Apr 21, 2024  
2021-2022 Course Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRJ 179 - White Collar Crime

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course provides basic understanding of white-collar crime and some of its ramifications. Special attention will be paid to the study of white collar crimes pertaining to corporate crime, occupational crime, governmental and political crime, enterprise/ organized crime, prevention/control mechanisms and societal responses to these crimes.
    Competencies
    1. Define white collar crime and differentiate white collar crimes from other types of crime.
    2. Identify various examples of white collar crime, deceptive practices and fraud.
      1. List and recognize examples of corporate crime.
      2. List and recognize examples of occupational crime.
      3. List and recognize examples of governmental crime including state crime and political crime.
      4. List and recognize examples of enterprise or organized crime.
      5. List and recognize examples of technology-related crime.
    3. Explain the effects of white collar crime.
      1. Describe the economic effects in both macro and micro perspectives.
      2. Identify potential environmental effects of white collar crime.
      3. Recognize the human impact of white collar crime both directly to the victim and indirectly to society.
    4. Describe legal responses and social controls of white colar crime.
      1. Provide examples of common methods to police and regulate against white collar crimes.
      2. Engage in case studies that explore the prosecution, defense, and adjudication of white collar crime.
    5. Compare and contrast the effects of white collar crime within cultural institutions of American society, specifically taking in to account financial, political, media and religious institutions.

  
  • CRJ 196 - Crime Scene Investigation 1

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course is an introduction to the nature of crime scenes and physical evidence collection including descriptions of forensic analysis, techniques for proper collection and preservation of evidence, and interpreting the significance of evidence.
    Competencies
    1. Assess documentation of evidence and crime scenes
      1. Define what a constitutes evidence and a crime scene
      2. Utilize documentation techniques of photography, sketching, report writing, and fingerprinting.
    2. Perform collection of evidence
      1. Identify the steps in proper crime scene examination
      2. Describe official personnel involved in the crime scene process and define their roles.
    3. Examine evidence and crime scenes
      1. Demonstrate proper collection, storage and preservation of various types of evidence.
      2. Use proper evidence packaging for chain of custody.
    4. Evaluate the processing of evidence and crime scenes
      1. Describe proper techniques for evidence processing and analysis.
      2. Explain the CSI effect and how it influences ethics and court proceedings.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 197 - Crime Scene Investigation 2

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course focuses upon the collection and analysis of evidence as it relates to crime scene processing and current forensic investigation trends or technologies.
    Competencies
    1. Collect and analyze trace evidence.
      1. Explain trace evidence and the various sources of trace evidence.
      2. Discuss the analytical instruments and techniques used in the collection of trace evidence.
    2. Collect and analyze blood and DNA evidence.
      1. Report the methods of collecting blood and DNA evidence from crime scene.
      2. List the instruments, techniques, and interpretive methods employed with blood, blood spatter and DNA evidence.
    3. Collect and analyze toxicological evidence.
      1. Identify toxicological evidence and the various sources of toxicological evidence.
      2. Recognize the analytical instruments and techniques used in the collection of toxicological evidence.
    4. Collect and analyze impression evidence.
      1. Indicate impression evidence, the types of impression evidence and its use in investigations.
      2. Analyze footprint, tool mark, and ballistic evidence.
    5. Examine cyber-crime and computer forensic investigations.
      1. Define cyber-crime terms and explain the forensic analysis of digital evidence as it relates to criminal investigations.
      2. Describe the extraction and preservation of electronic evidence from various devices.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 200 - Criminology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course explores the nature, extent, measurement, causes, and control of law-breaking behavior. The course also introduces different types of crime as well as the theories of crime.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interdisciplinary science of criminology.
      1. Explain the historical development of criminology
      2. Recall differences between fields of criminology and criminal justice
    2. Assess the nature of crime and victimization
      1. Identify strengths and limitations of the major sources of crime data
      2. Utilize crime data to understand the extent and patterns of crime.
    3. Examine core theoretical explanations of crime or law-breaking behavior
      1. Classify typologies of crime
      2. Apply theoretical explanations to the various crime typologies, criminals, and victims. 
    4. Determine the impact of the field of criminology to historical and contemporary public policy.
      1. Review the historical and contemporary trends in crime types and criminals.
      2. Assess the linkages between research on crime, criminological theory, and public policy
    5. Produce effective communication while demonstrating course content
      1. Create writing assignments that reflect understanding of disciplinary conventions.   
      2. Express ideas in verbal assignments  
    6. Evaluate ethical dilemmas in the areas of criminology and criminal justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 201 - Juvenile Delinquency

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course surveys of the causes of delinquency in children, focusing upon research and the major theories that have been proposed as explanations of delinquent behaviors.  The course will also consider the control and prevention of delinquency through policies and programs of the juvenile justice system.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate juvenile delinquency from a legal and sociological perspective
      1. Recognize the historical development of juvenile delinquency
      2. Compare and contrast adult and juvenile justice system
    2. Assess the differences between crime and delinquency
      1. Differentiate between sources of data
      2. Analyze techniques for measuring juvenile delinquency.
      3. Summarize juvenile crime trends
    3. Examine the theories of delinquency causation and understand the significance of delinquency within society’s context.
      1. Discuss theories of delinquency impact on policy and programs
      2. Describe theories of delinquency support by empirical evidence
    4. Assess roles of juvenile justice system
      1. Illustrate the interaction of juvenile offenders with law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
      2. Identify juvenile control, prevention, and treatment programs
    5. Evaluate student’s own collaboration skills within a  project-based learning activity
      1. Demonstrate teamwork skills
      2. Create a respectful and constructive environment with others
    6. Assess ethical dilemmas in the areas of  juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps and application

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 220 - Community-Based Corrections

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    An in-depth examination of the components of community based corrections; the study of the principles and practices of evidence-based approaches used in today’s community corrections field; and an exploration of the use of research-proven treatment strategies by parole, probation, and community corrections practitioners in helping offenders change their behavior and live a more prosocial and law-abiding life.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CRJ 120  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. ​Contrast the history of community-based corrections
      1. Discuss the history of probation and parole supervision
      2. Describe the history of pretrial supervision
    2. Argue the importance of evidence-based practices in community corrections
      1. Explain outcome measures and effectiveness for programs and policies
      2. Summarize current assessment, treatment, and supervision/case management practices
      3. Show the relationship between philosophy, theory, policy, and practice in community-based corrections 
    3. Summarize re-entry and frequent challenges experienced during reentry
      1. Enumerate understanding of collateral consequences
      2. Recall community-based reentry efforts with restorative solutions
    4. Examine the juvenile justice issues
      1. Differentiate between at-risk and protective factors
      2. Describe the juvenile justice process in comparison to the adult justice process.
    5. Differentiate the roles performed by community-based corrections personnel
      1. Identify roles and procedures performed by performed by community based corrections personnel in interactions with law enforcement and the courts
      2. Determine potential career paths in the area of community corrections
    6. Compare different ethical frameworks
      1. Analyze why people are motivated to commit ethical violations
      2. Relate the importance of professionalism in the area of community corrections

     

     

  
  • CRJ 222 - Correctional Treatment Method

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Examines the history, evolution, and development of correctional treatment in the United States and present an overview of the strategies that are used in the rehabilitation and counseling of juvenile and adult criminal offenders who are incarcerated or assigned to residential facilities.  Institutional and non-institutional programs are reviewed and treatment models are discussed.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CRJ 120  or instructor approval
    Competencies
     

    1. Apply correctional intervention, counseling, and treatment methods for correctional clients of varying types.
      1. Describe special challenges in working in a correctional setting
      2. Identify principles of effective intervention
    2. Evaluate current and future correctional intervention methods
      1. Discuss common theoretical counseling perspectives
      2. Understand evidence-practices when evaluating research, interventions, or treatment strategies with clients
    3. Determine correctional interventions for special populations
      1. Explain issues associated with clients with special attributes, such as youth, gender/sex, and age
      2. Summarize issues associated with clients with special offenses, such as sex offenses or drug offenses
    4. Create appropriate case plans for clients
      1. Understand risks, needs, and responsivity as part of assessment of clients
      2. Apply relevant contemporary approach for correctional intervention, counseling, or treatment method
    5. Differentiate the roles performed by corrections personnel
      1. Explain roles and procedures performed by personnel in interactions clients, the institution, and the courts.
      2. Determine potential career paths in the area of correctional intervention, counseling, or treatment
      3. Defend the importance of professionalism in the area of correctional interventions, counseling, or treatment
    6. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations with correctional interventions, counseling, or treatment
      1. Identify legal issues when providing interventions, counseling, or treatment at a correctional facility
      2. Recognize why people are motivated to commit ethical violations

  
  • CRJ 237 - Criminal & Constitutional Law

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course will review the historical development of constitutional law, the philosophy of law and the current impact on law enforcement officials. The judicial process will be examined to better understand the societal and political influences that impact current-day constitutional decisions and a review of the current constitutional protections afforded to an individual. The course will also provide an examination of the elements of common offenses and the procedural safeguards in the criminal process.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Outline the sources and historical evolution of criminal law doctrines and principles
      1. Describe the primary sources of criminal law in the United States, including common law and the Model Penal Code
      2. Explain the difference between civil and criminal law
      3. Differentiate elements of various crimes against persons, property, order, and state
    2. Assess the process of a criminal prosecution from investigation through trial and sentencing
      1. Define, recognize, and apply reasonable suspicion and probable cause
      2. Identify strengths and reliability of the evidence obtained in a criminal investigation
      3. Explain various defenses to prosecution
    3. Analyze the doctrinal limitations on criminal law
      1. Recall important court decisions that impact civil and criminal procedure
      2. Discuss key considerations in case law involving the rights of criminal defendants
    4. Summarize historic and current constitutional case law that impacts the criminal justice system
      1. Identify state and federal constitutional protections and limitations
      2. Explain applicable amendments of the Constitution in relation to the criminal justice system
    5. Evaluate student’s own collaboration skills within a  project-based learning activity
      1. Demonstrate teamwork skills
      2. Create a respectful and constructive environment with others
    6. Assess ethical dilemmas in the areas of law and criminal justice
      1. Recall the major ethical systems
      2. Describe ethical decision-making steps and application

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 245 - Scientific Investigation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An in-depth study into forensic science examinations and analysis techniques with a focus on the crime laboratory. 
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast the services provided by a crime laboratory.
      1. Identify evidence associated with each service provided by the laboratory, including: forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent fingerprints, questioned documents, fire debris, firearms/tool mark impression evidence, and digital evidence.
      2. Identify the proper processes and procedures for handling and testing evidence.
    2. Differentiate forensic chemistry techniques and procedures.
      1. Identify equipment for chemical examination.
      2. Describe the types of chemical tests for identification of evidence such as unknown substances, toxicology, poisons, drugs, and plants
    3. Evaluate forensic biology identification techniques.
      1. Identify instruments of microanalysis.
      2. Distinguish the varieties of biological evidence, such as bodily fluids, blood, and DNA.
    4. Assess the examination methods of comparative evidence.
      1. List the tools used for comparison.
      2. Explain the types of evidence associated with comparative analysis, such as forensic biometrics, fingerprints, ballistics, toolmarks, tire marks, footwear, trace evidence, and documents.
    5. Evaluate the different aspects of death investigations.
      1. Evaluate anthropology evidence and collection.
      2. Discuss forensic entomology and how it is used in death investigation. 
    6. Analyze ethics in forensic science.
      1. Define professional integrity and conflict of interest.
      2. Discuss objectivity.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 292 - Police Phys Fitness and Cond

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course presents the specific requirements of the State of Iowa police physical fitness entry standards (Cooper Test) and academy physical training for the police officer. A fitness exam will be conducted and a personal exercise and nutrition program will be developed to meet each student’s needs. Students will be evaluated at the beginning of the course to ensure they meet at least a 35% fitness level (as outlined in the State of Iowa Police Fitness Standards, Cooper Institute Standards). Each student’s fitness levels will be monitored throughout the course and student adherence to exercise and nutrition prescription will be assessed. Students will be expected to improve at a minimum of 15% above the 35% level of fitness.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the specific requirements of the Cooper Test.
    2. Design an individual exercise and nutrition plan.
      1. Demonstrate personal improvement in executing specific requirements of the Cooper Test.
      2. Describe the purpose of each exercise.
      3. Model the use safe use of exercise equipment, weight machines, and any other physical activity for the purposes of exercise.

  
  • CRJ 293 - Crim Justice Report Writing

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open


    This course will help Criminal Justice students master the ability to translate actions and observations into complete, accurate and understandable written reports for law enforcement and/or corrections professionals. Emphasis will be on the purpose of reports in the criminal justice field, the uses of reports, basic report components and guidelines for good report writing.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the fundamentals of proper report writing for criminal justice.
      1. Identify the common purposes and uses of reports
      2. Describe the issues of liability and responsibility as they relate to criminal justice reports 
    2. Examine the basic organizational structure of report writing.
      1. Demonstrate how to construct a report with clarity
      2. Report pertinent facts in chronological order.
      3. Demonstrate methods to convey information so that it can be understood by anyone
      4. Recognize criminal justice jargon and bias language and its detriment on reports
    3. Develop review techniques for written reports.
      1. Identify appropriate proofreading methods
      2. Demonstrate effective report editing techniques

     

  
  • CRJ 294 - CJ Communication Strategies

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Focus upon the unique types of verbal and written communication skills required in a criminal justice career. Students will learn and practice verbal and written communication strategies by completing a variety of projects representative of the documents created, or skills utilized, by individuals working within the criminal justice system.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 100   or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of effective communication skills
      1. Identify the basic communication process
      2. Explain the value of empathic listening and effective feedback
      3. Delineate verbal and non-verbal communication 
    2. Examine the purpose of the differing types of interviews, such as ones with suspects, defendants, clients, witnesses, victims, or informants
      1. Describe the three basic steps of an interview, to include planning, conducting, and recording
      2. Describe techniques used to document an interview
      3. List characteristics of interviews and interrogation
      4. Explain circumstances in which Miranda warnings apply
    3. Distinguish between a well-written criminal justice report and a poorly-written report
      1. Summarize the elements of a fair, accurate, complete, and concise report
      2. Explain written reports such as reports of investigation, reports of violations, case file notes, field notes, or other types of reports
      3. Describe the presentation of a report in a variety of criminal justice settings
    4. Determine types of criminal justice legal proceedings in which testimony may be required
      1. Explain the functions of administrative, civil, and criminal proceedings
      2. Describe the differences between depositions, hearings, grand juries, trials, sentencings, and revocations
    5. Investigate the judicial proceedings for which testimony is important
      1. Explain the different types of testimony which may be provided by witnesses, laypersons (opinion), and experts
      2. Describe how witness statements, arrest reports, incident reports, pre-sentence reports, and violation reports are used in court proceedings
      3. Understand the duties and responsibilities for testifying 
    6. Demonstrate the ability to conduct an interview and document the interview
      1. Choose the appropriate communication strategy involving a suspect, defendant, witness, and/or a victim
      2. Prepare a criminal justice report based on a practical exercise involving a suspect, defendant, witness, and/or a victim
    7. Demonstrate the ability to testify effectively in a criminal justice matter involving a report prepared by the student
      1. Display proper demeanor and attire for court testimony
      2. Demonstrate the proper technique for answering questions while testifying
      3. Determine knowledge of the facts and circumstances documented in a criminal justice report 
    8. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations when working in criminal justice
      1. Identify relevant caselaw, statutes, and other guidance for criminal justice professionals
      2. Understand the ethical obligations and consequences of false reporting and testimony

  
  • CRJ 296 - Latent Friction Ridge Evidenc

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This unit of study is intended to introduce the student to the basic preservation, development and collection of friction ridge evidence commonly found at crime scenes.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the importance of friction ridge impressions and how such evidence can help solve crimes.
      1. Define common terms regarding friction ridge evidence.
      2. Describe different types of friction ridge evidence.
    2. Apply criminal justice field standards regarding friction ridge evidence.
      1. Identify locations where friction ridge evidence might be located.
      2. Discuss importance of preserving areas likely to contain friction ridge evidence.
      3. Demonstrate proper documentation, processing, and collection techniques.
      4. Explain appropriate chain-of-custody steps.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  
  • CRJ 297 - Death & Injury Investigations

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This unit of study is intended to present a wide range of topics related to the investigation of death and injury to the human body from the standpoint of the investigating police officer. The presentation is intended primarily for law enforcement officers.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze appropriate investigative strategies.
      1. Define common terms regarding death and injury investigations.
      2. Differentiate among the various causes and manners of death
    2. Comprehend the basics of how injuries appear on the human body.
      1. Summarize the nature of postmortem changes in human body.
      2. Recall identification and recovery procedures for human skeletal remains.
      3. Discuss injuries common to child victims.
      4. Explain how fire and heat affect the human body.
    3. Identify the various professionals commonly involved in death investigations.

     

     

     

     

     

  
  • CRJ 298 - Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course of study is intended to introduce the student to the basic recognition, preservation, development, and collection of bloodstain evidence commonly found at crime scenes.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate bloodstain evidence
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in preserving, documenting, and examining bloodstain evidence.
      2. Explain motion, direction, and point of convergence.
      3. Discuss how surface texture, height, and force affect bloodstains.
    2. Characterize bloodstain patterns.
      1. Recall common terms, concepts, and descriptions of typical bloodstain evidence.
      2. Summarize presumptive and confirmatory testing, blood enhancement chemicals, DNA and serological testing.

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

  
  • CRJ 301 - Intro to Homeland Security

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course is an examination of the role government and, more specifically, first responders play in the current threat to our nation from terrorism. The course will examine the role, authority and history of the government when faced with these threats. The structure, style and current practices will be covered along with an attempt to discover best practices and cost-effective solutions.
    Competencies
    1. Construct a historical timeline reflecting significant terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally.
      1. Identify the role of the U.S. Constitution defines for federal, state and local governments in the area of emergency management and public safety.
      2. Identify which president established the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), identify which president established the Department of Homeland Security,
      3. Explain the history of emergency management in the United States and its priorities.
      4. Outline the essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism.
    2. Demonstrate very clear written and oral skills that describe:
      1. Essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism.
      2. Factual information in order to coordinate law enforcement agencies.
      3. Explain the statutory authority of the government in terrorism related events.
    3. Compose a historical timeline reflecting methods and outcomes used by national and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
      1. Classify the roles, functions, of and interdependency between local, federal and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
      2. Classify the roles, functions and interdependency between local, federal and international law.
      3. Explain the law enforcement and military interdependency between local, federal and international agencies to counter terrorist and criminal activity.
    4. Differentiate between ethical and unethical attitudes and actions regarding the execution of Homeland Security practices.
      1. Define unethical attitudes regarding race, religion and national identity.
      2. Explain how societies can view similar or same activities as having different levels of acceptance.
    5. Identify the characteristics, ideologies, motives, and behaviors of various extremist and terrorist groups.
      1. Explain how these characteristics foster and support terrorist activities
      2. Explain how these characteristics foster and support criminal behaviors.
    6. Examine and interpret forensic evidence to reconstruct crime and terrorism.
      1. Explain the role of physical evidence and its use in securing search and arrest warrants.
      2. Explain the “chain of evidence” regarding physical and forensic evidence and its value in a court of law.
    7. Craft effective strategies to generate useful information for local, national and international law enforcement agencies.
      1. Explain how this information is “vetted” and released.
      2. Explain the difference between information sources.
    8. Solve problems as an individual and in coordinated team setting.
      1. Define the cultures that may cause problems in this coordination.
      2. Define the problems inherent in team building during a crisis.
    9. Write clear and concise reports.
      1. Explain how these reports provide factual information, and accurate data analysis, and sound recommendations.
      2. Explain the consequence of poor reporting and inaccurate analysis and their effect on recommendations.

  
  • CRJ 302 - Transportation & Border Sec

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is an examination of the field of transportation and border security. The course will examine the role of both government and private enterprise in securing one of the most vulnerable and important industries worldwide. The course will discuss the threats to this industry with a view toward passenger, cargo and infrastructure protection. Strategies and policies to improve and protect the system will be discussed.
    Competencies
    1. Outline the essential characteristics of acts of terrorism.
      1. Describe the characteristics of national terrorism.
      2. Describe the characteristics of international terrorism.
    2. Construct a historical timeline relfecting significant transportation related terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally.
      1. Discuss the interdependency between nations regarding transnational terrorist organizations.
      2. Explain both military and law enforcement options available to nations and the problems inherent to these options.
    3. Differentiate between natural and unnatural threats to transportation systems and how to detect the difference.
      1. Discuss how a natural threat can morph into an unnatural threat to the transportation system.
      2. Explain how an unnatural threat can affect the policy makers and affect worldwide transportation systems. 
    4. Identify the characeristics of vulnerabilities in transportation systems.
      1. Discuss current attempts to remove these vulnerabilities.
      2. Articulate an understanding of developing research designed to harden the transportation system against future threats.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of technology on countering threats to transportation systems.
      1. Discuss current “threat” and “no fly” lists and their impact on passenger transportation systems.
      2. Articulate an understanding of “next generation” systems that might impact the freight and passenger systems.
    6. Discuss differences in dealing with security threats various tranportation systems.
      1. Describe security threats related to passenger transportation systems.
      2. Describe security threats related to freight transportation systems.
    7. Classify the roles, functions of, and interdependency between local, Federal and International law enforcement agencies and the military to foster border security.
    8. Create effective strategies to generate useful information for local, national and international law enforcement agencies.
      1. Explain how these strategies are designed to concur with current United States and international law.
      2. Explain cultural differences that might impact the initiation of these strategies.
    9. Solve problems as an individual and in a coordinated team settings.
      1. Describe the issues regarding combining subcultures and organizational expertise while preserving team integrity.
      2. Describe the issues inherent in team building during a crisis.
    10. Write clear, concise and accurate reports.
      1. Discern relevant, factural information.
      2. Demonstrate accurate data analysis.
      3. Make sound recommendations.

  
  • CRJ 303 - Intel Analysis & Sec Mgmt

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is an examination of the field of intelligence analysis and its role in the security of the United States and its citizens. The course examines current trends in the intelligence world. Additionally, the course explores the role of operations, operators, source development and the ever-changing world of spy versus spy.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 301  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate operational knowledge of intelligence gathering and analysis pertinent to homeland security and other threats facing government and private sectors.
      1. Define the value of raw intelligence in operational planning.
      2. Define the use of finished intelligence in policy making.
    2. Outline basic intelligence policies and functions of the United States Government.
      1. Identify the “major players” and their use and misuse of intelligence.
      2. Define both the providers and end users of intelligence and analysis.
    3. Articulate the meaning and purposes for the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-458).
      1. Explain the structure fix recommended by this Act.
      2. Identify the major changes to the intelligence community provided by this Act.
    4. Evaluate the dependability and reliability of source information.
      1. Define the difference between a dependable source and a reliable source.
      2. Define the inherent weakness of source reporting. 
    5. Enumerate specific methods and/or techniques for obtaining intelligence, synthesizing it and analyzing it.
      1. Explain the importance of the Attorney General Guidelines to intelligence agencies operating in the United States.
      2. Discuss the value and dangers of other nations’ source information and the danger of circular reporting.
    6. Test and challenge intelligence in light of critical judgment and evidentiary analysis.
      1. Understand the difference between evidence that will stand in a court of law and intelligence that is actionable.
      2. Test and challenge intelligence in light of policy makers and end users.
    7. Implement basic intelligence gathering techniques and analysis.
      1. Understand source develoment and confirmation.
      2. Understand source vetting and test tecnique.
    8. Using various forms of intelligence, apply sound reasoning, formulates predictions and forecasts terrorist activities.
    9. Describe the foundation and goals for security.
      1. Describe and identify the stakeholders regarding security.
      2. Describe the lead agencies regarding security of the United States.
    10. Identify, describe and analyze threats to national and international safety and security.
      1. Understand the critical threats to the United States both domestically and internationally.
      2. Understand and describe the most likely actors that threaten the United States and those nations with whom it shares an interest.
    11. Apply ethical and professional behaviors to intelligence gathering and operations.
      1. Explain the difference between actions that are legal, moral and ethical, and actions that might serve to violate any of those principals.
      2. Explain a value system that might place actionable intelligence ahead of human rights.

