. Review trade publications and professional organizations appropriate for continuing education.
    Competencies
    1. Assess hospitality and the philosophy of the hospitality and tourism industry.

    1. Describe the scope of travel and tourism industry.
    2. Describe the history of the Food Service and Tourism Industry.
    3. Evaluate the growth and development of the hospitality and tourism industry
    4. Compare the various cuisine and contributions of leading culinarians

    2. Examine the organization, structure and functional areas in various hospitality and tourism organizations as a perspective for later courses in menu planning, purchasing, food productions and service, food and beverage controls..

    1. Identify professional organizations within the fields; explain purpose and benefits.
    2. Define career opportunities through participation in field trips and guest speakers.

    3.  Distinguish and evaluate industry trends as they relate to career opportunities and the future of the industry.

    1. Discuss and evaluate industry periodicals.
    2. Discuss professional ethics practiced in the industry.

    4.  Examine the management of hospitality and food service organizations.

    1. Outline the hierarchy in the management system.
    2. Discuss areas of disconnect in communication chains.

  
  •  

    HCM 347 - International Pastries

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Provides additional theory and lab experience in preparing pastries representative of cultural traditions of the world. Stresses bakery procedures, use and care of equipment of bakery equipment, sanitation, safety, work simplification, costing and production of high quality pastry items. Includes research into cuisines of the world and associated pastries.
    Prerequisite: HCM 116 , HCM 224  
    Competencies
    1. Examine the history of French pastries
      1. Establish a timeline for the origins of baking
      2. Trace historical French tortes
      3. Identify early cooking methods
    2. Assess breakfast pastries
      1. Produce laminated doughs
      2. Prepare rich doughs
      3. Construct quiche
      4. Prepare batters (pancake, waffle, fritter and crepe)
    3. Critique mini pastries
      1. Describe petit fours sec and glace
      2. Prepare petit fours sec
      3. Construct petit fours glace
      4. Design miniature cookies, pate a choux and tartlets
      5. Produce macaron
    4. Evaluate a buffet of tortes
      1. Choose several classical tortes
      2. Construct tortes
      3. Create elaborate decorations
    5. Assess charlottes and Bavarian
      1. Discuss gelatin in relation to mousses and Bavarian
      2. Prepare mousse
      3. Prepare lady fingers
      4. Prepare Bavarian cream
    6. Compare and Contrast the quality of French pastries
      1. Compare scratch pastries to mass produced
      2. Contrast ingredients for quality
      3. Evaluate texture and flavor

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    HCM 510 - Work Experience

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    An approved program of experience in one of the many hospitality areas.  Work experience is a short/long term placement of Postsecondary or Secondary students.  Placement generally provides insight into the Hospitality Industry with many different opportunities in restaurant, hospital, private club, school food service, fast food, fine dining facilities and Assisted Living Centers.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate culinary skills via a work experience.

    1. Apply for and obtain a culinary job.
    2. Receive permission from instructor for position.

    2.  Evaluate work experience.

    1. Determine if job was maintaining high culinary expectations.
    2. Discuss pros and cons of this position.

    3.  Assess how sanitation and safety were conducted in experience.

    1. Evaluate if there were ways the position could have improved food handling.
    2. Decide if additional safety criteria should have been utilized in position.

    4.  Complete work log.

    1. Turn in materials by due dates.
    2. Summarize work conducted.

    5.  Demonstrate professionalism.

    1. Wear clean, appropriate attire.
    2. Maintain personal hygiene.
    3. Speak clearly and politely with co-workers.
    4. Show up on time.

    6.  Predict future employment.

    1. Analyze if this is the type of position you would like to consider to work in again.
    2. Determine other positions in the culinary field that you might want to pursue employment.             

  
  •  

    HCM 550 - Food and Wine Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This introductory course involves flavor profiles of both food and wine with a focus on culinary principles. This course is not for Culinary Arts/ Hospitality Careers majors.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss principles of pairing wine with food
      1. Identify food flavor groups and the effect on wine perception including earthy, meaty, and smoky
      2. Analyze the effect of food chemistry on wine perception including tannin-protein interaction, acid-fat balance, and complementary sweetness for pairing with desserts
      3. Recommend foods to be paired with wine based on ?body
    2. Explain flavors and flavorings
      1. Discuss basic principles of the physiology of the sense of taste and smell
      2. Recognize a variety of herbs, spices, oils, vinegars, wines and other flavorings
      3. Understand how to use flavoring ingredients to create, enhance or alter the natural flavors of a dish
      4. Investigate the presence of herb and spice odors in wine
    3. Discuss principles of cooking
      1. Explain how heat is transferred to foods through conduction, convection and radiation
      2. Explain how heat affects food
      3. Discuss the basic principles of various cooking methods
      4. Explain how food is affected by Maillard browning, coagulation, starch gelatinization, dextrinization of starches, and caramelization
      5. Evaluate the impact of cooking processes with wine pairing
    4. Categorize salads and appetizers
      1. List salad categories including main dish, accompaniment, and bound salads
      2. Compare types of salad dressings and emulsions
      3. Define and describe hors d’oeuvres, appetizers, and canapés
      4. Discuss effects of vinegar and greens on perception of wine
    5. Explain stocks, soups, and sauces
      1. Compare stocks and broths
      2. Discuss thickening agents
      3. Identify mother sauces and derivatives
      4. Identify modern sauces: flavored oils, flavored vinegars, chutney, salsa, relish, hot and cold emulsions, compote, coulis, and confiture
      5. Discuss clear, cream, consommé and international soups
      6. Review wine selection to accompany sauces
    6. Evaluate the principles of meat cookery
      1. Explain the structure and composition of meats; beef, veal, pork, lamb and game
      2. Discuss various cooking methods for meat: braise, sauté, poach, grill, broil, pan fry, deep fry
      3. Discuss dry and moist heat cooking methods
      4. Discuss international dishes found in each cooking method
      5. Discuss the importance of developing flavor, texture and mouth-feel
      6. Compare the body of the protein to the body of the body of the wine
    7. Evaluate the principles of poultry cookery
      1. Explain the structure and composition of poultry; chicken, turkey, ratites and game birds
      2. Discuss various cooking methods for poultry: braise, sauté, poach, grill, broil, pan fry, deep fry
      3. Discuss dry and moist heat cooking methods
      4. Discuss international dishes found in each cooking method
      5. Discuss the importance of developing flavor, texture and mouth-feel
      6. Compare the body of the protein to the body of the body of the wine
    8. Evaluate the principles of fish and shellfish cookery
      1. Explain the structure and composition of fish and shellfish; flat fish, round fish, mollusks, crustaceans, cephalopods
      2. Discuss various cooking methods for fish and shellfish: braise, sauté, poach, grill, broil, pan fry, deep fry
      3. Discuss dry and moist heat cooking methods
      4. Discuss international dishes found in each cooking method
      5. Discuss the importance of developing flavor, texture and mouth-feel
      6. Investigate how Mediterranean wine producing regions utilize wine with fish
    9. Discuss cheese and dairy
      1. Identify and taste a variety of milk based products
      2. Discuss cheese families and characteristics
      3. Discuss flavor profiles
      4. Evaluate synergism between cheese and wine based on textural attributes
    10. Discuss principles of the bakeshop
      1. Discuss desserts and wine pairing opportunities
      2. Identify types of custards, pastries, cakes, cookies
      3. Discuss flavor profiles of desserts
      4. Discuss cheese as dessert
      5. Review principles guiding the selection of wine to accompany desserts

  
  •  

    HCM 600 - Intro to Lodging Operations

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An in-depth look at the management and operations of key services within hotel properties. Included are guest services, housekeeping, maintenance and security. Course will examine the intricacies of these services from a management perspective.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the function of housekeeping and how it operates
    2. Explain the operations of guest services
    3. Explain the function of reservations
    4. Explain food/beverage service and its relationship to catering
    5. Describe the function of security
    6. Explain the operation of personnel/human resources
    7. Describe the function of maintenance
    8. Explain marketing and sales

  
  •  

    HCM 604 - Hotel Service Internship

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 20
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An approved program of work experience in one of the many hotel/motel properties in the area.
    Prerequisite: HCM 320 .
    Corequisite: HCM 600  
    Competencies
    1. Work in many different areas of hotel
      1. Observe work function of sales
      2. Observe work function of front desk
      3. Observe work function of security
      4. Observe work function of housekeeping
      5. Observe work function of food and beverage
    2. Develop a good salesmanship history of hotel rooms
      1. Explain room history analysis
      2. Identify proper record keeping
    3. Work in the convention areas
      1. Observe work areas of convention sales, from set up to tear down
      2. Identify proper techniques used in the convention business to make the function run smoothly
    4. Work in front desk operations
      1. Observe from desk procedures
      2. Identify good from bad operations
    5. Work in auditory positions
      1. Observe night audit positions
      2. Define procedure used to balance books

  
  •  

    HCM 605 - Hotel Administration

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A management course that introduces the student to advanced studies of property management, catering, sales, legal aspects, security and maintenance of all departments of the hotel.
    Competencies
    1. Develop an organizational chart depicting the functional relationship among hotel divisions and departments
      1. Explain the organizational chart dividing the divisions into different categories
      2. Apply the concepts of the organizational chart to a plan
    2. Explain the function and operation of the various systems, forms, equipment, and computer applications found in the front office
      1. Demonstrate computer usage in front office
      2. Apply computer forms to use in various hotels
    3. Construct an efficient reservation system which records crucial information while avoiding problems in processing various types of reservations
    4. Develop a checklist for taking reservations
      1. Explain the reservation system used by various hotels 
    5. Construct a registration system that helps ensure a hotel’s profitability while meeting the needs of guests by using effective guestroom sales techniques and efficient credit establishment procedures
      1. Develop a system to implement procedures between sales and registration
      2. Explain guest needs and credit procedures
    6. Develop an efficient communication system to operate within the front office, and between the front office and departments such as housekeeping and maintenance
      1. Prepare checklist for housekeeping and maintenance initiated by front office
      2. Solve and utilize problems of communication in front office
    7. Develop procedures regarding hotel safety and security, with particular emphasis on key control and emergencies
      1. Organize security scenario procedures
      2. Prepare checklist of procedure to follow during an emergency situation
      3. Assess eviction scenarios and procedures
      4. Evaluate the signs of human trafficking and means of prevention
    8. Develop procedures for handling complaints
      1. Prepare a checklist on how to handle different types of complaints
      2. List several different means in solving complaints
    9. Follow basic hotel accounting procedures ranging from posting accounts to conducting cash and check transactions at the front desk
      1. Prepare checklist for basic accounting procedures
      2. Implement the accounting procedure in a mock setting
    10. Evaluate check-out and settlement procedures
      1. Explain different process used by various hotels on checking out
      2. Analyze procedures and compare from one hotel to another
    11. Perform the steps involved in the night audit process
      1. Demonstrate through “Job Shadowing” all steps in night auditing
      2. Solve problems that might occur
    12. Develop check-out and settlement procedures
      1. Explain different process used by various hotels on checking out
      2. Evaluate procedures and compare from one hotel to another
    13. Follow check-out and settlement procedures
      1. Evaluate check-out procedures to see if this is the most efficient use of time
      2. Analyze settlement procedures to begin profit/loss statement
    14. Analyze statistics relevant to establishing room rates, forecasting room availability, budgeting for operations, and evaluating front office operations
      1. Summarize, through reports, all business operations of a hotel
      2. Justify business reports to instructor
      3. Interpret STAR reports as tools of revenue management
    15. Explain the important elements of recruiting, selecting, orientating and training front office employees
      1. Construct training programs for all the different departments
      2. Apply the training program on a mock basis to evaluate its effect

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

Human Services

  
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    HSV 109 - Intro to Human Services

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    History and introduction to the social welfare institution. Theoretical perspectives, concepts, values and intervention strategies are examined. Systems theory is used to explore legislation and services designed to meet client needs.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the history and early influences on the development of the social welfare institution
    2. Interpret the relationship between society’s value system and existing welfare programs
    3. Describe the basic concepts which underlie the human services delivery system
    4. Utilize principles of systems analysis to develop an understanding of the political, social and economic theories which influence trends in the social welfare system
    5. Cite major contemporary welfare legislation
    6. Describe the complexity and diversity of agencies which deliver human services
    7. Identify the services which are provided by the major types of human services agencies
    8. Recognize the roles and responsibilities of professionals and middle level workers in human services agencies
    9. Demonstrate academic self-discipline
    10. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend reading material in human services and news media
    11. Demonstrate logical and analytical thinking

  
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    HSV 130 - Interviewing/Interper Relation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study of interviewing theories including roles and relationships between the interviewer and the interviewee. Methodology of developing questions, conducting interviews, recording data and analyzing it, and writing assessments and histories are emphasized.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of important concepts in interviewing
      1. Describe three communication models
      2. List the advantages and disadvantages of open questions
      3. List the advantages and disadvantages of closed questions
      4. List the advantages and disadvantages of directive interviews
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of nondirective interviews
      6. List the advantages and disadvantages of scheduled interviews
      7. List the advantages and disadvantages of nonscheduled interviews
      8. Describe listening levels
    2. Establish interpersonal relationships with interviewees
      1. Talk with people comfortably
      2. Demonstrate open body language
      3. Describe open and closed body language observed in student interviews
      4. Sense impact of self on interviewee
      5. Interpret nonverbal behaviors, emotions, and physical characteristics which the student observes
      6. Respond appropriately to interviewee nonverbal communication
      7. Probe interviewee responses
      8. Reflect the feelings and content of interviewee responses
    3. Conduct ten survey interviews
      1. Choose interviewing strategies appropriate for a survey
      2. Write the interview schedule
      3. Pretest the interview schedule
      4. Interview ten people using the survey schedule and record their responses
      5. Tabulate the results of the survey
      6. Write a report of the survey results
    4. Conduct an assessment appraisal interview
      1. Choose interviewing strategies appropriate for an assessment interview
      2. Research the problem to be assessed to determine the criteria for an assessment
      3. List the criteria to be used for the assessment
      4. Write three or more open questions which can be used to gather information about each criterion in the assessment
      5. Write the assessment interview schedule
      6. Conduct an assessment interview using the schedule
      7. Record interviewee responses
      8. Record nonverbal behaviors and emotions which the student observed
      9. Organize interviewee verbal and nonverbal responses into an assessment
      10. Report the interview responses in a written human services assessment
    5. Conduct a complete history interview
      1. Choose interviewing strategies appropriate for a complete history interview
      2. Research the areas which will be included in the history to determine the criteria for assessment
      3. List the criteria to be used for the assessment in each area of the history
      4. Write three or more open questions which can be used to gather information about each criteria in each area of the history
      5. Write an interview schedule for a complete history
      6. Conduct a complete history interview using the schedule
      7. Record interviewee responses
      8. Record nonverbal behaviors and emotions which the student observed
      9. Organize interviewee verbal and nonverbal responses into a complete history
      10. Report interviewee responses in a written human services history
    6. Demonstrate human services self discipline
      1. Meet assigned deadlines
      2. Attend class regularly
      3. Participate in class activities and discussion in a meaningful way
      4. Give feedback to classmates to help them develop their interviewing skills
    7. Demonstrate logical and analytical thinking
      1. Write survey results, an assessment, and a history using correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling
      2. Write survey results, an assessment, and a history that report interview information in a clear and comprehensible manner, that are well-organized, and that distinguish between fact and opinion
      3. Write survey results, an assessment, and a history in which opinions are supported with facts from the interviews, evidence, and/or reason, and in which conclusions follow from the evidence presented

  
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    HSV 133 - Conflict Resolution

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is designed to study the history, components and process of conflict resolution and to examine the implications for the use of conflict resolution within the human services, psychology and social work fields. This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop conflict resolution skills, as well as to examine their own comfort with conflict and how conflict is presented in the media. The course will also focus on the application of mediation in terms of social justice issues, in particular on child welfare, juvenile problems and restorative justice.
    Competencies
    1. Understand the theory, underlying concepts and steps in conflict resolution
      1. Students will be able to describe the history of conflict resolution
      2. Students will be able to describe and demonstrate the introductory phase of conflict resolution
      3. Students will be able to describe and demonstrate the story gathering phase of conflict resolution
      4. Students will be able to describe and demonstrate the resolution phase of conflict resolution
    2. Students will be able to differentiate conflict resolution from other forms of intervention such as counseling/therapy, advocacy, arbitration and litigation
      1. Students will compare and contrast conflict resolution with counseling/therapy
      2. Students will compare and contrast conflict resolution with advocacy
      3. Students will compare and contrast conflict resolution with arbitration
      4. Students will compare and contrast conflict resolution with litigation
    3. Students will demonstrate basic skills associated with the mediation/conflict resolution process and link these processes to mediation theory
      1. Students will demonstrate the introductory stage of mediation
      2. Students will demonstrate the story-gathering stage of mediation
      3. Students will demonstrate the resolution stage of mediation
      4. Students will explain how these stages relate to mediation theory
    4. Students will have the opportunity to explain mediation techniques used to resolve an impasse and techniques used to work with challenging people in mediation
      1. Students will be able to explain and demonstrate ways of dealing with an impasse
      2. Students will be able to describe types of challenging behaviors in mediation and demonstrate techniques for working with them
    5. Students will clarify their own conflict resolution style and comfort with conflict
      1. Students will examine different styles of conflict and identify their own conflict resolution style and comfort with conflict
      2. Students will observe how conflict is presented in the media
      3. Students will keep a conflict journal
    6. Students will be introduced to culturally sensitive principles that may apply to conflict resolution
      1. Students will examine cultural differences in conflict
      2. Students will be able to list cultural differences and how they may impact mediation
      3. Students will be able to demonstrate strategies for dealing with cultural conflicts in mediation
    7. Students will understand the concept to restorative justice
      1. Students will be able to define restorative justice
      2. Students will be able to compare and contrast restorative justice with retributive justice
      3. Students will be able to list and explain restorative justice practices

  
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    HSV 135 - Women’s Issues

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course explores selected concerns that women are likely to bring into a counseling situation. Topics include sex roles, gender and socialization, and their impact on women’s lives.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the definition and history of American feminism
      1. Correctly define the word ?feminist?.
      2. Identify the American Women?s Rights Movement and achievements of this movement
      3. Identify gender inequities that still exist in America today
      4. Identify the definition of and need for gender-specific services
    2. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of loss of a child
      1. Identify issues of death of a child
      2. Identify issues of infertility
      3. Identify issues of giving a child up for adoption
      4. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience about loss of a child
      5. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who have lost a child
      6. Recognize one’s own feelings about the loss of a child
    3. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of abuse
      1. Identify issues of domestic abuse
      2. Identify issues of sexual abuse
      3. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience about abuse
      4. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who have experienced abuse
      5. Recognize one’s own feelings about abuse
    4. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of relationships.
      1. Identify issues of divorce and it?s impact on women and girls
      2. Identify issues of lesbians
      3. Identify issues of traditional wife/mother vs. career roles
      4. Identify issues of grief
      5. Identify issues of young mothers
      6. Identify issues of relational aggression among girls
      7. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience because of relationship issues
      8. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who have relationship issues
      9. Recognize one’s own feelings about these relationship issues
    5. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of health and mental health issues
      1. Identify issues of addictions
      2. Identify issues of disabilities
      3. Identify issues of abortion
      4. Identify issues of childbirth
      5. Identify issues of women who work in the medical field
      6. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience because of health issues
      7. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who have health and mental health issues
      8. Identify and define issues of snare and guild and how women are impacted by them
      9. Recognize one’s own feelings about these health issues
    6. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of poverty
      1. Identify issues of poverty
      2. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience because of poverty
      3. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who are poor
      4. Recognize one’s own feelings about persons who are poor
    7. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of their employment
      1. Identify issues of employment of minority women
      2. Identify issues of sexual harassment and discrimination
      3. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience because of her treatment in the workplace
      4. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who experienced issues in the workplace
      5. Recognize one’s own feelings about working women
    8. Explain some of the issues that impact minority women in America
      1. Correctly define discrimination and racism
      2. Understand the concept of “white privileged”.
      3. Identify issues of minority women in America today
    9. Explain some of the gender specific issues and problems women face in our society because of the criminal justice system
      1. Identify issues of women in prison
      2. Perceive some of the feelings which a woman may experience within the criminal justice system
      3. Describe some of the resources available to serve people who are in or have been in the criminal justice system
      4. Recognize one’s own feelings about women in prison
    10. Demonstrate academic self-discipline
      1. Meet assigned deadlines
      2. Attend class regularly
      3. Participate in class activities and discussions in a meaningful way
    11. Demonstrate logical and analytical thinking
      1. Write class essays using correct grammar, punctuation and spelling
      2. Write essays that answer questions, address issues in a clear and comprehensive manner, are well-organized and distinguish between fact and opinion
      3. Research chosen class project topic and write research papers that are clear, comprehensive, well-organized and distinguished between fact and opinion