  
  • CRJ 305 - Introduction to Cyber Terrorism

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course explores methods cyber terrorists use to plan, communicate, fund and ultimately wage cyber attacks.  Students will consider motivators of prospective actors as well as identify the associated risks to critical infrastructure and key resources through scenarios and case studies.  Lastly, an overview of policy and procedural/technical measures will allow participants to consider possible means to protect and defend vulnerable public and private resources.
    Competencies
    1. Categorize Cyber Attacks scenarios.
      1. Define Cyber Terrorism.
      2. Differentiate Exploitation, Disruption, Destruction
      3. Classify historical and fictional examples
    2. Evaluate motivators of Cyber Terror entities.
      1. Analyze motivations of Nation-State / Foreign Interests
      2. Classify motivations of Domestic challengers
      3. Examine motivations of economic competitors
      4. Differentiate motivations of rogue elements
      5. Interpret motivations Hacktivists
    3. Outline vulnerabilities of cyber-related critical infrastructure and key resources.
      1. Name Physical/Infrastructure elements
      2. Describe Internet of Things (IoT)
      3. Generalize Virtual/Logical constructs
      4. Summarize ?Big data? concepts
    4. Dissect Techniques of attacks.
      1. Distinguish Human (social) Engineering
      2. Summarize Malicious Software (malware)
      3. Identify Insider Attacks
    5. Analyze methods of Information Gathering by Cyber Terror entities.
      1. Discuss Sympathetic/Freedom-of-Information Sites including but not limited to: Wikileaks, Cryptome, and Leaked policies/procedures/legal guides/handbooks/”recipes”
      2. Review Open-Source Information including but not limited to: Published procedures, Floor-plans of public buildings, Maps of critical infrastructure, Public cameras, Crowd-sourced media/information, Social Network Divulgence
      3. Explain the cyber-relevance of Formal Education including but not limited to: Online courses, and Digital-versions of Texts
    6. Examine Methods of Communication by Cyber Terror entities.
      1. Describe how Websites are utilized including but not limited to: Rumors and Misinformation, Recruitment, and Remote attack deployment
      2. Explain cyber-related covert communication including but not limited to: Codes, Encryption, Steganography, One-time Use Channels
    7. Relate Methods of Financial Gain by Cyber Terror entities.
      1. List Direct/Indirect Contribution methods including but not limited to: ?Charity? sites, Protection Money/Ransom ? Physical Harm, Reputation, Data
      2. Discuss methods of theft and fraud including but not limited to: ID Theft/Credit Fraud, Banking Interception/Impersonation, Money Laundering through barter or virtual currency
      3. Extend the implications of Market Influence/Disturbance
    8. Examine Technical “Tools” used by Cyber Terror entities.
      1. Describe characteristics of Open-Source Tools including: Free, Less-regulated, Modifiable
      2. Explain concepts and uses of Concealment Software including: Encryption, Data Hiding/Steganography, Anonymizers (TOR)
      3. Discuss Malware concepts including Automated Scripts and Documented Author Tools
      4. Summarize Simulation, Virtual Reality & Virtualization products that could prepare attackers for control and programming of real-world assets
      5. Discuss impact of Prototypes / Distributed Fabrication methods including 3D Printing and Materials/Parts access
    9. Discuss prevention/deterrence/mitigation efforts of cyber terror activities.
      1. Outline efforts related to SCADA / Control Systems, Business / Governmental Computer Systems, Personal and computers/phones
      2. Describe other technical and non-technical countermeasures

  
  • CRJ 325 - Intro to Emergency Management

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This introductory course provides a basic overview of the history of the emergency management industry by highlighting the major shifts of focus over the years.  Students will have a fundamental understanding of the industry phases and structures.
    Competencies
    1. Explore the foundations of emergency management in the United States
      1. Identify the roles, responsibilities, and functions of the professional emergency manager
      2. Discuss the essential elements of an effective emergency management program
    2. Describe the five mission areas of emergency management
      1. Identify the elements of the preparedness system described in key preparedness doctrine and guidance
      2. Explain the relationship between core capabilities, the five mission areas, and preparedness
    3. Explain key factors in serving the whole community
      1. Identify trends that contribute to disaster complexity
      2. Identify strategies for building the resilience of the whole community
    4. Explain legal considerations in emergency management
      1. Identify the need for a legal basis for emergency management
      2. Discuss potential liability issues for emergency managers related to planning, mutual aid agreements, sunshine laws, volunteers, evacuation, and sheltering
    5. Describe the intergovernmental and interagency context of emergency management
      1. Explain the importance of engaging the whole community
      2. Describe the emergency management roles and responsibilities of local, state, tribal, and federal governments.
    6. Describe administration in emergency management related to staffing and information management
      1. Describe staffing options for routine and emergency operations
      2. Describe the importance of documentation in emergency management

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 326 - Emergency Planning

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Emergency Planning provides information that will enable persons the ability to assess their community’s hazards, determine community resources, and write an all-hazards plan to assign responsibility to various agencies who will respond during an emergency or disaster.  The primary purpose of this course is to provide background information on reasons for planning and who might be involved in the process, as well as to provide a framework within which to develop a plan.
    Competencies
    1. Discuss the need for emergency planning
      1. Indicate the significance of emergency planning
      2. List the consequences resulting from a lack of planning
    2. Describe the emergency planning process
      1. Describe the six steps in the emergency planning process
      2. Define the purpose of an emergency operations plan
    3. Use a hazard profile to assess community vulnerability and risk
      1. Describe the purpose of a hazard vulnerability analysis
      2. Identify the threats and hazards effecting a community
      3. Assign probability of occurrence to threats and hazards of a community
    4. Describe the format and content of an emergency operations plan
      1. List the components of a basic plan
      2. Describe the difference between an annex and an appendix
    5. Determine how to staff and organize a planning team
      1. List the organizations involved in emergency planning
      2. Discuss each organization’s contribution to the team
    6. Develop an emergency operations plan
      1. Compare different formats for an emergency operations plan
      2. Use a template to write a basic plan based on emergency planning doctrine and guidance

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 327 - Exercise Design & Evaluation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course introduces participants to the fundamentals of exercise design, providing them with the knowledge and skills to develop, conduct, and evaluate effective exercises that test an organization’s emergency management plans. Throughout the course, participants will learn about topics including the types of exercises, the exercise design steps, how to design and conduct an exercise, and the evaluation process.
    Competencies
    1. Describe the exercise design process
      1. Describe the eight exercise design steps
      2. Identify the types of exercises
    2. Assess hazards that affect a community or organization
      1. Select a hazard for an exercise
      2. Determine the underlying reasons for the focus on the selected hazard
    3. Develop a purpose statement for an exercise
      1. Determine the scope of the exercise
      2. Select  the core capabilities for the exercise
    4. Develop objectives for an exercise
      1. Construct objectives following the SMART format
      2. Align core capabilities with objectives for an exercise
    5. Design a discussion based exercise
      1. Develop a Situation Manual (SITMAN) for a tabletop exercise
      2. Construct a PowerPoint presentation for a tabletop exercise
    6. Develop exercise evaluation support material
      1. Determine critical tasks to be evaluated for a tabletop exercise
      2. Construct exercise evaluation guides for a tabletop exercise

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 328 - Disaster Response & Recovery

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand and think critically about response and recovery operations in the profession of emergency management. Students will utilize problem-based learning by analyzing actual disaster events and applying the theories, principals, and practice of response and recovery. In addition, students will learn about the issues faced by special populations and how to address these special needs in natural disaster response and recovery.
    Competencies
    1. Describe key aspects of the response mission area
      1. Describe the core concepts of the National Response Framework
      2. Discuss what occurs during a disaster and the impact it has of life, property, and the environment
    2. Discuss elements of effective decision making during incident response.
      1. Describe features and advantages of using the Incident Command System (ICS) for incident response.
      2. Describe key roles in incident response
    3. Examine resource management planning during response operations
      1. List the steps in resource management planning
      2. Describe the process for managing resources during an incident
    4. Describe key aspects of the recovery mission area
      1. Discuss the core principles of recovery
      2. List the steps in the disaster recovery process
    5. Explain typical disaster recovery operations
      1. Identify Individual Assistance (IA) programs
      2. Describe types of Public Assistance (PA)
    6. Analyze human responses to disasters
      1. Examine special issues during recovery including damage to the environment from hazards and sheltering animal populations
      2. Identify actions to promote emotional healing in the community after a disaster

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 329 - Mitigation

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course develops foundational skills to identify, analyze, and evaluate risk in an organization within the context of all-hazards emergency management and introduces the development of risk reduction strategies.
    Competencies
    1. Describe key aspects of the mitigation mission area
      1. Explain the purpose of mitigation
      2. Identify the steps in the mitigation planning process
    2. Compare and contrast risk assessment and analysis theories
      1. Define the terms threat, vulnerability, likelihood, and consequence
      2. Interpret risk factors and strategies as part of a comprehensive risk analysis
    3. Develop a hazard analysis and vulnerability assessment for an organization or community
      1. Determine potential impacts of hazards to a community or organization
      2. Categorize risk factors utilizing threat and hazard risk assessment tools and guidance
    4. Create an outreach strategy
      1. Identify strategies for building local support for mitigation
      2. Develop messages that align with outreach strategies
    5. Determine community capabilities
      1. Conduct a capability assessment
      2. Identify capability gaps of a community or organization
    6. Create a mitigation strategy
      1. Determine mitigation goals and actions
      2. Outline action plans for implementation of goals and actions

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 333 - CSI & Forensic Photography

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course emphasizes photography fundamentals and practical techniques for crime scene and evidence documentation. Concentrating on technical aspects specific to creating images for investigative purposes, topics include alternate light sources as well as an exploration of special considerations for analysis, documentation, and presentation.
    Competencies
    1. Produce fair and accurate representations of crime scenes.
      1. Demonstrate basic concepts of evidence and crime scene photography.
      2. Use three types of crime scene photography: overall, mid-range and close-up.
      3. Develop fundamental knowledge of digital imaging technologies.
    2. Critique image quality.
      1. Demonstrate use of professional digital camera
      2. Select appropriate settings for f-stops, shutter speed, exposure, and aperture for their effects on digital images.
    3. Generate images using basic knowledge of exposure with and without flash.
      1. Produce photos using oblique lighting and under UV light conditions
      2. Use Paint with Light technique effectively.
    4. Appraise legal issues related to photographs and digital imaging.
      1. Assess relevant and material photos for admissibility.
      2. Explain the requirement that a photograph has to be more probative than prejudicial.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • CRJ 932 - Internship

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Open
    Involves 150 hours of active internship for students in an agency other than the one in which they may be employed. Synthesis paper required.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Prerequisite: Criminal History Background Check to determine eligibility
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the justice/law system and the society of which it is a part
      1. Weigh the effects of the justice/law system on society
      2. Assess the control of society on the justice/law system
    2. Keep a log of significant activities
    3. Evaluate the internship
      1. Determine the agency’s strengths and weaknesses
      2. Criticize the agency’s performance
    4. Evaluate their education to date
      1. Determine the strengths and weaknesses of criminal justice courses
      2. Determine the strengths and weaknesses of the core curriculum 
    5. Keep commitments in a work environment
      1. Meet time commitments
      2. Function appropriately for conditions
    6. Discuss the historical development of the criminal justice system
      1. Trace major trends in the rise of the criminal justice system
      2. Project future trends in criminal justice 

  
  • CRJ 949 - Special Topics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Special topics expand the curriculum to meet the unique interests of students, as well as current issues. Registration in Special Topics may be repeated indefinitely, but only the most recent 6 credits will apply towards a Criminal Justice award.
    Competencies
    1. Critique the current trends in the field
      1. Determine positive and negative field trends
      2. Assess the impact of trends on the field
    2. Defend ideas on future trends in the field
      1. Appraise what industry aspects may be out of date.
      2. Evaluate what aspects may see greater demand
      3. Propose ways the field can capitalize on possible future trends.
    3. Research special topic area
      1. Distinguish between the applicable materials in the special topic area
      2. Apply pertinent laws and regulations
    4. Examine the roles and functions of legal professionals in the special topics area
      1. Describe pre-conviction activities
      2. Discuss post-conviction activities
    5. Analyze case studies of different field scenarios
      1. Explain how a person would react in this situation
      2. Describe whether or not the appropriate decisions were made
      3. Devise an appropriate ethical plan based on all of the information available.
    6. Create a project on a given topic
      1. Generate a well thought out viewpoint
      2. Develop a presentation that is appropriate for a given audience

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019

Data Analytics

  
  • DAT 201 - Data Science I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    In this course, students will be introduced to fundamental concepts and applications of data science. Students will perform data analysis, learn about computing for data science and report data findings. Additionally, ethical issues in data science is addressed.
    Competencies
     

    1. Analyze foundational concepts in data science
      1. Define data science
      2. Examine data science related case studies
      3. Define foundational concepts in data analysis
    2. Examine components of data analysis pipelines
      1. Outline the data science process
      2. Demonstrate understanding of the reasoning for each step in the data analytics pipeline
    3. Design and execute programs using a high-level language to solve basic data science problems
      1. Utilize data types, operations, control structures and iterations
      2. Utilize functions and follow scoping rules
      3. Demonstrate use of a debugging method
    4. Analyze key concepts in data science project management
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of how a data science project progresses
      2. Explain what advantages or disadvantages exist for popular project methodologies
    5. Evaluate ethical issues in data science
      1. Argue the difference between patents, copyrights, designs and trademarks and illustrate their use in the context of data science
      2. Explain how laws and technology safeguard from cyberattacks
      3. Describe the role of trade secrets in relation to data science
      4. Discuss how organizations with international ties must consider privacy laws, regulations, and standards across countries in which they operate.
      5. Compare and contrast individual privacy and security
      6. Compare the needs of society to individual rights to privacy
      7. Discuss potential concerns involving microtargeting and algorithmic fairness
    6. Compare and contrast broad classes of learning approaches.
      1. Identify inputs of various learning approaches
      2. Identify outputs of various learning approaches
      3. Describe ranges of problem types to which learning approaches can be applied
    7. Analyze and report data collection needs
      1. Document collecting high quality data for a particular purpose
      2. Document the resources needed to carry out a particular investigation
    8. Perform data analysis
      1. Format/cleanse a dataset so that it can be better analyzed
      2. Identify interesting information from a dataset that could be used to make better business decisions
    9. Report data findings
      1. Write a professional report based on a data analysis findings
      2. Present findings orally

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DAT 202 - Data Science II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    In this course, students will explore data acquisition, data cleansing, data analysis, data visualization, and simple modeling using programming solutions. Students will also learn techniques for presenting high quality output from data science initiatives.
    Prerequisite: CIS 189  with a minimum grade of C- and DAT 201  with a minimum grade of C-
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: CIS 289  and (MAT 157  or MAT 162 )
    Competencies
     

    1. Examine data acquisition
      1. Define data acquisition
      2. Describe exploratory data analysis
    2. Incorporate data acquisition
      1. Discuss various storage structures and methods for data gathering
      2. Write a web-scraper to gather data
      3. Access a database in a program
      4. Read data from a file in a program
      5. Discuss how ethics play a role in data acquisitions
    3. Evaluate methods of data delivery
      1. Analyze types and uses of various data displays
      2. Apply best practices in displaying data
      3. Construct numerical summary of data
      4. Create visual summaries of data
    4. Write a program to construct a pipeline for data analysis
      1. Perform data filtering
      2. Apply data transformation
      3. Perform data aggregation
      4. Construct data visualizations
      5. Model data
    5. Outline the data exploration lifecycle
      1. Demonstrate understanding of the data exploration lifecycle and its components
      2. Explain the necessity of this lifecycle in producing quality results
    6. Incorporate visual tools, techniques and strategies for data analysis
      1. Use graphical tools for data exploration
      2. Use appropriate techniques for data visualizations
    7.  Evaluate the interpretation of results
      1. Describe the four types of data analytics: descriptive, diagnostic, predictive and prescriptive
      2. Explain the role of statistical significance in data analytics
      3. Compare and contrast reproducibility and repeatability
    8. Examine ethical issues in data science
      1. Identify ethical issues in data science
      2. Discuss ethical behaviors of a data scientist
    9. Report data findings
      1. Write a professional report based on a data analysis findings
      2. Present findings orally

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DAT 303 - Data Science III

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    In this course, students will be introduced to a variety of machine learning model styles, how these models work, and when they should be applied. Students will also get to utilize tools, both desktop applications and the Python development environment, to apply these models to datasets.
    Prerequisite: DAT 202 with a minimum grade of C- and CIS 289  with a minimum grade of C- and (MAT 157 OR MAT 162)

     
    Competencies
     

    1. Compare and contrast general machine learning concepts
      1. Describe the advantages/disadvantages of each model class
      2. Explain when a supervised leaning model should be used vs. an unsupervised one
      3. Discuss problems related to algorithmic and data bias, as well as privacy and integrity of data
    2. Evaluate unsupervised learning models and their concepts
      1. Explain when and why a hierarchical clustering model is the appropriate tool for analyzing a dataset
      2. Discuss when and why k-Means clustering is the appropriate tool for analyzing a dataset
    3. Analyze neural networks and their concepts
      1. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using a neural network and when it is appropriate for making predictions
      2. Demonstrate understanding of backward propagation and how it applies to neural networks
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of supervised learning models and the advantages/disadvantages of each
      1. Explain when and why a regression model is the appropriate tool for analyzing a dataset
      2. Discuss when and why a Naïve Bayes model is the appropriate tool for analyzing a dataset
      3. Describe when and why a decision trees model is the appropriate tool for analyzing a dataset
    5. Build models to analyze datasets utilizing open source desktop machine learning tools
      1. Construct an unsupervised learning model to analyze a dataset
      2. Develop a supervised learning model to analyze a dataset
      3. Create a neural network model to analyze a dataset
    6. Explore topics in data sampling
      1. Describe the different types of biases in data sampling
      2. Demonstrate the danger of overfitting
      3. Explain the purpose of training, validation and test datasets
      4. Use k-fold cross validation to evaluate the performance of a model
    7. Evaluate modeling results and interpret the meaning/value of the results
      1. Define true/false positive/negative
      2. Give examples of recall, precision and accuracy
      3. Generate and use a ROC curve to evaluate prediction performance
      4. Interpret model quality by applying performance metrics such as root mean squared error (RMSE), confusion matrices, gain charts and silhouette scores
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of overfitting and underfitting and their causes
    8. Construct machine learning models in Python to do data analysis on datasets
      1. Design a project that utilizes an unsupervised machine learning model to analyze a dataset
      2. Develop a project that utilizes a supervised machine learning model to analyze a dataset
    9. Create an ensemble learning model
      1. Build an ensemble learning model that utilizes multiple machine learning model techniques to analyze a dataset
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of why and when you would most effectively utilize ensemble learning.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

  
  • DAT 500 - SAS Visual Analytics

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    SAS (Statistical Analysis System) is a popular, analytic software suite. This course will prepare students for the SAS Certified Visual Business Analyst exam. Course content will cover exam objectives for data sources, data items, SAS Visual Analytics Explorer and SAS Visual Analytics Designer.
    Competencies
    1. Explore SAS Visual Analytics
      1. Explore SAS Visual Analytics concepts
      2. Use the SAS Visual Analytics home page
      3. Discuss the course environment and scenario
    2. Manage Environment and Data
      1. Explore SAS Visual Data Builder
      2. Explore SAS Visual Analytics Administrator
    3. Assess SAS Visual Analytics Explorer
      1. Examine Visual Analytics Explorer
      2. Select data and define data item properties
      3. Create visualizations
      4. Enhance visualizations with analytics
      5. Interact with visualizations and explorations
    4. Design Reports
      1. Examine the SAS Visual Analytics Designer interface
      2. Create a simple report
      3. Create data items and working with graphs
      4. Work with filters and report sections
      5. Establish interactions, links, and alerts
      6. Work with gauges and display rules
      7. Work with tables
      8. Work with other objects
    5. Assess Custom Graph Builder
      1. Create custom graphs
      2. Use custom graph objects in a report
    6. Create Analyses and Reports with SAS Visual Analytics

     


Dental Assistant

  
  • DEA 253 - Dental Science I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to anatomy and physiology, microbiology and oral pathology.
    Prerequisite: None required (recommend completion of all General Education requirements prior to beginning program)  
    Corequisite: DEA 256 , DEA 424 , DEA 507 , DHY 161 , DHY 221  
    Competencies
     

    1. Summarize basic cell anatomy and function
      1. Explain major cell functions
      2. Describe the basic differences between animal and non-animal cell anatomy
      3. Relate the mechanisms of transport across cell membranes
    2. Identify the pioneers of microbiology
      1. Match the pioneers to their contributions
      2. Recognize historical chronologically 
    3. Explain the mechanisms of immunity
      1. List the portals of entry into the human body
      2. Recognize the anatomical structures that defend the body from disease
      3. Define the different types of immunity
      4. List the various forms of vaccination
    4. Recognize pathological organisms
      1. Distinguish between bacteria and viruses
      2. Explain how cellular reproduction is affected by pathological organisms
      3. Recognize congenital defects and diseases
      4. Identify malignant diseases
    5. Examine appropriate methods of asepsis in the dental office
      1. Define the different methods of asepsis
      2. List the advantages and disadvantages of each method
      3. Determine the effectiveness of each asepsis technique
    6. Compare the different systems of the human body.
      1. Recall the functions of the human body systems
      2. Recognize anatomic features of each body system
    7. Classify anatomical relations of the body
      1. Understand body planes
      2. Identify the body divisions
    8. Distinguish the body’s mechanisms of healing
      1. Summarize the inflammatory response
      2. Explain between primary and secondary healing
      3. Explain cellular reproduction
    9. Evaluate pathological oral conditions
      1. Recognize healthy oral structures and conditions
      2. Explain the process of caries formation
      3. List the stages of periodontal disease
      4. Compare vascular, viral and bacterial oral lesions

  
  • DEA 256 - Dental Anatomy

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The study of head, neck and dental anatomy is combined to give students the foundation for application in dental assisting.
    Prerequisite: None required. (Recommend completion of all general education requirements prior to beginning program)
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: DEA 424   
    Corequisite: DEA 253 , DEA 507 ,DHY 161 , DHY 221  
    Competencies
    1. Define the nomenclature for the oral cavity
      1. Discuss the dentitions, names and functions of the teeth
      2. Describe the arrangement of the teeth, the eruption sequence
      3. Identify the tooth identification systems 
    2. Differentiate between the structures of the oral cavity 
      1. Identify the oral cavity,  external structures, oral vestibule, oral cavity proper
      2. Describe the tooth and the surrounding structures
    3. Interpret the morphology of the secondary dentition
      1. Differentiate between surfaces, shape and size of the teeth
      2. Identify teeth by shape, size and characteristics
    4. Describe the tooth histology and primary dentition
      1. Identify  names, number ,eruption dates and value of primary teeth
      2. Define the development  and formation of teeth including anomalies
    5. Discuss occlusion, form and function of the masticatory system
      1. Identify classifications of occlusion and deviations
      2. Review the importance of contact areas, interproximal spaces, embrasures
      3. Define the curvature and planes of the dental arches
    6. Discuss the bones of the skull
      1. Identify the location of the anatomic landmarks of the cranial, facial, mandible and maxilla
      2. Identify the bones of the skull and their locations including cranial, facial, mandibular and maxillary.
    7. Identify the muscles of the head and neck
      1. Describe the origin, insertion, and function of the muscles of mastication 
      2. Identify muscles of mastication, tongue, facial expression, neck, soft palate and pharynx
      3. Discuss nerve innervation for the muscle groups 
    8. Classify the nerves of the head and neck anatomy
      1. Identify parts of a neuron
      2. Distinguish between the nervous systems, cranial nerves
    9. Relate knowledge of the arteries of the head and neck
      1. Identify the branches of the carotid arteries
      2. Describe the blood supply and drainage of veins 
    10. Illustrate knowledge of salivary glands and temporomandibular joint  
      1. Classify the minor and major salivary glands
      2. Describe and locate structures of temporomandibular joint
      3. Discuss clinical concerns with the temporomandibular joint  

  
  • DEA 263 - Dental Science II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The study of pharmacology, medical emergencies in the dental healthcare setting, and nutrition. Child and Adult Abuse training also received within this course.
    Prerequisite: DEA 253  , DEA 256 DEA 424 , DEA 507  , DHY 161  , DHY 221  
    Corequisite: DEA 321  , DEA 576  , DEA 591  , DEA 615  , DEA 702  
    Competencies
     

    1. Assess the critical detail of the medical/dental history
      1. Review the patient’s history before examination
      2. Discuss any medical contraindications
      3. Recognize signs of abuse
    2. Interpret common medical emergency system in a dental office
      1.  Determine risk factors
      2. Identify supplies that might be found in minimal emergencies kit (systems).
      3. Initiate emergency procedures
    3. Classify drug categories
      1. Differentiate between brand names and generic names of drugs
      2. List sources of accurate drug information
      3. Describe parts of a prescription
      4. Discuss how to record or update a drug/ allergy history
    4. Investigate the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental staff in an emer­gency
      1. Examine the rights of the patient who is receiving dental treatment
      2. Analyze privileged information
      3. Discuss importance of confidentiality in dental office
    5. Evaluate criteria for successful nutrition counseling
      1. Assess the six groups of essential nutrients, their function and sources
      2. Interpret nutritional quality
      3. Explain how to read a food label
      4. Identify health risks related to diet
      5. Discuss the effects of medications on nutrition
      6. Calculate calories provided per gram for carbohydrates, fats, and proteins
      7. Compare fat soluble and water-soluble vitamins, their functions and food sources
      8. Relate the five influences of food habit
      9. Explain the five steps involved in modification of food habit
      10. Discuss dietary management of patients with special needs
      11. Explain the food guide pyramid
      12. Compile a fourteen day diet history

  
  • DEA 297 - Ethics/Jurisprudence Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    The study and legal responsibilities of the dental profession as well as the functions and jurisprudence of dental auxiliary personnel. Study for and completion of the Iowa Board of Dental Examiners Registration exams will take place during this course.

    Prerequisite: All first and second semester courses successfully completed
    Corequisite: DEA 577  
    Competencies
    1. Interpret legal and ethical considerations of the dental team
      1. Define all legal terminology relating to dentistry
      2. Describe the legal implications of the patient record and its required thoroughness
      3. Identify the techniques of gaining consent and when/from whom it is necessary
      4. List obligations between the operator and the patient concerning care/treatment/referrals
      5. Outline the Iowa Practice Act regarding the governing of dentistry including Dentists, Hygienists and auxiliaries
      6. Define the auxiliaries’ role concerning the legal considerations that are possible in a dental office
      7. Identify examples of the American Dental Association and the American Dental Assistants Association principles of ethics
      8. State how dentistry follows ethical principles in regard to advertising, professional fees and charges and professional responsibilities and rights
    2. Interpret changes in dental health care
      1. Differentiate between civil and criminal law
      2. Identify the components of a contract
      3. Define due care
      4. Consider examples of malpractice, including torts and fraud
      5. Explain the Good Samaritan Law
      6. Classify types of patient consent
      7. Define the statute of limitations
    3. Outline the Iowa Dental Practice Act
      1. Identify who oversees the Dental Practice Act and how licenses/registrations/certifications for the dental personnel are obtained
      2. Summarize the Scope of Practice for dental assistants in Iowa
      3. Discuss the various levels of supervision
      4. Determine how changes in the Iowa Dental Practice Act are implemented

     

  
  • DEA 321 - Dental Radiography II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A continuation of Dental Radiography I. Weekly seminars for basic interpretation of radiographics and laboratory experience to develop student competence in making oral radiographic surveys.
    Prerequisite: DEA 253 , DEA 256 , DEA 507 , DHY 161  
    Competencies
    1. Recognize commonly found radiolucent/radiopaque landmarks in the maxilla and the mandible
      1. Identify various parts of the maxilla on drawings and on radio­graphs by naming its parts
      2. Discover various surface landmarks on the face by naming the surface land­marks
      3. Identify anatomical landmarks of the mandible by naming them on drawings and on radio­graphs
      4. Identify the structure found on the maxilla and mandibular arch using an unmounted film
    2. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of panoramic radiographics
      1. List the types of patients who require extraoral radiographs
      2. List the parts of the film cassette and the steps in its care
      3. Describe the loading of the film cassette
      4. List and identify the various parts of the Panorex machine
      5. List the steps in the operation of the Panorex machine
    3. Apply the techniques used for the temporomandibular joint exposure
      1. Explain various usages for the temporomandibular joint projection
      2. Position a patient correctly for TMJ exposure
      3. Translate the exposure using proper forms and identification of patient on film and clinical record
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the use for cephalometric x-rays
      1. List the advantages and disadvantages of cephalometric x-rays
      2. Identify the steps needed for patient positioning
      3. List the parts of the film cassette and the steps in its care
      4. Demonstrate the proper loading of the film cassette
      5. Translate the exposure using proper form and identification of patient on the film and clinical records
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the infection of the periapical tissue
      1. Discuss normal periapical tissue
      2. Generalize the cause of infection of periapical tissue
    6. Identify common dental anomalies
      1. List common anomalies and the arch in/on which you would find each
      2. State causes and correction of the anomalies
    7. Recognize by viewing a radiograph with dental caries present
      1. Identify caries from restorations/lesions
      2. Label the extent the caries have progressed into tooth structure
    8. Recognize radiographic aspects of periodontal disease
      1. Describe the tissues in the realm of healthiness
      2. Discuss the causes and progression of periodontal disease
      3. State the limits and importance of radiographs for identification of this disease
      4. Outline the therapy/treatment needed for a patient with periodontal disease
    9. List common trauma to the teeth
      1. Name the various fractures to the teeth and foreign objects associat­ed with the injury
      2. Discuss the possibility of using additional radiographs to confirm injury
    10. Explain the responsibility of the dental assistant regarding radiographic technique usage of x-rays
      1. Assess patient needs based on health history
      2. Using good judgment, demonstrate proper film and instrument for the proce­dure
      3. Appraise equipment and radiation dosage accuracy for patient protection

  
  • DEA 424 - Dental Materials Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Through laboratory experience, the student learns techniques in preparation and utilization of dental materials.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: DEA 256    
    Competencies
     

    1. Produce safe practice in the laboratory.
      1. Perform laboratory housekeeping practices.
      2. Appraise emergency equipment, procedures and assess first aid supplies.
      3. Locate material safety data sheets (M.S.D.S.) for dental products
    2. Formulate infection control practices.
      1. Categorize the infectious, physical, and chemical hazards in a dental office.
      2. Appraise the practice of universal precautions in dentistry.
      3. Prove the types of personal protective equipment (PPE) that must be used for the practice of dentistry in the operatory and laboratory and justify the criteria of selection.
      4. Rank the methods that may be used to prevent cross-contamination during distribution of dental supplies.
      5. Defend the significance of an office exposure control program and protocol for managing exposure to bloodborne pathogens for office personnel and the dental laboratory.
    3. Incorporate use of the instruments of measure.
      1. Predict mass on a gram scale
      2. Assess use of a milliliter graduate and ruler
      3. Prove volume using a cubic centimeter graduate.
    4. Generate care and use of dental equipment in the laboratory.
      1. The whip mix machine
      2. The model trimmer
      3. The dental lab engine
      4. The dental lathes for wet and dry use.
      5. The Sta-Vac machine
      6. The Triad machine
    5. Compare and contrast impression materials and perform the manipulation technique for each product including:
      1. Wax and impression compound
      2. Zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE)
      3. Agar or reversible hydrocolloid, alginate
      4. Polysulfides, condensation silicones, polyethers and addition silicones
    6. Compare and contrast gypsum materials and perform the manipulation technique producing a variety of gypsum products to include:
      1. Materials: dental plaster, stone, and improved stone
      2. Products: study model, cast and die
    7. Create an alginate impression on a student partner.
      1. Appraise the aspects of patient preparation for alginate impressions including appropriate tray criteria and use of rope wax if needed.
      2. Perform mixing of the alginate, loading, seating and removal of the tray to obtain acceptable alginate impressions.
      3. Critique the impressions to acceptability of laboratory standards.
    8. Generate and trim a study model
      1. Assess the following laboratory procedures: a. use a gypsum product to pour a study model from an impression. b. trim the study model on the model trimmer using appropriate cast cuts for patient consultation and treatment planning
      2. Compare and contrast the two methods of diagnostic cast/study model fabrication.
      3. Critique the completed study model for diagnostic proficiency. 
    9. Formulate the application and manipulation of dental waxes.
      1. Compare and contrast pattern and processing dental waxes.
    10. Formulate the application and manipulation of dental amalgam.
      1. Incorporate acceptable mercury hygiene practices.
      2. Perform by mixing and placing a dental amalgam restoration in a tooth cookie.
    11. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of dental materials used in removal prostheses, bleaching trays and a variety of oral appliances.
      1. Assess the different oral appliances used in the dental profession.
      2. Interpret the different thermoplastic materials used in the fabrication of oral appliances and critique their properties.
      3. Prove the steps involved in fabricating an oral appliance.
    12. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of adhesive and direct polymeric restorative materials.
      1. Evaluate the differences of the microanatomy of enamel and dentin regarding etching and bonding.
      2. Prioritize the properties of restorative resins.
      3. Interpret the differences between flowable and condensable composites.
    13. Perform the application of a variety of abrasive polishing materials used in the clinical or laboratory setting.
      1. Compare and contrast the rate of abrasion for clinical and laboratory procedures
    14. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of a variety of dental cements
      1. Critique the properties of Zinc oxide eugenol, zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate cement, glass ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide cement.
      2. Prove the mixing process and setting times for the cements stated above.
    15. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of a variety of provisional restorations.
      1. Prove the construction and placement of provisional restorations.
      2. Perform the procedure for the construction and placement of provisional restorations.

  
  • DEA 507 - Princ of Dental Assisting

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Beginning concepts of chairside assisting with emphasis on the role of the dental team in delivery systems. Terminology, instrument identification, equipment and basic procedures are covered
    Prerequisite: None required (recommend completion of all general education requirements prior to beginning program)
    Corequisite: DEA 253  , DEA 256  , DEA 424  , DHY 161  , DHY 221  
    Competencies
    1. Use correct dental terminology
      1. Articulate the importance of using proper terminology
      2. Explain how to use a prefix, suffix and root words to determine meaning
      3. Know how and when to use a dictionary or other references.
    2. Identify the specific responsibilities of each dental health team member.
      1. Name the educational levels and skills of each staff position
      2. Identify the level of patient contact for each team member position
    3. Apply the principles of four handed dentistry
      1. Identify the zones of activity for chairside assisting
      2. Summarize the principles of body mechanics
      3. Identify the classifications of motion
      4. Demonstrate the principles of instrument transfer
      5. Identify instruments and their application grasp
      6. Manipulate the delivery and retrieval of instruments
    4. Maintain the operating field
      1. Identify all types of oral evacuation tips and their uses
      2. List the criteria for evacuation tip placement
      3. Recall methods of tissue retraction
      4. Use additional sources of moisture control.
    5. Examine various types and functions of dental operatory equipment
      1. Demonstrate operational parts of a contoured chair
      2. List the requirements for a dental operating chair for the dentist and the assistant
      3. Recall the function and operation of all parts of the unit used in our dental clinic
      4. Identify the different types of rotary instruments and their application
      5. Name the different types, shapes, and functions of burs
    6. Name the types and functions of various dental instruments and supplies.
      1. Define and identify the components of hand instruments
      2. Identify and state the function of other armamentarium.
    7. Maintain dental operatory equipment and instruments
      1. Compare sterilization vs. disinfection
      2. Utilize manufacturers guidelines for appropriate handpieces/equipment and uses
      3. Outline the need for scheduled maintenance
      4. Identify the correct type of sterilization technique appropriate for instrument/equipment types
    8. Differentiate between aseptic and non-aseptic environments
    9. Evaluate infection control techniques designed to prevent the spread of transmitted diseases to the care of all patients following OSHA/CDC guidelines
      1. Outline current CDC/OSHA guidelines and responsibilities concerning patient/team protection
      2. Explain where compliance information is located.
      3. Identify the rationale, regulations, and recommendations for training requirements in the dental office
      4. List the routes of microbial transmission
      5. Demonstrate the principles of infection control encompassing hand washing, personal protective equipment, barriers, chemical disinfectants, ultrasonic cleaners, sterilizers, and instrument storage
      6. List various disinfectants and their applications as used in dentistry
      7. Describe types of sterilization units
      8. Identify types/uses of ultrasonic cleaners
      9. Demonstrate the usage of several types of sterilization monitors, such as process indicators and biologic testing.
      10. Use  pre-procedure mouth rinses, high volume evacuation, dental dams and disposable items
      11. Identify physical equipment and mechanical devices provided to safeguard employees
      12. Describe Safety Data Sheets (SDS)  and use the SDS system of colors, numbers, and pictograms used for hazardous material identification
    10. Perform aseptic handwashing technique
    11. Outline modes of disease transmission
      1. Define disease transmission
      2. Examine barriers to disease transmission
    12. Preform accurate record keeping
      1. Identify the essential parts of patient records
      2. Outline the need for clear/accurate patient records
      3. Complete charting activities in an electronic record
    13. Seat patients
      1. Demonstrate communication principles during seating and dismissing of patient
      2. Identify proper patient positioning for procedures
    14. Instruct patients on applicable methods of preventive dentistry
      1. Describe plaque and its formation
      2. Outline considerations in regard to caries and periodontal disease
      3. Identify etiological components of all dental disease
      4. Describing recommended oral hygiene methods.
      5. Identify special needs of patients
    15. Demonstrate for coronal polishing and application of anticariogenic treatments
      1. Define oral prophylaxis
      2. Explain the differences between coronal polishing, scaling and root planing
      3. Prepare tray for performing a coronal polish
      4. Demonstrate methods to ensure patient/operator safety and comfort
      5. Outline the principles of polishing and the relationship between the method of application of a polishing agent and its effect on tooth structure
      6. Identify instruments/equipment used for coronal polishing
      7. Define types of fluoride and their applications
      8. Apply communication principles of patient management
        1. Identify the concepts that deal with the psychological aspects of the patient
        2. Outline the professional aspects of communication
        3. Explain the personal aspects of communication and role behavior in the dental environment
        4. Define personal space
        5. Distinguish the roles ethnic and sociological backgrounds influence behavior
        6. Identify our basic needs as human beings
        7. Collect and record patient vital signs
        8. Outline rationale for taking patient history
        9. Discuss techniques of gaining medical/dental history
        10. Identify common locations for obtaining a pulse and characteristics to monitor
        11. Recall normal pulse ranges
        12. List the name and function of equipment required to monitor a blood pressure
        13. Outline the appropriate steps in taking a blood pressure reading and its recording
        14. Define the normal ranges of a blood pressure and factors which cause variances
        15. Interpret characteristics for assessing respiration
        16. Outline steps in evaluating and recording respiration
        17. Define normal range of respiration
        18. Identify the need of a general assessment of the patient

  
  • DEA 576 - Dental Assisting Clinic I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application of knowledge and skills as student rotate through dental healthcare settings. At least 50% of rotations are in general dental practices with the remaining rotations in specialty dental practices
    Prerequisite: DEA 253 , DEA 256 , DEA 507 , DEA 424 , DHY 221 , DHY 161  
    Corequisite: DEA 591  , DEA 615 , DEA 263 , DEA 321 , DEA 702  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate professional work habits
      1. Display promptness and excellent attendance
      2. Define and describe self-motivation
      3. Illustrate organizational skills
      4. Perform professional patient and coworker communications
      5. Apply a clean, neat and professional appearance
      6. Demonstrates self-control
      7. Accepts constructive criticism
      8. Seeks help and guidance, if needed
    2. Apply infection control techniques designed to prevent the spread of transmitted diseases to the care of all patients following OSHA/CDC guidelines
      1. Identify and apply OSHA/CDC recommended guidelines
      2. Illustrate aseptic technique
      3. Identify proper sterilization techniques
      4. Identify proper disinfecting techniques
      5. Describe and utilize barriers to transmission
      6. Demonstrate proper PPE needed for all procedures
    3. Demonstrate employability skills
      1. Perform operative skills needed for 4 handed dentistry
      2. Practice communication skills, verbal and written
      3. Utilize patient management skills
      4. Demonstrate dental office maintenance skills
      5. Development of problem solving skills
      6. Illustrate anticipation of operator needs
      7. Display proper housekeeping techniques
    4. Review with the patient dental disease chain, plaque control techniques, and dietary considerations
      1. Recite personalized oral hygiene instructions
      2. Discuss dietary needs of the patient
      3. Develop a nutritional plan for a patient
      4. Use of the “show and tell” technique
      5. Collect feedback to check communication success
    5. Perform clinical supportive functions
      1. Prepare, seat and dismiss patient
      2. Perform laboratory functions
      3. Arrange tray set ups
      4. Demonstrate rubber cup polish and fluoride application
      5. Maintain patient records
      6. Manipulate materials used in dentistry in a chairside or laboratory setting
    6. Provide diagnostic aids, including radiographs, patient records, vital signs and laboratory functions
      1. Produce radiographs as operator requests
      2. Reproduce intra oral structures in the form of a study model
      3. Operate an intra oral camera
      4. Take and record vital signs
    7. Assist with general business office procedures
      1. Perform filing, billing, and other front office duties
      2. Collect patient records for the following day
      3. Assist with confirming patients
      4. Maintain reception room
    8. Display additional assisting skills
      1. Identifies and considers the safety and comfort of the patient
      2. Displays adaptability
      3. Uses equipment and supplies with care, ingenuity and economy
      4. Identifies signs and symptoms presented by patients and the changes that take place

  
  • DEA 577 - Dental Assisting Clinic II

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 16
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A deeper application of knowledge and skills as student rotate through dental healthcare settings. At least 50% of rotations are in general dental practices with the remaining rotations in specialty dental practices. 
    Prerequisite: All first and second semester courses successfully completed
    Corequisite: DEA 297  
    Competencies

    1. Display professional habits for work and personal health
      1. Illustrate OSHA standards for the dental office/lab environment
      2. Demonstrate proper sleep habits and a clean, neat appearance.
      3. Demonstrate the proper concerns in relation to personal illness and prohibiting transmission
      4. Maintain proper nutrition
      5. Refrain from personal habits detrimental to health
      6. Demonstrate punctuality/attendance
      7. Demonstrate dependability
      8. Give a feeling of self-confidence
      9. Apply self-motivation techniques
      10. Demonstrate organizational skills
      11. Utilize proper communication techniques
      12. Express a helpful/caring attitude while being an effective “P.R.” employee
    2. Examine employability skills
      1. Demonstrate effective chairside/4 handed dentistry technique
      2. Provide patient management skills
      3. Demonstrate organization/self-motivation
      4. Utilize problem solving skills
      5. Demonstrate anticipation of operator needs
    3. Participate in all aspects of patient care
      1. Assist in chairside functions
      2. Demonstrate preventive measures for oral hygiene
      3. Perform Coronal polish and fluoride
      4. Assist in patient record maintenance
      5. Perform laboratory functions
      6. Collect patient health information
      7. Review health history, and take vital signs
      8. Assist/complete the laboratory prescription
      9. Demonstrate successful communication/interaction skills at chairside and business office settings
    4. Function as a team member in a general practice/specialty dental office
      1. Demonstrate the ability to work well with others
      2. Show willingness to share in responsibilities and workload
      3. Be an asset to the dental team’s effectiveness
      4. Know the importance of being a pleasant and optimistic team member
    5. Perform intra-oral procedures independently, as delegated
      1. Demonstrate patient safety techniques
      2. Practice proper aseptic technique to protect patient/operator health 
    6. Perform general business office procedures
      1. Illustrate filing and pulling patient records/statements
      2. Practice computer usage appropriate to office procedures
      3. Assist with billing and insurance services
      4. Answer telephones
      5. Practice scheduling/confirming appointments
      6. Assist in maintaining office/reception room
    7. Perform general laboratory duties
      1. Write laboratory prescriptions
      2. Demonstrate ability to work with stone and plaster
      3. Perform accurate trimming techniques
      4. Assist with appliance fabrication /repairs
      5. Fabrication of custom trays
      6. Demonstrate precautions for working with patient appliances
      7. Perform all other laboratory tasks legally delegated to auxiliaries

  
  • DEA 591 - Dental Assisting Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Discussion and problem-solving from clinical practice. Provides an awareness of types of office situations and discussion of clinical aspects of dental assisting and dentistry. Oral reports and weekly evaluations are required.
    Prerequisite: DEA 253 , DEA 256 , DEA 507 , DEA 424 , DHY 221 , DHY 161 .
    Corequisite: DEA 576  
    Competencies
    1. Identify community resources and services available in Polk County
      1. Identify programs/services for victims of abuse
      2. Identify programs/services for victims of rape
      3. Identify programs/services for victims of discrimination
      4. Identify programs/services available to those in financial need
      5. Identify programs/services available to victims of sexually transmitted diseases including Aids
    2. Demonstrate the ability to give oral health instruction to any given age or special needs group
      1. Define plaque
      2. Discuss the significance of a plaque free oral environment
      3. Discuss the 4 food groups and nutritional needs of each age group
      4. Demonstrate acceptable brushing technique
      5. Demonstrate flossing technique
      6. Discuss use and care of oral hygiene aids
      7. Identify oral health care modifications for handicapped individuals
    3. Identify problem solving techniques
      1. Define the problem to be dealt with
      2. List the steps to a possible appropriate solution
      3. Outline the outcomes of the possible solutions
      4. Select the appropriate response for the correct solution
    4. Demonstrate record keeping abilities
      1. Prepare an accurate tally sheet showing the hours spent in the clinical offices
      2. Prepare a task sheet showing duties performed daily in the clinical office
      3. Produce an organized clinical notebook according to guidelines
    5. Demonstrate the ability to secure information concerning an assignment or clinical site
      1. Identify appropriate resources for the needed information
      2. Demonstrate using a telephone book
      3. Identify information/services provided by the library
      4. Demonstrate successful/appropriate communication technique
    6. Identify appropriate responses to criticism
      1. Define constructive criticism and its value
      2. Define nonconstructive criticism
      3. Describe the importance of self-control
    7. Identify appropriate employee health/work habits
      1. Identify health risks in the dental office
      2. Define OSHA/CDC guidelines governing the employees work environment in the dental environment
      3. Identify the importance of self care
    8. Identify appropriate work behaviors
      1. Identify the importance of promptness
      2. State the importance of reliability
      3. State the importance of being organized
      4. Define self-motivation and its importance in the dental office
      5. Identify the importance of a professional appearance
    9. Identify public relation needs of a work site
      1. State the importance of patient/staff communication
      2. Identify professionalism in telephone communication
      3. Identify the importance of successful patient management
    10. Identify office environment needs
      1. State the importance of staff communication
      2. Identify the need for staff/dentist communication
      3. Outline the importance of creating a pleasant environment and how to achieve this
      4. State the importance of visuals for patient relaxation
    11. Identify the assistant’s role in the management of the dental patients of all ages
      1. Identify common behavior characteristics of patient of various ages
      2. Identify the importance of meeting the needs of patients through communication techniques
      3. Identify the importance of listening to the dental patient
      4. Identify behavior management techniques in the dental office setting
      5. Identify the signs of child and elder abuse and the procedure for reporting suspected abuse
    12. Identify the importance of professionalism in the role of the dental assistant.
      1. Identify the ethical behavior of the dental assistant to the patient and patient care
      2. Identify the ethical behavior of the dental assistant to the dental team members
      3. Identify ethical behavior of the dental assistant to the Dentist
      4. Identify the rights of dental patients to confidentiality and how to protect these rights

  
  • DEA 615 - Clinical Dental Assisting

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A continuance of Principles of DA I (DEA 507 )  with emphasis on operative dentistry, dental specialties and advanced dental assisting functions
    Prerequisite: DEA 253 DEA 256  , DEA 424  , DEA 507  , DHY 161  , DHY 221  
    Corequisite: DEA 321 , DEA 576 , DEA 591 , DEA 263 , DEA 702  
    Competencies
    1. Perform dental assisting procedures in general and specialty practices
      1. Summarize dental specialties
      2. Outline the duties that can be legally delegated to auxiliaries
      3. Identify duties exclusive to the dentist
      4. State and demonstrate your responsibility in patient protection
      5. List items necessary to an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan
    2. Examine the use of  local anesthetics
      1. Identify properties, side effects, indications and contraindications of anesthetics
      2. Discuss the anatomy/physiology of sensory nerves and nerve fibers and how they are effected by local anesthesia
      3. Compare topical and local anesthetics
      4. Assemble and disassemble the anesthetic syringe
      5. Demonstrate the technique for syringe transfer
      6. Explain the accepted safety guidelines regarding the use of sharps
      7. Describe the procedures for monitoring the patient during anesthetic injections
    3. Assess properties, side effects, indications and contraindications analgesics
      1. Outline the history of analgesics including nitrous oxide.
      2. Compare and contrast analgesia vs. general anesthesia
      3. Recall the various levels of analgesia
      4. State the recovery time necessary
      5. Outline the dentist/auxiliary’s responsibility concerning patient safety
    4. Evaluate the assistant’s role in restorative procedures
      1. Identify the importance of restoring tooth function
      2. Recall GVB cavity classifications
      3. Prepare the required armamentarium for each restorative procedure
      4. Demonstrate the care/preparation for use of all restorative equipment
      5. Display proper application of matrix bands
      6. Utilize proper evacuation technique and variables in use
      7. Demonstrate proper use of the dental lamp
      8. Use dental materials for restorative procedures
      9. Identify auxiliaries’ role in patient management
      10. Attach high-speed rotary hand pieces, attachments and burs
      11. Identify types and uses of abrasives that may be used
      12. Provide pre- and post-operative treatment instructions to patients for the restorative procedures as prescribed by a dentist
    5. Evaluate the assistant’s role in pedodontic procedures and patient management
      1. State factors that influence child behavior
      2. List factors that help establish respect and cooperation
      3. Describe management techniques for each child age group, and other special needs patients
      4. Recall the operative techniques for the child patient that differ from those of the adult patient
      5. Differentiate between the endodontic techniques for the child patient verses the adult patient
      6. Describe the preventive techniques for the child patient that differs from the adult
      7. State factors of concern for the child oral surgery patient from the adult patient
      8. Compare and contrast the radiographic technique for a child patient verses the adult
      9. Identify pedodontic appliances used and their purpose
      10. Discuss patient pre- and post-operative treatment instructions for the pedodontic patient as prescribed by a dentist
    6. Examine objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistants’ role in removable prosthodontics
      1. Define all terminology used in the specialty of removable prosthodontics
      2. List essentials for a complete diagnosis
      3. Outline degenerative changes that occur from improper replacements
      4. List factors that are important for replacement tooth selection
      5. Describe border molding
      6. Identify materials used and their applications
      7. Outline the use of base plates/wax rims
      8. List problems the denture/partial denture patient may have after delivery
      9. Define advantages/disadvantages of immediate dentures
      10. List the information to be discussed with the patient concerning the appliance
      11. Identify the techniques for denture/partial denture repair
      12. Instruct the patient how to care for removable prosthetic appliances as prescribed by a dentist
    7. Examine objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistants’ role in fixed prosthodontics
      1. Define all terminology used in this specialty
      2. List the indications/contraindications for a fixed prosthesis
      3. Discuss the components of the diagnosis and the case presentation
      4. Identify the requirements/purpose of a fixed bridge
      5. Identify the types of materials used and their application
      6. Define occlusal registration
      7. List types of temporary coverage
      8. Recall cements that may be used for temporary and permanent crowns
      9. Identify all equipment/materials/accessories used during procedures and their maintenance
      10. Demonstrate patient pre- and post-operative treatment instructions for the prosthodontic patient based on prosthodontic procedure
      11. Instruct the patient how to care for fixed prosthetic appliances as prescribed by a dentist
    8. Examine considerations, objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistants’ role in orthodontics
      1. Define all terminology used in orthodontics
      2. Identify all instruments/equipment/accessories used in orthodontic procedures chairside/laboratory and their maintenance
      3. List variables to be considered prior to orthodontic treatment
      4. State categories of malocclusion
      5. Discuss special oral hygiene needs of the orthodontic patient as well as the education needed for appliances
      6. Define cephalometry and its purpose
      7. Outline the components of a records appointment
      8. Discuss records management in orthodontics
      9. Outline the procedure for fabrication of an orthodontic retainer
      10. Identify and state the purpose of a space maintainer
      11. Demonstrate patient pre- and post-operative treatment instructions for the orthodontic patient as prescribed by a dentist
    9. Assess considerations, objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistant’s role in periodontics
      1. Define all terminology used in periodontics
      2. Identify all instruments/equipment used and their appropriate application
      3. Identify variables that must be considered before beginning periodontic therapy
      4. Identify the types of tissues of the periodontium
      5. Define the principal cause of periodontal disease
      6. Compare and contrast periodontosis and periodontitis
      7. Identify tissue conditions and their treatment
      8. Recall charting any pocket involvement
      9. State the purpose of scaling, root planing and curettage
      10. Identify and state the proper application of periodontal materials
      11. Outline and identify the special oral hygiene needs of the periodontal patient
      12. Demonstrate patient pre- and post-operative treatment instructions for the periodontic patient as prescribed by a dentist
    10. Examine considerations, objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistants’ role in oral surgery
      1. Define all terminology used in this specialty
      2. Identify all instruments/equipment/accessories used, their application and their care and maintenance
      3. Identify the variables/conditions that need to be considered before performing a surgical procedure
      4. Describe patient preparation prior to an oral surgery procedure
      5. State the purpose of sedation and its indication
      6. Identify the importance of patient monitoring and the techniques used
      7. List categories of pre-operative and post-operative medication
      8. State how the surgical scrub is different from a procedural hand wash
      9. State the purpose of exfoliative cytological exam, cytological smear, and a biopsy
      10. Recall classifications of normal/abnormal tissues
      11. Recall suture removal techniques
      12. Demonstrate patient pre- and post-operative treatment instructions for the oral surgery patient as prescribed by a dentist
    11. Examine considerations, objectives, procedures, indications, contraindications and the assistants’ role in endodontics
      1. Define all terminology used in endodontics
      2. Identify all instruments/equipment/accessories used, their application and their maintenance
      3. Identify the variables/conditions that need to be considered before performing a surgical procedure
      4. Define objective and subjective symptoms
      5. Identify clinical symptoms possible for endodontic involvement
      6. Identify normal pulp tissue and periodontium
      7. Describe the specialized diagnostic tests/procedures used in an endodontic evaluation
      8. List methods and medicaments used to disinfect the root canal
      9. Identify the role of antibiotics
      10. State conditions that indicate root canal failure
      11. Identify and discuss radiographic technique for endodontic procedures
      12. Demonstrate patient pre-and post-operative treatment instructions for the endodontic patient as prescribed by a dentist

  
  • DEA 702 - Dental Office Procedures

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Covers the business aspects of the dental office: patient relations, appointment book management, financial records, telephone communications, credits and collections, dental insurance, tax records, supply and inventory systems.
    Prerequisite: 35 WPM keyboard skills and computer literacy
    Competencies
    1. Understand the role of a business office assistant in a dental setting.
      1. Understand the function and responsibilities of a business office assistant.
      2. Identify personal characteristics of a business office assistant.
      3. Discuss the concept of professionalisms as related to a business office assistant.
      4. Understand the legal responsibilities and ethics of a business office assistant.
      5. Understand the role/expectations of the business office assistant as it relates to other team members and patients.
    2. Understand the importance of oral communication within a dental office.
      1. Identify techniques used for effective oral communication.
      2. Understand and explain common barriers to communication with patients and team members.
      3. Explain the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication.
      4. Understand and explain basic rules of telephone etiquette and taking proper messages.
      5. Discuss barriers to effective telephone communication with patients.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of basic written communication skills.
      1. Identify the characteristics of effective sentences and recognize common sentence errors.
      2. Demonstrate correct punctuation, spelling, numbers and grammar in written work.
      3. Incorporate dental and/or lay terminology when appropriate in written work.
    4. Demonstrate ability to write effective professional correspondence used in dental offices.
      1. Identify the basic rules/format of writing a business letter.
      2. Discuss methods, format and use of written communication within a dental office, between providers and with patients.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to write effective, professional correspondence.
    5. Demonstrates knowledge about patient development and maintenance systems.
      1. Explains purpose of continuing care/recall systems.
      2. Explain the strategies of common continuing care/recall programs.
      3. Describe different patient reminder methods.
      4. Demonstrate ability to properly address continuing care/recall card confirmation postcard.
      5. Demonstrate activation of continuing care system and make future appointment using Dentrix. (Comp 20)
      6. Understand the role and types of marketing used by dental practices.
    6. Demonstrates knowledge of appointment management.
      1. Discuss the role of the Business Office Assistant in appointment scheduling.
      2. Explain basic scheduling concepts and the information required when making a patient appointment.
      3. Understand common abbreviations used on the daily schedule and explain why they are used.
      4. Identify different types of patient appointments such as new, continuing care, returning and emergency and required considerations for each.
      5. Describe scheduling considerations for meeting patient needs and team preferences.
      6. Demonstrate ability to schedule patient appointments manually and using Dentrix. (Comp 20)
    7. Understand the dynamics of staff management within a dental office.
      1. Explain purpose and describe contents of an office policy and procedure manual.
      2. Understand the importance of team communication and common office strategies used.
      3. Understand the purpose of job descriptions.
      4. Describe common employee training, development, reviews and guidelines for employment.
      5. Discuss employee compensation in dental offices.
      6. Discuss concepts and types of payroll systems.
      7. Explain the purpose of payroll records, deduction and required forms.
    8. Understand patient records.
      1. Discuss common filing systems and steps required to ensure accurate filing.
      2. Understand the basic parts of a patient record and their purpose.
      3. Explain what active and inactive patient charts are and how they are stored in the dental office.
      4. Describe the process used for transferring patient information.
    9. Understand inventory control systems used within a dental office.
      1. Understand the differences between types of supplies.
      2. Discuss factors to be considered when ordering supplies.
      3. Explain purpose, difference and information included on an invoice and statement.
      4. Describe common inventory systems.
      5. Demonstrate ability to accurately complete an order form.
      6. Understand the role of overhead in the profitability of a practice.
      7. Discuss the importance of and strategies for controlling expenses in the dental office
    10. Understand basic concepts of dental insurance.
      1. Understand common dental insurance terminology.
      2. Discuss different types of dental insurance plans.
      3. Explain ADA code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature.
      4. Demonstrates knowledge by preparing claim forms manually and using Dentrix. (Comp 20)
    11. Understand accounts receivable in a dental office.
      1. Understand key terms associated with accounts receivable.
      2. Understand common types of accounts receivable in a dental office.
      3. Explain basic concepts of bookkeeping such as charges, posting, adjustments, credits, balances.
      4. Understand common systems of statement production.
      5. Discuss common financial policy options in dentistry.
      6. Discuss common methods of collecting money owed to the dental office.
      7. Demonstrate creation of patient statement in Dentrix. (Comp 20)
      8. Demonstrate how to post patient payment to ledger in Dentrix. (Comp 20)
    12. Understand accounts payable in a dental office.
      1. Understand key terms associated with accounts payable.
      2. Describe categories of office expenses and types of accounts payable.
      3. Explain various forms of payment used in the dental office.
      4. Familiar with parts and types of a check.
    13. Understand employment strategies used in dentistry.
      1. Understands types of job opportunities available in the field of dentistry.
      2. Determine the best position based on personal preferences, strengths and weaknesses.
      3. Understand the dynamics of the process and documents required for applying for a job in the dental field.
    14. Demonstrate proficiency with Dentrix Dental Software.
      1. Develop appointment book matrix and schedule appointments using appointment management techniques.
      2. Demonstrate how to create new family files.
      3. Demonstrate ability to enter and/or change patient information.
      4. Demonstrate ability to enter primary and/or secondary insurance information.
      5. Demonstrate ability to chart patient’s previous dentistry, existing condition and treatment needs.
      6. Demonstrate scheduling patient appointments based on reatment needs.
      7. Demonstrate completing appointments and posting charges.
      8. Demonstrate creation of insurance claim form.
      9. Demonstrate how to process patient Explanation of Benefits (EOB).
      10. Demonstrate creation of patient statement.
      11. Demonstrate how to post patient payment to ledger.
      12. Demonstrate activation of continuing care system and make future appointment.
      13. Demonstrates proper use of medical alerts.
      14. Demonstrate tracking of referrals to and from the dental office.