  
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    HSV 185 - Discrimination and Diversity

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course will address theoretical and historical perspectives on racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination; applications to social work, culturally competent practice, change strategies, and intercultural communication strategies. Students will explore and process their own personal prejudices and biases in class. Students will learn skills to increase cultural competency and work effectively with persons from diverse backgrounds.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate awareness of individual cultural experiences and cultural heritage
      1. Describe personal culture
      2. Share family cultural stories, legends and tales
      3. Explore personal environment, family dynamics, and values
      4. Understand the personal lens through which we view the world
      5. Explain unconscious ethnocentrism
    2. Demonstrate awareness of overt and covert racism
      1. Give examples of overt racism
      2. Give examples of covert racism
      3. Identify overt and covert racism in the media
    3. Analyze stereotypes, assumptions, and labels present today
      1. Challenge personal assumptions, stereotypes or biases
      2. Give examples of stereotypes, assumptions, and labels regarding the following areas; race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, age, ability and culture
      3. Explain how stereotypes, assumptions, and labels can affect people
      4. Identify areas in people?s lives that influence assumptions or biases
      5. Give examples of ways to overcome personal biases in order to work effectively with diverse populations
    4. Critically examine majority group domination of minority groups
      1. Explain “white privilege”.
      2. Describe difference in power based on race, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, ability, etc
      3. Give examples of unequal systems in America today
      4. Participate in sensitivity activity
    5. Develop culturally-sensitive practice skills
      1. Identify questions to ask client in order to gather important cultural information
      2. Demonstrate how to properly work with interpreters
      3. Perform assessments that ask culturally-sensitive questions
      4. Develop a case plan that addresses cultural needs of client
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of intercultural counseling/communication
      1. Read about counseling techniques for various populations of people
      2. Present information regarding a specific population
      3. Describe how to effectively work with individuals and their families who are culturally different from themselves
      4. Role-play situations in which intercultural communication techniques are displayed

  
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    HSV 220 - Intro to Counseling Theories

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduction to major counseling theories including psychoanalysis, gestalt, existential, family systems, reality therapy, behavioral therapy, and person-centered therapy. Applications in mental health and social services settings are considered.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of psychoanalysis as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with psychoanalysis
      2. Describe the historical development of psychoanalysis
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of psychoanalysis
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use psychoanalysis in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of psychoanalysis
    2. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Individual Psychology as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Individual Psychology
      2. Describe the historical development of Individual Psychology
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Individual Psychology
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Individual Psychology in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Individual Psychology
    3. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Transactional Analysis as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Transactional Analysis
      2. Describe the historical development of Transactional Analysis
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Transactional Analysis
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Transactional Analysis in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Transactional Analysis
    4. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Rational-Emotive Therapy as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Rational-Emotive Therapy
      2. Describe the historical development of Rational-Emotive Therapy
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Rational-Emotive Therapy
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Rational-Emotive Therapy in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Rational-Emotive Therapy
    5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Reality Therapy as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Reality Therapy
      2. Describe the historical development of Reality Therapy
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Reality Therapy
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Reality Therapy in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Reality Therapy
    6. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Behavioral Therapies as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Behavioral Therapies
      2. Describe the historical development of Behavioral Therapies
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Behavioral Therapies
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Behavioral Therapies in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Behavioral Therapies
    7. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Gestalt Therapies as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Gestalt Therapies
      2. Describe the historical development of Gestalt Therapies
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Gestalt Therapies
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Gestalt Therapies in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Gestalt Therapies
    8. Demonstrate basic knowledge of Person Centered Therapy as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with Person Centered Therapy
      2. Describe the historical development of Person Centered Therapy
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of Person Centered Therapy
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use Person Centered Therapy in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of Person Centered Therapy
    9. Demonstrate basic knowledge of family systems theory as used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
      1. Explain the major terms and concepts associated with family systems theory
      2. Describe the historical development of family systems theory
      3. Explain the theoretical perspective of family systems theory
      4. Describe how mental health professionals use family systems theory in the treatment process
      5. List the advantages and disadvantages of family systems theory
    10. Compare the major therapies used by mental health professionals in the treatment process
    11. Demonstrate academic self-discipline
      1. Meet assigned deadlines
      2. Attend class regularly
      3. Participate in class activities and discussions in a meaningful way
    12. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend reading material in human services
      1. Read most or all of the assigned material
      2. Use the terminology and concepts associated with the individual theories in discussion and writing assignments
    13. Demonstrate logical and analytical thinking
      1. Write essays using correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling
      2. Write essays that answer questions and address issues in a clear and comprehensible manner, that are well-organized, and that distinguish between fact and opinion
      3. Write essays in which both facts and opinions are supported with evidence and/or reason, and in which conclusions follow the evidence presented

  
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    HSV 255 - Addictive Disease Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A historical and theoretical background to current concepts of addiction. A variety of addictive behaviors are examined with special focus on psychoactive drug dependency.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the biological, psychological, sociological, and moral theories of addiction
      1. Discuss genetic predisposition and brain chemistry from current research
      2. Relate depression, anxiety and personality disorders to the psychological theory
      3. Illustrate the relationship of poverty, crime, and role conflict to the social dimension
      4. Summarize how values, belief systems, and choice enter into the moral concept
    2. Explain the historical development of attitudes toward addiction in the United States
      1. Identify significant persons who influence thinking
      2. List organizations and agencies that contributed to education and services
      3. Relate events that contributed to problems and solutions
      4. Discuss the scope of addiction
    3. Illustrate destructive behaviors that are currently interpreted as forms of non-chemical addiction
      1. Outline addictive agents other than chemicals
      2. Outline activities that have addictive potential
      3. Discuss addiction in types of relationships
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the categories, classes and names of the most common chemicals of abuse and dependency
      1. Give examples of analgesics, sedatives, stimulants, hallucinogens, and OTC substances
      2. List benzodiazepine, amphetamine and barbiturate classes and their abuse potential
      3. Name generic and brand names of prescription drugs of abuse
    5. Explain the signs and symptoms of chemical addiction according to diagnostic criteria currently used
      1. Explain the medical, psychological and social features in diagnosis
      2. Explain DSM-TR diagnosis criteria for substance use disorders
      3. Outline the 6 Dimensions of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).
    6. Explain how special needs groups in the population are affected by chemical addiction
      1. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on ethnic minorities
      2. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on gay/lesbians
      3. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on the disabled
      4. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on the elderly
      5. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on youth and adolescents
      6. Discuss the impact of clinical addiction on women (and pregnancy).
      7. Discuss the impact of co-occurring disorders
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of chemical addiction on the lives of family members and friends
      1. Outline the relationship patterns
      2. Discuss the related issue of enabling
      3. Discuss the related issue of codependency
    8. Identify the types of intervention used in chemical addiction
      1. Outline evidenced based practices
      2. Review pharmological interventions
      3. Review legal interventions: commitment process/commital
    9. Examine rehabilitation services currently available for chemical addiction
      1. Investigate levels of care used by healthcare organizations
      2. Analyze specific components of treatment
      3. Examine the significance of support groups in recovery
    10. Demonstrate academic self-discipline
      1. Keep up with reading assignments
      2. Attend class regularly
      3. Participate in class discussions in a meaningful way
    11. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend literature of the field of addiction
      1. Read, for understanding, all assigned addiction related material
      2. Use the terminology and concepts associated with addiction in discussions and writing assignments
    12. Demonstrate logical and analytical thinking
      1. Write answers to test questions using correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling
      2. Write answers to test questions in a clear and comprehensible manner, addressing issues and distinguishing between fact and opinion
    13. Identify ethical behavior
      1. Outline principles of ethical behavior as identified by Iowa Board of Certification
      2. Discuss ethical dilemmas

  
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    HSV 286 - Intervention Theories/Prac I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study of several management and planning theories and practices used to assess client needs, establish goals, identify resources and make appropriate referrals. Community resources are explored. Only offered Fall and Spring semesters.
    Prerequisite: HSV 109 , HSV 130  
    Competencies
    1. Identify many of the agencies which provide services in the Human Services field using First Call for Help.
      1. Identify services provided by various agencies
      2. Identify eligibility requirements of clients
      3. Identify client referral processes
    2. Perform an assessment of client needs
      1. Gather relevant data
      2. Identify needs, citing facts that indicate the need
      3. Select appropriate agencies which provide services which could meet the client needs, using First Call for Help
      4. Write human services assessments which could be used to refer clients for services
    3. Compare case management and planning techniques used by human services agencies
      1. Identify strengths and weaknesses of rules and regulations
      2. Identify strengths and weaknesses of client contracts
      3. Identify strengths and weaknesses of management by objectives (MBO).
    4. Develop one’s own learning goals and objectives for the field experience using MBO processes
      1. Identify student interests using values classification strategies
      2. Identify student skills using skills inventories
      3. Formulate goal statements, objectives and evaluation procedures
      4. Identify career interests using career life planning
    5. Investigate the working environment of human services agencies by visiting at least 3 agencies
      1. Produce research questions
      2. Examine human service agencies of interest
      3. Identify the roles, responsibilities and relative power of human services professionals and middle level workers at those agencies
      4. Report learning in writing and in oral reports to the class
    6. Choose a field experience site consistent with the student’s interests, abilities and goals
      1. Identify at least 3 agencies where the student could do field experience and reach the learning goals which the student has written
      2. Obtain a “job interview” with a potential supervisor at each agency to discuss the possibility of a field experience, the student’s goals, the “Field Experience Guidelines”, and the supervisor’s expectations
      3. Negotiate a contract for field experience with the supervisor
    7. Develop a contract which has been negotiated with the supervisor of the agency
      1. Prepare a job description reflecting the student’s understanding of the supervisor’s expectations concerning job duties, competencies which are needed, and performance standards
      2. Confirm with the supervisor that the job description accurately reflects his/her expectations
      3. Modify the student’s learning goals, if necessary
      4. Complete the “Plan for Field Experience”.
      5. Complete the “Release of Information”.

  
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    HSV 803 - Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Theories and values of the social sciences, including human services, are used to interpret and respond to client and agency behaviors.  Written analysis is emphasized.  Evaluation of theory and knowledge as it applies to internship is stressed. Offered fall, spring and summer semesters.
    Prerequisite: HSV 109  , HSV 130  , HSV 286  (Minimum grade of “C”)
    Corequisite: HSV 804  
    Competencies
    1. Develop learning goals for Internship site.
      1. Develop a minimum of 3 learning goals related to field experience site.
      2. Share learning goals with instructor and Internship supervisor.
      3. Assessment and evaluation of progression of learning goals.
    2. Write professional documentation through assessment, behavioral observations, progress notes and/or meeting minutes of people at the student’s internship.  Documentation will be consistent with all professional standards of human services recording.
      1. Observe client verbal and nonverbal behaviors.
      2. Describe client behaviors clearly, concisely, and factually.
      3. Write documentation, behavioral observations or progress notes using correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
      4. Write clinical documentation, behavioral observations or progress notes that are free of judgmental, and discriminatory statements.
    3. Articulate learning about skills gained through internship.
      1. Maintain a documentation of skills learned at internship site, observations, questions and number of hours worked.
      2. Identify areas of critique or concern about social issues and treatment of specific populations.
      3. Process and include previous course learning and application of theories, cultural competence and knowledge within the context of internship.
      4. Discuss personal strengths and weaknesses.
    4. Demonstrate academic and human services standards of self-discipline.
      1. Meet all assigned deadlines and classes.
      2. Demonstrate compliance of NASW, ACA, or IBC Codes of Ethics.
      3. Participate in class activities and discussion in a meaningful way.    

  
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    HSV 804 - Internship

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 10
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Supervised experience in a human services agency enables students to apply their skills and knowledge by working directly with clients and or human services organizations. 
    Prerequisite: HSV 109  , HSV 130  , HSV 286  
    Corequisite: HSV 803  
    Competencies
    1. Perform all work at the internship as specified by the job description at a satisfactory level as determined by the supervisor.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively with clients in a human services setting.
      1. Observe other staff as they work with clients or in job role.
      2. Provide direct service to clients or agency project, while under supervision.
      3. Respond appropriately to clients and agency within the scope of the program and services which are provided by the agency.
    3. Document observations and services in professional human services records suitable for medical and/or legal purposes.
      1. Use correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling.
      2. Write all documents in a clear and comprehensible manner, that are well organized, and that distinguish between fact and opinion.
      3. Write behavioral observations with possible interpretations are supported by evidence from verbal and nonverbal behavior.
      4. Document work at the field experience site by completing all written assignments required by HSV803 Human Services Seminar.
    4. Reach the learning goals and objectives specified in the student’s individual learning contract.
    5. Demonstrate human services professionalism and self discipline in all aspects of work at the field experience.
      1. Attend work punctually at all scheduled times.
      2. Complete all work in a timely manner, meeting all assigned deadlines.
      3. Maintain NASW, IBC or ACA Code of Ethics at all times.
      4. Take initiative in seeing work that needs to be done and volunteering to do it.
      5. Adhere to professional standards of conduct as discussed in human services courses and as specified by the field experience agency and supervisor.
    6. Evaluate personal progress in developing the skills of a professional human services worker.
      1. Assess strengths and weaknesses of your performance at the field site.
      2. Identify areas of the human services profession where your strengths can be used effectively.
      3. Assess their skills and style of interacting with clients.
      4. Describe their interaction with human services professionals including the supervisor, co-workers, and any professionals from other agencies which the student interacts.
      5. Evaluate the degree to which they have met the supervisor’s expectations, particularly those specified in the individual job description and learning contract.

  
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    HSV 811 - Pract: Chem Depend Counsel I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Open
    Supervised experience in three of these treatment programs for chemically dependent people: inpatient, outpatient, follow-up care, halfway house and family therapy.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance at an approved practicum site
    Competencies
    1. Observe chemical dependency counselors in their performance of the following
      1. Conduct individual and group counseling sessions with chemi­cally dependent clients and their families
      2. Assess needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Develop treatment plans
      4. Evaluate outcomes of client treatment
      5. Interpret client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Provide feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Present educational material to large groups
    2. Read comprehensive assessments, treatment plans, progress notes, social histories, discharge summa­ries, and referrals
    3. Perform the following counselor functions under close supervision
      1. Conduct individual and group counseling sessions with chemically dependent clients and their families
      2. Assess needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Develop treatment plans
      4. Evaluate outcomes of client treatment
      5. Interpret client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Give feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Present educational material to large groups
      8. Write an assessment, treatment plan, progress notes, a social history, a discharge summary, and referrals
    4. Plan the following counselor functions independently under general supervision
      1. Conduct individual and group counseling sessions with chemically dependent clients and their families
      2. Assess needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Develop treatment plans
      4. Evaluate outcomes of client treatment
      5. Interpret client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Give feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Present educational material to large groups
      8. Write an assessment, treatment plan, progress notes, a social history, a discharge summary, and referrals
    5. Perform the above (4.1 through 4.8) counselor functions under general supervision
    6. Exemplify professional behavior as specified in the Iowa Board of Substance Abuse Counselor Certification code of Ethics and Confidentiality
    7. Demonstrate professional self-discipline
      1. Attend all scheduled work assignments
      2. Meet assigned deadlines
      3. Identify work that needs to be done at the work site and volunteer to do it
      4. Participate in all work activities in a meaningful way

  
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    HSV 812 - Pract: Chem Depend Counsel II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Open
    Supervised experience in one of these treatment programs for chemically dependent people: inpatient, outpatient, residential, adolescent dual diagnosis or family services.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance at an approved practicum site
    Competencies
    1. Observe chemical dependency counselors performing the following functions
      1. Conducting individual and group counseling sessions with chemically dependent clients and their families
      2. Assessing needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Developing treatment plans
      4. Evaluating outcomes of client treatment
      5. Interpreting client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Giving feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Presenting educational material to large groups
    2. Read assessments, treatment plans, progress notes, social histories, discharge summaries, and referrals
    3. Perform the following counselor functions under close supervision
      1. Conduct individual and group counseling sessions with chemically dependent clients and their families
      2. Assess needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Develop treatment plans
      4. Evaluate outcomes of client treatment
      5. Interpret client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Give feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Present educational material to large groups
      8. Write an assessment, treatment plan, progress notes, a social history, a discharge summary, and referrals
    4. Plan specific counselor functions independently
    5. Perform the following counselor functions independently under general supervision
      1. Conduct individual and group counseling sessions with chemically dependent clients and their families
      2. Assess needs of CD clients and their families
      3. Develop treatment plans
      4. Evaluate outcomes of client treatment.
      5. Interpret client behaviors and information provided by the client
      6. Give feedback to influence clients to enable them to understand and change their own behaviors
      7. Present educational material to large groups
      8. Write an assessment, a treatment plan, progress notes, a social history, a discharge summary, and referrals
    6. Exemplify professional behavior as specified in the Powell CDC or other facility and Iowa Board of Substance Abuse Counselor Certification code of Ethics and Confidentiality
    7. Demonstrate professional self-discipline
      1. Attend all scheduled work assignments
      2. Meet assigned deadlines
      3. Identify work that needs to be done at the work site and volunteer to do it
      4. Participate in all work activities in a meaningful way


Humanities

  
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    HUM 116 - Encounters in Humanities

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    An interdisciplinary course exploring the human condition through literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, music and dance. The course examines the cultural context of individual works and movements, the thematic relationships between the arts and the relevance of the arts in our lives today.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the relationship between differing perceptions and the arts
      1. Characterize various human perspectives regarding art
      2. Explain the role of cultural and historical contexts in perceptions of art
      3. Discuss the role of individual perception in art, with regard to specific reasons people perceive the arts differently
      4. Examine works of art
    2. Examine the history and role of the arts in human societies
      1. Identify relationships between the development of human societies and art
      2. Interpret the social, cultural, and historical context of an artistic movement, artist, or specific work of art
      3. Discuss significant historical events within a specific time period
      4. Examine important social and scientific developments as they relate to the arts
      5. Assess the historical relevance of an artistic movement, artist, or individual work of art
    3. Examine characteristics of specific artistic styles and movements
      1. Differentiate between individual artist trademarks and intricacies
      2. Distinguish characteristics of specific artistic styles such as classic, romantic, impressionist, modern, and contemporary
      3. Compare works of art by the same artist, by other artists, within a movement, and with other movements
      4. Examine historical and cultural contexts for themes and principles in the arts
      5. Compare distinguishing themes or principles in the arts
    4. Formulate in writing an informed response to the arts
      1. Discuss creative purpose and design
      2. Assess varying definitions of “art”
      3. Characterize the relationship between form and content
      4. Describe important biographical, social, cultural, and historical events reflected in artwork
    5. Examine artistic themes and principles reflected across multiple cultures
      1. Contrast definitions of art across regions and cultures
      2. Demonstrate understanding of multicultural artistic perspectives
      3. Discuss varying global and regional influences in contemporary art
      4. Discuss the role cultural differences play in perception
    6. Compose a written analysis of the experience of viewing at least two artistic events including, but not limited to, exhibits, galleries, plays, concerts, or installations
      1. Illustrate meaningful aspects of the viewing experience
      2. Examine responses by audiences and critics and their contexts
      3. Demonstrate thoughtful reflection upon a personal experience of the arts
      4. Interpret the work exhibited or performed
    7. Compose effective writing that demonstrates understanding of course competencies
      1. Generate writing as an active process, using planning, drafting, revising, and editing
      2. Apply standard rules of grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and spelling
      3. Produce analyses or interpretations through written assignments
      4. Understand definitions and consequences of plagiarism
      5. Integrate sources effectively within the given context
      6. Document sources using MLA style