Dental Hygiene

  
  • DHY 114 - Dental Anatomical Sciences

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Dental anatomy supplemented by lectures, quizzes, exams and discussions on the development, morphology and functions of the teeth, as well as principles of dental charting. Anatomy and physiology of the head and neck including mastication.
    Prerequisite: BIO 164  
    Competencies
    1. Assess deciduous and permanent dentitions
      1. Compare the dentitions of humans including any anatomical structures and describe the dentition using correct terminology and definitions.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the dental numbering systems and normal eruption sequence for the teeth in the deciduous and permanent dentitions
      3. Demonstrate a knowledge of the morphology of each surface of the crown as well as the root of each of the teeth in the deciduous and permanent dentitions
      4. Demonstrate a knowledge of the functions of the pulp and normal pulpal anatomy and morphology of all the teeth in the deciduous and permanent dentition
    2. Examine the rational for dental charting and why the dental chart is considered a permanent legal record.
      1. Describe the sections of the Dentrix electronic patient record.
      2. Assemble the appropriate armamentarium and materials needed for charting.
      3. Record existing dental hard tissue restorations, prosthodontics, pathology, and services rendered.
      4. Read aloud recorded charting accurately using the proper dental terminology
    3. Examine dental caries
      1. Define dental caries
      2. Explain techniques for caries detection and outline the process of dental caries
    4. Examine human anatomy
      1. Identify the general anatomy of the oral cavity, face, bones of the head and neck, muscles of the head and neck and temporomandibular joint
      2. Identify the anatomic locations of the cranial nerves of the head and neck and know their paths and their functions.
      3. Identify the anatomic locations of veins and arteries of the head and neck and know their paths and their functions.
    5. Know and identify landmarks and rationale for dental local anesthetic injections.
      1. Identify intraoral and extraoral landmarks for maxillary local anesthetic injections
      2. Identify intraoral and extraoral landmarks for mandibular local anesthetic injections
    6. Examine the role of the lymphatic system.
      1. Discuss the components of the lymphatic system and their roles.
      2. Identify the anatomic location and names of the lymph nodes of the head and neck
    7. Understand the infection process and the role that odontogenic infection can have on the teeth and the human body
    8. Recall normal head and neck anatomy and be able to identify anomalies extraorally and intraorally.
      1. Recall normal anatomical position and shape of adult and deciduous dentitions and be able to identify anomalies if they exist
      2. Recall normal anatomical shape and position of the bones, muscles, and lymphatics of the head and neck and be able to identify anomalies if they exist.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • DHY 121 - Oral Histology & Embryology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    General and oral histology beginning with a consideration of cytology and followed by a study of the fundamentals of oral embryology and the normal microscopic anatomy of oral tissues.
    Prerequisite: BIO 164  
    Competencies
    1. Examine the stages of tooth development both morphologically and physiologically
      1.  Know the components of the tooth germ and it will produce
      2. Differentiate the mineralization processes of enamel, dentin and cementum.
    2. Assess Histological Development
      1. Contrast the histological development and composition of enamel with that of dentin and cementum
      2. Compare the histological development and composition of dentin with enamel and cementum
      3. Contrast the histological development and composition of cementum with that of enamel and dentin.
    3. Evaluate the periodontal ligament
      1. Differentiate between the cellular and fibrous components of the pulp and periodontal ligament
      2. Analyze the changes that occur within the pulp, enamel, dentin, and the periodontal ligament during aging
    4. Demonstrate the knowledge of cellular histology
    5. Evaluate the histology and development of the oral cavity
      1. Examine the histology of the oral mucous membrane
      2. Differentiate the cellular and ductal components of the major salivary glands
      3. Synthesize the histological development of the fibrous and bony components of the temporomandibular joint
    6. Assess embryological development
      1. Differentiate histologically the pre-eruptive and post eruptive phases of tooth movement
      2. Synthesize the embryological and histological development of the maxilla and mandible
      3. Analyze the embryological development of the oral cavity
      4. Contrast normal versus abnormal embryological development of the oral structures

  
  • DHY 133 - Pharmacology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The study of drugs and their action on living tissue including their use as an aid in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease or to control or improve any physiological or pathological condition.
    Prerequisite: CHM 132 , DHY 114 , DHY 181 , DHY 182  
    Competencies
     

    1. Demonstrate behavior congruent with the American Dental Hygienists? Association Code of Ethics
      1. Demonstrate accountability and responsibility for own professional behavior and development
      2. Demonstrate accountability and responsibility reflecting professional values.
      3. Demonstrate professional behavior by being on time for class.
    2. Discuss the history of pharmacology
    3. Describe the role of pharmacology in the dental hygiene process of care
    4. Define the ways in which drugs are named and the significance of each
      1. Outline the procedures for drug development and evaluation of drug safety
      2. State the purpose of the Nuremburg code and the current Institutional Review Boards
    5. Identify the four phases of clinical evaluation in drug approval and the five schedules of drugs
    6. Describe the elements of a drug prescription
      1. State the necessities for the dental hygienist?s understanding of the basics of prescription writing.
      2. Name those persons who may write prescriptions
      3. Recognize units of measure for the:
    7. Recount reliable sources of information about drugs
      1. Name the three classes of drug action
      2. Identify the log dose-effect curve and distinguish between potency and efficacy
      3. Recognize factors which cause variations of individual response to a drug
    8. Compare the differences between pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics.
      1. Describe the drug-receptor interaction and types of drug receptors.
      2. Differentiate dose, potency, and efficacy in the context of the actions of drugs
      3. Explain the pharmacologic effect of a drug and factors that cause variations in individual response.
      4. Discuss the major steps in pharmacokinetics: absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion
      5. Summarize the various routes of drug administration
      6. Distinguish between a loading dose and a maintenance dose
    9. Define an adverse drug reaction and differentiate among the five categories of reactions: cytotoxic, drug-drug, drug-food, drug-disease, and idiosyncratic
      1. Distinguish between local and systemic effects of drug administration
      2. Distinguish between enteral and parenteral routes of drug administration and uses for each
      3. State how the effects of a drug can be recognized
      4. Identify three factors which influence a drug’s passage across cell membranes
      5. Define:
      6. Define absorption and factors influencing drug absorption
      7. Define distribution of drugs through
      8. Recall three mechanisms of drug action
      9. Recognize drug biotransformation and excretion mechanisms
    10. Describe actions dental hygienists should take to avoid adverse drug reactions in the patients they treat
      1. Name the factors that alter a drug’s effect
      2. State the most accurate suggestion for determining children’s dosage
    11. Review the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
      1. Describe the neurophysiology of nerve stimulus transmission
      2. Elaborate on the autonomic nervous system, including functional organization and neurotransmitters.
    12. Discuss the pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, contraindications, and dental considerations of cholinergic agents
    13. Discuss the pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, contraindications, and dental considerations of anticholinergic agents
    14. Discuss the pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, contraindications, and dental considerations of adrenergic agents
    15. Explain adrenergic and adrenergic-receptor blocking agents
      1. State the necessities for the dental hygienist understanding the basics of prescription writing.
      2. Name those persons who may write prescriptions
      3. Recognize units of measure for the
      4. Recognize and translate common abbreviations used in prescription writing
      5. Identify parts of the prescription
    16. Review the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
      1. Describe the neurophysiology of nerve stimulus transmission
      2. Elaborate upon the autonomic nervous system, including functional organization and neuron-transmitters
    17. Describe nociception
    18. Explain the differences in mechanism of action of opioid and nonopioid analgesics
      1. Cholinergic agents and their
      2. Anticholinergic agents and their
      3. Adrenergic drugs and their
      4. Adrenergic blocking agents and their
    19. Discuss commonly used pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of odontogenic and orofacial pain including
      1. the primary line of treatment
      2. secondary line of treatment
      3. tertiary line of treatment
      4. adverse drug events
    20. Understand the concept of bacteriocidal versus bacteriostatic antibacterial drugs.
      1. Three ways in which analgesics work
      2. The classification of nonnarcotic analgesics
      3. The salicylates with regard to
      4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or drugs
      5. Acetaminophen:
      6. Drugs used to treat gout
      7. Narcotic analgesic agents with regard to
      8. Specific agents and their
    21. Understand the pharmacodynamics of the following antibacterial drugs
      1. bacterial cell wall inhibitors
      2. inhibitors of DNA synthesis and repair
      3. inhibitors of translation and transcription
    22. Discuss bacterial resistance to anitibiotic drug therapy and factors that influence its development
      1. Identify three types of infective dental processes
      2. Explain situations in which the dental hygienist may encounter the use of anti-infective agents
      3. State the goal of chemotherapy of infectious diseases
      4. Define the following
      5. Identify general principles of antimicrobial therapy and considerations for
      6. List indications for antimicrobial agents
      7. Recall general adverse effects
    23. Identify antibacterial agent and the dosage regimen for the treatment of odontogenic infections
    24. Summarize the concept and practice of antibiotic prophylaxis in dentistry.
      1. Identify indications for and describe the prophylactic antibiotic regimen for TJR patents.
      2. Identify indications for and describe the prophylactic antibiotic regimen to prevent infective endocarditis in susceptible clients
      3. List dental procedures which require and which do not require antibiotic prophylaxis in TJR or IE susceptible clients
    25. Name several types of antifungal agents and discuss their indications in dentistry and potential adverse reactions
    26. Discuss the treatment of herpes simplex.
      1. List reasons why the management of anxiety is important in the delivery of patient care
      2. Recall the two components of cognitive appraisal according to Lozarus and variables associated with each
      3. Identify “automatic thoughts” and their characteristics
      4. Name fears associated with dental treatment and their sources
      5. Relate techniques and tools utilized in patient anxiety assessment
      6. Relate pain control modalities available for dental patients and their purposes
      7. Distinguish between
      8. Discuss normal sleep patterns, drugs which alter sleep patterns, and side effects from these alterations
      9. Recall benzodiazephines with regard to
      10. Briefly discuss buspirone
      11. Identify barbiturate drugs with regard to
      12. Identify nonbarbiturate sedative-hypnotics and their
      13. Identify centrally acting muscle relaxants and their
      14. Discuss sedative-analgesic combinations with regard to
      15. Review special considerations and cautions when using antianxiety agents
    27. Describe the various drugs and drug combinations used to treat acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
      1. State the action of general anesthetics
      2. Define the term balanced anesthesia and
      3. Recall four factors which influence the choice of a drug for anesthesia
      4. Describe preparation of the patient for general anesthetic administration
      5. Name the methods of administering a general anesthetic
      6. Identify the patient responses characteristic of each of the
      7. State the goals of surgical anesthesia
      8. Identify adverse reactions encountered with the administration of general anesthetics
      9. Categorize the classes of general anesthetics
      10. Relate physical factors and the process to achieve inhalation anesthesia
      11. Define minimum alveolar concentration and state its use
      12. Identify pharmacological effects, clinical application, advantages and disadvantages for
      13. Define “dissociative anesthesia” and its
      14. Discuss the use of opioids in conjunction with general anesthesia
      15. Define “neuroleptanalgesia” and its
      16. Recall the role of benzodiazephines in anesthesia
      17. Recall characteristics of an ideal local anesthetic
      18. Classify the local anesthetics chemically
      19. Discuss local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors with regard to
      20. Name the ingredients in a local anesthetic solution
      21. Distinguish between infiltration, field block, and nerve block injections
      22. Identify names, pharmacologic and clinical effects, and duration of action for
      23. Recall suggestions for choosing an anesthetic agent
      24. Identify agents for and application of topical anesthetics
      25. Prepare to administer local anesthesia utilizing the Handbook of Local Anesthesia by Malamed
      26. Practice administration of local anesthesia for the following injections: supraperiosteal, anterior superior alveolar nerve block, infraorbital nerve block, middle superior alveolar nerve block, posterior superior alveolar nerve block, greater palatine ne
      27. Demonstrate proper record keeping on patient chart following administration of local anesthesia
      28. Recall that the local anesthetic must be ordered by the dentist and the administration performed under direct supervision
    28. Explain the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacologic effects, and adverse reactions of local anesthetics.
      1. Recall characteristics of an ideal local anesthetic
      2. Classify the local anesthetics chemically
      3. Discuss local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors with regard to:
      4. Name the ingredients in a local anesthetic solution
      5. Distinguish between infiltration, field block, and nerve block injections.
      6. Identify names, pharmacologic and clinical effects, and duration of action for:
      7. Recall suggestions for choosing an anesthetic agent
      8. Identify agents for and applciation of topical anesthetics
      9. Prepare to administer local anesthesia utilizing the Handbook of Local Anesthesia by Malamed
      10. Practice administration of local anesthesia for the following injections: supraperiosteal, anterior superior alveolar nerve block, infraorbital nerve block, middle superior alveolar nerve block, posterior superior alveolar nerve block, greater palatine ne
      11. Demonstrate proper record keeping on patient chart following administration of local anesthesia
      12. Recall that the local anesthetic must be ordered by the dentist and the administration performed under direct supervision
    29. Summarize the history of general anesthetics in dentistry
      1. Discuss the indications and contraindications for use of this conscious sedation modality
      2. Discuss the complications associated with use
      3. Discuss the signs and symptoms of the baseline level of conscious sedation
      4. List safety features associated with gas cylinders and the gas machine
      5. Calculate the percentage of nitrous oxide and the percentage of oxygen from the tidal volume to be recorded on the patient?s dental record
      6. Safely administer nitrous oxide oxygen sedation by using titration to induce the proper level of sedation, monitoring the patient during analgesia, and oxygenating the patient at the completion of the sedation period
      7. Recall that this procedure must be ordered by the dentist and performed under direct supervision
    30. Describe how general anesthesia works and the stages involved
      1. Define cardiovascular disease
      2. Discuss implications of cardiovascular disease in the following situations
      3. Define terms describing actions of drugs on the cardiovascular disease
      4. Review pathophysiology of congestive heart failure
      5. Identify cardiac glycosides with regard to
      6. Review the mechanism of cardiac rhythm
      7. Identify antiarrhythmic agents and their
      8. Recall symptoms, cause, and precipitating factors in angina pectoris
      9. Identify antianginal drugs with regard to
      10. Define hypertension and its symptoms
      11. Categorize hypertensive disease
      12. Identify antihypertensive agents and their
      13. Name antihyperlipidemic drugs and their
      14. Review the clotting mechanism
      15. State the purpose of and indications for anticoagulant therapy
      16. Identify action, uses, administration and adverse effects of
      17. Recall measures for dental patients on anticoagulant drug therapy
      18. Relate the term “epilepsies” and etiologies
      19. Review types of epileptic seizures and characteristics of each
      20. Discuss the mechanism of action of anticonvulsant drugs and their general adverse effects
      21. Identify anticonvulsive agents with regard to
      22. List procedures for dental treatment of epileptic patients
    31. Name and describe several types of general anesthetics and their adverse effects.
      1. Discuss the role of drug therapy in psychiatric disorders
      2. List factors in assessing a patient’s need for drug therapy
      3. Identify cautions you should use when treating patients with mental disorders
      4. Identify antipsychotic agents with regard to
      5. Classify types of depression
      6. Identify antidepressant drugs and their
      7. Recall MAOIs with regard to
      8. Recall names of atypical antidepressants plus their advantages and disadvantages
      9. Name the drug used in treatment of manic depressive illness and its
      10. State reasons you should be aware of adrenocorticosteroid agents
      11. Review the natural mechanism of release of adrencorticosteroid agents
      12. Classify adrenocorticosteroids
      13. Identify glucocorticoids with regard to
      14. Review pituitary hormones and their functions
      15. Discuss thyroid hormones and
      16. Recall pancreatic hormones and diabetes mellitus
      17. Identify antidiabetic agents
      18. Review female sex hormones and their purposes
      19. Identify oral contraceptives with regard to
      20. Name the male sex hormones and their uses
      21. Identify clomiphene and its
      22. Discuss the use of antineoplastic drugs
      23. Identify mechanisms of action for these agents
      24. Identify the classification of antineoplastic agents, drugs in each category, and their uses
      25. State why adverse effects occur as well as early and principal adverse effects
      26. Outline oral care protocol for patients receiving chemotherapy
      27. Identify diseases associated with the respiratory system
      28. Identify each of the respiratory drug groups with regard to
      29. Relate dental concerns for the patient with respiratory problems
      30. Identify gastrointestinal drugs and their
      31. Discuss the following
      32. State the role of drugs as part of emergency treatment
      33. Recall causes, signs and symptoms, and treatment of potential dental office emergencies
      34. Identify equipment and drugs included in an emergency kit for the dental office
      35. Identify uses and actions for drugs commonly used in an emergency situation
    32. Discuss the use of nitrous oxide in dentistry, including how it works, the pharmacological effects, adverse reactions, and contraindications using Clark and Bunnick, Handbook of Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen Sedation as your primary text
      1. Describe pain and anxiety management in dentistry
      2. Recall the physical properties and pharmacokinetics of N2O.
      3. Describe the manufacturing and packaging of N2O/O2.
      4. Describe the delivery systems available for N2O/O2 delivery in the dental office.
      5. Recall the steps from the protocol list necessary for client assessment, preparation, N2O/O2 titration, and complete recovery from analgesia.
      6. Identify the signs and symptoms of appropriate minimal sedation and oversedation
      7. Identify potential biohazards for healthcare personnel associated with chronic exposure to N2O.
      8. Identify ethical and legal considerations regarding N2O administration.
      9. Identify all components of the DMACC nitrous-oxide-oxygen equipment.
      10. Demonstrate proper documentation of nitrous oxide-oxygen delivery to a DMACC client
    33. Describe anticaries, antigingivitis, and desensitizing agents used in dentistry and their application.
      1. Define the types of drug interactions and the best means for preventing problems of this nature
      2. Discuss mechanisms of drug interactions, including
      3. Identify dental drug interactions in the following areas
    34. Review common oral mucous membrane lesions and conditions including signs, symptoms and treatments
    35. Compare the indications and effects of the available drugs used to treat diabetes mellitus.
      1. Explain the management of diabetic dental clients
      2. Describe the various drug-drug interactions of diabetic medications
      3. dental treatment of the alcoholic patient
      4. dental treatment of the cocaine-addicted patient
      5. recognizing drug -shoppers
      6. reporting the drug impaired dental health care worker
    36. State the uses for glucoccorticosteriods and the management of clients on these drugs.
    37. List drugs taken for thyroid disorders and state the management of clients taking these drugs
    38. Summarize the components of oral contraceptives and dental concerns.
    39. Summarize the components of hormone replacement therapies and dental concerns.
    40. Chose from a list all drugs that are contraindicated during pregnancy.
    41. Describe the etiology and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disorder and peptic ulcer disease
      1. Explain the differences in treatment between GERD and PUD.
      2. Discuss any contraindications or precautions in dental clients with GI disorders.
    42. Discuss the treatments for constipation and diarrhea
    43. Define the term antiemetic and be able to give examples of them
    44. Briefly define the terms asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
    45. Briefly review the classification of asthma
    46. List the different types of medications available to treat the different types of cough.
    47. Define the terms antitussive, expectorant, and decongestant.
    48. Discuss the pathophysiology, prevalence and risk factors associated with asthma and COPD.
    49. Review the different classes of medications used to treat asthma including mechanism of action, adverse reactions, and drug interactions
    50. Discuss the dental concerns associated with cardiovascular disease and how metabolic equivalents can be used to assess risks.
    51. Describe hypertension and the stepped-up approach to treating it.
    52. List the different classes of antihypertensive medications including pharmacologic effects and adverse reactions
    53. Define the term angina and review the classes of medications used to treat it
    54. Describe the factors that may place one at risk for hyperlipidemic disorders.
    55. List the categories of drugs used to treat high cholesterol including pharmacologic effects and adverse reactions
    56. Define the term arrhythmia and list its causes
    57. Describe the four classifications of antiarrhythmics and the ADEs and drug interactions associated with them
    58. Briefly review the coagulation process and drugs used to treat coagulopathies.
    59. Describe congestive heart failure and the pharmacologic effects and adverse reactions of cardiac glycosides
    60. List other drugs used to treat congestive heart failure.
    61. Discuss the dental concerns associated with the drugs used to treat cardiovascular disorders
    62. Describe the mechanism of action, interactions, and dental relevance of the benzodiazepines barbiturates, nonbarbituate sedatives and antihistamines used as anxiolytics or sleep aids.
    63. Summarize the mechanism of action, pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and management considerations of the antidepressants.
    64. Summarize the mechanism of action, pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and management considerations of the antipsychotics
    65. Summarize the mechanism of action, pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and management considerations of the drugs used to treat Parkinson Disease
    66. Describe the two categories of seizures and give a brief description of the different classifications of seizure disorders
    67. Summarize the mechanism of action, pharmacologic effects, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and management considerations of the drugs used to treat seizure disorders
    68. Review and council patients on the dental concerns associated with all antiseizure medications
    69. Discuss why people choose herbal products over traditional medicine.
    70. Discuss the federal legislation governing herbal and dietary products.
    71. List several reliable sources of information on supplements
    72. Discuss good manufacturing practices and the standardization of herbal products
    73. Discuss herbal products used in dentistry as well as common alternative dental products and their efficacy
    74. Define antineoplastic agents and discuss their use and adverse drug effects.
      1. Summarize the use, mechanisms of action, and classification of antineoplastic agents
      2. Describe several adverse drug effects associated with antineoplastic agents.
      3. Discuss the dental implications of clients planning to take or actively taking antineoplastic drugs
    75. Define several types of inflammatory arthropathies and gout
      1. Summarize the use, mechanisms of action, and classifications of drugs used to treat arthropathies and gout
      2. Describe considerations in the dental hygiene management of clients with arthropathy
    76. Define addiction, dependence, tolerance, and abstinence syndrome in relation to drug abuse.
    77. Identify several types of central nervous system depressants and stimulants that are commonly abused.
    78. Describe the three stages of substance abuse treatment
    79. Describe dental hygiene management for the substance-abusing client.
    80. Discuss ways in which the dental health care worker can identify clients or colleagues who may be abusing drugs