  
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    HUM 120 - Introduction to Film

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    An introduction to the conventions, scope, purposes and techniques of films. Includes viewing and writing about a variety of films.
    Competencies
    1. Interpret film according to narrative and dramatic principles
      1. Define narrative and dramatic elements such as character, plot, setting, motif, symbol, theme, etc.
      2. Discuss narrative and dramatic elements in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze narrative and dramatic elements in a wide range of films
    2. Analyze film according to principles of mise en scene
      1. Define elements of mise en scene such as setting, lighting, staging, and shot composition
      2. Discuss elements of mise en scene in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze elements of mise en scene in a wide range of films
    3. Analyze film according to principles of cinematography
      1. Define elements of cinematography such as movement of the camera, lenses, film stock, and special effects
      2. Discuss elements of cinematography in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze elements of cinematography in a wide range of films
    4. Analyze film according to principles of editing
      1. Define modes and elements of editing such as continuity, montage, parallel, cross-cutting, analytical, transitions, etc.
      2. Discuss elements of editing in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze elements of editing in a wide range of films
    5. Analyze film according to principles of sound
      1. Define elements of sound such as dialogue, music, and effects
      2. Discuss elements of sound in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze elements of sound in a wide range of films
    6. Evaluate film according to the theory of style
      1. Define film style
      2. Analyze elements of narration, mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound as it relates to film style
    7. Critique film by applying at least five critical theories
      1. Define aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.)
      2. Discuss aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.) in a wide range of films
      3. Analyze aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.) in a wide range of films
    8. Assess films from a diverse range of cultures and historical periods
      1. View films from a diverse range of cultures and historical periods, such as: Silent, German Expressionism, French Poetic Realism, Classical Hollywood, European Art Cinema, New Waves (French, British, Hollywood, Czech, etc.), Blockbuster
      2. Discuss the cultural context and significance of films from various historical periods
      3. Analyze the cultural context and significance of films from various historical periods
      4. Compare/contrast film technique, technology, and style among films from various cultures and historical periods
    9. Create effective writing to demonstrate understanding of course goals
      1. Produce analyses or interpretation through written assignments
      2. Use filmic terminology appropriate to genres and/or theories
      3. Practice academic English and current MLA citation guidelines

  
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    HUM 121 - America in the Movies

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    An interdisciplinary course that combines the insights of history and literature by examining popular American movies. The course explores the social, cultural and ethical questions raised in such films.
    Competencies
    1. Interpret film according to narrative and dramatic principles
      1. Define narrative and dramatic elements such as character, plot, setting, motif, symbol, theme, etc.
      2. Discuss narrative and dramatic elements in a range of films
      3. Analyze narrative and dramatic elements in a range of films
    2. Analyze film according to principles of mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound
      1. Define elements of mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound
      2. Discuss elements of mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound in a range of films
      3. Analyze elements of mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound in a range of films
    3. Examine the history of Hollywood film with a particular focus (survey, genre, auteur, topic, etc.)
      1. View films from a broad historical background, from 1890s to the present
      2. Discuss important historical events, their representations in film, and their influence on film material and form
      3. Analyze the evolution of film throughout history
    4. Assess the social and cultural context of film
      1. Identify cultural values reflected in films
      2. Discuss cultural values evidenced in films and the ways in which art reflects culture
      3. Compare and contrast cultural values in film throughout history
    5. Compare and contrast how other cultures and film industries intersect with Hollywood
      1. Identify other cultural or industrial alternatives to Hollywood filmmaking
      2. Illustrate how other cultures or film industries have imitated, appropriated, or critiqued Hollywood style and vice versa
    6. Critique film by applying at least five critical theories
      1. Define aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.)
      2. Discuss aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.) in a range of films
      3. Analyze aspects of at least five critical theories (Formalist, Genre, Auteur, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, Historical, Apparatus, Race/ethnicity, Gender, Queer, etc.) in a range of films
    7. Create effective writing to demonstrate understanding of course goals
      1. Produce analyses or interpretation through written assignments
      2. Use filmic terminology appropriate to genres and/or theories
      3. Use academic English and current MLA citation guidelines

  
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    HUM 249 - Study Abroad: BritLife & Culture

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is a survey of British life and culture, limited to students in the London Study Abroad Program. Taught by various professional guest lecturers, this course examines various aspects of the social fabric, including some of the main institutions, the geographic and political context, and the arts. Students will compare and contrast conditions and lifestyles of different time periods while undertaking related visits in London and throughout Britain. Course assignments, determined by the DMACC faculty member, will focus on major humanities themes and ideas as expressed in art and culture. Students may not receive credit for both HUM 249 and HIS 249 .
    Competencies
    1. Examine the history and culture of London.
      1. Explain how life in London has changed from prehistoric times to the beginning of World War I, after visiting the Museum of London.
      2. Compare the information from the lecture on the history and culture of London with part of one of the following selections, or a similar work suggested by your instructor: Edward Rutherford’s London: The Novel, Peter Acroyd’s London: The Biography, or Andrew Duncan’s Secret London: Exploring the Hidden City, with Original Walks and Unusual Places to Visit.
      3. Describe the highlights of one of the many London tours that emphasize a particular area or famous person, such as the Inns of Court, Charles Dickens or Jack the Ripper Tour.
      4. Examine and analyze the variety of orators who openly share their opinion about political issues and the state of the world, after visiting Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of Great Britain.
      1. Compare the cultural differences between England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.
      2. Examine a contemporary understanding of Great Britain’s people, culture and places of beauty after reading one of the following by Bill Bryson?Icons of England or Notes from a Small Island (or a similar work assigned by your instructor).
      3. Compare the historical accounts referenced in the lecture on the history of Great Britain with the accounts discussed in one of the following: Jane Austin’s The History of England or Charles Dickens’s A Child’s History of England (or a similar work assigned by your instructor).
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the Monarchy and Royal Family.
      1. Discuss the current cultural impact of the royal family on British society.
      2. Compare one of the works by a famous painter, such as Vermeer, exhibited in the Queen’s Gallery, which is one of the most valuable collections of art in the world, with another painting by the same master that can be found in the National Gallery.
      3. Examine the impact of the monarchy on British life and culture during the era depicted in one of the many films about the English Monarchy, such as Elizabeth, The Young Victoria, The Queen, or Elizabeth: The Golden Age.
      4. Compare the class lecture notes with the information found in one of the following, or a similar work suggested by your instructor: Peter Fearon’s Behind the Palace Walls: The Rise and Fall of Britain’s Royal Family, Robert Hardmon’s A Year with the Queen or William T. Vollman’s The Royal Family.
    4. Explain social class and its meaning in contemporary British society.
      1. Explain historical and modern issues of social class.
      2. Compare and contrast the similarities and differences between the middle class and nobility.
      3. Discuss the presentation of social classes as demonstrated in a film such as Remains of the Day or Upstairs/Downstairs, or another film suggested by your instructor.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of theatre in British culture.
      1. Evaluate a minimum of two London theatre productions.
      2. Reflect on personal responses to all theatre performances.
      3. Analyze additional theatre options, such as fringe theatre, opera or ballet.
      4. Discuss multiple examples of street theatre.
    6. Examine the role of Parliament and politics in British culture.
      1. Summarize the guided tour of the Houses of Parliament.
      2. Analyze the discussion held about British politics with an MP.
      3. Distinguish the difference between the Houses of Parliament and the political system in the United States.
    7. Examine Great Britain’s relationship with the European Union.
      1. Explain the political, economic and social implications of not belonging to the EU.
      2. Summarize why Great Britain has maintained the British pound.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of Anglo-American relationship.
      1. Examine how British pop music influenced American composers.
      2. Compare a current British sitcom with a similar American counterpart.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of World War II and the Blitz.
      1. Summarize the Blitz experience after a visit to the Imperial War Museum.
      2. Summarize the importance of the World War II paintings in the Imperial War Museum.
      3. Discuss how the British people rallied to save St. Paul’s during the Blitz.
    10. Investigate London’s architecture.
      1. Identify and explain a variety of architectural styles found within London.
      2. Explain the rebuilding of London after the Blitz.
      3. Explain the differences between a palace and a castle.
      4. Examine the architectural exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum.
    11. Investigate places such as Stonehenge and Salisbury, Oxford, Cambridge or Bath.
      1. Identify and discuss the relevance of appropriate landmarks and buildings found in these destinations.
      2. Compare the local cuisine to American cuisine.
    12. Investigate such places as the Globe Theatre, National Portrait Gallery, Houses of Parliament or the Imperial War Museum.
      1. Explain the purpose and relevance of these galleries or museums.
      2. Explain the differences from these venues of importance from other London sites such as the Tower of London, the National Gallery or the Tate Modern.


Industrial Technology

  
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    IND 124 - Control Systems Overview

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An overview of control systems in an industrial environment, including hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical/electronic systems. Topics include valves, actuators, motor starters, relays, timers and programmable controllers.
    Competencies
    1. Identify components of a hydraulic control system
      1. Describe the operation of directional control valves
      2. Describe the operation of pressure control valves
      3. Describe the operation of hydraulic actuators
    2. Identify components of a pneumatic control system
      1. Describe the operation of compressors
      2. Describe the differences between hydraulic and pneumatic valves and actuators
    3. Identify the components of an electrical control system
      1. Describe the operation of electric motors
      2. Describe the operation of motor starters
      3. Describe the operation of switches
      4. Describe the operation of relays
      5. Describe the operation of timers
      6. Describe the operation of various sensors
      7. Describe the operation of various actuators
    4. Identify the components of a programmable controller control system
      1. Describe the operation of the processor
      2. Describe the operation of the discrete input/output section
      3. Describe the operation of operator panels

  
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    IND 144 - Pump Overhaul and Repair

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Overview of internal parts, principles of operation and maintenance of positive displacement and centrifugal pumps.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate a gear type positive displacement pump through disassemble, inspect, repair, and reassemble.
      1. List the types of gear pumps
      2. Identify the parts of a gear pump
      3. Explain the operation of a gear pump
      4. State the factors that effect the efficiency of a gear pump
    2. Evaluate a vane type positive displacement pump through disassemble, inspect, repair, and reassemble.
      1. List the types of vane pumps
      2. Identify the parts of a vane pump
      3. Explain the operation of a gear pump
      4. State the factors that effect the efficiency of a gear pump
    3. Evaluate a reciprocating pump through disassemble, inspect and reassemble.
      1. List the types of reciprocating pumps
      2. Identify the parts of a reciprocating pump
      3. Explain the operation of a reciprocating pump
      4. State the factors that effect the efficiency of a gear pump
    4. Discuss the various types and applications of special service pumps
    5. Evaluate a diaphragm, submersible and jet pump through disassemble, inspect, repair, and reassemble.
      1. Identify the parts of a diaphragm, submersible, and jet pump
      2. Point out the different types of suction and discharge valves for a diaphragm pump
      3. Explain the operation of a diaphragm, submersible, and jet pump
      4. State the factors that effect the efficiency of a diaphragm, submersible and jet pump
    6. Assess Packing and Mechanical seal systems
      1. Summarize the differences between packing and mechanical seal systems
      2. List the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical seals and packing
      3. Discuss the principles of operation of mechanical seals
      4. Identify the precautions to be taken when replacing mechanical seals
    7. Calculate the amount of shims required to align a prime mover to a mechanical device
      1. Define the following terms: “Soft-foot”, Angular misalignment, and Parallel
      2. Outline the four step alignment process
    8. Evaluate a centrifugal pump through disassemble, inspect, repair, reassemble, and alignment.
      1. Identify the parts of a centrifugal pump
      2. Explain the operation and pump laws for a centrifugal pump
      3. State the factors that effect the efficiency of a centrifugal pump
      4. Calculate bearing measurements
      5. Describe the effect of the introduction of the system curve on the pump curves

  
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    IND 146 - Mech Power Transmission I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course in fundamental mechanical power transmission used in manufacturing. Topics covered include the inspection, maintenance and repair of chain- and belt-driven equipment. This will include the sizing of belts and pulleys, determining speed ratios and the importance of proper sizing for process control.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the components of a chain drive system
      1. Identify the different parts of a chain drive system
      2. Differentiate between the different types of chains
    2. Determine the type and size of chain drives to use for different applications
      1. Explain the use of the different types of hubs for sprockets
      2. Demonstrate the ability to match chain to application
      3. Identify the different types of keys and keyseats used to retain sprockets on the shaft of chain driven systems
    3. Discuss the component parts of a v-belt drive system
      1. Identify the different types of belts used
      2. Explain the construction of the typical v-belt
      3. Identify and explain the types of sheaves used in belt drive systems
    4. Determine the proper type and size of v-belt drive to be used for different applications
      1. Show the proper assembly of a belt drive system
      2. Demonstrate the proper belt tension measurement process
      3. Identify the inspection and replacement criteria for belt drives
    5. Explain the component parts of a flat belt conveyor system
      1. Discuss the construction and joining methods for flat belts
      2. Identify the components used to adjust flat belts
    6. Determine the proper type and size of flat belt drive
      1. Demonstrate the proper assembly of a flat belt system
      2. Practice the adjustment of a flat belt conveyor system
    7. Determine speed ratios for chain and belt drive systems
      1. Define the components of the ration
      2. Demonstrate the ability to determine ratio required for different applications

  
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    IND 147 - Mechanical Power Trans II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A fundamental course in the principles of mechanical power transmission. Topics include the use of gears to effect speed changes, the identification and use of bearings, clutches, couplings and brakes.
    Competencies
    1. Identify Mechanical Power Transmission terms
      1. Define the following terms: Pitch Diameter, pitch circle, Outside Diameter, Diameter Pitch, Addendum, Dedendum, Clearance, Whole Depth, Working Depth, Pitch, Circular Pitch, Face of the tooth, Flank of the tooth, Face of the gear, Fillet, Pressure angle,
      2. Identify and label the different types of gears provided for the assigned exercise
    2. Configure a gear box arrangement to provide the proper speed ratio for an assigned exercise
      1. Determine the gear ratio for assigned exercise
      2. Demonstrate the ability to fit gears together and measure backlash
    3. Describe the applications of rolling element bearings in industry
      1. Identify the types of bearings used in industry
      2. Determine bearing size and fit from reference charts
      3. Demonstrate the ability to identify bearing failure and determine cause
    4. Demonstrate the ability to properly install and remove bearings
      1. Select the proper bearing to be installed.
      2. Inspect and measure bearings
    5. Discuss the purpose for clutch/brake assemblies in industrial equipment
      1. Identify the parts of an electric brake/clutch assembly
      2. Explain the operation of an electric brake/clutch assembly
    6. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate an electric clutch/brake assembly into assigned exercise
      1. Assemble a drive assembly using an electric brake/clutch
      2. Determine the point of clutch engagement/disengagement
    7. Discuss of couplings in power transmission systems
      1. Identify the different types of couplings
      2. Assemble the different coupling types
    8. Explain the importance of proper equipment alignment
      1. Define the following terms: Angular misalignment, Parallel misalignment, Soft-foot
      2. Discuss the effects of improper alignment
    9. Perform a minimum of a three-point equipment shaft alignment
    10. Demonstrate the ability to complete the four-step alignment procedure

  
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    IND 901 - Technical Internship I

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 5
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    The student will work with a participating employer. The tasks will be consistent with the student’s ability and previous coursework. A task list will be issued to the employer.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate acceptable employee attendance habits

    1. Attend regularly

    2. Demonstrate job punctuality

    2. Provide employer a responsible and productive employee

    1. Demonstrate a positive attitude to work

    2. Apply yourself when working

    3. Show employee dependability

    4. Display quality work

    5. Exhibit good judgment

    6. Present ability to learn

    7. Revel initiative

    8. Illustrate work relations with others

    3. Complete internship weekly work reports

    1. Log daily work

    2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person

    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks provided by employer

    5. Confirm to employer policies and procedures

    1. Observe all company policies

    2. Identify employer expectations for an intern

    6. Complete 300 hours of training

    7. Project professional appearance

    1. Develop abilities to show initiative

    2. Develop pride in doing a job well

    3. Complete tasks within acceptable standards of quality and quantity of work

    8. Increase occupational proficiencies

    1. Develop steps for learning/practicing skills

    2. Apply the steps developed

    9. Examine personal management skills needed for a specific profession or occupation

    1. Develop personal responsibility characteristics regarding workplace situations involving workplace safety, discrimination, harassment, and personal ethics

    2. Acquire knowledge about work-related issues such as conflict management, unexpected or unusual events, and/or relationships with co-workers

    10. Demonstrate employability and career development skills

    1. Illustrate how receiving constructive feedback can enhance one’s insights and improve professional behaviors

    2. Recognize the impact of professional values

  
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    IND 902 - Technical Internship II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 5
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Practice experience through on-the-job training in an industry or business setting. Tasks will be consistent with the student’s career objective, skills, and knowledge.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze duties completed through internship

    1. Utilize knowledge, skills, and abilities required for business and industry careers

    2. Use effective communication

    2. Assess techniques and skills learned in course work

    1. Learn to work under pressure

    2. Develop work habits that will lead to successful employment

    3. Use college and employer reports

    1. Identify due dates of each report

    2. Submit reports to the identified recipients

    4. Complete the assigned internship tasks

    5. Complete 300 internship hours

    6. Project professionalism

    1. Arrive on time to work

    2. Show initiative

    3. Communicate professionally

    7. Demonstrate business and industry knowledge acquired in the classroom

    1. Apply skills learned in classroom

    2. Practice good work habits

    8. Analyze educational needs for future employment

    1. Relate what you learned before the employment experience with what you need to know on the job

    2. Investigate educational requirements for those positions above your employment level

    9. Examinecareer opportunities fitting career goals

    1. Outline personal career goals

    2. Investigate career opportunities in field

    10. Demonstrate ethics in business

    1. Discuss ethics with supervisor or colleagues/co-workers

    2. Prepare a list of potential ethical issues

    3. Predict how you would handle the issues you identified

  
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    IND 903 - Technical Internship III

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 5
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Provides practical experience in a business or industry environment. Includes employer/supervisor evaluations.
    Competencies
    1. Describe duties completed through an internship

    1. Understand importance of the ability to carry on a professional conversation

    2. Recognize the importance of retraining and learning new skills

    3. Use effective communication

    2. Observe policies, procedures, and regulations

    1. Identify employer expectations

    2. List employer policy and procedures

    3. Observe all company regulations

    3. Complete internship weekly work reports

    1. Log daily work

    2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person

    4. Complete 300 on-the-job work experience

    5. Project professional appearance

    1. Avoid tardiness

    2. Develop abilities to show initiative

    3. Complete tasks within acceptable standards

    6. Provide the internship site with a responsible and productive employee

    1. Present a positive attitude at work

    2. Demonstrate the ability to learn

    3. Show quality work completed

    4. Exhibit good judgment

    7. Complete the assigned internship tasks

    1. Follow supervisor’s instructions

    2. Understand company rules, policies, and procedures

    8. Demonstrate positive employer relations

    1. Meet employer expectations

    2. Accept additional responsibilities as assigned

    3. Initiate tasks without being told

    9. Develop problem-solving techniques to on-the-job situations

    1. Use attitudes necessary for successful job performance and cooperation with co-workers and management

    2. Describe attitudes and steps necessary to solve problems and conflicts

    10. Write clearly and effectively

    1. Use appropriate style, format, grammar, and tone

    2. Communicate effectively with supervisor, co-workers, and vendors

  
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    IND 904 - Technical Internship IV

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 5
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Students will gain practical experience through on-the-job training.
    Competencies
    1. Describe duties completed through an internship

    1. Utilize knowledge, skills, and abilities required on the job

    2. Recognize the importance of learning and retraining on the job

    2. Observe policies, procedures, and regulations on the job

    1. Identify employer expectations

    2. List employer policy and procedures

    3. Complete internship weekly work reports

    1. Log daily work

    2. Return work reports to the internship instructor by mail or in person

    4. Work a minimum of 300 hours

    5. Project professional appearance

    1. Avoid tardiness

    2. Understand safety and function of certain required clothing and equipment

    6. Demonstrate professionalism and self-discipline in all aspects of work

    1. Adhere to professional standards

    2. Take initiative in seeing work is completed

    7. Show personal and interpersonal knowledge and skills

    1. Demonstrate ethical conduct in all job-related activities

    2. Project an image appropriate for the profession

    3. Communicate clearly when speaking and writing

    4. Apply self-management skills

    8. Observe policies, procedures, and regulations

    1. Identify employer expectations

    2. List employer policies and procedures to be complied with

    9. Project a professional image

    1. Avoid tardiness

    2. Develop abilities to show initiative

    10. Practice company safety policies and procedures

    1. Attend any appropriate safety meetings

    2. Outline safety procedures and policies at the work site


Informatics

  
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    INF 110 - Fundamental Informatics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students explore the core principles of informatics and will gain a strong understanding of the changing role of today’s informatics professional through current examples and informatics references. No matter what their major, students can use the principles learned in this course to function more effectively as workers, managers, decision-makers and organizational leaders applying today’s technology.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the major steps of the systems development process and state the goal of each.
    2. Define the types of roles, functions, and careers available in informatics.
    3. Explain how the use of information systems to add value to the organization can also give an organization a competitive advantage
    4. Develop a plan for selecting computer hardware to meet the evolving needs of the organization and its supporting information systems
    5. Explain why systems and application software are critical in helping individuals and organizations achieve their goals
    6. Identify several key software issues and trends that have an impact on organizations and individuals
    7. Describe the relational database model and outline its basic features
      1. Identify the common functions performed by all database management systems, and identify popular database management systems
      2. Identify and briefly discuss current database applications
    8. Identify several network types and describe the uses and limitations of each
    9. Describe how the Internet works, including alternatives for connecting to it and the role of Internet service providers
      1. Outline a process and identify tools used to create Web content.
      2. Define the terms intranet and extranet and discuss how organizations are using them
    10. Identify several advantages associated with the use of electronic commerce and mobile commerce
      1. Identify the key components of technology infrastructure that must be in place for e-commerce and m-commerce to work
      2. Identify key control and management issues associated with transaction processing systems
    11. Discuss information systems in the functional areas of business organizations.
      1. Identify and describe the basic components of a decision support systems.
      2. State the goals of a group support system and identify the characteristics that distinguish it from a decision support system
      3. Identify the fundamental uses of an ESS and list the characteristics of such a system
      4. List and discuss the use of other special purpose systems
    12. List some of the tools and techniques used in knowledge management.
      1. Define the term artificial intelligence and state the objective of developing artificial intelligence systems
      2. List the characteristics and basic components of expert systems.
      3. Define the term virtual reality and provide three examples of virtual reality applications
    13. Identify the key participants in the systems development process and discuss their roles.
      1. Discuss the key features, advantages, and disadvantages of the traditional, prototyping, rapid application development, and end-user systems development life cycles
      2. Discuss the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools and the object-oriented approach to systems development.
      3. State the purpose of systems analysis and discuss some of the tools and techniques used in this phase of systems development
      4. State the purpose of systems implementation and discuss the various activities associated with this phase of systems development
      5. State the importance of systems and software maintenance and discuss the activities involved
      6. Describe the systems review process
      7. Identify specific measures to prevent computer crime.
    14. Identify specific actions that must be taken to ensure the health and safety of employees as it relates to the use of technology in the work place
    15. Outline criteria for the ethical use of information systems.


Intercollegiate Physical Education

  
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    PEV 115 - Varsity Baseball

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in men’s baseball. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for playing Baseball
    2. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
    3. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for Baseball
    4. Participate in team practices
    5. Develop strategies for game preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation
      3. Participate in team practice using skills
    6. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for Baseball
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to Baseball
    7. Develop weight training program
      1. Develop a work out program for Baseball
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities
    8. Practice sport specific activities
      1. Participate in season practices
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of Baseball-specific strategies
      3. Develop an understanding of Baseball-specific activities

  
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    PEV 121 - Varsity Basketball, Men

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in men’s basketball. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for playing Basketball
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for Basketball
      3. Participate in team practices
    2. Develop strategies for game preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation
      3. Participate in team practice using skills
    3. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for Basketball.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to Basketball
    4. Develop weight training program
      1. Develop a work out program for Basketball
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities
    5. Practice sport specific activities
      1. Participate in season practices
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of Basketball-specific strategies
      3. Develop an understanding of Basketball-specific activities

  
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    PEV 122 - Varsity Basketball, Women

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in women’s basketball. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for playing Basketball
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for Basketball
      3. Participate in team practices
    2. Develop strategies for game preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation
      3. Participate in team practice using skills 
    3. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for Basketball
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to Basketball
    4. Develop weight training program
      1. Develop a work out program for Basketball
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities
    5. Practice sport specific activities
      1. Participate in season practices
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of Basketball-specific strategies
      3. Develop an understanding of Basketball-specific activities.

  
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    PEV 130 - Varsity Cross Country

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in cross country. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year, with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach.
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for cross country
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for cross country
      3. Participate in team practices
    2. Develop strategies for meet preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for meet preparation
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to cross country
    3. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for cross country
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to cross country
    4. Develop weight training program
      1. Develop a work out program for cross country
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities
    5. Practice sport specific activities
      1. Participate in practice skills for playing Golf
      2. Participate in season practices
      3. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for Golf.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of cross country-specific strategies
      5. Participate in team practices
      6. Develop an understanding of cross country-specific activities

  
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    PEV 140 - Varsity Golf

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in golf. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit of one credit per year, with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Develop strategies for game preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation
      3. Participate in team practice using skills.
    2. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for Golf.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program.
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to Golf
    3. Develop weight training program
      1. Develop a work out program for Golf
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities
    4. Practice sport specific activities

  
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    PEV 160 - Varsity Softball

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in women’s softball. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year, with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport section may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for playing softball.
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for softball.
      3. Participate in team practices.
    2. Develop strategies for game preparation.
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation.
      3. Participate in team practice using skills.
    3. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for softball.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program.
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program.
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to softball.
    4. Develop weight training program.
      1. Develop a work out program for softball.
      2. Learn proper weight training techniques.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform specific weight training activities.
    5. Practice sport specific activities.
      1. Participate in season practices.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of softball-specific strategies.

  
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    PEV 170 - Varsity Volleyball

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Provides experience and instruction in women’s volleyball. Course is designed for the varsity athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 1 credit per year, with a maximum of 2 credits total. Credit for a sport course may not be applied toward graduation if credit is also received for any skill technique course in the same sport.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the head coach
    Competencies
    1. Participate in practice skills for playing Volleyball
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate the ability to learn new skills for Volleyball
      3. Participate in team practices
    2. Develop strategies for game preparation
      1. Practice skills as demonstrated by the coach
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of strategies for game preparation
      3. Participate in team practice using skills
    3. Participate in pre-season conditioning program for Volleyball
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of pre-season conditioning program
      2. Participate in the pre-season conditioning program
      3. Practice pre-season conditioning program related to Volleyball

  
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    PEV 190 - Varsity Spirit Squad

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    For men and women desiring to be basketball cheerleaders for varsity basketball season.

Interior Design

  
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    INT 124 - Interior Design Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and experience needed to create pleasing and effective interior design. Focus will be on space planning, furniture styles, color schemes, wall coverings, and floor and window treatments. Also includes exploration of the interior design profession and related career areas.
    Competencies
    1. Describe characteristics of the interior design industry
    2. Identify interior ambience styles
      1. List characteristics of each
      2. Describe the ambience style that best fits your personal expression
    3. Identify characteristics of major furniture styles
    4. Explain shopping strategies for purchasing furniture
    5. Describe how to check for quality in furniture
      1. List materials available
      2. Identify joining methods
      3. Describe various finishes
    6. Describe the elements and principles of design
    7. Describe the principles of color as they apply to interior design
      1. Identify the seven color schemes
      2. Discuss how color can create illusions in a room
      3. Describe how to successfully implement neutrals as a color decorating scheme
    8. Evaluate the characteristics of various fabrics for home furnishings
      1. List properties that upholstery fabrics should possess
      2. Describe the window fabrics that are used for curtains/drapes
      3. Explain the fabrics used for the manufactured product category “linens.”
    9. Explain the basic floor planning arrangement techniques
    10. Select appropriate window treatments for various window styles
      1. Identify various window types
      2. Describe fabric techniques for window coverings
      3. Identify different characteristics of shades, shutters, and blinds
      4. Identify drapery/curtain hardware
      5. List steps in measuring for drapes
    11. Discuss the various choices available to decorate walls and ceilings
      1. Describe wallpaper types and finishes
      2. Describe the different types of paint
      3. Describe painting techniques
      4. Describe fabric treatments for walls
    12. Identify appropriate floor covering for various room functions
      1. List all floor covering options available
      2. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of each floor covering
    13. Describe the functions of lighting in room design
      1. List the types of lighting appropriate for various rooms
      2. Identify various lighting fixtures
    14. Describe techniques for creating personal touches in room design

  
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    INT 125 - Interior Design Planning

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Focuses on the development of interior design plans and the execution of these plans. Builds upon knowledge acquired in Interior Design Analysis through analyzing client needs and creating design boards and presentations to meet those needs.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: INT 124  
    Competencies
    1. Apply design elements and principles in room planning and layout
    2. Draw a room floor plan
      1. Take correct measurements
      2. Use standardized symbols of architects and interior designers
    3. Create a plan within a specified budget
    4. Plan a color scheme
      1. Demonstrate correct choices of colors for room lighting and function
      2. Use appropriate colors for a room’s proportions
      3. Use colors to convey the emotions and feelings desired in a room
      4. Incorporate patterns and texture
    5. Work with various room decor styles to understand the components of each
    6. Evaluate current trends in home furnishings in such areas as style, fabrication and color
    7. Develop design plans for the various rooms of a home
      1. Identify special considerations unique to each room category
      2. Incorporate all components including wall color/coverings, flooring furniture, window treatments and lighting
      3. Create room arrangements indicating furniture placement and traffic flow
    8. Present design plans in storyboard form consistent with processes used in the interior design industry


Interpretation and Translation

  
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    ITR 101 - Intro Interpret & Translation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A general introduction to the field of oral language interpreting and translation (I/T), including linguistic theory of communication, translation approaches, problems and processes, cultural competency and ethics, the role of the interpreter, modes of interpretation and interpreter errors. Taught in English; students need not be bilingual in other languages to take this introductory course.
    Competencies
    1. Explain where meaning resides
      1. Explore the meanings of words in isolation and in context.
      2. Define the polysemous nature of words.
      3. Describe the usefulness and limitations of dictionaries.
      4. Predict how extra linguistic information can affect the translation of a text.
      5. Identify the linguistic level at which the purpose of a text becomes apparent.
    2. Develop a learning portfolio of four ITR Research Areas.
      1. Design a cover page and table of contents.
      2. Identify four research areas.
      3. Develop 1-3 research questions for each research area.
      4. Compile at least one artifact for each research question.
      5. Write a one-page reflection on each of the research questions, incorporating at least one of the theoretical concepts or models explored in the course.
      6. Demonstrate consistent progress on the portfolio project by successfully completing each portfolio checkup.
      7. Present the learning portfolio in electronic form.
    3. Demonstrate comprehension of communication and quality and its role in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define communication.
      2. Define quality
      3. Discuss the relevance of communication and quality to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      4. Apply the concepts of communication and quality to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      5. Summarize the importance of communication and quality to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
    4. Demonstrate comprehension of the theory of fidelity and its role in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define fidelity.
      2. Discuss the relevance of fidelity to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the theory of fidelity to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of fidelity to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
    5. Demonstrate comprehension of the Efforts Model and its role in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define the Efforts Model.
      2. Discuss the relevance of the Efforts Model to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the concepts of the Efforts Model to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of the Efforts Model to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
    6. Demonstrate comprehension of the Gravitational Model and its role in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define the Gravitational Model.
      2. Discuss the relevance of the Gravitational model to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the concepts of the Gravitational model to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of the Gravitational Model to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
    7. Demonstrate comprehension of the Comprehension Model and its role in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define the Comprehension Model.
      2. Discuss the relevance of the Comprehension Model to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the concepts of the Comprehension Model to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of the Comprehension Model to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
    8. Demonstrate comprehension of the role knowledge acquisition plays in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define knowledge acquisition.
      2. Discuss the relevance of knowledge acquisition to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the concepts of knowledge acquisition to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of knowledge acquisition to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
      5. Define sight translation
      6. Define at least two situations in which sight translation is appropriate
    9. Demonstrate comprehension of the role coping tactics play in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define coping tactics.
      2. Discuss the relevance of coping tactics to professional interpretation and translation in at least one class discussion thread.
      3. Apply the concepts of coping tactics to a typical interpretation or translation scenario.
      4. Summarize the importance of coping tactics to professional interpretation and translation in a well-written one-page reflection.
      5. Demonstrate beginning competency in simultaneous pre-interpretation through shadowing exercises
    10. Develop beginning skills in consecutive interpretation
      1. Explain the concept of memory development
      2. Practice memory development in English
      3. Explain the purpose of notetaking in consecutive interpretation
      4. Practice notetaking in English
      5. Demonstrate beginning competency in consecutive pre-interpretation through re-telling exercises
    11. Develop beginning skills in sight translation
      1. Identify the preparatory steps for sight translation
      2. Practice the preparatory steps for sight translation
    12. Develop an awareness of the typology of interpreting errors
      1. Identify the interpreter errors that make up the typology
      2. Explain the consequences of each type of interpreter error
      3. Assess self and peer pre-interpreting skills by identifying errors
    13. Explore the issues of interpreter ethics
      1. Define ethics and codes of conduct
      2. Comprehend the place of codes of conduct in a profession
      3. Contrast/compare ethical considerations for translators as compared to interpreters
    14. Complete the foreign language proficiency assessment to receive a passing or baseline score for subsequent re-takes.
      1. Set up time with instructor to take exam at least once.
      2. Review exam with instructor to discuss results.

  
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    ITR 102 - Tools Interpret & Translate

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    In-depth training in the research and technological tools that interpreters and translators use in their field. Extensive use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries and thesauri. Features of Microsoft Word and Excel for language work and glossary development. Internet tools for vocabulary research and enrichment. Interpretation equipment. Digital recorders for modified consecutive interpretation. Introduction to TRADOS translation memory program.
    Corequisite: ITR 101  or permission of instructor
    Competencies
    1. Express the rationale for the proper use of technological tools and reference materials in interpretation and translation.
      1. Identify the technological tools and reference materials used in interpretation and translation.
      2. Distinguish the types and proper uses of lexicographical tools and reference materials.
      3. Evaluate technological tools and reference materials to choose at least two technological tools and two reference materials for personal glossary work.
    2. Demonstrate ability to input language-specific characters in Windows applications.
      1. Identify the language-specific characters needed to input the student’s working language (other than English).
      2. Demonstrate ability to configure Windows for student’s working language (U.S. International keyboard for European language-based special characters, or language-specific keyboard for non-European language-based special characters).
      3. Use the selected keyboard and keystrokes to type words and phrases that illustrate the special characters needed for inputing the student’s working language (other than English).
      4. Contrast the keyboard configuration method of inputting special characters with other methods of inputting special characters (ASCII numbers, character maps, insert symbols, etc.).
      5. Discuss pros and cons of input methods with classmates.
      6. Report on experience with inputting special characters through a well-written, one-page written reflection.
    3. Demonstrate ability to produce PDF versions of Microsoft Office documents and web pages.
      1. Explore the “Save as PDF” function in Microsoft Office.
      2. Dowload and install the PrimoPDF application.
      3. Prepare PDF versions of one Microsoft Office document and one web page with either the “Save as PDF” function or PrimoPDF.
      4. Contrast the “Save a PDF” function with the Primo PDF application.
      5. Discuss pros and cons of both methods of producing PDF versions with classmates.
      6. Report on experience with producing PDF versions through a well-written, one-page written reflection.
    4. Demonstrate ability to download, play, record, and upload digital files using apersonal digital recorder.
      1. Install the digital recorder software successful.
      2. Download sample digital file and report on its content in class discussion.
      3. Demonstrate ability to configure software to produce digital files in .mp3 or .wma format, rather than .wav format.
      4. Prepare a digital recording that conforms to minimum standards of production (voice quality, volume, lack of hesitation words, appropriate tone).
      5. Upload digital recording to the distance learning platform.
      6. Report on experience with working with digital recordings through a well-written, one-page written reflection.
    5. Demonstrate ability to loacte and evaluate internet search engines for use in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Identify at least one internet search engine in English and in student’s other working language.
      2. Use each identified internet search engine to successfully search for information on an assigned topic.
      3. Prepare and upload PDF version of each website located through the internet search engines.
      4. Evaluate reliability and usefulness of identified internet search engines with classmates.
      5. Report on experience with using internet search engines for teminology research through a well-written, one-page written reflection.
    6. Demonstrate ability to locate and evaluate internet news sites for use in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Identify at least one internet news site in English and in student’s other working language.
      2. Use each identified internet news site to successfully search for information on an assigned news topic.
      3. Prepare and upload PDF version of each website located through the internet news sites.
      4. Compare terminology and point of view of assigned news topic located in English news site and news site from student’s other working language.
      5. Evaluate reliability and usefulness of identified internet news sites.
      6. Report on experience with using internet news sites for terminology research through a well-written, one-page written reflection.
    7. Demonstrate ability to create e-glossary in Microsoft Excel for interpretation and translation work.
      1. Explore the features of Microsoft Excel through completing the online tutorial.
      2. Discuss the types of information and sorting columns that are relevant for a useful e-glossary.
      3. Research tranlastion equivalents of at least 10 terms in English and the student’s other working language.
      4. Prepare e-glossary of at least 200 terms with appropriate sorting columns.
      5. Demonstrate ability to sort and extract terms from e-glossary based on provided criteria.
      6. Discuss ideas for e-glossary with classmates.
      7. Report on experience with developing e-glossary through a well-written, one-page written relfection.
    8. Demonstrate ability to locate and evaluate online reousrce materials for use in professional interpretation and translation.
      1. Define digital recording
      2. Characterize the issued regarding use of digital recording in modified consecutive interpreting
      3. Evaluate the potential usefulness of digital recording technology in different interpreting scenarios
    9. Demonstrate ability to transfer inforamtion electronically through file attachments and use of removable storage media.
      1. Develop awareness of English and non-English search engines
      2. Develop skill in locating desired terminology by completing assignment
      3. Identify websites of use to the interpreter/translator
      4. Apply internet browsing mastery by incorporating researched terms into personal glossary
    10. Identify and evaluate commonly-used Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) tools.
    11. Develop and implement an Action Plan with respect to interpretation and translation tools.
    12. For each goal, identify means of demonstrating achievement of the goal.