  
  • DHY 141 - General & Oral Pathology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Basic concepts of disease process and the oral manifestations of inflammation, degenerative changes, neoplasms and developmental anomalies of the oral cavity.
    Prerequisite: BIO 164 , DHY 121 , DHY 114  
    Competencies
    1. Differentiate between lesions and normal tissue
      1. Define each of the terms in the vocabulary list
      2. List and define the eight diagnostic categories that contribute to the diagnostic process
      3. Name a diagnostic category and give an example of a lesion, anomaly, or condition for which this category greatly contributes to the diagnosis
      4. List and describe the clinical characteristics and identify a clinical picture of rhomboid glossitis and ectopic geographic tongue
      5. Describe the clinical and histologic differences between leukoedema and linea alba
    2. Examine the process of inflammation and repair and our body’s ability to heal
      1. Define words listed in vocabulary section
      2. List the five classic signs of inflammation that occur locally at the site of inflammation
      3. List three systemic signs of inflammation
      4. List the types of white blood cells that participate in inflammation and describe how each is involved
      5. Describe the differences between acute and chronic inflammation
      6. Define and contrast hyperplasia, hypertrophy and atrophy
      7. Describe and contrast attrition, abrasion, and erosion
      8. Describe the pattern of erosion seen in bulimia
      9. Describe the relationship between bruxism and abrasion
      10. Describe the difference between a mucocele and a ranula
      11. Describe the clinical features, radiographic appearance, and histologic appearance of a periapical abscess, a periapical granuloma, and a periapical (radicular) cyst
      12. Describe and contrast internal and external tooth resorption
    3. Describe the immune reaction
      1. Define each of the words in the vocabulary list
      2. Describe the primary difference between the immune response and the inflammatory response
      3. List and describe the two main types of lymphocytes, their origins, and their activities
      4. List the activities of macrophages
      5. Describe, using the cells involved, the difference between the humoral immune response and the cell-mediated immune response
      6. Describe the difference between passive and active immunity
      7. List and describe four types of hypersensitivity reactions, and give an example of each
      8. Define autoimmunity, and describe how it results in disease
      9. Describe and contrast the clinical features of each of the three types of aphthous ulcers
      10. Describe and compare the clinical features of urticaria, angioedema, contact mucositis, fixed drug eruption, and erythema multiforme
      11. Describe the clinical and histologic features of lichen planus
      12. Name the two cells that histologically characterize angerhans cell disease. Describe the acute disseminated form, chronic disseminated form, and chronic localized form and state the names that have traditionally been used for each of these conditions
      13. Describe the clinical features of desquamative gingivitis, and list three diseases in which it may occur
    4. Recognize infectious diseases and compare specific infections
      1. State the difference between the inflammatory and immune response to infection
      2. Describe the factors that allow opportunistic infection to develop
      3. List two examples of opportunistic infections that can occur in the oral cavity
      4. For each of the following infectious diseases, name the organism causing it, list the route or routes of transmission of the organism and the oral manifestations of the disease, and describe how the diagnosis is made; impetigo, tuberculosis, actinomycosis
      5. Describe the relationship between streptococcal tonsillitis and pharyngitis and the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for dental hygiene treatment
      6. List and describe four forms of oral candidiasis
      7. Describe the clinical features of herpes labialis
      8. Describe the clinical features of recurrent intraoral herpes simplex infection, and compare them with the clinical features of minor aphthous ulcers
      9. Describe the clinical characteristics of herpes zoster when it affects the skin of the face and oral mucosa
      10. List two oral infectious diseases for which a cytologic smear may assist in confirming the diagnosis
      11. List four diseases associated with the Epstein-Barr virus
      12. List two diseases caused by coxsackieviruses that have oral manifestations
      13. Describe the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, including initial infection and the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
      14. List and describe the clinical appearance of five oral manifestations of HIV infection
    5. Distinguish and define developmental disorders
      1. Define each of the words in the vocabulary list
      2. Define inherited disorders
      3. Recognize developmental disorders of the dentition
      4. Describe the embryonic development of the face, oral cavity, and teeth
      5. Define each of the developmental anomalies discussed in this chapter
      6. Identify (clinically, radiographically, or both) the developmental anomalies discussed in this chapter
      7. Distinguish between intraosseous cysts and extraosseous cysts
      8. Describe the differences between odontogenic and nonodonogenic cysts
      9. Name four odontogenic cysts that are intraosseous
      10. Name two odontogenic cysts that are extraosseous
      11. Name four nonodontogenic cysts that are intraosseous
      12. Name four nonodontogenic cysts that are found in the soft tissues of the head, neck, and oral region
      13. List and define three anomalies that affect the number of teeth
      14. List and define two anomalies that affect the size of teeth
      15. List and define five anomalies that affect the shape of teeth
      16. Define and identify each of the following anomalies affecting tooth eruption: impacted teeth, embedded teeth, and ankylosed teeth
      17. Identify the diagnostic process that contributes most significantly to the final diagnosis of each developmental anomaly discussed in this chapter
    6. Define and describe genetic anomalies
      1. Define each of the vocabulary words
      2. State the purpose of mitosis
      3. State the purpose of meiosis
      4. Explain what is meant by the Lyon hypothesis and give an example of its clinical significance
      5. Explain what is meant by a gross chromosomal abnormality and give three examples of syndromes that result from gross chromosomal abnormalities
      6. List the four inheritance patterns
      7. Explain what is meant by X-linked inheritance
      8. State the inheritance pattern and describe the oral manifestations and, if appropriate, the characteristic facies for each of the following: cyclic neutropenia, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS), cherubism, chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-van Creveld syn
      9. State the inheritance pattern, the oral or facial manifestations, and the type and location of the malignancy associated with each of the follwing syndromes: Gardner syndrome; nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Grolin syndrome); multiple mucosal neurom
      10. State the location and malignant potential of the intestinal polyps in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Gardner syndrome
      11. List the four types of amclogencsis impefecta
      12. Briefly compare and contrast dentinogenesis imperfecta, amelogenesis imperfecta, and dentin dysplasia, including the inheritance patterns, the clinical manifestations, and the radiographic appearance of each
    7. Describe the dynamics of circulation and pathologic disturbances that can occur in the human body
      1. Discuss the common causes of edema of tissues and spaces
      2. Explain the etiology and pathogenesis of left heart failure
      3. Explain the etiology and pathogenesis of right heart failure
      4. List common causes of hemorrhage based on interference with the mechanisms of clotting
      5. Define hypertension
      6. Define the subtypes of hypertension
      7. Discuss the theories of pathogenesis of hypertension
      8. List the types of antihypertensive drugs and match them to their actions
      9. List the common morbid sequelae of hypertension
      10. Identify the causes of shock
      11. Describe the cause and pathogenesis of syncope
      12. List the major and minor risk factors for atherosclerosis
      13. Explain the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerosis and correlate them to risk factors
      14. Differentiate atherosclerosis from arteriosclerosis by cause and by sequelae
      15. Define thrombosis and embolism
      16. List common factors which predispose to thrombosis
      17. List the usual and morbid sequelae of thrombosis and embolism
      18. Explain passive congestion
      19. Predict the routes of travel of emboli of venous and arterial origin
      20. Define ischemic heart disease and distinguish the subtypes
      21. Recognize valvular heart conditions which predispose to bacterial endocarditis
      22. Select conditions of heart valves which should be premedicated before dental treatment
      23. Define ischemia and infarction of tissues and list the common sequelae
    8. Compare neoplastic to normal cell growth
      1. Define each of the vocabulary words
      2. Explain the difference between a benign tumor and a malignant tumor
      3. Define leukoplakia and erythroplakia
      4. Define the following neoplasms, describe the clinical features of each, and explain how they are treated: papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, pleomorphic adenomia, monomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, m
    9. Describe and define various bone lesions and disorders of the maxilla and mandible
      1. Define benign fibro-osseous lesions
      2. Define dysplasia as it relates to bone diseases and differentiate the term from epithelial dysplasia
      3. Describe the clinical, radiographic, and microscopic features of periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia
      4. Compare and contrast periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia
      5. List the benign fibro-osseous lesions that occur in the jawbones
      6. Compare and contrast monostotic fibrous dysplasia with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia
      7. Compare and contrast the radiographic appearance, histologic appearance, and treatment of fibrous dysplasia of the jaws with those of ossifying fibroma of the jaws
      8. Compare and contrast the three types of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia
      9. Describe the histologic appearance of Paget disease of bone and describe its clinical and radiographic appearance when the maxilla or mandible is involved
      10. State the cause of osteomalacia and rickets
    10. Describe the etiology, and pathogensis of dental caries and dental pulpal disorders
      1. List the common etiologic factors which contribute to dental caries
      2. Compare and contrast the pathogenesis of enamel, dentinal and cemental caries
      3. Explain the role of saliva in caries control
      4. Compare the clinical signs and symptoms of reversible and irreversible pulpitis
      5. Describe the pathogenesis of periapical abscess, cyst, and granulomas
      6. List important and morbid sequelae of periapical infection and inflammation
      7. Explain the interrelationship of periapical pathoses to each other
      8. Recognize the appearance and significance of a parulis
    11. Describe physical and chemical injuries to the hard and soft dental tissues
      1. Define factitial and iatrogenic injury
      2. Distinguish attrition, erosion and abrasion by cause and clinical features
      3. Recognize dental injuries suggestive of perimyolysis
      4. Discuss common causes of resorption of teeth
      5. List common extrinsic and intrinsic stains of teeth
      6. Relate common forms of physical injury to the clinical presentation of those conditions
      7. Recognize common clinical lesions suggestive of chronic mucosal injury
      8. Use appropriate questioning to determine or rule out the cause of suspect injurious lesions
      9. Refer lesions that are not readily explainable for further diagnosis
      10. Recognize the significance and treatment of pyogenic granuloma, epulis granulomatosum, and fibroma
      11. List common denture-related tissue injuries and discuss the etiology and treatment of each
      12. Recognize aspirin burn, dilantin hyperplasia and amalgam tattoo based on clinical appearance and history
      13. Distinguish certain oral lesions which are caused by allergic reactions systemic medicine or topical agents
      14. Recognize that cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy will likely predispose to numerous oral morbid conditions
      15. Help prevent and manage oral lesions in patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy
      16. Help prevent osteoradionecrosis
      17. Use special regimen in patients who have radiation xerostomia to prevent caries and periodontal infection
    12. Analyze the oral manifestations of systemic diseases and nutritional deficiencies
      1. Define each of the vocabulary words
      2. Describe the difference between gigantism and acromegaly and list the physical characteristics of each
      3. State the oral manifestations of hyperthyroidism
      4. Describe the difference between primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism
      5. List the oral manifestations that occur in the uncontrolled diabetic state
      6. List the major clinical characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes
      7. Define Addison disease and describe the changes that occur on the skin and oral mucosa in a patient with Addison disease
      8. Compare and contrast the cause, laboratory findings, and oral manifestations of each of the following: iron-deficiency anemia, pernicious anemia, folic acid deficiency, and vitamin B deficiency
      9. Compare and contrast the definitions and oral manifestations of thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia
      10. Define celiac sprue
      11. Describe the difference between primary and secondary aplastic anemia
      12. Describe the oral manifestations of polycythemia
      13. Explain why platelets may be deficient in polycythemia vera
      14. Describe the most characteristic oral manifestations of agranulocytosis
      15. Describe and contrast acute and chronic leukemia
      16. State the purpose of each of the following laboratory tests: platelet count, bleeding time, prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and international normalized ratio (INR)
      17. List two causes of thrombocytopenic purpura
      18. Describe the oral manifestations of thrombocytopenia and nonthrombocytopenic purpura
      19. Define hemophilia and describe it oral manifestations and treatment
      20. Describe the difference between primary and secondary immunodeficiency
      21. Describe the oral problems that would be expected to occur in a patient with radiation-induced xerostomia
      22. List two drugs that are associated with gingival enlargement
    13. Analyze diseases affecting the temporomandibular joint
      1. Label the following on a diagram of temporomandibular joint: glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, articular disk, mandibular condyle, joint capsule, and superior belly of the lateral pterygoid muscle
      2. State the function of the muscles of mastication
      3. State three factors that have been implicated in the cause of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), and three questions that would be appropriate to ask of a patient suspected of having a TMD
      4. List at least two symptoms that are suggestive of temporomandibular dysfunction
      5. State the function of radiographs in the evaluation of a patient with symptoms suggestive of temporomandibular dysfunction
      6. List five types of TMDs
      7. List and describe the two main categories of treatment of TMDs
      8. State the names of one benign and one malignant tumor that may affect the temporomandibular joint area

  
  • DHY 161 - Oral Radiology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Lecture includes radiation physics; biological effects; radiation safety and protection; properties of x-ray film and digital receptors; techniques of exposing, processing, mounting and evaluating images; asepsis and legal and ethical responsibilities involved in performing radiographic procedures on dental patients of all ages and physical characteristics. Laboratory experiences are structured to enhance didactic competencies and to develop skills in exposing, processing, mounting, evaluating and interpreting radiographic images, as well as promoting clinical competence and professional demeanor.
    Corequisite: DEA 256  and DEA 507  or DHY 114  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss historic contributions associated with the discovery and growth of X-radiation.
      1. Summarize the importance of dental radiographs.
      2. List the uses of dental radiographs.
      3. Summarize the discovery of x-radiation.
      4. Recognize the pioneers in dental x-radiation and their contributions.
      5. List the highlights in the history of x-ray equipment, film, and techniques.
    2. Interpret the fundamental concepts of atomic and molecular structure.
      1. List the three states of matter and the properties of each.
      2. Identify the structure of the atom.
      3. Define molecule and discuss how molecules are formed.
      4. Describe the process of ionization.
    3. Discuss the nature of radiation.
      1. Indicate the various types of radiation in the electromagnetic spectrum.
      2. Describe the nature of electromagnetic wave forms.
      3. Define crest, wavelength and frequency.
      4. List the properties of x-rays.
    4. Recognize the components of the x-ray machine, their functions, and their controlling factors.
      1. Describe the main components of an x-ray tube and their functions.
      2. Identify the electric currents of an x-ray tube and their effect on the emitted radiation.
      3. Understand the types of x-rays that are produced.
      4. Explain interactions of x-radiation and matter
    5. Explain the characteristics of dentally used radiation and how these affect radiographic image production.
      1. List the three characteristics of a radiation beam.
      2. Describe how kilovoltage, milliamperage, time, and distance can alter an x-ray beam. 
      3. Recall the Inverse Square Law.
    6. Examine Radiation Biology and the harmful effects of ionizing radiation on human tissues.    
      1. Describe the mechanisms, theories, and sequence of radiation injury.
      2. Identify the factors that determine radiation injury.
      3. Discuss short-term and long-term effects as well as the somatic and genetic effects of radiation exposure.
      4. Recall the effects of radiation exposure on cells, tissues, and organs.  
      5. Identify the relative sensitivity of a given tissue to x-radiation.
      6. Define the units of measurement used in radiation exposure.
      7. Describe sources of radiation exposure.
      8. Estimate risk exposure in dental radiography.
      9. Summarize the concepts associated with Radiation Protection.
      10. Practice all principles of radiation safety applicable to exposure of radiographs.               
      11. State what ALARA stands for.
    7. Demonstrate the use of image receptors and accessories.
      1. Identify the various types and sizes of image receptors and positioning devices available for use in dental radiography. 
      2. Describe the composition of a film packets and the use of each component material                               
      3. Define latent image formation
      4. Discuss the function and composition of grids.
      5. Describe proper receptor storage and protection.
    8. Examine categories of radiographic image characteristics and the factors that influence them. 
      1. Differentiate between radiolucent and radiopaque areas on a radiographic image   
      2. Describe a diagnostic dental radiograph.
      3. List two visual characteristics of a radiographic image and the factors that influence them.                         
      4. Describe a step-wedge.
      5. List three geometric characteristics of a radiographic image and the factors that influence them.  
      6. Define focal spot, penumbra, resolution, target-film distance, and object film distance.    
    9. Relate proper processing of x-ray film.
      1. List important features of a darkroom
      2. Identify darkroom equipment.
      3. List and indicate the purpose of chemicals used in creating radiographic images.  
      4. Compare steps for proper manual and automatic processing of films
      5. Identify common darkroom errors on radiographs.
      6. Describe methods to prevent errors.
    10. Assess appearances of normal radiographic landmarks, artifacts, and shadows.
      1. Determine radiopaque and radiolucent substances.
      2. Identify restorative materials on the radiograph
      3. Describe variations in the radiographic appearance of normal landmarks and suggest reasons for such variations.   
    11. Produce diagnostically useful images.
      1. Identify and assemble the parts of receptor holding devices.
      2. Explain the purpose of the various types of bitewing surveys.
      3. Compare the paralleling and bisecting techniques.
      4. Assemble properly the armamentarium required for the chosen exposure technique which minimizes patient discomfort and anxiety.
      5. Place and expose radiographs according to identified criteria.
      6. Identify film positioning errors.
    12. Discuss the importance of communication in the operator-patient relationship.
      1. Describe the influence of the operator’s attitude and appearance on patient treatment.
      2. Relate procedures indicated for special need’s patients.
      3. Recall answers to common questions concerning x-rays asked by patients.
    13. Employ a systematic approach in radiographic interpretation.
      1. Recognize and evaluate radiographic exposures which meet established criteria.
      2. Label images properly with the date, patient’s full name or identification number, and the operator’s name.
      3. Describe methods to improve or modify the procedure or final product if the identified criteria are not met.
      4. Relate methods of prevention or correction of previously identified exposure, handling and processing errors.
    14. Demonstrate proficiency in the fundamental use of digital radiography.
      1. Review advantages and disadvantages of digital imaging systems.
      2. Describe the two types or radiographic digital imaging
      3. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of receptors.
      4. Describe and demonstrate infection control procedures that should be used with digital receptors.
      5. Discuss legal issues that surround the use of digital imaging technology
    15. Perform panoramic radiography and other extraoral radiographic techniques with instruction in interpretation and component parts as appropriate.
      1. Describe proper patient positioning, head alignment, and rationale for the extra oral radiographic exposures.
      2. Recall the rationale for choosing screened or non-screened receptors.
      3. Relate steps in loading, cleaning and caring for the cassettes and screens.
      4. Demonstrate steps in operation of the Orthoralix 8500 machine.
      5. Explain the differences between tomography, computed tomography, and cone-beam computed tomography, and describe their roles in oral health care.
    16. Evaluate radiographic manifestations of pathologic conditions of jaws including benign neoplasms and malignancies.
      1. Incorporate case history, clinical examination and any existing films.
      2. Use an appropriate viewing environment.
      3. Discriminate normal versus abnormal conditions.
    17. Assess developmental abnormalities and basic disease processes of teeth and supporting structures.
      1. Identify and classify dental caries on a radiograph.
      2. Recall factors that would affect caries interpretation and how they appear.
      3. Describe radiographic and clinical signs and symptoms of infections of periapical tissues.
      4. Discuss the importance of both clinical and radiographic examinations in the diagnosis of periodontal disease.
      5. Identify bone loss classifications and recognize their radiographic appearances.                    
      6. Determine if radiographic evidence is of diagnostic quality.
      7. List common dental anomalies and their distinctive clinical and radiographic features.
      8. Recognize radiographic features of regressive changes in the dentition.
    18. Utilize supplementary techniques and alternate imaging modalities for special needs patients.
      1. Use the exposure technique which minimizes patient discomfort and anxiety.
      2. Relate receptor and tube-head placement for disto-oblique exposure techniques.
      3. Recall methods used to localize an object in the oral cavity.
      4. Recognize appropriate use of film duplicating.
      5. List steps in film duplicating.
    19. Evaluate legal and ethical issues related to dental radiography.
      1. Explain quality assurance procedures.
      2. Assess patients’ radiographic needs prior to exposing any radiographs.
      3. Adhere to accepted guidelines for prescribing and exposing radiographs.
      4. Review all available radiographs of each patient for interpretation of presence or absence of disease.
      5. Record radiographic findings in the patient record.

     