  
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    ITR 103 - Fund of Interpretation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study and practice of the basic theory and techniques of language interpretation, applied to general topics of current events. The modes of interpretation: sight translation, consecutive interpretation, simultaneous. Introduction to lexicography and vocabulary development.
    Prerequisite: ITR 101  , ITR 102  and either a passing score on the foreign language proficiency within the last five years or instructor permission  
    Competencies
    1.  Discriminate among the modes of interpreting
      1. Explain the proper mode of interpreting for different interpreting situations.
      2. Identify the proper tools and positioning required by the different modes.
      3. Apply the correct mode(s) to different interpreting situations.
    2. Demonstrate initial competency in general sight translation skills.
      1. Identify proper protocols for sight translation
      2. Examine textual problems posed by common sight translation texts.
      3. Assess self and peer performance in sight translation exercises.
      4. Demonstrate ability to perform acceptable sight translation based on non-specialized texts.
    3. Demonstrate initial competency in general consecutive interpreting skills.
      1. Identify proper protocols for consecutive interpreting.
      2. Develop initial competency in notetaking skills
      3. Assess self and peer performance in consecutive interpreting exercises.
      4. Demonstrate ability to perform acceptable consecutive interpretation based on non-specialized texts
    4. Demonstrate initial competency in general simultaneous interpreting skills.
      1. Identify proper protocols for simultaneous interpreting.
      2. Demonstrate growing competence in using simultaneous interpreting skills.
      3. Assess self and peer performance in consecutive interpreting exercises.
      4. Demonstrate ability to perform acceptable simultaneous interpretation based on non-specialized texts
    5. Demonstrate continued development of lexicographical research through preparation and use of electronic personal glossary
    6. Explore the issues of cultural competency as related to interpretation.
      1. Comprehend the assumptions underlying cultural competency.
      2. Examine personal beliefs regarding up to three current events.
      3. Identify differences in personal belief systems in materials from another culture.
      4. Explain the implications of cultural assumptions in translation.

  
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    ITR 104 - Fundamentals of Translation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Study and practice of the basic theory and techniques of language translation applied to general topics of current events. Translation as product, translation as process, cultural problems in translation, denotative vs. connotative meanings, formal properties of texts, language variety and glossary development.
    Prerequisite: ITR 101 , ITR 102  and either a passing score on the foreign language proficiency within the last five years or instructor permission  
    Competencies
    1. Explore basic translation concepts
      1. Define basic vocabulary: text, source text, target text, source language, target language, strategy, strategic decisions, decisions of detail.
    2. Distinguish between translation as product and translation as process.
      1. Distinguish between literal and idiomatic translations, and describe situations in which each one may be the preferred mode of translation
      2. Perform intralingual translation of a selected text.
      3. Perform a gist translation of a selected text
      4. Distinguish the degrees of freedom in translation: interlinear, literal, faithful, balanced, idiomizing, and free translations
      5. Assess the appropriateness of the different degrees of freedom in translation for selected texts.
    3. Explore the cultural problems encountered in translation.
      1. Identify the basic principles of cultural transposition: exoticism, calque, cultural borrowing, communicative translation, and cultural transplantation.
      2. Explain the issues regarding the translation of names.
      3. Explain the role of compromise and compensation in inter-cultural translation
      4. Apply appropriate compensation strategies to the translation of an inter-cultural text.
    4. Distinguish between the denotative meaning and the connotative meaning of a text
      1. Define synonymy, hypernymy, and hyponymy.
      2. Identify synonymy, hypernymy and hyponymy in examples from source language and target language
      3. Correctly translate the denotative meaning of an illustrative text.
      4. Define attitudinal meaning, associative meaning, affective meaning, allusive meaning, collocative meaning, and reflected meaning.
      5. Identify attitudinal meaning, associative meaning, affective meaning, allusive meaning, collocative meaning, and reflected meaning in examples from source language and target language
      6. Correctly translate the connotative meaning of an illustrative text.
    5. Explore the formal properties of texts
      1. Identify basic phrase structure; sentence, phrase, word, morpheme.
      2. Explore discourse considerations in translation; cohesion and coherence, sentence splitting, textual restructuring, paragraphing, genre
      3. Identify metaphors in illustrative texts
      4. Develop basic translation techniques for metaphors
    6. Explore language variety in texts.
      1. Define the basic principles of language variety; dialect, sociolect, code switching, social register, and tonal register
      2. Identify language variety in illustrative texts in source language and target language.
      3. Explain the effects of appropriate and inappropriate handling of language varieties in translation
    7. Demonstrate continued development of lexicographical research.
      1. Include relevant terminology from assigned texts to electronic glossary.
      2. Provide appropriate translations from target language.
      3. Provide appropriate categorizations to glossary entries.
      4. Generate category-specific extracts from glossary

  
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    ITR 109 - Interp/Trans Ethics I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduction to basic professional ethics as applied to interpretation and translation, including exploration of prior attitudes, frameworks for intellectual and ethical maturity, conflict resolution, core values, ethical decision-making and business practices. Case studies are used to develop a sense of professional ethics.
    Prerequisite: Complete three required ITR courses with a minimum grade of “C”
    Competencies
    1. Explore prior attitudes about ethics and morals
      1. Identify and contrast culture-based values
      2. Identify and explore perceived ethical conflicts in daily and professional life
      3. Report on findings via a well-written, one-page reflection.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of frameworks for intellectual and ethical maturity.
      1. Identify the stages of intellectual and ethical maturity.
      2. Apply the stages of intellectual and ethical maturity to analysis of case studies.
    3. Demonstrate initial competency in recognizing and resolving conflicts.
      1. Identify conflicts as presented in case studies
      2. Discuss principles for resolving conflicts with classmates
      3. Develop and justify resolutions for resolving conflicts as presented in case studies
      4. Report on findings via a well-written, one-page reflection
    4. Demonstrate understanding of core values
      1. Identify the concept of core values
      2. Explore individual and group core values.
      3. Apply core values analysis to case studies
      4. Report on findings via a well-written, one-page reflection
    5. Demonstrate initial competency in ethical decision-making
      1. Identify the concept of ethical decision-making
      2. Discuss procedures for ethical decision-making
      3. Apply ethical decision-making to case studies
      4. Report on findings via a well-written, one-page reflection.
    6. Demonstrate understanding of ethical business practices
      1. Describe the need for ethical business practices.
      2. Identify the consequences of lack of ethical business practices.
      3. Apply ethical business practices to case studies.
      4. Report on findings via a well-written, one-page reflection.
    7. Explore the origins of professional codes of ethics for interpreters and translators.
    8. Identify the basic canons of interpreter ethics: accuracy and completeness, representation of qualifications, impartiality and avoidance of conflict of interest, professional demeanor, confidentiality, scope of practice, assessing and reporting impediment
    9. Demonstrate understanding of the duty of accuracy and completeness.
      1. Identify problems of accuracy and completeness in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of accuracy and completeness
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    10. Demonstrate understanding of the duty to represent qualifications accurately.
      1. Identify problems of representation of qualifications in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of representation of qualifications
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.

  
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    ITR 209 - Interp/Trans Ethics II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    In-depth analysis and application of interpreter and translator codes of ethics including accuracy, representation of qualifications, avoidance of conflicts of interest, professional demeanor, confidentiality, maintaining a proper role, competency, reporting ethical violations, professional development, disciplinary procedures and cultural advocacy. Model scenarios are used for developing and applying ethical judgments.
    Prerequisite: Complete a minimum of three 200-level ITR courses
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the duty of impartiality and avoidance of conflicts of interest
      1. Identify problems of partiality and conflicts of interest in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of partiality and conflicts of interest
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of the need for professional demeanor.
      1. Identify problems of lack of professional demeanor in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of lack of professional demeanor
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of the duty of confidentiality.
      1. Identify problems of breaches of confidentiality in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of breaches of confidentiality
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of the duty of accuracy and completeness.
      1. Identify problems of accuracy and completeness in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of accuracy and completeness
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of the limitation of scope of practice.
      1. Identify problems of scope of practice in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of scope of practice
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    6. Demonstrate understanding of the duty of assessing and reporting impediments to performance
      1. Identify problems of assessing and reporting impediments to performance in model scenarios
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of assessing and reporting impediments to performance
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    7. Demonstrate understanding of the duty to report ethical violations
      1. Identify problems of ethical violations in model scenarios.
      2. Discuss and evaluate possible solutions to problems of ethical violations
      3. Choose best solution to problem and justify it based on ethical principles.
      4. Present rationale in well-written, one-page reflection.
    8. Demonstrate understanding of the duty to pursue professional development.
      1. Identify at least two avenues for obtaining professional development locally
      2. Discuss and evaluate types of professional development needed by interpreters and translators.
      3. Develop an Action Plan for professional development goals.
    9. Identify disciplinary procedures for interpreters and translators in local jurisdiction.
      1. Identify the agency or institution governing interpreter/translator discipline.
      2. Describe the procedures for initiating disciplinary proceedings.
      3. Identify the due-process protections for the complainant and the respondent.
      4. Describe the possible outcomes of a disciplinary process
    10. Explore the issues of cultural advocacy as related to codes of ethics
      1. Define the concept of cultural advocacy.
      2. Describe the controversy surrounding cultural advocacy in interpretation situations
      3. Incorporate examples of appropriate or inappropriate cultural advocacy to ethics scenarios and personal reflections
      4. Present a justification for or against cultural advocacy in a well-written, one page reflection

  
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    ITR 271 - Healthcare Term & Sight Trans

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Identification of the origins of healthcare terminology. Advanced sight translation training focusing on healthcare documents. Lexicographical training in locating, understanding and using frequently used legal terminology in healthcare environments. Intensive practice in sight translating the following types of healthcare documents: consents for treatment, advanced directives, beneficiary notifications and instructions for taking medication.
    Prerequisite: ITR 910  or admission to the Interpretation & Translation-Healthcare program
    Competencies
    1. Identify the origins of medical terminology
      1. Identify the Latin origins of medical terminology in English
      2. Identify the Greek origins of medical terminology in English
      3. Contrast and compare 1 major difference between American medical terminology and medical terminology of source countries of clients
    2. Identify the healthcare documents that are usually sight translated
      1. Describe the situation(s) in which each type of document is encountered.
      2. Identify the characteristics (formal vs. informal, English vs. other language, typed vs. handwritten) of each type of document.
    3. Identify the specialized resources needed to conduct research in healthcare terminology
      1. Characterize a reliable terminological resource
      2. Identify 2-3 print resources in English
      3. Identify 2-3 electronic resources in English
      4. Identify 2-3 print resources in the other language
      5. Identify 2-3 electronic resources in the other language
    4. Develop general sight translation skills
      1. Develop good command of both languages through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review
      2. Develop good public speaking skills; voice projection, clear enunciation, good posture, and smooth pacing through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review.
      3. Develop mental agility through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review
    5. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for consents for treatment
      1. Analyze consents for treatment to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to consents for treatment in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to consents for treatment.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Perform sight translation of consent for treatment.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.
    6. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for advance directives
      1. Analyze advance directives to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to advance directives in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to advance directives.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Perform sight translation of advance directive.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    7. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for beneficiary notifications.
      1. Analyze beneficiary notifications to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to beneficiary notifications in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to beneficiary notifications.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Perform sight translation of beneficiary notifications
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    8. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for instructions for taking medication.
      1. Analyze instructions for taking medication to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to instructions for taking medications in personal electronic glossary
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to instructions for taking medication.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Perform sight translation of instructions for taking medication
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement

  
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    ITR 273 - Healthcare Interpretation I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Theory and practice of consecutive interpretation as applied to common healthcare situations. Advanced consecutive interpretation skills building: listening/ prediction, analysis, note-taking, recall, positioning, situational control and interpreting. Intensive practice in consecutive interpretation in the following healthcare situations: admitting interviews, well-baby visits, informational sessions and standard doctor visits.
    Corequisite: ITR 271  
    Competencies
    1. Identify healthcare situations in which consecutive interpreting should be performed.
    2. Develop listening/prediction techniques for healthcare consecutive interpretation
      1. Identify genres of texts/speeches encountered in healthcare contexts: narration of events, arguments for or against a position, persuasive texts, and descriptions.
      2. Use listening skills to develop structure maps or conceptual maps of different genres of healthcare discourse
      3. Use structure maps or conceptual maps to predict the flow of information in new examples of healthcare discourse
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving listening/prediction abilities in both languages
    3. Develop analysis techniques for healthcare consecutive interpretation
      1. Define the major constituents of a sentence or idea (S-V-O).
      2. Identify the major constituents of each sentence or idea in a healthcare text.
      3. Compare and contrast the major constituents in English and the other language
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving SVO identification in both languages
    4. Develop note-taking techniques for healthcare consecutive interpretation.
      1. Define the tools and format needed for effective note-taking.
      2. Describe the proper goal of effective note-taking
      3. Demonstrate ability to accurately note S-V-O units, links, and unpredictable information.
      4. Demonstrate ability to graphically represent the sequence of events: indentation, verticalization, lines.
      5. Demonstrate ability to use standard and personalized symbols in note-taking for consecutive interpretation
    5. Develop recall techniques for healthcare consecutive interpretation
      1. Identify the issue of memory load according to the Efforts Model of interpretation
      2. Describe the difference between short term memory and long term memory.
      3. Identify the strategies for enhancing retention; segmentation (chunking), semantic retention, use of multiple intelligences for recall development.
      4. Explain the issue of semantic and non-semantic information in human services interpreting
      5. Demonstrate effective recall skills through extensive healthcare consecutive interpreting practice
    6. Develop skills in positioning and situational control for healthcare consecutive interpretation
      1. Identify the factors requiring proper positioning of the interpreter in healthcare consecutive interpretation; audibility, non-verbal cues, unobtrusiveness.
      2. Explain the appropriate positioning of the healthcare interpreter in the following situations; admitting interviews, well baby visits, informational sessions, and standard doctor visits
      3. Demonstrate ability to use proper verbal and non-verbal protocols to control the rate of speech or to request repetitions during healthcare interpreting situations
      4. Explain and justify the need to use the third person when intervening as the interpreter in healthcare interpreting events
    7. Demonstrate ability to interpret for healthcare situations.
      1. Identify terminology commonly occurring in healthcare situations
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for healthcare situations.
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for healthcare situations.
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret for admitting interviews, well-baby visits, informational sessions, and standard doctor visits.
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.
      7. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement

  
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    ITR 274 - Healthcare Interpretation II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Theory and practice of simultaneous interpretation as applied to health care. Advanced simultaneous interpretation skills building: listening/prediction, shadowing and decalage, note-taking, positioning, situational control, equipment use and interpreting. Intensive practice in simultaneous interpretation situations (informational meetings, emergency room interventions, operating room procedures, mental health consultations/interventions) in the following healthcare areas: infectious disease prevention/ control, cardiovascular events, labor/childbirth and mental health.
    Prerequisite: ITR 273  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Identify healthcare situations in which simultaneous interpretation should be performed.
    2. Develop listening/prediction techniques for healthcare simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Identify genres of texts/speeches encountered in healthcare contexts: informational meetings, emergency room interventions, operating room procedures, mental health consultations/interventions.
      2. Use listening skills to develop structure maps or conceptual maps of different genres of healthcare discourse.
      3. Use structure maps or conceptual maps to predict the flow of information in new examples of healthcare discourse.
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving listening/prediction abilities in both languages
    3. Develop shadowing and décalage techniques for healthcare simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Identify the issue of multi-tasking according to the Efforts Model of Interpretation
      2. Define shadowing
      3. Define décalage
      4. Develop shadowing ability and décalage technique through practice healthcare texts in both languages.
      5. Develop and implement a strategy for improving décalage technique in both languages
    4. Develop note-taking techniques for healthcare simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Distinguish note-taking for simultaneous interpretation from note-taking for consecutive interpretation
      2. Demonstrate ability to accurately note unpredictable information
      3. Demonstrate ability to graphically represent the sequence of events: indentation, verticalization, lines
      4. Demonstrate ability to use standard and personalized symbols in note-taking for simultaneous interpretation
    5. Develop skills in positioning and situational control
      1. Identify the factors requiring proper positioning of the interpreter in healthcare simultaneous interpreting situations: audibility, non-verbal cues, unobtrusiveness, presence/absence of interpreting booth, presence/absence of interpreting equipment.
      2. Demonstrate ability to use proper verbal and non-verbal protocols to control the rate of speech or to request repetitions during healthcare simultaneous interpretation situations.
    6. Develop ease in using simultaneous interpreting equipment for healthcare simultaneous interpretation
      1. Identify the advantages of using equipment over the whispering (chuchotage) method
      2. Distinguish among the different types of simultaneous interpreting equipment: wired, FM, infrared
      3. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each type of simultaneous interpreting equipment
      4. Develop skills in using simultaneous interpreting equipment through extensive practice with education interpreting texts
      5. Demonstrate ability to switch to chuchotage when interpreting equipment fails.
      6. Demonstrate ability to use simultaneous interpreting equipment for relay interpreting (A-B-C-B-A).
    7. Demonstrate ability to interpret infectious disease prevention/control informational meetings simultaneously
      1. Identify healthcare terminology commonly occurring in infectious disease prevention/control informational meetings.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for infectious disease prevention/control informational meetings
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for infectious disease prevention/control informational meetings
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret infectious disease prevention/control informational meetings simultaneously
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement
    8. Demonstrate ability to interpret cardiovascular emergency room interventions simultaneously.
      1. Identify healthcare terminology commonly occurring in cardiovascular emergency room interventions
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for cardiovascular emergency room interventions
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for cardiovascular emergency room interventions
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret cardiovascular emergency room interventions simultaneously
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement
    9. Demonstrate ability to interpret for labor/childbirth operating room events simultaneously.
      1. Identify education terminology commonly occurring in labor/childbirth operating room events.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for labor/childbirth operating room events
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for labor/childbirth operating room events.
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret labor/childbirth operating room events simultaneously
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement
    10. Demonstrate ability to interpret for mental health consultations/interventions simultaneously.
      1. Identify healthcare terminology commonly occurring in mental health consultations/interventions
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for mental health consultations/interventions
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for mental health consultations/interventions
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret mental health consultations/interventions simultaneously
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement

  
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    ITR 277 - Healthcare Translation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Advanced written translation training focusing on healthcare documents. Advanced lexicographical training in healthcare terminology. Intensive practice in translating the following types of healthcare documents: discharge information, degrees and diplomas, living wills and patient educational materials.
    Prerequisite: ITR 271  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Identify healthcare documents in which translation should be performed; discharge information, degrees and diplomas, living wills and patient educational materials.
    2. Review principles of translation as applied to healthcare translation
      1. Explain the levels on which meaning resides.
      2. Explain the freedom of translation continuum
      3. Explain difference between the denotative meaning and the connotative meaning of a text.
      4. Identify false cognates in medical terminology and propose correct translations.
    3. Use appropriate resource materials to determine the best translation equivalents of healthcare terminology found in practice healthcare texts.
      1. Determine whether terminology in question is already in student?s personal electronic glossary
      2. Determine additional resources needed to locate correct terminology
    4. Explore common translation problems as applied to healthcare texts.
      1. Define and identify transposition
      2. Define and identify expansion
      3. Define and identify modulation
      4. Define and identify nominal and verbal modifiers
      5. Define and identify double conjunctions in English
      6. Identify 1 syntactic difference between English and student?s other language.
      7. Define lexical repetition and give 1 example from English healthcare texts.
    5. Demonstrate ability to translate discharge information
      1. Analyze discharge information to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to discharge information in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to discharge information
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Prepare translation of discharge information
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    6. Demonstrate ability to translate degrees and diplomas
      1. Analyze degrees and diplomas to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to degrees and diplomas in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to degrees and diplomas.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Prepare translation of degree or diploma
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    7. Demonstrate ability to translate living wills.
      1. Analyze living wills to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to living wills in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to living wills.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Prepare translation of living wills
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    8. Demonstrate ability to translate patient educational materials.
      1. Analyze patient educational materials to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to patient educational materials in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to patient educational materials.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Prepare translation of living wills.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement

  
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    ITR 291 - Judiciary Term & Sight Trans

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Identification of the origins of judiciary terminology. Advanced sight translation training focusing on court/ law enforcement documents. Lexicographical training in locating, understanding and using frequently used legal terminology in judicial proceedings. Intensive practice in sight translating the following types of judicial documents: trial information and indictments, waivers of detention hearings, plea agreements and presentencing reports.
    Prerequisite: ITR 910  or admission to the Interpretation & Translation-Judiciary program
    Competencies
    1. Identify the origins of judicial terminology.
      1. Identify the origins of American judicial terminology
      2. Contrast and compare one major difference between American judicial terminology and education terminology of source countries of clients.
    2. Identify the judicial documents that are usually sight translated.
      1. Describe the situation(s) in which each type of document is encountered.
      2. Identify the characteristics (formal vs. informal, English vs. other language, typed vs. handwritten) of each type of document.
    3. Identify the specialized resources needed to conduct research in judicial terminology.
      1. Characterize a reliable terminological resource
      2. Identify 2-3 print resources in English
      3. Identify 2-3 electronic resources in English
      4. Identify 2-3 print resources in the other language
      5. Identify 2-3 electronic resources in the other language
    4. Develop general sight translation skills.
      1. Develop good command of both languages through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review
      2. Develop good public speaking skills; voice projection, clear enunciation, good posture, and smooth pacing through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review.
      3. Develop mental agility through sight translation practice and peer/instructor review
    5. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for trial informations and indictments
      1. Analyze trial informations and indictments to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to trial informations and indictments in personal electronic glossary
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to trial informations and indictments
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Perform sight translation of trial informations and indictments
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    6. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for waivers of detention hearings.
      1. Analyze waivers of detention hearings to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to waivers of detention hearings in personal electronic glossary
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to waivers of detention hearings
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Perform sight translation of waiver of detention hearings.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    7. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for plea agreements
      1. Analyze waivers of plea agreements to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to plea agreements in personal electronic glossary
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to plea agreements
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary
      5. Perform sight translation of plea agreement
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement
    8. Develop sight translation and terminological research skills for presentencing reports.
      1. Analyze presentencing reports to extract specialized terms.
      2. Incorporate terms relating to presentencing reports in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to presentencing reports
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Perform sight translation of presentencing reports.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.