  
  • DHY 170 - Principles of Dental Hygiene

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Basic principles of clinical dental hygiene are introduced. In the practicum portion, we will look at the etiology of deposits and their effect on oral tissue, along with the theory and instrumentation techniques in deposit removal.
    Prerequisite: BIO 164 ,  CHM 122 .
    Corequisite: DHY 171  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate the ability to log on to a DMACC computer, access and utilize information on the DMACC network, access the Internet and search the Internet for information
    2. Describe the tools and demonstrate techniques for self care biofilm remov­al
      1. List tools needed for a personal oral care program
      2. State the purpose and demonstrate the use of a disclosing agent
      3. Describe the preferred design of a toothbrush
      4. Relate toothbrushing instructions with regard to: grasp of brush; sequence of brushing; count system vs. clock system for amount of brushing
      5. State the purpose for the Bass method of toothbrushing
      6. Describe the type of toothbrush to be used with the Bass technique
      7. Describe and demonstrate the Bass technique with regard to; bristle placement; amount of pressure; motion
      8. Describe and demonstrate the rolling stroke technique with regard to bristle placement and motion.
      9. State the purpose for the rolling stroke technique
      10. State the benefit derived from using a fluoride dentifrice
      11. State the purpose for tongue brushing
      12. Outline and demonstrate the procedure for tongue brushing
      13. Name the types of floss
      14. Relate and demonstrate the techniques for utilizing dental floss
      15. State the purpose of re-examining the mouth after toothbrushing and flossing
      16. State when the toothbrush should be replaced
    3. Discuss professional responsibilities of the dental hygienist and dental hygiene services for patient care
      1. Adhere to DMACC and Dental Hygiene Program policies
      2. Define “the dental hygienist.”
      3. Name the three basic categories of service performed by the dental hygienist
      4. Differentiate between primary and secondary prevention
      5. Define the term “dental hygiene care.”
      6. Identify the relationship between educational and clinical dental hygiene services
      7. Recall the name of the founder of dental hygiene and the year of the first course study
      8. Recognize the original concept of dental hygiene services and how this concept expanded
      9. Discuss some modern definitions and philosophies of dental hy­giene
      10. Define a paradigm and distinguish it from a conceptual model
      11. Compare Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory with nursing’s human needs theory
      12. Identify and define the four central paradigm concepts for the dental hygiene human needs conceptual model
      13. Define the human needs related to dental hygiene care and describe their implications for dental hygienists
      14. For each of the identified human needs, plan dental hygiene intervention to help meet the deficiency.
      15. Discuss the relationship of the human need theory to the dental hygiene process of care.
      16. Discuss: planning dental hygience care, the role of the dental hygienist in patient care and modifications in dental hygiene care.
      17. Identify the special practice areas of dentistry and settings for the dental hygienist
      18. Review factors to teach the patient
    4. Recall the components of a client’s personal, dental, and medical history that might influence dental treatment needs.
      1. Systematically collect, analyze, investigate, and record information from a client’s personal, dental and health histories.
      2. Assess health status and determine risks, disease control level and likihood of a medical emergency.
      3. Manage client and practitioner risks.
      4. Identify need for medical consultation.
      5. Collaborate with other healthcare practitioners to develop and individualized dental hygiene care plan.
      6. Recognize implications of client health status for dental hygiene care.
      7. State the specific objective of patient examination as part of diagnostic work-up.
      8. Define: sign and symptom.
      9. Distinguish between: subjective and objective symptoms, and general and pathognomic sysmptoms.
      10. Differentiate among the five types of examinations
      11. Identify the following general methods of examinations: visual; palpation; instrumentation; percussion; and auscultation.
      12. Name three general methods used to obtain a patient history
      13. Outline three alternative appointment procedures for obtaining the history
      14. Recount characteristics of an adequate patient history form
      15. Relate factors included in introducing the history to the patient
      16. Discuss introduction of the form to the patient and limitations of a history
      17. Describe a questionnaire and three categories of questions to be included
      18. Describe the interview with regard to: participants; setting; communication; attitude, and use of a structured form.
      19. Identify advantages and disadvantages for both the questionnaire and interview methods of patient history preparation
      20. Name the three sections to be included in a patient history and give at least three examples of items within each section
      21. State when and for what purpose the patient history should be reviewed
      22. Name the four categories of conditions for immediate evaluation of the patient history and items to be considered for each
      23. Identify conditions which are indications for prophylactic pre­medication
      24. Recall the standard and special regimens for prophylactic antibiotic therapy
      25. Adhere to Federal and State Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act      (HIPAA) privacy policies and procedures
      26. Review factor to teach the patient
    5. Recognize the objectives of effective health communication.
      1. Identify the types of communication relevant to the dental encoun­ter
      2. Recall the skills and attributes necessary for effective communication.
      3. Recognize categories of words that should be avoided in dental communication
      4. Demonstrate the ability to use “I” statements to provide effective feedback
      5. Discuss techniques used to influence behavior and perception
      6. Demonstrate the ability to formulate a variety of questions that maximize freedom of response
      7. Demonstrate the ability to use the components of reflective listening effectively
      8. Identify the major function of nonverbal communication
      9. Recall ways in which one may attend to the nonverbal behavior of themselves and the patient
    6. Recall the application of attending physically in establishing patient relations
      1. List the five steps of attending physically
      2. Explain the importance of attending physically in establishing good patient relationships
      3. Consider factors when making alterations in physical attending behaviors
    7. Apply the correct positioning of the patient and operator to facilitate proper instrumentation, comfort, and efficiency
      1. List steps to be taken in preparation for your patient
      2. Present considerations for reception of your patient
      3. State eight advantages of the preferred working position
      4. Outline the considerations in basic positioning for the seated clini­cian
      5. Identify the application of principles of good body mechanics for the standing clinician
      6. Name four commonly used body positions for the patient
      7. Outline the characteristics and sequence of procedures for effective dental chair adjustment
      8. Identify adjustments in chair positions for a small child
      9. Describe correct adjustment of the dental light
      10. List three objectives of working positions
      11. Review technical hints
      12. Review factors to teach the patient
    8. Discuss and demonstrate application of principles and methods of preven­tion of disease transmission
      1. State the objective in dental hygiene concerning prevention of disease transmission
      2. Identify the two responsibilities of the dental team in this area
      3. Discuss the implications when pathogenic or potentially pathogenic organisms are present in the oral cavity of each patient
      4. Define terms related to transfer of infectious material
      5. Recall transmission of airborne infection with regard to: dust-borne organisms; aerosols and splatter; and means for prevention of transmission.
      6. Define “autogenous infection” and recognize: sources; factors that alter normal defenses, and prevention.
      7. Review pathogens transmissible by way of the oral cavity
      8. Review key questions, limitations, and use of the medical history as related to prevention of disease transmission
      9. Recognize an immunization program for the hygienist in private practice
      10. Discuss design and care of the most desirable clinical attire for the clinician.
      11. Identify use of the face mask and efficiency; indications and clinical application.
      12. Discuss use of protective eyeglasses and occurrence of eye infections and injuries; indications; features of acceptable glasses, and clinical applications.
      13. State how cross-infection from hands can be prevented.
      14. Identify the two times thorough handwashing is emphasized
      15. Define; resident bacteria; transient bacteria.
      16. State the rationale for and purposes of an effective handwashing procedure
      17. Describe proper hand care
      18. Outline appropriate times and steps for application of the short-scrub stroke - count procedure; and hand sanitation procedure.
      19. List indications for types and use of gloves
      20. Review hints and factors to teach the patient.
      21. State when procedures for prevention of disease transmission should take place
      22. Discuss treatment features considered in infection control
      23. Define the following terms: sterilization, disinfection, sanitization, surface disinfection, contamination, aseptic technique, sterile - clean technique
      24. Outline the steps and considerations in preparation of instruments for sterilization and their: handling, manual cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, care of the unit, packaging
      25. Identify the acceptable methods of sterilization and their: uses, principles of action, preparation of materials, operation, advantages and disadvantages
      26. Identify methods of disinfection and their uses, principles of action, preparation of materials, operation, advantages and disadvantages
      27. Discuss proper care of dental unit water lines
      28. Outline procedures to prepare for an appointment and care of sterile instruments
      29. Recognize patient preparation with regard to: reduction of baceria in the oral cavity, appropriate situations for application of a surface disinfectant
      30. Review: summary of procedures for prevention of disease transmission, maximum precautions (as for hepatitis B carrier), technical hints, factors to teach the patient
    9. Recount the regulations established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and guidelines from the Center for Disease Control and apply to infection control in dentistry
    10. Identify infectious diseases of oral transmission
    11. Explain that vital signs contribute to the proper evaluation of a patient in conjunction with the complete medical history
      1. Name the four vital signs of the body
      2. Relate the significance of recording normal and/or abnormal vital signs
      3. State the two general times the temperature of the patient should be taken
      4. Identify the correct Fahrenheit values for: normal body temperature, fever, hyperthermia, hypothermia
      5. Recall four factors which influence body temperature
      6. Recognize three methods for determining body temperature
      7. Name four indications for use of the oral thermometer
      8. Identify two types of thermometers
      9. Compare the three readings
      10. Outline the procedure for determining body temperature with regard to: necessary equipment, patient preparation, thermometer preparation, temperature taking, reading and recording, and care of the thermometer
      11. Relate proper care of the patient with a temperature elevation
      12. Define the pulse and pulse rate.
      13. List three factors, in addition to rate, to be evaluated during taking of the pulse
      14. State the normal pulse rate for: children, adults
      15. Define: tachycardia and bradycardia, and give five causes for each condition.
      16. Outline the procedure for pulse determination with regard to: site, patient preparation, time, and recording
      17. Define “a respiration.”
      18. State the normal respiratory rate for: children and adults.
      19. Recognize abnormal respiration rates for the adult
      20. Identify three influencing factors for: increased respiration rate, and decreased respiration rate.
      21. Outline the procedure for observing respiration with regard to: when performed, four factors to be evaluated, patient position and recording
      22. Define: blood pressure, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure, and blood pressure classifications.
      23. Identify the three factors upon which blood pressure depends
      24. Identify four influencing factors of: increased blood pressure, and decreased blood pressure.
      25. Define: hypertension and its readings, and hypotension and its readings.
      26. Name and describe the necessary equipment for blood pressure determination
      27. Outline the procedure for blood pressure determination with regard to: patient preparation, application of cuff, placing stethoscope, inflation of cuff, deflation of cuff, recording of systolic and diastolic readings, and appropriate notification of unusual findings.
      28. Review technical hints and factors to teach the patient
    12. Identify aspects of the Iowa Right to Understand Law that apply to the dental practice setting
      1. State the purpose of the Iowa Right to Understand Law
      2. Recognize the responsibilities of the: manufacturers, distributors, and/or importers, and employers.
      3. Identify the rights of the: employees and Bureau of Labor
    13. Summarize the “Protocol for the Prevention of Transmission and the Management of HIV/AIDS at DMACC and its Clinical Sites.”
    14. Identify and/or demonstrate the fundamental instrumentation techniques necessary for adaptation and activation of the working end to the tooth
      1. Classify instruments by purpose and use.
      2. Identify information provided on the instrument handle
      3. Name the three major parts of a dental instrument
      4. Define instrument balance
      5. Relate the functions of a proper instrument grasp
      6. State the two types of basic instrument grasps you will be using
      7. Define fulcrum
      8. List three characteristics of the preferred finger rest
      9. Identify variations of finger rest with regard to: problems and general categories
      10. State and demonstrate the proper pressure that should be applied with the fulcrum and adverse effects of excess pressure
      11. Define adaptation
      12. Identify characteristics of a well-adapted instrument
      13. Define: angulation, lateral pressure, and a stroke
      14. Describe and apply the motion, directions, and length in which a stroke may be ap­plied
      15. Relate factors which influence stroke selection
      16. State effects and components of adequate vision and accessibility
      17. Identify the necessity for a thorough procedure and adverse effects of roughness during instrumentation
    15. Discuss the extraoral and intraoral examination
      1. List the objectives for conducting a thorough patient examination
      2. Discuss the current concept of patient care within our profession
      3. Relate steps to be taken in preparation for the examination
      4. Name and describe the 2 primary methods of examination for the extra- and intraoral inspection
      5. Recall advantages of a systematic sequence of examination
      6. Outline the sequence of steps for the oral cancer examination procedures
      7. Recall all information to include when describing a lesion
      8. State physical characteristics to be recorded
      9. Recall the three morphologic categories of lesions plus characteris­tics and terminology for each
      10. Define other descriptive terms
      11. State the principal method for control of oral cancer
      12. Identify the most common sites for oral cancer
      13. Recognize the basic forms of early cancer
      14. Name the two procedures for follow up of a suspicious lesion
      15. Define and list the indications for a biopsy
      16. Define and list indications and limitations of the cytological smear
      17. Recognize child abuse with regard to: general signs, oral signs, and parental attitude.
      18. Discuss the responsibility of professional personnel in reporting child abuse
      19. Recall definitions associated with substance abuse
      20. Identify general categories of substances of abuse
      21. Relate factors in recognition of drug abusers: general signs, and oral characteristics
      22. Discuss appointment factors for this type of patient
      23. Review technical hints and factors to teach the patient
    16. Specify methods, instruments, and procedures for supra- and subgingival examination and evaluation
      1. Identify the two methods of examination and the instruments to be used
      2. State when, in the appointment sequence, the explorer and probe are applied
      3. Describe the various styles of periodontal probes and their uses.
      4. Describe the mouth mirror, its purposes and uses, techniques for use, and proper care
      5. Recall purposes for application of air
      6. Describe the compressed air syringe and the technique and precau­tions for use
      7. List the general purposes and uses of explorers
      8. Describe the basic parts of the explorer
      9. Differentiate the types of explorers and their specific functions
      10. Distinguish the three basic tactile sensations when exploring
      11. Identify types of stimuli used to detect irregularities
      12. Describe procedures for supragingival examination: use of vision, facial and lingual surfaces, and proximal surfaces.
      13. Relate the steps in proper technique for subgingival evaluation with the explorer
      14. Name the terms for recording findings
    17. Describe and recognize characteristics of normal healthy gingiva and changes which occur in disease
      1. Review anatomy of the gingiva, periodontium, and related struc­tures
      2. Distinguish between gingival and periodontal disease
      3. Recall descriptive terminology with regard to severity and distribu­tion of disease
      4. Discuss importance of early recognition of tissue change
      5. Compare clinical signs of health in gingiva and changes which occur in disease with regard to: color, size, position, contour or shape (gingival margin or papillae; consistency, surface texture, bleeding and exudate.
      6. Recognize normal gingival characteristics for children with: primary dentition, mixed dentition
      7. Identify gingival changes in disease which may occur in children or young adults
      8. Recognize the characteristics of normal healthy gingiva following periodontal treatment
      9. Review factors to teach the patient
    18. Name, describe, and state the function of instruments utilized for removal of dental deposits
      1. State the first objective of dental hygiene treatments
      2. Discuss the term “oral prophylaxis” as a preventive periodontal treatment procedure
      3. List nine general objectives of dental hygiene instrumentation
      4. State the purpose of instrumentation
      5. Identify the cutting edges, purposes and uses, and application of: curets (area specific and universal), sickle scalers
      6. Recognize six basic qualities of all instruments which influence their usefulness
      7. Give eight reasons for maintaining sharp instruments
      8. Define scaling and root planing
      9. List the effects of complete removal of calculus and root planning
      10. Outline the procedure to prepare for instrumentation
      11. Define “bacteremia” and relate its occurrence
      12. Identify two precautions for preventing bacteremia
      13. Describe the procedures or techniques used in examina­tion for supragingival calculus
      14. Describe the procedures or additional techniques used in examina­tion for subgingival calculus
      15. Recall advantages of using a systematic procedure of instrumen­ta­tion
      16. Outline the overall use and system of individual instruments in the clinical procedure for scaling
      17. Sequence and describe the fundamental steps in instrument applica­tion for calculus removal
      18. Recognize factors which make subgingival calculus removal more complicated than supragingival calculus removal
      19. Give several reasons why the curet should be used for subgingival scal­ing and root planing
      20. Describe variations in the steps for removing subgingival calcu­lus
      21. Name three differences between root planing and subgingival scaling
      22. Describe the strokes used in root planing
      23. Discuss the importance of irrigating sulci or pockets
      24. Trace the healing time and process following complete calculus removal
      25. Relate the effect of: partial scaling, scaling tooth surface, and instrumentation within the pocket
      26. State the principal objective in the location of a broken instrument tip
      27. Outline the seven steps in the correct procedure to follow when an instrument blade tip breaks in the patient’s mouth
      28. Recall methods of enhancing patient comfort related to
      29. List four techniques which may be used to maintain a clear field
      30. Review factors to teach the patient
    19. Discuss disease development and contributing factors in gingival and periodontal tissues
      1. Define gingivitis and periodontal disease.
      2. Define a pocket
      3. Recall the parts of a pocket
      4. Name the two types of pockets and the basis of their classifica­tions
      5. Define and identify the characteristics of: a gingival pocket, and periodontal pockets
      6. Outline the sequence of steps in the development of a: gingival pocket and periodontal disease
      7. Identify the tooth surface pocket wall with regard to: tooth structure involved, substances found within the pocket, tooth surface changes which may occur as a result of pocket formation, methods and instruments for detection of surface irregularities, causes of surface roughness for enamel, CEJ, cemental surface, cementum.
      8. Define furcation involvement and relate clinical significance of observations
      9. Define mucogingival involvement and recall the significance of attached gingiva and clinical observations
      10. Describe the self-cleansing mechanism
      11. Distinguish between: complicating factors to disease development, and local or systemic factors.
      12. Identify complicating factors in the following areas: dental, gingival, and other
      13. State functions of saliva
      14. Define xerostomia and its: causes,effects, and treatment
      15. Review factors to teach the patient
    20. Identify the derivation, composition, distribution, occurrence, clinical appearance and significance to oral health of soft deposits
      1. Name the four “soft deposits.”
      2. Define: acquired pellicle, dental plaque, and materia alba
      3. Outline the development of acquired pellicle with regard to: formation, and source of materials
      4. Distinguish between the three types of pellicle
      5. Relate the significance of acquired pellicle
      6. Outline the sequence and composition in formation on plaque
      7. Discuss distribution of plaque
      8. Identify factors influencing plaque accumulation
      9. State two factors responsible for the size and diversity of the oral microflora
      10. Define opportunistic pathogens
      11. Identify sites available for colonization by oral bacteria
      12. Discuss the dynamic nature of the oral cavity with regard to
      13. Relate aspects of gingival sulcus environment to microbial colonization
      14. Name the beneficial and detrimental effects of normal microflora
      15. Identify criteria for colonization of the mouth and related factors for each
      16. Discuss “bacterial succession.”
      17. List mechanisms that limit colonization of the mouth and factors related to each.
      18. Trace the development of the oral microbiota during stages of the life cycle: infancy, childhood and adolescence, and adulthood
      19. Discuss colonization of oral surfaces: soft tissues, smooth tooth surfaces, and retentive areas (occlusal pits and fissures, interproximal areas and gingival sulci).
      20. Relate the composition of plaque
      21. Describe and contrast the characteristics of dental plaque and materia alba with regard to clinical appearance, distribution, occurrence, removal, recurrence, composition and structure, source, attachment, and significance to oral health.
      22. Identify methods for detecting dental plaque
      23. Compare supra- and submarginal dental plaque
      24. Discuss the significance of bacterial plaque and its pathogenic effects
      25. Explain the equation for dental caries initiation including essential and contributing factors
      26. Discuss the relationship between bacterial plaque and periodontal disease
      27. Relate the effect of diet on dental plaque with regard to: food intake and texture.
      28. Discuss food debris with regard to: location and impaction, and effects
      29. Review technical hints
      30. Review factors to teach the patient
    21. Compare the characteristics and techniques of examination for supra- and submarginal calculus
      1. Define “dental calculus.”
      2. State the purpose for removal of calculus
      3. Name the two classes of dental calculus
      4. Differentiate clinical characteristics of supra-and subgingival calcu­lus with regard to: location, color, shape, consistency and texture, quality, and distribution of teeth.
      5. Describe the occurrence of calculus
      6. List two techniques of examination for supragingival calculus
      7. List three techniques of examination and samples of conditions which indicate presence of subgingival calculus
    22. Relate the formation, structure, and significance of dental calculus
      1. Outline the sequence of calculus formation
      2. Discuss formation time of dental calculus
      3. Describe the structure of calculus
      4. Identify three general modes of attachment of calculus
      5. Recognize the composition of calculus
      6. Discuss the significance of dental calculus with regard to: plaque, pocket, plaque control techniques and scaling, permeability, and drainage from diseased pocket.
      7. State the two effective measures for prevention and control of calcu­lus
      8. Review factors to teach the patient
    23. Recognize the importance of instrument design as it applies to maintaining a sharp cutting edge and the original shape of the instrument
      1. List two objectives for techniques of instrument sharpening
      2. Identify sharpening stones with regard to: materials, categories and sterilization.
      3. Recognize four characteristics of facilities for sharpening
      4. Define a “cutting edge”.
      5. Explain the role of the sharpening stone in the dynamics of sharp­ening
      6. Describe three types of tests to conduct for examination of instru­ment sharpness
      7. Discuss care of instruments when sharpening before sterilization
      8. State when instruments should be sharpened
      9. Recall techniques to be applied after sharpening
      10. When sharpening curets and sickle scalers, identify: surfaces to be sharpened, and most desirable sharpening procedure.
      11. Outline the steps, pressure, and strokes in sharpening lateral and facial surfaces of your sickle and curet scalers
      12. Describe the techniques for sharpening the hoe
      13. Outline procedures for care and storage of the: ceramic stone and mounted stones.
      14. Declare when to discard an instrument
      15. Review technical hints
    24. Recount the etiology, composition, distribution, and clinical appearance of extrinsic and intrinsic stains
      1. State the two discolorations of the teeth which are the concern of the dental hygienist
      2. Recall the significance of stains
      3. Define: extrinsic & intrinsic, exogenous and endogenous.
      4. Relate techniques for the identification and removal of stains: occurring directly on the tooth surface, and incorporated within tooth deposits.
      5. Identify clinical appearance, distribution on tooth surfaces, composition, occurrence, and etiology of the following extrinsic stains: yellow, green, black line, tobacco, brown pellicle and other brown stains, orange and red, and metallic stains.
      6. Recognize intrinsic stains associated with: pulpless teeth, tetracycline, restorative metals, endodontic therapy, hereditary amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis
      7. Recognize five examples of exogenous intrinsic stains
      8. Recall technical hints for stain removal
      9. Review factors to teach the patient regarding tooth staining

  
  • DHY 171 - Principles of Dental Hyg Pract

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    See DHY 170 .
    Prerequisite: BIO 164 , CHM 122 .
    Corequisite: DHY 170  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate actions in accordance with standards of personal and profes­sional account­ability
      1. Focus on goals set for becoming a professional
      2. Accept responsibility for engaging in activities that will promote success in achieving professional and personal goals
      3. Evaluate if you are becoming the sort of person you have chosen to be and become in terms of the values that human life supports across a broad range of human experiences (intrinsic values), and in terms of the obligations that a dental professional under
    2. Prepare the clinical site, clinician, and patient
      1. Identify, operate and/or adjust the dental chair, unit, light, stool
      2. Identify basic maintenance procedures to improve longevity, clean­liness and appearance of the components of the dental operatory
      3. Follow current CDC recommendations and OSHA standards for control of contamination and biohazardous materials
      4. Apply product information regarding health and physical haz­ards in Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS) to product utiliza­tion in the dental setting
      5. Begin to analyze data in the patient medical and dental history in prepara­tion for interview and treatment
    3. Conduct patient assessment to provide baseline information for determining the general and oral health status of each patient
      1. Utilize interviewing techniques that ensure a thorough health history
      2. Gather information regarding the patient’s perspectives (wants, needs, and expectations).
      3. Adopt language patterns that reinforce that the patient is a partner in care
      4. Obtain patient’s vital signs
      5. Conduct an intraoral and extraoral examination identifying normal and abnor­mal structures
    4. Implement safe, effective, non-traumatic clinical dental hygiene tech­niques
      1. Demonstrate, given a typodont or partner
      2. Identify dull instruments and utilize basic principles of instrument sharpening
      3. Consider the variables of gingival condition, deposit characteristics, tooth morphology in order to begin to
    5. Demonstrate proficiency within prescribed error margins

  
  • DHY 181 - Dental Hygiene I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A continuation of instrumentation techniques. Emphasis is placed on patient assessment and principles of patient education in chairside instruction. Topics include polishing techniques, topical application of fluoride and supplementary procedure.
    Prerequisite: DHY 170 , DHY 171 .
    Corequisite: DHY 182  
    Competencies
    1. Examine the utilization and manipulation of the electronic patient documentation system that is currently used in conjunction with the accepted SOAP system within the scope of patient care at our DMACC dental hygiene clinic.
      1. Distinguish between the various components of the electronic patient record system, locate those components as needed, and indicate how each would be utilized during the course of patient care.
      2. List the various components of the SOAP documentation system and defend the placement of various pieces of collected data, processes, treatment and education into a particular portion of that system.
      3. Translate all patient assessment, treatment plan, problems, goals, completed procedures and patient education into a structured SOAP format.
    2. Describe the basic principles of accepted patient treatment regimens within the scope of practice of a clinical dental hygienist.
      1. Summarize the theory of selective polishing and the rationale for practicing it in relationship to the specific parameters of individual patient needs.
      2. Identify the correct mechanical application of various modalities for polishing and select an appropriate choice per patient within the accepted standard of patient care.
      3. Identify the accepted standard of care for the use of various disclosing solutions, assorted dental flosses, various oral irrigators, polishing strips, available home care products, and available fluoride options.
      4. Review the various parts of a periodontal probe and describe the use of that probe to verify multiple aspects of a patient’s periodontal status during clinical assessment processes.
      5. Explain all of the clinical findings collected during the periodontal evaluation both in professional terms for the benefit of a colleague’s understanding, as well as paraphrased into layman’s terms for the benefit of a patient’s understanding.
    3. Analyze the structures and functions of the periodontium both in health and diseased scenarios and distinguish between the two conditions.
      1. Examine the clinical and microscopic anatomy of the dentogingival unit/periodontium.
      2. Identify the parameters that determine the definition of health.
      3. Identify the parameters that determine the definition of disease.
      4. Distinguish between gingival disease vs. periodontal disease and current theories of disease progression.
      5. Separate local disease-influencing factors from systemic disease-influencing factors.
      6. Relate the concept of systemic risk factors for periodontal disease to the relationship of periodontal disease as a risk factor for systemic diseases.
      7. Outline the classifications of inflammatory periodontal disease and the interrelationship with hormones, medications, systemic diseases and dental implants.
    4. Evaluate policies and procedures presented in DMACC’s “Basic Outline for Clinical Procedures” as they pertain to simulated clinical case studies.
      1. Predict life endangering emergency conditions and demonstrate methods to avoid such emergencies.
      2. Produce a list of preparation strategies to meet any medical emergency within a clinical setting.
      3. Choose dependent adult/child abuse indicators that necessitate the implementation of “mandatory reporter” protocols.
      4. Compute papilla bleeding index (PBI), patient hygiene performance (PHP), Deposit Classification, and Periodontal Disease Classification according to assessment data and recognized indices.
    5. Analyze the principles and methods currently recommended for the prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal disease.
      1. Illustrate a program of prevention taking into account primary, secondary and tertiary measures.
      2. Outline dental health education that incorporates motivational approaches and patient-centered considerations.
      3. Select educational processes that utilize “sequence of instruction”, incorporate principles of learning, engage a multidimensional approach, and emphasize short/long term goal setting.
      4. Examine various teaching aids and intraoral devices designed to enhance the achievement of educational goals.
    6. Assess the variety of intra oral cleansing devices and hygiene products available for home care use by the consumer, and the dental hygienist’s role in the prescription of these devices or products.
      1. Distinguish between many varieties of manual toothbrushes versus electric toothbrushes, including bristle composition, head and handle configuration, mode of action, historical evolution, cost, and evidence-based effectiveness.
      2. Describe the various patient parameters and product components or ingredients that would indicate the prescription of any particular toothbrush, toothpaste, mouth rinse, oral cleansing device, or any other supplemental product.
      3. Explain the sanitary care practices for the maintenance of any oral hygiene care item or device.
      4. Discuss the evidenced-based research necessary to make informed prescriptions of oral care devices and products.
    7. Relate how fixed and removable prostheses impact the oral environment and the comprehensive care plan that is facilitated by the dental hygienist.
      1. Identify the different “appliances” and “prostheses”  that affect oral health outcomes
      2. Relate various “appliances/prostheses” to functionality, assessment processes, disease control practices, home care practices, patient education requirements, and patient compliance issues.
    8. Distinguish normal mechanical relationships between the teeth of the maxillary arch and the mandibular arch versus typical deviations between the two arches.
      1. Explain the rationale for determining evolving arch relationships in the primary dentition and the erupting permanent dentition.
      2. Describe the effects of malocclusion pertaining to functionality, facial profile, proximal contacts, pathological migration, traumatic influences, effect on supporting periodontium, tooth mobility, fremitus, temporomandibular disease, wear facets and attrition.
      3. Classify the various types of deviations based on molar relationship, canine relationship, and mal-relationships between groups of teeth according to Angle’s classification system.
      4. Indicate factors relevant to patient education.
    9. Evaluate the indicators for vitality pulp testing and the principles of application for testing.
      1. Predict the need for a pulp vitality test based on patient symptoms.
      2. Indicate the need for thermal, percussion or electric pulp vitality testing.
      3. Select the correct armamentarium depending on which test is performed.
    10. Appraise the definition, action, indications and techniques of application of pit and fissure sealants as part of a complete preventive program.
      1. Differentiate between the available sealant options, the composition of each, the application conditions, the patient behavioral situation, radiographic findings, and relate each to patient requirements.
      2. Examine current evidenced-based research on available sealant options, identify limiting factors, contrast beneficial factors, and compare this evidence to current clinical practice.
    11. Evaluate the influence of patient/clinician experiences in a clinical setting as they pertain to ongoing professional growth.
      1. Judge the degree that a particular clinical experience has contributed to professional growth
      2. Assess the long-term effect on clinical skills or patient management techniques in similar situations with future patients.
      3. Describe the value of collaboration among the various health care professionals and summarize the various ways that they can and should collaborate for the best possible patient care outcomes.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DHY 182 - Clinical Dental Hygiene I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    See DHY 181 .
    Prerequisite: DHY 170 , DHY 171 .
    Corequisite: DHY 181  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate behavior congruent with the American Dental Hygienists’ Association Code of Ethics.
      1. Demonstrate accountability and responsibility for own professional behavior and development.
      2. Demonstrate accountability and responsibility reflecting professional values.
      3. Demonstrate professional behavior by being on time.
    2. Demonstrate previous practicum competencies with progressive independence, greater efficiency, and higher order critical thinking skills.
    3. Demonstrate and evaluate actions in accordance with standards of personal and professional accountability.
      1. Practice accurate periodontal charting
      2. Practice accurate dental charting
      3. Utilize plaque and gingival indices
      4. Complete occlusal assessment
      5. Use selection criteria to recommend radiographic surveys for new and recall patients
      6. Produce diagnostic radiographs
      7. View x-rays in a logical evaluation sequence
    4. Develop additional patient assessment skills to privde baseline information for determining the general and oral health status of each patient.
    5. Prepare dental hygiene diagnosis utilizing the assessment data to determine the patient’s health status and which health goals and courses of treatment are best.
      1. Design a treatment plan best suited to the specific needs of each patient
      2. Identify priorities for treatment including
      3. Discuss with the patient and faculty
      4. Demonstrate, given a partner or patient, basic instrumentation principles and techniques for periodontal probe, files, prophylaxis angle, oral irrigator
      5. Consider the variables of gingival condition, pocket topography and depth, deposit characteristics, tooth morphology in order to begin to
      6. Identify dull instruments and utilize basic principles of instrument sharpening
      7. Recognize limitations of instrumentation based on patient variables
      8. Establish a systematic sequence when performing proce­dures
      9. Utilize the following adjunct services when appropriate
      10. Evaluate treatment outcomes
      11. Follow established emergency protocol system and procedures when managing a medical emergency
      12. Adhere to the State of Iowa Code regarding mandatory reporters of dependent adult/child abuse
    6. Implement safe, effective, non-traumatic clinical dental hygiene techniques.
      1. Design a treatment plan best suited to the specific needs of each patient.
      2. Identify priorities for treatment including: a. emergency needs, b. prevention of disease, c. therapy, d. maintenance needs
      3. Discuss with the patient and faculty: a. dental hygiene treatment, b. operator responsibility, c. patient responsibility, d. informed consent, e. appointment schedule
      4. Demonstrate, given a partner or patient, basic instrumentation principles and techniques for the explorer, periodontal probe, curets and scalers, prophylaxis angle, periodontal files.
      5. Consider the variables of gingival condition, pocket topography and depth, deposit characteristics, tooth morphology in order to begin to: a. differentiate deposits from anatomical features, b. detect and remove most supragingival deposits including plaque, calculus, stain, c. begin to detect and remove subgingival deposits.
      6. Identify dull instruments and utilize basic principles of instrument sharpening.
      7. Recognize limitations of instrumentation based on patient variables.
      8. Establish a systematic sequence when performing procedures.
      9. Utilize the following adjunct services when appropriate: a. sealant placement, b. pulp vitality testing, c. care of dental appliances, d. fluoride therapy, e. oral irrgation/debridement
      10. Evaluate treatment outcomes.
      11. Follow established emergency protocol system and procedures whe managing a medical emergency: a. name indications and contraindications of basic life support, using the AED and oxygen administration, b. recall the equipment for oxygen resuscitation, c. outline the sequence of steps for applications of the AED and oxygen resuscitation equipment, d. identify systemic disease conditions and their sysmptoms and emergency treatment procedures, e. review technical hints and factors to teach the patient.
      12. Adhere to the State of Iowa Code regarding mandatory reporters of dependent adult/child abuse.
    7. Develop strategies to implement dental health education programs for individuals.
      1. Apply a philosophy of prevention that: a. encompasses the total health of the patient, b. specifically targets (1) health behaviors in control of the patient, (2) the patient’s life style, (3) those professional prcedures which can enhance oral health maintenance.
    8. Demonstrate increasing proficiency within prescribed error margins.

  
  • DHY 211 - Periodontology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The clinical characteristics, histopathology, etiology and treatment of periodontal diseases are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the dental hygienist in the prevention and management of periodontal diseases.
    Prerequisite: DHY 121 , DHY 181 , DHY 182 .
    Corequisite: DHY 282  
    Competencies
    1. Recognize the anatomy of periodontal structures in the healthy state.
      1. Review the clinical anatomy of the periodontium.
      2. Review the microscopic anatomy of the periodontium.
      3. List the functions of the periodontium.
      4. Describe the lymphatic, blood and nerve supply to the gingiva and the attachment apparatus.
    2. Recognize the prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontal diseases in the population.
      1. Describe epidemiology and its descriptive terms; prevalence, incidence, extent, and severity.
      2. Explain the significance of epidemiologic data to future treatment.
      3. Describe the role of indices in private practice and population surveys.
      4. Describe the prevalence and incidence of periodontal diseases.
      5. Identify risk factors and risk indicators for periodontal diseases.
      6. Discuss future periodontal treatment needs and future trends that may have an impact on dental hygiene practice.
    3. Identify the clinical components of a dental examination and how it relates to the periodontal condition.
      1. List and discuss five phases of the dental hygiene process for periodontal patient care.
      2. Explain the importance of stating the goals for periodontal patient care.
      3. Discuss the difference between a dental diagnosis and a dental hygiene diagnosis.
      4. Explain the importance of data collection.
      5. Evaluate the importance of total health assessment in providing periodontal services.
      6. Discuss the importance of interviewing and questioning the patient.
      7. Discuss the implications of the chief complaint and medical history in planning periodontal treatment.
      8. Discuss the role of the dental hygienist in evaluating the dental and oral hygiene status of a patient.
      9. Describe the importance of performing an intraoral and extraoral examination.
      10. Describe the components of the dental examination.
      11. Explain how the findings of the dental evaluation relate to the recognition of periodontal diseases.
      12. Describe the significance of dental plaque on gingival health.
      13. Discuss calculus formation and its effects on gingival health.
      14. Describe the types of stains and their significance to oral hygiene.
      15. Determine the use and effectiveness of disclosing solutions for assessing gingival health.
      16. Plan oral hygiene education and resulting services based on the extent and location of tooth accumulated materials.
      17. Describe the rationale for performing a gingival assessment as part of the patient evaluation.
      18. Describe the clinical features of the gingiva in health and disease.
      19. Evaluate the procedures used in performing a gingival assessment.
      20. Explain bleeding at the gingival margin versus bleeding on probing.
      21. Recognize and discuss factors found in gingival assessment procedures that may be predictors of future disease activity.
      22. Explain the purposes for performing a periodontal assessment.
      23. Describe the components of a periodontal assessment.
      24. Explain the clinical significance of each component of a periodontal assessment.
      25. Discuss the significance of measuring clinical attachment loss versus probing depths.
      26. Compare and contrast several factors that can affect the accuracy of probe readings.
    4. Discuss the radiology background that is used in conjunction with clinical data to recognize and classify periodontal diseases.
      1. Recognize and discuss the periodontal structures seen on a radiograph.
      2. Discuss the rationale for radiographs in periodontics.
      3. Explain the features of conventional and computer-based digital imaging.
      4. List and discuss the benefits and limitations of radiographs used in periodontics.
      5. Explain the radiographic improvements aimed at decreasing patient radiation exposure.
      6. Discuss the types of radiographs used in the treatment planning and evaluation of implants.
    5. Describe the methods that can be used as a supplement to conventional periodontal assessments for recognizing and monitoring periodontal diseases.
      1. Evaluate the role of using adjunctive diagnostic aids as a predictor for periodontal breakdown.
      2. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the various adjunctive diagnostic methods for detecting periodontal disease activity.
      3. Describe the type of patient that may require adjunctive diagnostic testing.
    6. Relate an understanding of periodontal diseases and evidence-based periodontal treatment planning.
      1. Discuss the evidence-based approach to treatment planning.
      2. Describe treatment guidelines for periodontal patients.
      3. Explain when more aggressive forms of therapy are needed and thus appropriate times for referral to a periodontist.
      4. Explain “informed consent”.
      5. Describe geriatric patient considerations in periodontal treatment planning.
      6. Discuss periodontal prognostic signs.
    7. Recall the fundamentals of counseling periodontal patients on oral hygiene self-care.
      1. Describe preventive measures taken to prevent and control the progression of periodontal diseases.
      2. Discuss preventive care as it relates to private practice.
      3. Discuss the various tooth brushing methods used to maintain gingival health.
      4. Compare the effectiveness of a powered toothbrush versus a manual toothbrush.
      5. Discuss the importance of interdental cleaning in maintaining periodontal health.
      6. Discuss an effective plaque-control regimen following periodontal surgery.
    8. Recognize current concepts about the adjunctive use of chemical agents in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory periodontal diseases.
      1. Discuss the rationale for the use of chemical agents in the treatment of the inflammatory periodontal disease.
      2. List and discuss the various types of drug delivery systems.
      3. Describe the newest types of controlled-release devices.
      4. Discuss enzyme suppression therapy.
    9. Recall the objectives and therapeutic outcomes of periodontal instrumentation.
      1. Discuss the rationale for periodontal debridement.
      2. Explain the clinical outcomes of periodontal debridement.
      3. Discuss the effects of nonsurgical treatment on the subgingival microflora.
      4. Describe the effects of combined oral hygiene self-care with subgingival periodontal debridement on clinical attachment loss.
      5. Describe the healing response in gingivitis and periodontitis after periodontal debridement.
    10. Describe the etiology, identifying features, and therapy of occlusal trauma.
      1. Identify and describe two types of occlusal trauma.
      2. Recognize and describe the clinical and radiographic signs of occlusal trauma.
      3. Discuss the interrelationship between occlusal trauma and periodontitis.
      4. Define the role of the dental hygienist in occlusal therapy.
    11. Recognize the basic principles, and postoperative care for periodontal surgical procedures.
      1. Discuss the rational of periodontal surgical therapy.
      2. Describe the indications and contraindications for periodontal surgical therapy.
      3. Compare and contrast the currently accepted surgical treatment modalities.
      4. Counsel patients on postoperative care following periodontal surgery.
      5. Identify and explain the management of postoperative complications.
      6. Discuss surgical wound healing and how soon after surgery a reevaluation can be performed.
    12. Identify the basic principles of periodontal regeneration.
      1. Describe the process of periodontal regeneration, including the type and origin of cells involved in the regenerative process.
      2. Compare and contrast the different clinical procedures used to attain periodontal regeneration.
      3. Discuss postoperative care after periodontal regenerative surgery.
    13. Describe dental implants and the proper implant evaluation and maintenance procedures.
      1. Define the role of the dental hygienist in the management of patients with dental implants.
      2. Discuss dental implant indications, contraindications, benefits, and risks.
      3. Explain the various types of dental implants rationale for use, and materials for each.
      4. Define the basic components of a dental implant.
      5. Discuss the general sequence of implant placement, uncovering, and restoration.
      6. Compare the tissues around natural teeth and dental implants.
      7. Discuss the steps in evaluating tissue conditions around dental implants.
      8. Describe peri-implantitis and its management.
      9. Describe proper instrument selection and therapeutic steps for in-office maintenance procedures.
      10. 13.10 Recommend appropriate home-care techniques for patients with dental implants.
    14. Participate in the initial preparation, treatment and post-care for the patient receiving periodontal surgical treatment requiring sutures and dressings.
      1. Recognize periodontal surgical procedures requiring sutures and dressings.
      2. Describe the purpose, characteristics and classification of suture materials.
      3. Describe needle components and characteristics
      4. Discuss knot characteristics, management and suturing procedures.
      5. List the supplies and steps for future removal.
      6. Explain the purposes, characteristics and types of dressing materials.
      7. Describe the characteristics of a well-placed dressing.
      8. Provide patient instructions
      9. Demonstrate the placement and removal of a periodontal dressing.
      10. Recognize the importance of bacterial plaque control follow-up.
    15. Recognize the role periodontal maintenance has in the treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases.
      1. Discuss the objectives of periodontal maintenance.
      2. Describe the components of periodontal maintenance.
      3. Describe the role of the dental hygienist in periodontal maintenance visits.
      4. Discuss the role of the dental hygienist in smoking cessation.
      5. Discuss when retreatment is necessary.
      6. Explain the factors involved in patient compliance.

  
  • DHY 221 - Dental Materials

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A study of materials utilized in the practice of dentistry. Properties of dental materials and ADA requirements are presented.
    Corequisite: DEA 256  and DEA 424  or DHY 114  and DHY 223  must be taken concurrently or prior to this course
    Competencies
    1. Formulate the reasons a dental assistant/dental hygienist should be knowledgeable in the science of dental materials.
      1. Generate the rationale for studying dental materials
      2. Rank the standards for dental materials
      3. Organize the classifications of dental materials
      4. Compare and contrast the classifications of dental caries and restorations
    2. Categorize Physical, Chemical, Electrical and Mechanical Properties in relation to the oral cavity.
      1. Compare and contrast the difference between physical, chemical, electrical and mechanical properties and the properties of each.
      2. Interpret how these properties may alter a restoration.
    3. Compare and contrast the use of Preventative materials including whitening agents, sealants, mouth protectors, and fluorides.
      1. Organize tooth whitening agents and assess the processes of use.
      2. Interpret the purpose, procedure, and efficacy of dental sealants.
      3. Rewrite the purpose of mouth protectors and organize the types used.
      4. Categorize the components in fluoride gels, rinses and varnishes and defend their uses.
    4. Generate the characteristics and uses of dental amalgam.
      1. Evaluate the types of silver alloy available for amalgam, in terms of content, particle shape and explain the clinical consequences of using different alloy types.
      2. Compose the factors that affect handling and performance of amalgam.
      3. Critique the physical properties and how those factors determine the life of a restoration.
      4. Assess mercury toxicity and proper protocol for dental personnel.
    5. Organize the composition, properties and application of direct esthetic restorations including:
      1. Categorize the uses, components, and factors affecting the placement of composites.
      2. Categorize the uses, components and factors affecting the placement of glass ionomers.
      3. Rewrite the steps for placement of a direct polymeric restoration.
    6. Formulate the Adhesive materials used with amalgam and direct polymeric restorations.
      1. Categorize the uses and properties of adhesives for each type of restoration.
      2. Compare and contrast the differences of the microanatomy of enamel and of dental regarding etching and bonding.
    7. Formulate the properties and uses of finishing, polishing, and cleansing agents.
      1. Assess the different types of polishing and the abrasives used.
      2. Rank the factors affecting abrasion and polishing.
      3. Generate uses, contraindications, and components in polishing agents and dentifrices.
    8. Compose the function of different categories of impression materials including:
      1. Assess the difference between direct and indirect restorative procedures.
      2. Organize the different uses and composition of impression materials.
      3. Compare and contrast the difference between reversible and irreversible impression materials and advantages/disadvantages of each.
      4. Critique infection control of the impression in relation to dental personnel.
    9. Organize the characteristics and uses of gypsum materials.
      1. Compare and contrast properties related to each type of gypsum material and why they are important.
      2. Design the general procedure for producing a quality gypsum product.
      3. Prove the chemical formulation that produces a gypsum material.
      4. Critique the procedure for a quality study model.
    10. Compare and contrast the properties and uses of waxes.
      1. Categorize the difference between pattern waxes and processing waxes.
      2. Organize the properties of waxes.
    11. Rewrite the properties and uses of casting alloys, wrought alloys and solders.
      1. Compare and contrast the composition of various metals used and support why they are important.
      2. Generate the steps needed to achieve the casting process for an indirect restoration.
      3. Categorize the different types of indirect restorations and argue the advantages or disadvantages of each.
      4. Organize the different types of metals and classifications of each.
    12. Compare and contrast the properties and uses of acrylic resins in removable prostheses and provisional restorations.
      1. Formulate polymerization.
      2. Organize the steps in the construction of a removable prosthesis.
      3. Structure the fabrication of a provision restoration.
    13. Compare and contrast the components and uses of cements, bases, cavity liners and varnishes.
      1. Organize the properties and function of each type of cement, base, liner and varnish.
      2. Predict the manipulation and chemical reactions of each type of cement, base, liner and varnish
      3. Categorize the different cements, base, liner or varnish used in reference to the type of restoration being placed.
    14. Compare and contrast the indications and contraindications for dental implants and the various types used.
      1. Categorize the materials used for implants.
      2. Critique the stages of osseointegration.
      3. Formulate the proper care of a dental implant by dental personnel and the patient.
    15. Compare and contrast the different types of sutures.
      1. Categorize the classification of suture materials.

  
  • DHY 223 - Dental Materials Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Through laboratory experience, the student learns techniques in the preparation and utilization of dental materials.
    Corequisite: DHY 221  
    Competencies
    1. Produce safe practice in the laboratory.
      1. Perform laboratory housekeeping practices.
      2. Appraise emergency equipment, procedures and assess first aid supplies.
      3. Locate material safety data sheets (M.S.D.S.) for dental products
    2. Formulate infection control practices.
      1. Categorize the infectious, physical, and chemical hazards in a dental office
      2. Appraise the practice of universal precautions in dentistry.
      3. Prove the types of personal protective equipment (PPE) that must be used for the practice of dentistry in the operatory and laboratory and justify the criteria of selection.
      4. Rank the methods that may be used to prevent cross-contamination during distribution of dental supplies.
      5. Defend the significance of an office exposure control program and protocol for managing exposure to bloodborne pathogens for office personnel and the dental laboratory.
    3. Incorporate use of the instruments of measure.
      1. Predict mass on a gram scale
      2. Assess use of a milliliter graduate and ruler
      3. Prove volume using a cubic centimeter graduate.
    4. Generate care and use of dental equipment in the laboratory.
      1. The whip mix machine.
      2. The model trimmer
      3. The dental lab engine
      4. The dental lathes for wet and dry use
      5. The Sta-Vac machine
      6. The Triad machine
    5. Compare and contrast impression materials and perform the manipulation technique for each product including:
      1. Wax and impression compound
      2. Zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE)
      3. Agar or reversible hydrocolloid, alginate
      4. Polysulfides, condensation silicones, polyethers and addition silicones
    6. Compare and contrast gypsum materials and perform the manipulation technique producing a variety of gypsum products to include:
      1. Materials: dental plaster, stone, and improved stone
      2. Products: study model, cast and die
    7. Create an alginate impression on a student partner.
      1. Appraise the aspects of patient preparation for alginate impressions including appropriate tray criteria and use of rope wax if needed.
      2. Perform mixing of the alginate, loading, seating and removal of the tray to obtain acceptable alginate impressions.
      3. Critique the impressions to acceptability of laboratory standards.
    8. Generate and trim a study model
      1. Assess the following laboratory procedures: a. use a gypsum product to pour a study model from an impression. b. trim the study model on the model trimmer using appropriate cast cuts for patient consultation and treatment planning
      2. Compare and contrast the two methods of diagnostic cast/study model fabrication.
      3. Critique the completed study model for diagnostic proficiency.
    9. Formulate the application and manipulation of dental waxes.
      1. Compare and contrast pattern and processing dental waxes.
    10. Formulate the application and manipulation of dental amalgam.
      1. Incorporate acceptable mercury hygiene practices.
      2. Perform by mixing and placing a dental amalgam restoration in a tooth cookie.
    11. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of dental materials used in removal prostheses, bleaching trays and a variety of oral appliances.
      1. Assess the different oral appliances used in the dental profession.
      2. Interpret the different thermoplastic materials used in the fabrication of oral appliances and critique their properties.
      3. Prove the steps involved in fabricating an oral appliance.
    12. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of adhesive and direct polymeric restorative materials.
      1. Evaluate the differences of the microanatomy of enamel and dentin regarding etching and bonding.
      2. Prioritize the properties of restorative resins.
      3. Interpret the differences between flowable and condensable composites.
    13. Perform the application of a variety of abrasive polishing materials used in the clinical or laboratory setting.
      1. Produce the steps of amalgam polishing.
      2. Compare and contrast the rate of abrasion for clinical and laboratory procedures.
    14. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of a variety of dental cements.
      1. Critique the properties of Zinc oxide eugenol, zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate cement, glass ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide cement.
      2. Prove the mixing process and setting times for the cements stated above.
    15. Compare and contrast the application and manipulation of a variety of provisional restorations.
      1. Prove the construction and placement of provisional restorations.
      2. Perform the procedure for the construction and placement of provisional restorations.

  
  • DHY 230 - Oral Health Nutrition

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course relates nutrients and their effect on oral health throughout the life cycle. Course includes an introduction to the principles of dietary counseling for optimal oral health.
    Prerequisite: BIO 164 , CHM 132  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate healthy eating habits and understand how eating habits can affect the oral cavity
      1. List the general physiological functions of the six nutrient classes
      2. Identify factors that influence food habits.
      3. Name the food groups in MyPyramid
      4. Identify significant nutrient contributions of each food group, and assess their implications for oral health.
      5. Analyze dietary intake of a patient, using the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid Food Guidance System.
      6. Differentiate the purposes of dietary reference intakes (DRIs), MyPyramid, and reference daily intakes (RDIs).
      7. Apply basic nutritional concepts to help patients with nutritional problems.
    2. Evaluate the digestive system
      1. Discuss factors that influence food intake.
      2. Outline general functions of each digestive organ.
      3. Point out chemical secretions necessary for digestion of energy-containing nutrients and in what parts of the gastrointestinal tract they are secreted.
      4. Chart the nutrients that require digestion and the digested products that can be absorbed.
      5. Summarize the role of gastrointestinal motility in the digestion and absorption process.
      6. Predict how the digestion and absorption processes may affect nutritional status and oral health.
    3. Assess the role carbohydrates play in nutrition and oral health.
      1. Characterize the role of carbohydrate in the caries process.
      2. Compare and contrast carbohydrate consumption when counseling patients to reduce risk for dental caries.
    4. Evaluate the role that proteins and lipids play in nutrition and in oral health
      1. Identify the basic structural units of dietary lipids.
      2. Describe how fatty acids affect properties of fat
      3. Name the essential fatty acids and some of their functions.
      4. List the functions of fats in the body and explain how these affect oral health.
      5. Give examples of dietary sources of saturated, monosaturated, polysaturated, omega-3 and trans fatty acids, and cholesterol.
      6. State the number of kilocalories provided per gram of fat
      7. Plan appropriate interventions when dietary modification of fat intake has been recommended to a patient.
      8. Formulate nutritional directions for patients concerning fats.
    5. Relate energy metabolism and energy balance for a healthy diet.
      1. Explain physiological sources of energy.
      2. Identify factors affecting the basal metabolic rate.
      3. Assess factors affecting energy balance.
      4. Describe the effects of inadequate energy intake.
    6. Evaluate the role of vitamins, minerals and water in a healthy diet and how inadequacies can affect oral health.
      1. List the fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins. and compare the characteristics of each.
      2. Identify functions, food sources, deficiencies, surpluses, toxicities, and oral symptoms for vitamins A, D, E, K, and C.
      3. Outline causes and symptoms of mineral excesses or deficits.
      4. Defend the role of water fluoridation in the prevention of dental caries
      5. Summarize nutritional directions for patients regarding calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and fluoride.
      6. Apply dental hygiene considerations for trace elements present in calcified structures.
      7. Discuss nutritional directions for vitamins closely involved in maintaining healthy oral tissues.
    7. Justify nutritional requirements affecting oral health in women.
      1. Assess nutrients commonly supplemented during pregnancy and lactation
      2. Recommend food intake during pregnancy and lactation to provide adequate nutrients using national guidelines.
      3. Prioritize nutritional factors affecting fetal development.
      4. Create nutritional directions for patients who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
    8. Justify nutritional requirements during growth and development and prioritize eating habits which affect oral health.
      1. Describe the procedure for introducing solid foods after the initial stage of feeding by bottle or breast.
      2. Examine ways to handle typical nutritional problems that occur in infants, young children, school-age children, and adolescents.
      3. Assess nutrition education needs for patients during infancy, early childhood, elementary school years, and adolescents.
      4. Correlate physiological changes that alter the nutritional status of infants and adolescents.
    9. Critique nutritional requirements for older adults and eating habits which affect oral health.
      1. Identify nutrition education needs for older adults.
      2. Assess physiological changes altering an older patient’s nutritional status.
      3. Contrast differences in amounts of nutrients needed by older patients compared with younger patients
      4. Rank factors influencing food intake of older patients.
      5. Justify dietary changes that could be implemented to provide optimum nutrient intake for older patients.
    10. Evaluate a nutrition counseling session for the prevention and management of dental caries and periodontal disease.
      1. Discuss the responsibility of the dental hygienist with regard to dietary counseling.
      2. Identify the type of patient who needs dietary counseling.
      3. Explain the role each of the following play in the caries process: tooth, saliva, food, and dental biofilm.
      4. Choose foods that stimulate salivary flow.
      5. Outline food choices and their timing to reduce the cariogenicity of a patient’s diet.
      6. Analyze the role nutrition plays in periodontal health.
      7. Correlate the effects of food consistency and composition in periodontal disease.
      8. Describe nutritional factors associated with gingivitis and periodontitis.
      9. Relate the importance of a screening device for identifying patients nutritionally at risk for dental caries and/or periodontal disease.
    11. Evaluate and record the DMACC Assessment of Caries and Periodontal Risk factors and counseling session on a student partner
      1. Describe the components needed to assess the nutritional status of a patient.
      2. Explain the purpose and perform the CariFree CariScreen Caries Susceptibility Test on a student partner.
      3. Fill out your CAMBRA (Caries management by risk assessment) form based on your patient’s provided or identified data.
      4. Assess your patient’s 5 day diet record.
      5. Formulate a dietary treatment plan for a dental problem influenced by nutrition.
      6. Identify the steps and considerations in implementing a dietary treatment plan.
      7. Describe the steps in a recorded nutritional counseling session.
      8. Demonstrate several communication skills the dental hygienist should employ when counseling a patient.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  • DHY 251 - Community Oral Health

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The course relates the concepts of dental public health and preventive dentistry, including principles of biostatistics, epidemiology, dental manpower and delivery systems. Students plan, implement and evaluate a community dental health project.
    Prerequisite: DHY 261  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the connection between people’s health and community oral health.
      1. Identify public health problems, including dental disease, within a community and relate them to public health measures or solutions.
      2. Illustrate the role of government in public health solutions and appraise its role in the 10 greatest public health achievements of the 20th Century.
      3. Examine the basic core functions of public health and how the dental hygienist plays a role in various community oral health practices within each core function.
    2. Compare and contrast responsibilities included in a public health career, including program development, implementation and evaluation in a variety of settings.
      1. Distinguish between independent options versus community agency options as possible public health careers for dental hygienists.
      2. Examine the problem of access to oral health care as it relates to an increased need for more dental hygienists in the public health arena.
      3. Identify the common skills and educational requirements for both private practice and public health service.
    3. Evaluate how community health is affected by social, demographic, political, economic, and technological changes.
      1. Describe the basic terms, concepts and characteristics of epidemiology as they pertain to community health.
      2. Summarize the conceptual models that illustrate the determinants of health and how those determinants affect the health of individuals and communities, including oral health.
      3. Compare and contrast the different methods of data collection utilized in community health assessments and how that data supports program development and future program evaluation.
      4. Compare the health goals and objectives of the most recent Healthy People initiative to the previous 10-year Healthy People initiative to assess the successes and failures or those initiatives.
      5. Identify oral health disparities and contrast that to current trends of oral health in the United States.
    4. Appraise community oral health programs as opportunities for achieving improved oral health and ultimately, overall health.
      1. Identify oral health programs at multiple levels of government and illustrate how program goals and objectives are essential to the success of program planning, implementation and evaluation.
      2. Summarize the benefits of primary prevention programs, including fluoridation, sealants, and oral health education.
      3. Identify and differentiate between different funding streams and structures for obtaining dental services through public health systems.
    5. Evaluate methods of research which yield reliable evidenced-based information.
      1. Defend the various parameters of the scientific research method and equate that to dependable conclusions of statistical significance.
      2. Describe the criteria for reviewing scientific literature and interpret its importance in evidenced-based decision-making.
      3. Summarize in-depth research findings and relate those findings to professional peers from the dental hygiene community through a formal presentation.
    6. Appraise various promotion efforts within a community health setting that can increase demand for care, use of dental services, and preventive self-care measures.
      1. Evaluate various health promotion theories and their application to the promotion of oral health.
      2. Describe various accepted and innovative health-messaging strategies for delivering health information to consumer groups.
      3. Summarize the basic components, advantages, and limitations of various methods of presenting scientific information to health professionals.
      4. Describe various service-learning programs that enhance a dental hygienist’s understanding of and opportunity for community involvement.
      5. Assess various professional organizations that offer professional growth and development in the field of community and dental public health.
      6. Summarize each health care professional’s role and define their responsibility in patient care.
      7. Analyze the roles and responsibilities of various health care professionals, including Dental Hygiene professionals, working in a reciprocal and collaborative relationship for the benefit of the patient’s total health care.
    7. Assess the concept of social responsibility as it pertains to personal and professional ethics.
      1. Interpret the various opinions surrounding health as a right or a privilege.
      2. Relate how the current delivery of oral health care services affects access to care.
      3. Predict how the concept of need versus demand affects allocation of resources and ultimately affects the hygienist’s role as Consumer Advocate and Educator.
      4. Illustrate the responsibility of the dental hygienist within the realm of community education, risk communication, leadership, cultural competency and his/her role in providing care to special populations.
      5. Prepare a community outreach presentation that draws upon educational and communications skills, which addresses the specific oral health needs of a particular geriatric population.
      6. Produce a lesson plan that draws upon educational and communication skills, which addresses the specific oral health needs of a particular school-aged population.
    8. Recognize general physical, mental, emotional, and systemic characteristics of the geriatric population and indicate how those might influence or be influenced by unmet oral health care needs.
      1. Describe the demographics, risk factors, disease patterns, physiological changes, and psychological factors that have implications for oral changes and treatment challenges.
      2. Discuss likely educational needs of geriatric populations based on their unique oral conditions.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DHY 261 - Dental Health Education