  
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    ITR 293 - Judiciary Interpretation I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Theory and practice of consecutive interpretation as applied to common judiciary situations. Advanced consecutive interpretation skills building: listening/ prediction, analysis, note-taking, recall, positioning, situational control and interpreting. Intensive practice in consecutive interpretation in the following judiciary situations: attorney-client interviews, proffer interviews, depositions and witness testimony.
    Corequisite: ITR 291  
    Competencies
    1. Identify judiciary situations in which consecutive interpreting should be performed.
    2. Develop listening/prediction techniques for judiciary consecutive interpretation.
      1. Identify genres of texts/speeches encountered in judiciary contexts: narration of events, arguments for or agains a postion, persuasive texts, and descriptions.
      2. Use listening skills to develop structure maps or conceptual maps of different genres of judiciary discourse.
      3. Use structure maps or conceptual maps to predict the flow of information in new examples of judiciary discourse.
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving listening/prediction abilities in both languages.
    3. Develop analysis techniques for judiciary consecutive interpretation.
      1. Define the major constituents of a sentence or idea (S-V-O).
      2. Identify the major constituents of each sentence or idea in a judiciary text.
      3. Compare and contrast the major constituents in English and the other language/
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving SVO identification in both languages.
    4. Develop note-taking techniques for judiciary consecutive interpretation.
      1. Define the tools and format needed for effective note-taking.
      2. Describe the proper goal of effective note-taking.
      3. Demonstrate ability to accurately note S-V-O units, links, and unpredictable information.
      4. Demonstrate ability to graphically represent the sequence of events; indientation, verticalization, lines.
      5. Demonstrate ability to use standard and personalized symbols in note-taking for consecutive interpretation.
    5. Develop recal techniques for judiciary consecutive interpretation.
      1. Identify the issue of memory load according to the efforts model of interpretation.
      2. Describe the difference between short term memory and long term memory.
      3. Identify the strategies for enhancing retention: segmentation (chuncking), semantic retention, use of multiple intelligences for recal development.
      4. Explain the issue of semantic and non-semantic information in human services interpreting.
      5. Demonstrate effective recall skills through extensive healthcare consecutive interpreting practice.
    6. Develop skills in positioning and situational control for judiciary consecutive interpretation.
      1. Identify the factors requireing proper positioning of the interpreter in judiciary consecutive interpretation: audibility, non-verbal cues, unobtrusiveness.
      2. Explain the appropriate positioning of the judiciary interpreter in the following situations: attorney-client interviews, proffer interviews, depositions, and witness testimony.
      3. Demonstrate ability to use proper verbal and non-verbal protocols to control the rate of speech or to request repetitions during judiciary interpreting situations.
      4. Explain and justify the need to use the thir person when intervening as the interpreter in judiciary interpreting events.
    7. Demonstrate ability to interpret for judiciary situations.
      1. Identify terminology commonly occurring in judiciary situations.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary.
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for judiciary situations.
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for judiciary situations.
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret for attorney-client intervies, proffer intervies, depositions, and witness testimony.
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.

  
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    ITR 294 - Judiciary Interpretation II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Theory and practice of simultaneous interpretation as applied to judiciary interpretation. Advanced simultaneous interpretation skills building: listening/ prediction, shadowing and decalage, note-taking, positioning, situational control, equipment use and interpreting. Intensive practice in simultaneous interpretation situations in the following judiciary areas: initial appearances, bail/detention hearings, change of plea hearings and sentencing hearings.
    Prerequisite: ITR 293  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Identify judiciary situations in which simultaneous intrepretation should be performed.
    2. Develop listening/prediction techniques for judiciary simultaneous intrepretation.
      1. Identify genres of texts/speeches encountered in judiciary hearns: initial appearances, bail/detention hearings, change of pleas hearings, sentencing hearings.
      2. Use listening skills to develop structure maps or conceptual maps of different types of hearings; initial appearances, bail/detention hearings, change of plea hearings, sentencing hearings.
      3. Use structure maps or conceptual maps to predict the flow of information in examples of judiciary discourse.
      4. Develop and implement a practice strategy for improving listening/prediciton abilities in both languages.
    3. Develop shadowing and decalage techniques for judiciary simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Identify the issue of multi-tasking according to the efforts model of interpretation.
      2. Define shadowing.
      3. Define decalage.
      4. Develop shadowing ability and decalage technique through practice judiciary texts in both languages.
      5. Develop and implement a strategy for improving decalage technique in both languages.
    4. Develop note-taking techniques for judiciary simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Distinguish note-taking for simultaneous interpretati8on from note-taking for consecutive interpretation.
      2. Demonstrate ability to accurately note unpredictable information.
      3. Demonstrate ability to graphically represent the sequence of events: indentation, verticalization, lines.
      4. Demonstrate ability to use standard and personalized symbols in note-taking for simultaneous interpretation.
    5. Develop skills in positioning and situational control.
      1. Identify the factors requiring proper positioning of the interpreter in judiciary simultaneous interpreting situations: audibility, non-verbal cues, unobtrusiveness, presence/absence of interpreting booth, presence/absence of interpreting equipment.
      2. Demonstrate ability to use proper verbal and non-verbal protocols to control the rate of speech or to request repetitions during judiciary simultaneous interpretation situations.
    6. Develop ease in using simultaneous interpreting equipment for judiciary simultaneous interpretation.
      1. Identify the advantages of using equipment over the whispering (chuchatage) method.
      2. Distinguish among the different types of simultaneous interpreting equipment: wired, FM, infrared.
      3. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each type of simultaneous interpreting equipment.
      4. Develop skills in using simultaneous interpreting equipment through extensive practice with education interpreting texts.
      5. Demonstrate ability to switch to chuchotage when interpreting equipment fails.
      6. Demonstrate ability to use simultaneous interpreting equipment for relay interpreting (A-B-C-B-A).
    7. Demonstrate ability to interpret initial apprearance hearings simultaneously.
      1. Identify judiciary terminology commonly occurring in initial appearance hearings.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary.
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for initial appearance hearings.
      4. Demonstrate ability to interpret initial appearance hearings simultaneously.
      5. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.
    8. Demonstrate ability to interpert bail/detention hearings simultaneously.
      1. Identify judiciary terminology commonly occurring in bail/detention hearings.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary.
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for bail/detention hearings.
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for bail/detention hearings.
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret bail/detention hearings simultaneously.
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.
    9. Demonstrate ability to interpret change of pleas hearings simultaneously.
      1. Identify education terminology commonly occurring in change of plea hearings.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary.
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for change of plea hearings.
      4. Demonstrate ability to interpret change of plea hearings simultaneously.
      5. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.
    10. Demonstrate ability to interpret sentencing hearings simultaneously.
      1. Identify judiciary teminology commonly occurring in sentencing hearings.
      2. Incorporate new terminology into personal electronic glossary.
      3. Incorporate new symbols needed for note-taking while interpreting for sentencing hearings.
      4. Identify potential interpreting and ethical pitfalls when interpreting for sentencing hearings.
      5. Demonstrate ability to interpret sentencing hearings simultaneously.
      6. Identify areas of improvement and plans for improvement.

  
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    ITR 297 - Judiciary Translation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Advanced written translation training focusing on judiciary documents. Advanced lexicographical training in judiciary terminology. Intensive practice in translating the following types of judiciary documents: birth certificates, degrees and diplomas, plea agreements and wills.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ITR 291  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Identify judiciary documents in which translations should be performed: birth certificates, degrees and diplomas, plea agreements, contracts.
    2. Review principles of translation as applied to judiciary translation.
      1. Explain the levels on which meaning resides.
      2. Explain the freedom of translation continuum.
      3. Explain difference between the denotative meaning and the connotative meaning of a text.
      4. Identify false cognates in judiciary terminology and propose correct translations.           
    3. Use appropriate resource materials to determine the best translation equivalents of judiciary terminology found in practice judiciary texts
      1. Determine whether terminology in question is already in student’s personal electronic glossary.
      2. Determine additional resources needed to locate correct terminology.
    4. Explore common translation problems as applied to judiciary texts.
      1. Define and identify transposition.
      2. Define and identify expansion.
      3. Define and identify modulation.
      4. Define and identify nominal and verbal modifiers.
      5. Define and identify double conjunctions in English.
      6. Identify 1 syntactic difference between English and student’s other language.
      7. Define lexical repetition and give 1 example from English judiciary texts.       
    5. Demonstrate ability to translate birth certificates.
      1. Analyze birth certificates to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to birth certificates in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to birth certificates
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Prepare translation of birth certificates.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.
    6. Demonstrate ability to translate degrees and diplomas.
      1. Analyze degrees and diplomas to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to degrees and diplomas in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to degrees and diplomas.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Prepare translation of degrees and diplomas.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.
    7. Demonstrate ability to translate plea agreements.
      1. Analyze plea agreements to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to plea agreements in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to plea agreements.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Prepare translation of plea agreements.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.
    8. Demonstrate ability to translate contracts.
      1. Analyze contracts to extract specialized terms
      2. Incorporate terms relating to contracts in personal electronic glossary.
      3. Research terminological resources to find appropriate translations of terms relating to contracts.
      4. Incorporate translations in personal electronic glossary.
      5. Prepare translation of contracts.
      6. Incorporate peer/instructor review into plan for improvement.

  
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    ITR 871 - Healthcare I/T Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 3
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Application of the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in the classroom by interning under qualified/ certified interpreters and translators in a variety of healthcare environments. Interns develop professional resumes, cover letters and portfolios. After securing an internship position, interns will shadow their mentors and then move into actual translation/translation assignments in appropriate monitored situations.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite: Minimum of C in all ITR courses.
    Corequisite: ITR 209  
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Develop a professional résumé.
      1. Synthesize and incorporate relevant prior work experience.
      2. Synthesize and incorporate relevant prior studies.
      3. Prepare résumé according to format and editing guidelines.
      4. Print résumé using appropriate print/paper quality.
    2. Secure an internship position in an appropriate business situation, or a mentorship under a qualified business interpreter/translator.
      1. Use prior networking or active contact research to prepare list of potential positions.
      2. Use appropriate means (telephone, mail, visits) to make initial contacts with potential positions.
      3. Observe professional conduct in phone and in-person interviews.
      4. Notify instructor of internship position secured.
    3. Perform 60 hours of supervised translation or translation work during the term.
      1. Develop, in consultation with mentor and instructor, a plan of action for internship.
      2. Demonstrate professionalism (promptness, appropriate attire, appropriate behavior).
      3. Document translation and translation work performed during internship through weekly progress reports.
    4. Debrief experiences with instructor and other interns during weekly class sessions.
      1. Attend all class sessions.
      2. Hand in all required reports.
      3. Discuss potential technical and ethical issues that arise during internship.
      4. Apply principles discussed in class to internship activities.
    5. Develop a professional portfolio.
      1. Choose appropriate presentation style and format.
      2. Determine appropriate sections for portfolio.
      3. Gather relevant artifacts and reflections from prior studies/work.
      4. Incorporate updated résumé into portfolio.
      5. Obtain comments/critique on portfolio from internship mentor.

  
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    ITR 891 - Judiciary I/T Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 3
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Application of the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in the classroom by interning under qualified/ certified interpreters and translators in a variety of judiciary environments. Interns develop professional resumes, cover letters and portfolios. After securing an internship position, interns will shadow their mentors and then move into actual translation/translation assignments in appropriate monitored situations.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite: Minimum of C in all ITR courses.
    Corequisite: ITR 209  
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Develop a professional résumé.
      1. Synthesize and incorporate relevant prior work experience.
      2. Synthesize and incorporate relevant prior studies.
      3. Prepare résumé according to format and editing guidelines.
      4. Print résumé using appropriate print/paper quality.
    2. Secure an internship position in an appropriate business situation, or a mentorship under a qualified business interpreter/translator.
      1. Use prior networking or active contact research to prepare list of potential positions.
      2. Use appropriate means (telephone, mail, visits) to make initial contacts with potential positions.
      3. Observe professional conduct in phone and in-person interviews.
      4. Notify instructor of internship position secured.
    3. Perform 60 hours of supervised translation or translation work during the term.
      1. Develop, in consultation with mentor and instructor, a plan of action for internship.
      2. Demonstrate professionalism (promptness, appropriate attire, appropriate behavior).
      3. Document translation and translation work performed during internship through weekly progress reports.
    4. Debrief experiences with instructor and other interns during weekly class sessions.
      1. Attend all class sessions.
      2. Hand in all required reports.
      3. Discuss potential technical and ethical issues that arise during internship.
      4. Apply principles discussed in class to internship activities.
    5. Develop a professional portfolio.
      1. Choose appropriate presentation style and format.
      2. Determine appropriate sections for portfolio.
      3. Gather relevant artifacts and reflections from prior studies/work.
      4. Incorporate updated résumé into portfolio.
      5. Obtain comments/critique on portfolio from internship mentor.

  
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    ITR 910 - Emphasis Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A survey of specialized fields of judiciary interpretation/translation, healthcare interpretation/ translation, human services interpretation/translation, educational interpretation/translation and business translation/interpretation. Introduction to typical texts and interpreting situations in each specialty area.
    Prerequisite: ITR 103  or ITR 104  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    1. Distinguish among the different areas of specialization in interpreting/translation; judiciary, health care, human services, education and business
      1. Describe the contexts in which interpreting and translation are performed in each of the specialty areas
      2. List the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for interpreters and translators in each of the specialty areas
    2. Explore professional resources available for judiciary interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 professional association for judiciary interpreters/translators
      2. Identify the code of ethics for judiciary interpretation/translation
      3. Prepare and ask questions for judiciary interpreter/translator (guest speaker).
    3. Explore print and electronic resources available in judiciary interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 bilingual dictionary (print) in language combination for judiciary interpretation/translation
      2. Identify at least 1 bilingual glossary (electronic) in language combination for judiciary interpretation/translation
      3. Evaluate each resource identified, and report findings in a half-page review for each resources
      4. Perform a translation of a simple judiciary text, and peer edit the translation
      5. Perform an interpretation of a simple judiciary oral text, and peer edit the recording
    4. Explore professional resources available for health care interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 professional association for health care interpreters/translators
      2. Identify the code of ethics for healthcare interpreters/translators
      3. Prepare and ask questions for health care interpreter/translator (guest speaker).
    5. Explore print and electronic resources available in healthcare interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 bilingual dictionary (print) in language combination for health care interpretation/translation
      2. Identify at least 1 bilingual glossary (electronic) in language combination for healthcare interpretation/translation
      3. Evaluate each resource identified, and report findings in a half-page review for each resource
      4. Perform a translation of a simple healthcare text and peer edit the translation
      5. Perform an interpretation of a simple healthcare oral text, and peer edit the recording
    6. Explore professional resources available for human services interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 professional association for human services interpreters/translators
      2. Identify the code of ethics for human services interpreters/translators
      3. Prepare and ask questions for human services interpreter/translator (guest speaker)
    7. Explore print and electronic resources available in human services interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 bilingual dictionary (print) in language combination for human services interpretation/translation
      2. Identify at least 1 bilingual glossary (electronic) in language combination for human services interpretation/translation
      3. Evaluate each resource identified, and report finding in a half-page review for each resource
      4. Perform a translation of a simple human services text, and peer edit the translation
      5. Perform an interpretation of a simple human services oral text, and peer edit the recording
    8. Explore professional resources available for educational interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 professional association for educational interpreters/translators
      2. Identify the code of ethics for educational interpreters/translators
      3. Prepare and ask questions for educational interpreters/translator (guest speaker)
    9. Explore print and electronic resources available in educational interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 bilingual dictionary (print) in language combination for educational interpretation/translation
      2. Identify at least 1 bilingual glossary (electronic) in language combination for educational interpretation/translation
      3. Evaluate each resource identified, and report findings in a half-page review for each resource
      4. Perform a translation of a simple human services text, and peer edit the translation
      5. Perform an interpretation of a simple human services oral text, and peer edit the recording
    10. Explore professional resources available for business interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 professional association for business interpreters/translators
      2. Identify the code of ethics for business interpreters/translators
      3. Prepare and ask questions for business interpreter/translator (guest speaker).
    11. Explore print and electronic resources available in business interpretation/translation
      1. Identify at least 1 bilingual dictionary (print) in language combination for business interpretation/translation
      2. Identify at least 1 bilingual glossary (electronic) in language combination for business interpretation/translation
      3. Evaluate each resource identified and report findings in a half-page review for each resource
      4. Perform a translation of a simple business text, and peer edit the translation
      5. Perform an interpretation of a simple business oral text, and peer edit the recording
    12. Use a learning portfolio to present findings and to explore student?s preferred area of specialization
      1. Create an appropriate format for the portfolio
      2. Make sections for each of the areas of specialization
      3. Incorporate artifacts found through class work and individual research
      4. Write one-page reflections for each section of the portfolio.
      5. Write a three-page reflection indicating which area of specialization the student wishes to pursue, with reasons and goals.


Journalism

  
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    JOU 110 - Intro to Mass Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    An introduction to mass communication in a global marketplace. Emphasizes print and electronic media, advertising and public relations, ethics and new technology.
    Competencies
    1. Survey the history of the mass media–books, newspapers, magazines, film, popular music (recording), radio, television, and the Web
    2. Analyze the contemporary status of the mass media– books, newspapers, magazines, film, popular music (recording), radio, television, the Web and new communication technologies
      1. Examine the role of each medium in contemporary society
      2. Investigate the fundamental processes of gathering information for and disseminating information through each medium
    3. Appraise the various contemporary and enduring issues that evolve out of the interactions of individuals and the mass media
      1. Survey the ethics of mass communication
      2. Evaluate the impact of international communication
      3. Explain the effect of mass communication on modern culture
      4. Assess the role of mass communication in the functioning of democratic institutions
    4. Discuss factors influencing accuracy
    5. Analyze resources and methods needed to critically evaluate the mass media
      1. Examine mass communication research
      2. Investigate mass communication theory
    6. Demonstrate mass communication research
    7. Explain how markets and the media interact to determine media content
    8. Examine the tremendous and largely unrecognized role that mediated communication plays in constructing social reality
      1. Investigate how media personnel influence media content
      2. Scrutinize consumer concerns about media content and quality
      3. Survey how markets and media interact to determine media content
    9. List ways consumers can take a role in influencing the content and methods of mass communication
    10. Discover a sense of responsibility as a citizen of our popular culture
    11. Explore possible mass communication alternatives and futures

  
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    JOU 113 - Gender, Sexuality and Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course explores the ways mass media help form, reproduce and challenge our understandings of gender and sexuality. Students will be introduced to various theories and approaches to media and how and why certain stereotypes of gender and sexuality dominate across many formats. This course will increase students’ media literacy and understanding of the lack of diversity in stereotypical images of gender and sexuality, as well as investigate ways in which media has potential for social change in these areas. Students may not receive course credit for both JOU 113 and COM 146 .
    Competencies
    1. Analyze resources and methods needed to critically evaluate the mass media.
      1. Outline mass communication research
      2. Summarize mass communication theory
    2. Examine theories of social constructions of gender
      1. Identify components of the constructions of both masculinity and femininity
      2. Assess common assumptions of gender as a marker of identity.
      3. Analyze media portrayals and reinforcements of stereotypical representations of gender roles.
    3. Compare theories of the social construction of sexualities
      1. Analyze media portrayals and reinforcements of stereotypical representations of sexualities
      2. Assess common assumptions of sexuality as a marker of identity.
      3. Identify basic differences between heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality and other categorizations
    4. Analyze the relationships between gender, sexuality, and other categories of social difference in media representations.
    5. Evaluate various media formats targeted to specific genders and/or sexuality groups.
      1. Identify specific types of media forms or genres that are targeted to a specific gender/sexuality category
      2. Characterize ways in which targeted media reinforce or challenge stereotypes to their presumed audiences
    6. Predict alternatives and futures of representations of gender and sexuality in media.
      1. Identify alternative media voices and creators that challenge common portrayals and constructions of gender and sexuality
      2. Assess active campaigns against the perpetuation of media stereotypes
    7. Evaluate the impact and effects of mass communication on audiences and on modern society.
      1. Conduct an evaluation of a representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary U.S. media
      2. Question ethical obligations and responsibilities of media to diversify its images, particularly in areas of gender and sexuality
      3. Examine the role of media industry and markets in shaping constructions of gender and sexuality in contemporary media.
      4. Discover a sense of social responsibility as a media consumer

  
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    JOU 114 - Diversity and the Media

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Presents a historical perspective and a current analysis of various minority groups with regard to race, religion, disability, sexuality, social class and age. This course also explores how media depict these groups. Helps students understand why and how stereotypical media portrayals have been produced and how the under-representation of diversified images affects their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors toward others and contributes to multicultural illiteracy. Students may not receive course credit for both JOU 114 and COM 148 .
    Competencies
    1. Research current media effects on the consequences of stereotypical media portrayals and under-representation of alternative images
      1. Give examples of negative media portrayals of various minority groups.
      2. Discuss basic facts and concepts of the U.S. as a diverse country
      3. Evaluate the social and psychological effects of the portrayals of underrepresented groups in the media
      4. Identify and challenge portrayals, especially stereotypical representation, of underrepresented groups in the media.
    2. Examine theories of social construction of race, disability and age
      1. Assess common assumptions of diversity
      2. Compare and contrast theories of stereotypical representation of underrepresented groups in the media
    3. Evaluate the function and effects of the mass media on today?s society
      1. Discuss current mainstream media and its target audiences
      2. Analyze the print and electronic media as they relate to gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, mental or physical disability, and age issues.
    4. Distinguish alternative media voices and creators, multicultural contributions to media, the image rebuilding process, and corrective stereotypes.
      1. Analyze the needs and interests of diverse communities, and how they are being met by the mainstream media
      2. Investigate the role of nonmainstream media’s sources and outlets
    5. Evaluate various minority groups? representations in the media.
      1. Analyze popular media products
      2. Infer the media’s cultural influence and become a more informed consumer and enlightened participant in our media/consumer culture
    6. Communicate clearly and concisely in professional contexts involving mediated communication in regards to diverse social groups
      1. Conduct a research project on the representation of an identified group
      2. Present results of a research project in both oral and written forms
    7. Integrate a variety of materials to critically address issues about media, race, religion, disability, sexuality and gender
      1. Analyze how images of diverse groups have changed over time and why
      2. Reframe a sense of responsibility as a media consumer and citizen
    8. Predict changes in the diversity of media images
      1. Examine active campaigns against the perpetuation of media stereotypes.
      2. Develop a course of action of what can be done to promote positive change of diverse groups
      3. Brainstorm what can be done to promote change.
    9. Critique ethical obligations and responsibilities of media.
      1. Analyze the role of ethics of media to diversify its images of race, religion, disability, sexuality and gender
      2. Compare and contrast popular media’s success at representing minority groups

  
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    JOU 121 - Newswriting and Reporting

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Designed to provide students with experiences in gathering, organizing and writing news stories.
    Competencies
    1. Assess the elements of news
      1. Recognize the news elements in a variety of published stories
      2. Identify the five W’s, H, and “so what” in news stories
      3. Identify the elements of news in assigned stories researched and produced for publication
    2. Differentiate among the various types of stories
      1. Recognize hard news
      2. Recognize soft news
      3. Analyze sidebars and fact boxes
      4. Analyze a speech or meeting or press conference story
      5. Apply news qualities to demonstrate appropriate news judgment
      6. Analyze feature writing
    3. Gain knowledge of media law
      1. Understand the First Amendment
      2. Define libel/slander
      3. Explain invasion of privacy
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of open meetings and open records law
      5. Substantiate knowledge of copyright laws and plagiarism
    4. Gain knowledge of media ethics
      1. Examine ethical decision-making and standard codes of ethics
      2. Evaluate case studies for ethical implications
      3. Understand diversity
    5. Construct basic news stories
      1. Identify a variety of leads
      2. Write a variety of leads
      3. Write inverted pyramid news stories
      4. Identify visuals to enhance news stories
      5. Write a story that covers a speech or meeting or press conference
      6. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of accuracy, fairness, balance and objectivity in news writing
    6. Prepare advanced news stories
      1. Create leads for feature stories
      2. Develop “nut” graphs
      3. Write a feature story
      4. Identify visuals to enhance a feature story
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of accuracy, fairness, balance and objectivity in feature writing
    7. Develop interview and research skills necessary for basic reporting
      1. Reproduce accurate and complete notes
      2. Compose relevant questions for proposed stories
      3. Evaluate types of interview questions
      4. Conduct interviews through role-playing, in-class press conferences and interviews, and individually scheduled reporting assignments
      5. Understand how to use direct and indirect quotes
      6. Demonstrate appropriate use of attribution in stories
      7. Evaluate a variety of online databases
      8. Utilize library resources and other documentation to verify facts
      9. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of accuracy, fairness, balance and objectivity in the interview process
    8. Develop principles of clear writing necessary to the journalism profession
      1. Recognize common spelling errors
      2. Recognize common grammar, usage, and punctuation errors
      3. Compose stories and headlines using active verbs
      4. Utilize the AP Stylebook
    9. Be aware of the changing nature of news
      1. Keep abreast of current events
      2. Generate story ideas
      3. Utilize current technology available on your campus
      4. Identify emerging trends in journalism
    10. Gain knowledge of related fields in journalism
      1. Understand public relations writing
      2. Write a press release
      3. Understand broadcast news writing

  
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    JOU 122 - Intro to News Production

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Students will learn all aspects of producing content for a college news operation (web, social media, print). By the end of the course, students will contribute material for publication at the Campus Chronicle (Ankeny), Banner News (Boone) or the Urban Vibe (Urban).
    Corequisite: Recommended: JOU 121  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize the purpose of news.
      1. Define news
      2. Learn the basic history of journalism.
      3. Identify the role of the news media on campus.
      4. Learn the basics of professional journalism.
      5. Understand how news is consumed online and in print.
      6. Define convergence.
      7. Understand the impact of digital technology on the news.
    2. Produce news stories.
      1. Identify newsworthy story ideas.
      2. Gather information for news stories.
      3. Assemble material in a readable news style for digital and print publication.
      4. Consult the Associated Press Stylebook.
      5. Proofread.
      6. Learn the importance of visuals.
      7. Plan visuals to help convey the story to reader.
    3. Organize a personal work schedule to allow for the timely submission of stories for the news operation
      1. Meet established deadlines.
      2. Negotiate with editor(s) for additional time if circumstances genuinely warrant an extension.
    4. Develop a working understanding of equipment on your campus (digital cameras and recorders, scanners, printers, software) to be able to submit, upload and layout copy and visuals.
      1. Learn how to use Microsoft Word.
      2. Be exposed to Adobe InDesign.
      3. Know the basics of Adobe Photoshop.
      4. Understand elements of digital photography.
      5. Upload content to a blogging or newspaper publishing platform.
    5. Participate in all duties expected of a news staff member, DMACC student, and citizen.
      1. Participate in staff meetings (class).
      2. Engage in additional lab hours as arranged by instructor.
      3. Work on additional activities sponsored by the news organization (i.e. open house, retreat, recruiting, First Amendment Day, fundraising).
      4. Accept tasks as needed (i.e. photo assignments, proofreading, additional stories).
      5. Learn different methods and strategies for posting and promoting content through social media.
    6. Understand basic advertising principles as they apply to news operations.
      1. Identify potential clients.
      2. Create an ad proposal.
      3. Present an ad proposal to staff.
      4. Pitch an ad proposal to a client.
    7. Work cooperatively with editorial/staff team to contribute to a quality news operation.
      1. Accept constructive criticism from editor and other staff members.
      2. Apply suggestions for improvement.
      3. Listen to and respect the viewpoints of others.
      4. Be flexible with work assignments, article length, layout changes, etc.
      5. Check messages and e-mail regularly.
    8. Evaluate basic media law as it applies to college news operations.
      1. Know the basic principles of copyright law.
      2. Understand the basic concept of libel law.
      3. Summarize the First Amendment.
      4. Give examples of censorship, especially prior review.
    9. Develop ethical decision-making skills.
      1. Understand the implications of plagiarism.
      2. Justify the use of language in the publication.
      3. Identify conflicts of interest.

  
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    JOU 124 - Digital Media Production

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    An introduction to publishing online using digital equipment and software. An emphasis will be placed on journalistic style using writing, photography, video, and audio. May be repeated for an additional three semesters for a total of 12 elective credit hours.
    Competencies
    1. Understand how the Internet has changed journalism
      1. Explain the differences between traditional and digital media
      2. Define CMS (Content Management System)
      3. Identify what medium (text, video, photos, audio, slideshow with narration) will best represent a particular story
      4. Describe what makes something newsworthy
      5. Explain the steps involved when creating a news story
      6. Describe digital media tools including blogging, microblogging, podcasting, videos and photography
      7. Describe social media
      8. Describe crowdsourcing
      9. Recognize how analytics allows websites to track audiences
    2. Use a smartphone or tablet as a mobile news-gathering tool
      1. Understand the difference between using a smartphone or tablet and professional-level equipment
      2. Record audio with a smartphone or tablet
      3. Take photographs with a smartphone or tablet
      4. Record video with a smartphone or tablet
    3. Demonstrate how to create a news story for publication online
      1. Understand the different contemporary content publishing platforms, including social media
      2. Show how to create a post for text, photographs, video, podcasts and multimedia slideshows
      3. Write, edit, and transfer text
      4. Identify how to organize and categorize content online
      5. Understand source selection
      6. Conduct an interview
      7. Write a lead
      8. Attribute information and quotes
      9. Describe alternative news story structures
    4. Demonstrate how to take a news photograph
      1. Define photojournalism
      2. Show how to use a DSLR and transfer the images to a computer
      3. Adjust exposure, color and crop in Photoshop
      4. Understand resolution and how to save an image for the Web
      5. Publish and tag a photo on social media
    5. Produce a news video
      1. Identify equipment needed to capture quality audio and video
      2. Frame an interview shot
      3. Conduct a video interview using professional practices
      4. Compose a video script
      5. Use video editing software to edit a story and add narration
      6. Post the video online
    6. Produce a podcast
      1. Define the elements of a podcast
      2. Record audio
      3. Evaluate audio production quality
      4. Edit digital audio
      5. Upload finished podcast to a feed
      6. Promote the podcast via social media
    7. Create a multimedia slideshow
      1. Select the tools available to produce a multimedia slideshow
      2. Write an audio script
      3. Complete all steps to combine photos and other media with narration
      4. Post the multimedia slideshow online
    8. Analyze the legal issues involved with digital publishing
      1. Summarize the First Amendment
      2. Explain copyright law as it applies to journalism and online content
      3. Explain libel
      4. Differentiate the legalities of photographing and recording in public and private spaces
    9. Analyze the ethical issues involved with digital publishing
      1. Define plagiarism
      2. Discuss journalistic ethical codes
      3. Evaluate ethical standards in photojournalism
      4. Act honestly, fairly and objectively
      5. Explain how to manage online comments

  
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    JOU 130 - Intro to Audio Production

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Students will learn about audio production from a journalistic perspective. Students will create short features, podcasts, audio postcards, public service announcements, and news reports.
    Competencies
    1. Create an interview podcast.
      1. ​Describe the basic elements of a podcast.
      2. Write interview questions.
      3. Demonstrate how to edit and publish a podcast.
    2. Compose an audio feature story. 
      1. Demonstrate how to record an interview for a feature using portable equipment. 
      2. Characterize audio quality. 
      3. Explain actualities, wild sound, and narration. 
      4. Demonstrate how to write an audio script. 
      5. Identify ways of mixing audio. 
    3. Design a public service announcement (PSA).
      1. Write a PSA script.
      2. Describe the difference between a PSA and news story.
      3. Demonstrate methods of recording a PSA.
      4. Demonstrate methods of editing a PSA. 
    4. Create a news report.
      1. Identify the parts of a news report.
      2. Write a news report script.
      3. Demonstrate how to record a news report. 
    5. Generate an audio postcard.
      1. Write and record descriptive narration.
      2. Identify the best way to record ambient sound on location.
      3. Demonstrate how to edit narration and sound together.
    6. Examine equipment and software used in audio production.
      1. Describe different types of microphones.
      2. Identify different sound recording devices.
      3. Summarize different software options for editing audio.
    7. Break down ethical and legal issues relating to broadcast and podcasting.
      1. Explain ethical guidelines for journalists.
      2. Identify the most common legal issues for journalists.
      3. Describe FCC broadcast regulations in the U.S.
      4. Explain consequences for unethical or illegal actions.

    Competencies Revised Date: 09/10/2019
  
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    JOU 142 - News Practicum I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    This course offers entry-level practical experience in news production for a campus news operation. Students will work as general assignment reporters on their campus news staff and will be involved in all stages of news production including planning, reporting, proofreading, layout, design, advertising and social media.
    Prerequisite: JOU 121  or JOU 122  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Plan news as a general assignment reporter.
      1. Define news.
      2. Identify news stories relevant to the campus.
      3. Determine the best strategy to convey a news story.
      4. Cover a variety of news topics.
    2. Write news stories.
      1. Analyze different methods of background research.
      2. Identify and interview sources.
      3. Write a lead.
      4. Write direct, indirect and partial quotes.
      5. Follow inverted pyramid style and alternative story structures.
      6. Check facts.
      7. Maintain objectivity and fairness when writing a news story.
      8. Apply principles of media law.
    3. Edit news stories.
      1. Understand how to use an AP Stylebook.
      2. Apply AP Style.         
      3. Demonstrate newspaper style.
    4. Use the digital tools of the newsroom.
      1. Take photographs with a DSLR camera.
      2. Lay out a news page using InDesign.
      3. Use Photoshop to edit photos.
      4. Understand how to record audio during an interview.
      5. Upload news content to a website.
      6. Define methods for promoting content through social media.
      7. Demonstrate the ability to use Microsoft Word.
    5. Be actively involved in all campus newsroom operations.
      1. Participate in staff meetings.
      2. Complete additional hours as arranged by instructor.
      3. Work on additional activities sponsored by the news organization (i.e. open house, retreat, recruiting, First Amendment Day, fundraising).
      4. Complete tasks as needed (i.e. photo assignments, proofreading, advertising, and additional stories).
    6. Work cooperatively to contribute to a quality student news operation.
      1. Accept constructive criticism from the editor, adviser, and other staff members.
      2. Apply suggestions to improve the paper.
      3. Listen to and respect the viewpoints of others.
      4. Be flexible with work assignments, article length, layout changes, etc.
      5. Check messages and e-mail regularly.
      6. Fulfill all commitments to the DMACC community and the public.

     

  
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    JOU 143 - News Practicum II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course offers intermediate-level practical experience in news production for a campus news operation. Students will work as specialized/beat reporters on their campus news staff and will take leadership roles in all stages of news production including planning, reporting, writing, editing, photography, video, audio, visual, layout, design, advertising, website management and social media.
    Prerequisite: JOU 142  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Produce news as a specialized/beat reporter.
      1. Define news.
      2. Outline responsibilities of a specialized/beat reporter.
      3. Identify news stories on a beat relevant to the campus.
      4. Build a rapport with sources on a beat.
      5. Determine the best strategy to convey a news story on a beat.
      6. Cover a variety of stories on a beat.
    2. Write news as a specialized/beat reporter.
      1. Analyze different methods of background research.
      2. Identify and interview sources.
      3. Write a lead.
      4. Write direct, indirect and partial quotes.
      5. Follow inverted pyramid style and alternative story structures.
      6. Check facts.
      7. Maintain objectivity and fairness when writing a news story.
      8. Apply principles of media law.
    3. Edit news stories at an intermediate level.
      1. Apply AP Style.
      2. Follow newspaper style.
      3. Accept responsibility for editing a variety of stories.
    4. Use the digital tools of the newsroom.
      1. Take photographs with a DSLR camera.
      2. Use InDesign to lay out news pages.
      3. Edit photos using Photoshop.
      4. Record audio during an interview.
      5. Upload news content to a website.
      6. Define methods for promoting content through social media.
      7. Use Microsoft Word.
    5. Be actively involved at an intermediate level in all campus newsroom operations.
      1. Provide leadership in staff meetings.
      2. Participate in additional hours as arranged by instructor.
      3. Provide leadership in additional activities sponsored by the news organization (i.e. open house, retreat, recruiting, First Amendment Day, fundraising).
      4. Accept tasks as needed (i.e. advanced photo assignments, copy editing, additional stories, advertising).        
    6. Serve as a leader in a quality student news operation.
      1. Accept constructive criticism from editor, adviser and other staff members.
      2. Give constructive suggestions to improve the paper.
      3. Listen to and respect the viewpoints of others.
      4. Be flexible with work assignments, article length, layout changes, etc.
      5. Check messages and e-mail regularly.
      6. Guide and mentor new staff members.
      7. Fulfill all commitments to the DMACC community and the public.

  
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    JOU 163 - News Media and Politics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course will examine the role the news media play in politics. Focus will be on the relationship among the voting public, the mass media, policy makers and elected officials. The current or most recent election cycle will be assessed. This course is designed for both political science and journalism students. Students may not receive credit for both POL 163  and JOU 163.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the relationship between the news media and the American political system
      1. Outline the relevant historical background of political news coverage
      2. Assess the development of political coverage by the news media based on advances in technology
      3. Identify structure and roles within a newspaper and television news station
      4. Identify the structure and roles within a political campaign and public office
      5. Define media conglomeration
      6. Describe the political party system
      7. Discuss treatment in news media of non-traditional parties and candidates
    2. Examine the relationship between reporters and prospective and elected public officials
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of bias by reporters
      2. Develop and implement a checklist to ensure balance and fairness in reporting
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of media manipulation by candidates
      4. Analyze relationship of office of the president and White House reporters
      5. Assess the contributions of selected news media professionals
    3. Examine the relationship between the news media and the public
      1. Define informed public
      2. Understand media impact on public opinion in campaigns and elections
      3. Define agenda-setting
      4. Define public journalism
    4. Describe the role of political news within the news media structure
      1. Develop and apply news judgment
      2. Analyze story placement
      3. Define gate keeping and roles of gatekeepers
      4. Assess role of economics in news coverage
      5. Evaluate coverage of political news stories by individual news organizations and industry-wide
    5. Construct simple political news stories
      1. Identify news elements
      2. Conduct interviews
      3. Organize facts to create inverted pyramid stories
      4. Implement proper use of quotes
      5. Examine semantics and role of word choice
    6. Investigate the power of the news media in political campaigns
      1. Define a newspaper editorial
      2. Analyze the effect of endorsements
      3. Explain the impact of polling, exit polling, and surveys by the news media
      4. Compose and administer a survey
      5. Analyze campaign commercials including negative ads
    7. Apply principles of journalism ethics in political news coverage
      1. Examine policies regarding use of anonymous sources in political news
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of public records and Freedom of Information Requests
      3. Analyze political roles of the journalist
    8. Illustrate the role of media regulation on political news coverage
      1. Describe government regulations that affect political reporting
      2. Develop an understanding of equal coverage and the Fairness Doctrine
      3. Develop an understanding of prior restraint
    9. Analyze the role of new media in political news coverage
      1. Explore the role of the Internet and electronic communication
      2. Discuss the impact of movie-making as a form of political discourse
    10. Evaluate the political news coverage of the 2004 general election
      1. Apply news values of objectivity, fairness, accuracy to political stories
      2. Evaluate balance
      3. Examine persuasive values of editorials and columns

  
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    JOU 165 - Principles of Advertising

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Course explores advertising as a tool and socioeconomic force.
    Competencies
    1. Study the classic definitions of advertising
      1. Discuss the elements of effective advertising
      2. Define advertising
      3. Identify advertising?s types and roles
      4. Identify at least five players in the advertising world
      5. Explain the evolution of the advertising industry and the current issues it faces
    2. Know the ethics, regulations and social responsibility of advertising
      1. Discuss the social issues advertisers face
      2. List the key ethical issues that affect advertising
      3. Identify the main factors in advertising?s legal and regulatory environment
      4. summarize how the FTC and other federal agencies govern advertising
      5. Debate whether advertising self-regulation fulfills advertiser?s responsibility to society
    3. Compare the advertising and marketing process
      1. Define marketing and how advertising relates to marketing strategy
      2. Explain the marketing concept
      3. Outline the tools of marketing and explain advertising?s relationship to them
      4. Describe the role of the advertising agency, its organization, and compensation methods
    4. Explain the consumer audience
      1. Define consumer behavior and describe its relationship to advertising
      2. Explain what societal and cultural factors affect advertising and consumers
      3. Describe psychological influences on consumers
      4. Summarize the purchase decision-making process
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of account planning and research
      1. Explain the value of marketing research
      2. Describe the differences between strategic research and evaluative research
      3. Identify the factors that affect message development research
      4. Summarize key evaluative research objectives and methods
      5. Outline advertising research challenges
    6. Demonstrate an understanding as to how advertising works
      1. Explain how a basic communication model differs from interactive communication
      2. Explain how the advertising communication model works
      3. Outline the message reception and response process
      4. Summarize the key factors in brand communication
    7. Explain advertising planning and strategy
      1. Explain how advertising strategy and planning lead to more effective advertising
      2. Identify the key elements of a marketing plan
      3. List the key elements of an advertising plan, including its relationship to the marketing plan
      4. Describe the main parts of a creative platform and types of copy strategy
    8. Explain media planning and buying
      1. Explain how media planning fits into the advertising process
      2. Outline how media planners set media objectives
      3. Describe how media planners develop media strategies
      4. Explain the functions and special skills of media buyers
      5. Summarize the process of staging a media plan
    9. Understand print media
      1. Describe the newspaper medium and identify its strengths and weaknesses
      2. Identify the key factors that advertisers should know to make effective decisions about the magazine medium
      3. Explain factors that advertisers should consider for making out-of-home media decisions
      4. Analyze the factors that advertisers use to make decisions about directories
      5. Discuss the factors that contribute to an effective print media strategy
    10. Understand broadcast and interactive online media
      1. Discuss the structure of television, how it?s organized, its use as an advertising medium, the TV audience, and the advantages and disadvantages of TV advertising
      2. Discuss the structure of radio, how it is organized, its use as an advertising medium, its audience, and the advantages and disadvantages of radio advertising
      3. Discuss the structure of interactive media, how it is organized, its use as an advertising medium, its audience, and the advantages and disadvantages of radio advertising
    11. Understand the creative side of advertising
      1. Define creative advertising
      2. Explain how creative advertising leads to a Big Idea
      3. Describe the characteristics of creative people and their creative process
      4. Identify the key elements in a creative strategy
      5. Outline the key parts of a creative brief
      6. Explain how creative advertising relates to advertising effectiveness
    12. Understand how copywriting works
      1. Identify the food and bad practices in copywriting
      2. Describe the various copy elements of a print ad
      3. Explain the message characteristics and tools of radio advertising
      4. Discuss the major elements of television commercials
      5. Discuss how Web advertising is written
    13. Understand design and production
      1. Explain why visual communication is so important in advertising
      2. List the principles of layout
      3. Explain how design is affected by requirements of different media
      4. Describe how art and color are reproduced
      5. Explain how the art director creates TV commercials
      6. Identify the critical steps in planning and producing broadcast commercials
      7. Summarize the techniques of Web design.
    14. Understand direct-response marketing
      1. Distinguish between direct marketing and direct-reponse advertising
      2. Explain some types of direct marketing
      3. Name the players in direct marketing
      4. Evaluate the various media that direct-response programs can use
      5. Explain how databases are used in direct marketing
      6. Discuss the role of direct marketing in integrated marketing programs
    15. Study international advertising
      1. Explain the evolution of global marketing
      2. Summarize how international management affects international advertising
      3. Discuss the approaches to international advertising
      4. List the special problems international advertisers face

  
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    JOU 167 - Principles of PR

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    An introduction to public relations from a practical and theoretical perspective. This class examines the functions, ethics, and legal aspects of PR. Students will also learn the steps in planning a strategic communications campaign. 
    Competencies
    1. Examine the strategic communications industry.
      1. Chart the history of strategic communications.
      2. Describe different jobs in strategic communications.
      3. Define publicity.
      4. Define marketing.
      5. Describe current trends in strategic communications.
      2. Examine how organizations use PR. 
      1. Summarize crisis communication.
      2. Explain how advocacy groups use PR.
      3. Describe how the government uses PR.
      3. Evaluate tools used in PR.
      1. Create a press release.
      2. Describe how interviews are used.
      3. Explain when you would use a video news release.
      4. Discuss the role of social media in PR.
      4. Examine theories relating to strategic communication.
      1. Explain the basic model of communication.
      2. Summarize Agenda Setting.
      3. Define Cultivation.
      4. Explain Framing.
      5. Discuss Diffusion.
      5. Examine models of PR.
      1. Define Press Agentry/Publicity.
      2. Summarize the Public Information model.
      3. Explain Two Way Asymmetrical.
      4. Explain Two Way Symmetrical.
      6. Evaluate steps of a strategic communication campaign.
      1. Adapt a strategic communications plan.
      2. Generate strategic communication research.
      3. Design strategic communication implementation.
      4. Describe how to evaluate strategic communication.
      7. Examine PR regulation and ethics.
      1. Describe ethics rules according to the Public Relations Society of America.
      2. Define defamation.
      3. Summarize copyright.
      4. Describe how the First Amendment affects PR.
      5. Explain how the FCC oversees broadcast content.

    Competencies Revised Date: 09/11/2019
  
  •  

    JOU 242 - News Practicum III

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course offers practical experience in beginning-level management of news production for a campus news operation (print, online, mobile, social media). Students will work as editors on staff where they will have the primary responsibility for the planning, assigning and editing of news stories and news pages. Students in this class also will produce advanced news stories that may utilize multiple sources and investigative techniques. Assistance with the management of all aspects of the newsroom will be expected including recruiting, training, planning, reporting, writing, editing, photography, video, audio, visual, layout, design, advertising, website management and social media.
    Prerequisite: JOU 142 , JOU 143  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Engage in the planning and producing of news at a news editor-level position.
      1. Define news.
      2. Identify news stories relevant to the campus.
      3. Determine best strategy to convey a news story.
      4. Complete the steps in producing a news story.
      5. Help assign and manage news stories written by reporters on staff.
    2. Demonstrate how to assign, write, and verify the accuracy a news story at an advanced level.
      1. Analyze different methods of background research.
      2. Identify and interview sources.
      3. Write a lead.
      4. Write direct, indirect and partial quotes.
      5. Follow inverted pyramid style and alternative story structures.
      6. Check facts.
      7. Verify information thoroughly for accuracy.
      8. Take responsibility for the accuracy and objectivity of assigned newspaper    section(s).
      9. Maintain objectivity and fairness when writing a news story.
      10. Apply principles of media law.
    3. Edit news stories.
      1. Follow AP Style.
      2. Provide training on AP style.
      3. Demonstrate proper news style.
      4. Provide training on news style.
      5. Check facts.
    4. Use the digital tools of the newsroom.
      1. Take photographs with a DSLR camera.
      2. Provide training on taking digital photographs.
      3. Use InDesign to lay out news pages.
      4. Train others on using InDesign to lay out news pages.
      5. Apply Photoshop to edit photos.
      6. Conduct training on Photoshop to edit photos.
      7. Record audio during an interview.
      8. Provide training on the use of audio equipment and uploading content to a website.
      9. Upload news content to a website.
      10. Use Microsoft Word.
    5. Promote content through social media.
      1. Manage social media content.
      2. Provide training on social media content production.
    6. Be actively involved in all areas of campus newsroom operations.
      1. Manage staff meetings.
      2. Participate in additional hours as arranged by instructor.
      3. Lead additional activities sponsored by the news organization (i.e. open house, retreat, recruiting, First Amendment Day, fundraising).
      4. Identify and help assign additional tasks as needed (i.e. story and photo assignments).
    7. Lead the editorial/staff team to create a quality news operation.
      1. Offer constructive criticism to other staff members.
      2. Apply suggestions to improve the paper.
      3. Listen to and respect the viewpoints of others.
      4. Be flexible with work assignments, article length, layout changes, etc.
      5. Check messages and e-mail regularly.
      6. Guide and mentor other staff members.
      7. Fulfill all commitments to the DMACC community and the public.

  
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    JOU 243 - News Practicum IV

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course offers practical experience in the upper-level management of news operations for a campus news organization. Students will work at the highest level of leadership at the paper (managing editor, advertising manager, editor-in-chief). Students will gain experience in managing all aspects of a college newsroom, including staff development and training, oversight of the editorial, advertising, circulation and business departments and producing advanced news packages.
    Prerequisite: JOU 142 , JOU 143 , JOU 242  or instructor permission
    Competencies
    During this course, the student will be expected to:

    1. Provide upper-level management of a campus news operation.
      1. Define news.
      2. Identify and assign news stories relevant to the campus.
      3. Determine the best strategy to convey news stories.
      4. Assist with the steps in producing news stories.
      5. Assign and manage news stories written by the news staff.
    2. Evaluate all content published in the campus news operation.
      1. Analyze different methods of background research.
      2. Assist with identifying and interviewing sources.
      3. Write and edit leads.
      4. Write and edit direct, indirect and partial quotes.
      5. Follow inverted pyramid style and alternative story structures.
      6. Check facts.
      7. Take responsibility for the accuracy and objectivity of the newspaper.
      8. Maintain objectivity and fairness when writing a news story.
      9. Apply principles of media law.
    3. Edit news stories.
      1. Follow AP Style.
      2. Edit stories using AP Style.
      3. Demonstrate newspaper style.
    4. Use the digital tools of the newsroom.
      1. Take photographs with a DSLR camera.
      2. Manage the photography assignments of staff members.
      3. Supervise the layout of the news.
      4. Use InDesign to lay out news pages.
      5. Implement Photoshop to edit photos.
      6. Record audio and video during interviews.
      7. Upload news content to a website.
      8. Manage and supervise the promotion of content through social media.
      9. Use Microsoft Word.
    5. Be actively involved in all areas of campus newsroom operations.
      1. Manage and supervise staff meetings.
      2.  Understand and effectively delegate all the tasks that need to be completed for the news organization.
      3. Participate in additional hours as needed.
      4. Manage and supervise additional activities sponsored by the news organization (i.e. open house, retreat, recruiting, First Amendment Day, fundraising).
      5. Identify and assign additional tasks as needed (i.e. story and photo assignments).
    6. Lead the editorial/staff team to create a quality news operation.
      1. Offer constructive criticism to other staff members.
      2. Apply suggestions to improve the paper.
      3. Listen to and respect the viewpoints of others.
      4. Be flexible with work assignments, article length, layout changes, etc.
      5. Check messages and e-mail regularly.
      6. Guide and mentor other staff members.
      7. Fulfill all commitments to the DMACC community and the public.


Land Surveying

  
  •  

    SRV 110 - Survey Drafting

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course includes the application of manual and computer-aided techniques in survey drafting. The topics include plat maps, topography, field notebook sketches and property descriptions. Third-party software will be utilized.
    Prerequisite: CET 178 [Inactive] 
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of mapping and basic drafting standards
      1. Discuss Maps in general, types of maps, map requirements, and Cartography
      2. Demonstrate basic drafting techniques in weights and types of lines
    2. Review Surveying Fundamentals
      1. Discuss the shape and size of the Earth
      2. Illustrate types of surveys
      3. Demonstrate a measurement of distance
      4. Demonstrate elevation measurements
      5. Define traversing and demonstrate plotting a traverse
      6. Discuss Global Positioning System
    3. Demonstrate the procedure of location and direction
      1. Apply surveying techniques to calculate location and direction
      2. Compute location and direction on a quadrangle map
      3. Discuss map geometry and plot property using latitudes and longitudes
    4. Identify mapping scales
      1. Examine the numerical scale, graphical scale, verbal scale, scale conversion, engineer’s scale, metric scales, and CAD scales
      2. Identify Mapping symbols by types of symbols, special techniques, and drawing mapping symbols with CAD
    5. Assemble legal descriptions and plot plans by metes and bounds, lot and block, and the rectangular system
      1. Draw plot plans
      2. Discuss methods of sewage disposal
    6. Draw contour lines
      1. Distinguish contour line characteristics and types of contour lines
      2. Plot contour lines from field notes manually and with a CAD system
      3. Enlarge contour maps manually and digitizing contour maps with a CAD system
    7. Create Profiles utilizing contour map
      1. Review profile leveling
      2. Draw plans and profile drawings manually and with CAD 
    8. Examine highway layout
      1. Draw plan layout manually and with a CAD system
      2. Layout profile drawings manually and with a CAD system
    9. Calculate earthwork
      1. Determine highway cut-and-fill manually and with a CAD system
      2. Draw cross sections manually and with a CAD system.
      3. Determine site plan cut-and-fill manually and with a CAD system
    10. Discuss introductory Geographic Information System (GIS) concepts, components, data formats, and relate them to GIS applications in the survey field

  
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    SRV 120 - US Public Lands Survey System

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will develop a working knowledge of the United States Public Land Survey System and its application in Iowa surveying. Topics will include: the general plan; methods of survey; the system of rectangular surveys; monumentation; restoration of lost or obliterated corners; resurveys; special surveys and special instructions; field notes and plats.
    Prerequisite: CET 119 [Inactive], CET 169 [Inactive] 
    Competencies
    1. Examine the various concepts involved in determining the length of a line.
      1. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various units such as chains, feet and meters
      2. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various measuring tools such as the chain, steel tape and stadia
      3. Demonstrate various measuring methods such as direct chaining, traversing and triangulation
      4. Discuss how the advent of GPS has affected the measurement of distance
    2. Examine the various concepts involved in determining the direction of a line
      1. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the magnetic needle and the solar compass
      2. Illustrate the difference between bearings and azimuths
      3. Discuss the effect of time when making solar or astronomic observations
      4. Demonstrate the use of the Ephemeris
      5. Demonstrate a Polaris observation
      6. Demonstrate a solar observation
      7. Discuss how the advent of GPS has affected the determination of direction
    3. Illustrate the effects of curvature of the earth and convergency of meridians
    4. Interpret the general scheme of the rectangular system of public land surveys
      1. Define components of the rectangular survey system such as initial point, base line, principal meridan, standard parallels and guide meridians
      2. Explain the process of laying out township exteriors
      3. Demonstrate subdivision of townships and sections
      4. Explain subdivision by protraction
      5. Differentiate between lotted sections and fractional sections
      6. Describe the purpose of closing corners
      7. Examine the effects of navigability of streams and lakes and how navigability is determined
      8. Demonstrate the process for determining limits of closure
    5. Illustrate the importance of monumentation in the public land system.
      1. Demonstrate the system of marking monuments
      2. Explain the legal significance of monuments
      3. Discuss bearing trees, accessories and memorials
      4. Distinguish between a monument and a corner
    6. Compare lost and obliterated corners
      1. Differentiate between lost and obliterated corners
      2. Demonstrate the procedure for restoration of lost corners.
      3. Explain single and double proportion
    7. Interpret the information found in the original government field notes
      1. Assess the significance of original field notes
      2. Demonstrate how information from the original field notes can be used to analyze existing field evidence
      3. Identify potential sources from which original field notes may be obtained
    8. Interpret the information found on the original government subdivision plat
      1. Assess the significance of original subdivision plat
      2. Demonstrate how information from the original subdivision plat can be used to analyze existing field evidence
      3. Identify potential sources from which original subdivision plats may be obtained
      4. Explain the concept of “protecting the plat”.
    9. Analyze the process of performing Resurveys
      1. Explain the purpose of a resurvey
      2. Identify the entities exercising jurisdiction over public land and private land
      3. Differentiate between dependent and independent resurveys
      4. Differentiate between a resurvey and a retracement
      5. Explain the concept of “following in the footsteps”.
    10. Evaluate the effects of conditions such as bad weather, rugged terrain, hostile native inhabitants and low pay on the quality of the original government surveys
      1. Analyze the original instructions governing Public Land Surveys of Iowa
      2. Outline the changes in each successive update of the original instructions
    11. Analyze the special instructions to Deputy Surveyors
      1. Describe the types of information to be found in the letters of instruction of deputy surveyors
      2. Explain how the information in the various letter books relates to specific subdivision surveys within the State of Iowa
    12. Analyze the process of establishing Iowa’s state boundaries
      1. Discuss the establishment of the Iowa-Minnesota boundary
      2. Discuss the establishment of the Iowa-Missouri boundary and how Sullivan’s line affected the location
      3. Explain how the Mississippi and Missouri rivers affected the location of the east and west boundaries of Iowa
    13. Evaluate the effect that Indian Treaty Boundaries had on the original surveys

 

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