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An introduction to the principles of instruction in health care. The course will include developing, presenting and evaluating dental health education programs for public schools and community groups.
    Prerequisite: DHY 170 , DHY 171  
    Competencies
    1. Perceive how the person relates to the community and factors that influence personal and community health
      1. Discuss the differences between the World Health Organization’s definitions of health and others’ definitions, as well
      2. Discuss the concepts of wellness and high-level wellness in relation to health
      3. Discuss the models of health and health behavior associated with the treatment-orientation and prevention-orientation paradigms of healthcare leading to the current health promotion paradigm
      4. Differentiate between the three levels of prevention: primary, secondary, and tertiary, and provide an oral health example for each
      5. Differentiate between health education, health prevention, and health promo­tion
      6. Describe health promotion strategies of social marketing, health education, mass media, community organization, advocacy, and legislation
      7. Recognize the themes from Healthy People 2010 and Healthy Iowans 2010: empowerment, eliminating health disparities, collaboration, and dynamic change
      8. Identify oral health goals, rational and action steps from Healthy Iowans 2010 that impact children
      9. Discuss the role of the dental hygienist as change agent, manager, consumer advocate, researcher, and educator in health promotion
    2. Recognize that oral disease remains a public health problem for Americans and how this problem can be addressed through dental health education.
      1. Recall the importance of dental health education and promotion
      2. Identify essential information that the dental health educator must be cognizant of as a part of program planning
      3. Recognize that behavioral theories applicable on an individual level may not be transferable to solving group and community level health problems
      4. List and describe key issues in dental health education
      5. State the factors related to the learner and social environment that influence the dental education process
      6. Apply current theories of health education that research has proved effective
      7. Describe a variety of dental health programs
      8. Provide a list of strategies to further the public’s oral health
    3. Explain the objectives, components, contents, and factors involved in general and dental health school programs
      1. Define health education.
      2. Distinguish between public health education and school health education; describe their interrelationship
      3. Briefly outline the growth and development of school health program policies.
      4. Identify the responsibility for public school education
      5. Identify the major content areas of health instruction.
      6. State the primary goals of a dental disease prevention program
      7. Recognize the several different areas in which dental health concepts can be reinforced in the elementary school curriculum
      8. Discuss dental health as a major area of health education
      9. Describe the potential roles of the dental hygienist in a school setting
    4. Recognize and apply principles of the teaching-learning process
      1. Describe the domains of learning
      2. Identify major theories of motivation
      3. Describe how teaching, learning, and communication are interwoven
      4. Give examples of application of principles to classroom and/or chairside education
      5. Analyze written descriptions of presentations and isolate strengths and weak­nesses, based on teaching-learning principles
      6. Describe the application of learning theory in behavioristic, cognitive, and humanistic psychology
      7. Identify communication, teaching and learning techniques appropriate
    5. Prepare to become a classroom oral health educator throughout childhood and adolescence
      1. Identify aspects to be considered in preparing to become an effective educator
      2. Apply knowledge regarding classroom management techniques.
      3. Increase awareness of multicultural issues in a diverse student population
      4. Identify general methods of teaching and their appropriate use, such as lecture, demonstration, discussion and inquiry, games and activities, role playing, small group/cooperative learning, problem-solving; field trips, and audiovisuals and visuals.
      5. Recognize the emotional and physical development for the age/grade being taught
    6. Identify and apply components of a dental health lesson plan
      1. Focus on topics appropriate for dental health education for grades K-6.
      2. Utilize current theories for lesson planning.
      3. Identify necessary adaptations to meet the requirements of special needs students in the classroom
    7. Plan, implement and evaluate a dental health unit of instruction for first grade students in an Ankeny elementary school
      1. Observe the classroom setting and students
      2. Prepare a formal written lesson plan that focuses on objective-driven areas of dental health education.
      3. Implement the lesson plan at a time to be coordinated with the classroom teacher
      4. Evaluate the lesson utilizing object-driven criteria.
      5. Reveive and analyze the teacher/classroom evaluation and compare it to self-evaluation for the benefit of future presentations.
    8. Recognize program evaluation as a method to provide accurate information for decision making.
      1. Distinguish between basic and applied research.
      2. Recall the importance of measurable objectives in relation to evaluation methods.
      3. Define the following: reliability and validity.
      4. Explain the meaning of and discern the differences between evaluation, measurement, and testing
      5. Discuss the need for multiple evaluation instruments.
      6. List recognized factors to consider in instrument selection.
    9. Recognize and apply an approach for preparing a community outreach program
      1. Identify basic components required
    10. Recognize specific problems, skills and opportunities that are required to understand and perform prevention and treatment for children under the age of 5
      1. Describe the fetal development of the oral cavity and oral findings during pregnancy
      2. Discuss the timing and location of common caries experience in children
      3. State the rationale for recommended age of first dental interaction and possible indications for referral to a pediatric dentist
      4. Develop policy and office protocol that follow the needs of the developing child, using anticipatory guidance
      5. Discuss components of dental caries risk assessment
      6. Describe preventive measures for high risk children
      7. List principles that can be used in treatment and management according to risk assessment
      8. State the benefits of managing the caries process before the cavi­ties
      9. Recall how you know the caries process has been successfully managed
      10. Define anticipatory guidance
      11. List and describe the domains of behavior.
      12. Recall common fears children have about dental experiences
      13. Discuss the parental dimensions in regard to informed consent and risk management
      14. Identify traumatic injuries to primary teeth
      15. Recall periodontal and soft tissue abnormalities of young children
      16. Recognize factors affecting dental and maxillofocial growth and development
      17. State the major stages of comprehensive orthodontic treatment
      18. Describe early orthodontic treatment initiated in the primary or mixed dentition
      19. Describe mechanical plaque control aids as well as the use of fluorides and antimicrobial agents for the orthodontic patient

  
  • DHY 281 - Dental Hygiene II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A continuation of clinical practices. Further instruction and application in techniques for a complete oral prophylaxis and Phase 1 therapy. Topics include smoking cessation, intraoral photography, sonic scaling and air polishing.
    Prerequisite: DHY 181 , DHY 182 .
    Corequisite: DHY 282  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate a variety of advanced instrumentation techniques and clinical processes that may be strategic in achieving competent and successful Phase I patient therapy.
      1. Assess the use of appropriate sonic and ultrasonic technologies based on specific patient parameters, while taking into account contraindications and benefits for advanced treatment of complicated patient cases.
      2. Justify the appropriate selection and use of airpolishing devices dependent on specific patient parameters, while taking into account contraindications and benefits.
      3. Defend the appropriate use of high velocity evacuation versus low volume evacuation systems during patient treatment procedures, while accounting for specific patient parameters.
    2. Analyze supplementary technologies designed to enhance diagnostic capabilities, prevention strategies, recordkeeping, and educational modalities, all with the intent of contributing to better patient outcomes.
      1. Examine the processes and techniques for successfully incorporating intra/extra oral photography into patient treatment and/or education.
      2. Compare various cavity detection technologies designed to enhance diagnostic capabilities in a clinical setting.
      3. Categorize various preventive sealant processes and differentiate their proper selection and application per patient-based criteria and needs.
      4. Distinguish between various historical and current site-specific drug application options in order to select appropriate treatment choices for periodontally compromised patients.
      5. Select appropriate digital recordkeeping processes that will enhance accuracy, encourage completeness, make use of appropriate professional language, decrease errors, promote intra and inter professional dialogue, enhance communication skills, develop a legally defensible document and reduce unnecessary legal liability.
    3. Comprehend the principles of body movements for motion economy and efficiency, including correct postural criteria for patient, operator and assistant in a “four-handed” clinical setting.
      1. Describe and explain the appropriate “clock” positions and zones of activity that contribute to maximum efficiency and productivity.
      2. Relate the positions and zones of activity incorporated into various delivery systems to operator/assistant fatigue and productivity issues.
      3. Identify the primary benefits of an efficient process for time and motion management.
      4. Summarize the impact of facility design, traffic flow, auxiliary support, and environmental factors on maximization of clinical and facility resources.
    4. Evaluate the impact of tobacco products on systemic health and the oral environment and assess the rationale for dental hygienists to be involved in intervention activities.
      1. Appraise the success of Motivational Interviewing per current available evidence as to its effectiveness during behavioral modification counseling.
      2. Predict the successful transfer of Motivational Interviewing to a chair-side delivery format in the dental clinical setting.
      3. Compare the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing in Smoking Cessation Counseling to traditional chair-side educational processes.
    5. Analyze patient treatment options utilizing Evidenced-based Decision-making.
      1. Distinguish between acceptable sources of evidence-based information versus non-acceptable sources, and examine how each of those sources might affect the patient’s and the clinician’s ultimate decision-making.
      2.  Compare various techniques for online searches resulting in verifiable and reliably accurate evidence-based information.
    6. Investigate a particular product or recommendation intended for patient therapy, utilizing Evidenced-based Research, resulting in a comprehensive comparison of benefits versus contraindications.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DHY 282 - Clinical Dental Hygiene II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 6
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    A continuation of clinical practices: further instruction and application techniques for complete oral prophylaxes and non-surgical periodontal therapy skills are developed. Topics include smoking cessation, intraoral photography, ultrasonic scaling, air polishing, and site specific therapy.
    Prerequisite: DHY 181 , DHY 182 .
    Corequisite: DHY 281  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate previous practicum competencies with progressive independence and greater efficiency
    2. Demonstrate actions in accordance with standards of personal and professional accountability
    3. Evaluate comprehensive preventive treatment based on the assessment of each patient’s needs
      1. Identify interventions for treatment goals
      2. Plan appointment sequence
      3. Evaluate treatment outcomes
    4. Demonstrate the correct uses for dental anesthetics
      1. Summarize the implications for the application of topical anesthetic
      2. Locate anatomical sites for specific injection techniques
      3. Determine the correct depth and tissues penetrated by the local anesthetic needle for each injection
    5. Implement safe and effective clinical dental hygiene techniques in order to achieve and/or maintain the patient’s optimal oral health
      1. Detect and remove supra- and submarginal deposits
      2. Perform adjunctive services appropriately
      3. Practice accurate dental and periodontal charting and record keeping
      4. Demonstrate optimum infection control protocol.
      5. Produce and interpret diagnostic radiographic images.
      6. Demonstrate basic instrumentation skills with all instruments
      7. Identify dull instruments and implement the appropriate sharpening procedure
    6. Modify basic techniques based on patient variables
      1. Identify patients with special needs related to age, group and/or unique health conditions.
      2. Select appropriate patient self-care techniques based on patient need.
      3. Apply current research to patient education and techniques. 

           

  
  • DHY 291 - Dental Hygiene III

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A continuation of clinical practices. Topics include dental hygiene care for individuals with special needs, care planning, third-party payment applications, substance abuse and dependent adult abuse.
    Prerequisite: DHY 281 , DHY 282 .
    Corequisite: DHY 292  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze basic human need theories as related to the dental hygiene process.
      1. Compare between various theories and central paradigm concepts, including Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory, nursing’s human needs theory, and dental hygiene’s human needs model.
      2. Examine the dental hygiene human needs model in relationship to assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation as the core of professional practice.
    2. Synthesize historical data, clinical assessment data, socio-economic factors, standard of care expectations and patient human need theories to establish a comprehensive, realistic, formal patient treatment plan.
      1. Formulate an all-encompassing written treatment plan utilizing the entirety of the dental hygiene process and taking into consideration periodontal risk factors, ASA Physical Status, treatment modalities and prognosis considerations.
      2. Prioritize intervention strategies for appropriate treatment sequencing according to urgency, existing etiological factors, severity and extent of the condition, and individual patient requirements.
      3. Plan for appropriate inter-professional collaboration to address the multi-faceted needs of the patient during intervention processes.
      4. Revise intervention strategies based on jointly determined patient goals, patient compliance, patient understanding of influencing etiologies, and measurable, verifiable outcomes.
    3. Understand the intricate role of dental insurance as an economic force that affects access and quality of care regarding a variety of dental services.
      1. Describe and discuss how dental insurance resources require the cooperation of the patient, employer, provider, and insurer to maximize potential benefits.
      2. Explain the different types of prepaid dental care programs currently available and how each would be processed between the four key parties.
      3. Relate the difference between legitimate and fraudulent dental coding practices, describing appropriate examples under various codes.
    4. Analyze the principles of informed consent as it pertains to implicit and explicit consent within the dental treatment setting.
      1. Differentiate between implicit and explicit consent and the relationship between each type of consent and the torte law of battery.
      2. Correlate the two prominent types of consent to a dental hygienist’s scope of professional liability and subsequent professional insurance coverage/limitations.
    5. Comprehend the physical manifestations, the stages of progression, the biological changes, and the socio-cultural-economic impact of various addictive substances typically abused by dental patients, dental professionals and the general public.
      1. Paraphrase these manifestations, changes and impacts as they pertain to opioids, alcohol, cocaine, current street drugs, nitrous oxide, and tobacco.
      2. Relate the impact of these various addictive substances to the oral cavity and predict the visible oral manifestations and possible treatment interventions.
      3. Discuss the community impact from these addictions and discuss available treatment resources that would enable the dental hygienist to support the patient through education and intervention assistance.
    6. Evaluate characteristics of a variety of special needs patients and assess the need for any adaptive educational and clinical techniques.
      1. Appraise each special needs patient according to their risk factors, limitations, medications, possible emergency situations, oral health complications and oral health management restrictions.
      2. Justify the appropriate preplanning and assessment for each special needs patient appointment.
      3. Critique possible barriers to care for special needs patients and propose solutions to the dilemma of access to care.
      4. Judge the appropriateness of proposed educational and treatment interventions based on specific characteristics of each special need patient and design a unique written treatment plan demonstrating this judgment.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DHY 292 - Clinical Dental Hygiene III

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 15
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    See DHY 291 .
    Prerequisite: DHY 281 , DHY 282 .
    Corequisite: DHY 291  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate previous practicum competencies with progressive indepen­dence, greater efficiency, and confidence
    2. Demonstrate actions in accordance with standards of personal and profes­sional account­ability
    3. Implement safe, effective, non-traumatic clinical dental hygiene techniques in order to achieve and/or maintain the patient’s optimal oral health
      1. Detect and remove all supragingival deposits for all Deposit Classifications
      2. Detect and remove all subgingival deposits for Deposit Classification II
      3. Detect and remove most subgingival deposits for Deposit Classification III, IV, and V
      4. Perform correctly the following additional adjunct service when appropri­ate
      5. Apply current research to preventive and treatment modalities
      6. Identify patients with special needs for whom dental hygiene care is modified
      7. Demonstrate basic instrumentation skills with all instru­ments
      8. Modify basic techniques based on patient variables
      9. Produce, evaluate, interpret, and utilize all radiographs
    4. Produce a written preventive treatment plan to meet the needs of each patient
      1. Assemble assessment data from a variety of patient cases (including medical history, vital signs, intraoral and extraoral examinations and chartings, radio­graphic surveys, diagnostic casts, and the patient’s expectations).
      2. Identify priorities for treatment including
      3. Design a treatment plan best suited to the specific needs of each patient based on the established dental hygiene diagnosis
      4. Include in the case presentation for each patient (1) the legal requirements of informed consent and (2) the basic principles of interpersonal communica­tion
      5. Complete a logical sequence of planned appointments to facilitate the outcomes for each case
      6. Implement efficient treatment and modify treatment plan as necessary
      7. Evaluate treatment outcomes and identify need for additional supportive therapy
    5. Demonstrate the ability to apply the ethical decision-making process when confronted with an ethical dilemma
    6. Recognize the business aspects of the dental office: appointment book management, financial records, telephone communication, dental insurance
    7. Demonstrate increasing proficiency within prescribed error margins

  
  • DHY 301 - Dental Hygiene IV

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A continuation of clinical practices. Legal, ethical and management aspects of the dental care system are considered. Career alternatives and job-seeking skills are demonstrated.
    Prerequisite: DHY 292 , DHY 291 .
    Corequisite: DHY 302  
    Competencies
    1. Assessment of personal wants, needs and talents to enhance goal setting and selection of a career pathway
      1. Identify factors that health care providers often express as important considerations in selecting a practice setting
      2. Identify concerns that should be considered in assessing how a practice setting meets one’s priorities
      3. Explain how a formal decision making process applied to selecting an employment setting can clarify the strengths and weaknesses of each possible decision
    2. Identify how a dental hygienist can develop effective management and leadership skills that can be used by the dental hygiene clinician, office manager, change agent, consumer advocate, educator, or researcher
      1. Differentiate between leadership and management
      2. Explain how the dental hygienist uses the leadership process to benefit the client, the oral health team, society, and the dental hygiene profession.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of how Iowa dental consumers have been affected by changes in the Iowa code and Rules for Dental Hygiene Practice.
      4. Explain how the dental hygienist uses the leadership process to benefit the client, the oral health team, society, and the dental hygiene profession
      5. Explain how leadership and management skills can be used to effect change
      6. Demonstrate knowledge of how Iowa dental consumers have been affected by changes in the Iowa Code and Rules for Dental Hygiene Practice
    3. Recognize the business aspects and resources needed to run a dental practice
      1. Develop a mission statement and goals for the dental hygiene component of a dental practice
      2. Discuss economic considerations for a profitable practice including production, collection and office overhead.
      3. Describe marketing plans for promoting a dental practice.
      4. Outline the three types of appointment book management systems
      5. Discuss economic considerations for a profitable practice including production, collection and office overhead
      6. Develop a marketing plan for promoting a dental practice
    4. Appreciate how dental hygiene productivity contributes to overall practice goals
      1. Outline a personal plan for career development in the profession of Dental Hygiene
      2. Describe job search strategies, including a list of sources and a prioritized list of job selection criteria
      3. Explain the contributions of the dental hygienist to the dental practice
      4. Compare and contrast the methods of remuneration, including elements of risk and security and range in value for each.
      5. Evaluate job performance, including expectations and techniques necessary for changing performance.
      6. Describe employment alternatives to clinical practice.
      7. Describe employment alternatives to clinical practice
    5. Prepare a resume and develop interviewing skills that will present the applicant as capable and confident for a specific job opportunity
      1. Explain what a resume is and how it can affect an employer’s decision to offer employment to an individual
      2. Specify the usual components of a resume and cover letter
      3. Identify which items are by law not to be considered by employers in offering employment
      4. Prepare a personal resume and cover letter.
      5. Explain briefly the purpose and significance of the interview in finding employment
      6. Prepare for an interview session by using pre-interview techniques including
      7. Outline follow-up procedures that can enhance the effectiveness of the interview and perhaps increase the possibility of receiving an offer of a position
    6. Develop a plan for personal financial management, including an annual budget, adequate insurance coverage, investment goals, and a retirement plan.
      1. Identify payment mechanisms related to the provision of health care
      2. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of remuneration types and select a method that is most compatible with one?s own personal goals
      3. Summarize ways in which cost effectiveness and overall productivity can be measured in a health care delivery system
      4. List functions of a good financial manager
    7. Discuss the principles of technology functioning and application to dental hygiene practice.
      1. Describe the basis for the selection of technology in a dental hygiene environment.
      2. Describe some current technology applications in clinical dental hygiene practice.
      3. Discuss the legal and thical issues of technology usage in dental hygiene practice.
    8. Recognize and apply the rights and duties in the patient-health care provider relationship.
      1. Describe key ethical principles and philosophies affecting healthcare.
      2. Identify the issues emphasized in a code of ethics for dental hygienists.
      3. Develop an awareness of ethical dilemmas encountered in the practice of ental hygiene.
      4. Recognize a theoretical framework to assit in ethical decision making.
      5. Describe the legal concepts and theories that apply to dental hygiene practice.
      6. Recognize methods to reduce risks within the practice of dental hygiene.
    9. Create an ethical framework which allows the student to sort through morally legitimate alternatives and develop an informed perspective for ethical decision-making in practice.
      1. Summarize the sources which guide moral reasoning within the profession such as code of ethics, standards of practice and quality assurance.
      2. Identify perspectives which force us to weigh personal and public interests against professional obligations as health care providers.
      3. State the ethical principles for guiding the ethic decision-making process.
      4. Describe a situation which constitutes an ethical dilemma.
      5. Discriminate among and between ethically legitimate courses of action.
      6. Given an ethical dilemma, apply components of a problem-solving model evaluating issues and approaching decision-making in a step by step rpocess to determine the ethically valid choice(s).
      7. Assume responsibility for making ethically valid decisions in practice.
    10. Evaluate methods of recognizing and eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace.
      1. Differentiate between sexism, sex discrimination, and sexual harassment.
      2. Identify the process for the legal determination of sexual harassment.
      3. Develop methods to stop unwelcome sexual behavior.
      4. Recognize a theoretical framework to assist in ethical decision making
      5. Describe the legal concepts and theories that apply to dental hygiene practice
      6. Develop an awareness of the legal concepts affecting the dental hygienist-client and dental hygienist- dentist relationship
      7. Recognize methods to reduce risks within the practice of dental hygiene
    11. Discuss the standard of skill and care in providing health and dental care.
      1. Discuss the concept of standards and criteria as applied to quality assurance.
      2. Describe the quality assurance cyle in terms of assessment, feedback to providers, corrective action, reporting on corrective action, and reporting to a responsible party.
      3. Describe quality assessment in terms of the assessment of structure, process and outcome, evaluation, and correction.
      4. Describe a situation which constitutes an ethical dilemma
      5. Discriminate among and between ethically legitimate courses of action
      6. Given an ethical dilemma, apply components of a problem-solving model evaluating issues and approaching decision-making in a step by step process to determine the ethically valid choice(s).
      7. Assume responsibility for making ethically valid decisions in practice
    12. Explain the concept of consumer advocacy and how it relates to the ethical duties owed to patients.
      1. Describe the evolution of quality assurance practices in oral healthcare.
      2. Discuss why public agencies, third parties, and employers have an incentive to evaluate the quality of healthcare.
      3. Discuss the following quality assurance mechanisms: client surveys; client complaints; on-site evaluations; treatment record audits; clinical examinations; utilization review and peer review; formal education requirements; accreditation standards; the acc
      4. Advocate quality assurance activities in the oral healthcare environment.
      5. View the field of qulaity assurance as a viable career direction for the dental hygienist.
    13. Interpret portions of Chapter 153-Code of Iowa that pertain to the practice of Dental Hygiene and Dentistry.
      1. Discuss the concept of standards and criteria as applied to quality assurance
      2. Differentiate among quality assurance, quality assessment, and quality assurance mechanisms
      3. Describe the quality assurance cycle in terms of assessment, feedback to providers, corrective action, reporting on corrective action, and reporting to a responsible party
      4. Describe quality assessment in terns of the assessment of structure, process and outcome, evaluation, and correction
    14. Summarize the “Rules and Regulations” established by the Iowa State board of Dental Examiners.
      1. Describe the evolution of quality assurance practices in oral healthcare
      2. Discuss why public agencies, third parties, and employers have an incentive to evaluate the quality of healthcare
      3. Discuss the following quality assurance mechanisms; client surveys; client complaints; on-site evaluations; treatment record audits; clinical examinations; utilization review and peer review; formal educational requirements; accreditation standards; the a
      4. Advocate quality assurance activities in the oral healthcare environment
      5. View the field of quality assurance as a viable career direction for the dental hygienist

  
  • DHY 302 - Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 15
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    See DHY 301 .
    Prerequisite: DHY 292 , DHY 291 .
    Corequisite: DHY 301  
    Competencies
    1. Apply previous practicum competencies.
      1. Review previous competencies.
      2. Demonstrate previous practicum competencies with independence, efficiency, and confidence.
      3. Establish increasing proficiency within prescribed error margins
    2.  Demonstrate actions in accordance with standards of personal and professional accountability
      1. Act personally accountable in clinical environment
      2. Demonstrate professional accountability in a clinical environment
    3.  Implement safe, effective, non-traumatic clinical dental hygiene techniques in order to achieve and/or maintain the patient’s optimal oral health
      1. Detect and remove supragingival deposits for all Deposit Classifications
      2. Detect and remove all subgingival deposits for Deposit Classifications II and III
      3. Detect and remove most subgingival deposits for Deposit Classifications IV and V
    4. Demonstrate execution of and use of dental impressions
      1. Take dental impressions
      2. Make study models for clients with appropriate needs
    5.  Integrate basic science knowledge with pertinent patient data for education and treatment
      1. Render individualized comprehensive patient education
      2. Render individualized comprehensive patient education treatment
    6.  Communicate professionally in a clinical environment
      1. Discuss with other health professionals when providing patient care
      2. Obtain patient consent
    7.  Analyze current research in preventive and treatment modalities
      1. Apply current research to preventive modalities
      2. Apply current research to treatment modalities.
    8. Interpret  the required paperwork process for Clinical Boards.
      1. Select  the order and context that each piece is utilized in the testing situation according to the CRDTS manual
      2. Practice filing out the required paper work in a classroom environment.
    9. Evaluate the criteria necessary for candidate selection for Clinical Boards.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to correctly identify a qualifying candidate.
      2. Utilize the CRDTS manual criteria to screen potential candidates.
    10. Execute a live simulation of the Clinical Board Examination.
      1. Select qualifying candidates.
      2. Coordinate scheduling, attendance, and completion of  patient services
      3. Determine readiness for participating in Clinical Boards based on the results of the CRDTS scoring system of the mock candidate.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

Diesel

  
  • DSL 145 - Basic Electricity

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the basic electricity and electronic principles that apply to diesel-powered equipment. Systems and components covered include starting, charging, lighting and accessories.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the basic fundamentals of electricity
      1. Describe what electricity is
      2. Name the units for force, flow and resistance
      3. List the components of a basic circuit
      4. State the three forms of Ohm?s Law
      5. Describe the relationship of voltage, current and resistance in a circuit
      6. Explain general safety precautions when working with electricity
    2. Calculate values of resistance, current, voltage, using Ohms Law
      1. Solve for volts when amps and ohms are given
      2. Solve for amps when volts and ohms are given
      3. Solve for ohms when volts and amps are given
    3. Explore series circuits
      1. Define a series circuit
      2. Identify a circuit as being series
      3. Explain the rules for voltage, current and resistance in a series circuit
    4. Investigate parallel circuit
      1. Define a parallel circuit
      2. Identify a circuit as being parallel
      3. Explain the rules for voltage, current and resistance in a parallel circuit
    5. Examine series-parallel circuits
      1. Explain the series-parallel circuit
      2. Distinguish the series parts of the circuit from the parallel sections
    6. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multi-meter
      1. Check voltage applied to a circuit
      2. Check voltage drop across two given points in a circuit
      3. Measure the current in a live circuit
      4. Measure the resistance of various components
      5. List the prefixes commonly used along with their symbols
      6. Convert a value of voltage, current or resistance from one prefix to another or two a straight value
    7. Explore common electrical components
      1. Identify the symbols for different electrical components
      2. Explain the different types of resistors and the operation of each
      3. Describe the operation of a bulb and how its resistance is affected
      4. Discuss the functions of several types of semi-conductors
      5. Differentiate the different types of switches and their functions
    8. Analyze the function and condition of a lead-acid battery
      1. State the safety and environmental concerns involved in working with batteries
      2. List the basic components of the battery
      3. Discuss the different categories, types and applications of batteries
      4. Explain the chemical changes occurring during charging and discharging
      5. Diagnose the condition of a battery, performing the necessary steps using a load tester and multi-meter
      6. Explain how to charge a battery and the charge characteristics of different batteries
      7. Describe the proper procedure for jump starting a vehicle
      8. Define and measure parasitic load on the vehicle
    9. Investigate the starter, its related components and circuits
      1. Differentiate between a solenoid and a relay relating their functions to starter operation
      2. Identify the basic starter components
      3. Outline the requirements for motor action, relating these to the starter motor
      4. Describe what to look for when examining a starter
      5. Draw basic starter circuit diagrams, with and without a relay, describing the operation of each circuit
      6. Wire a starter to the vehicle making all necessary connections
      7. Diagnose the condition of the starter circuits, performing the necessary steps using a load tester and multi-meter
    10. Explore the principles and components relating to the charging circuit
      1. Outline the requirements for electromagnetic induction of current and voltage relating this to the alternator
      2. Explain DC,AC, 3 phase AC, Full wave rectification and half-wave rectification
      3. Identify the basic components of an alternator
      4. Describe the procedure for checking an alternator and its individual components
      5. Summarize the operation of the alternator, explaining the two circuits involved
      6. Wire an alternator to the vehicle making all necessary connections
      7. Diagnose the condition of the alternator and vehicle charging circuits using a load tester and multi-meter
    11. Make solder connections and perform other basic electrical repair techniques
      1. Demonstrate the proper procedure to make a good solder connection
      2. Show other methods that can be used to repair wiring or terminals

  
  • DSL 155 - Advanced Electricity

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The electrical circuitry on diesel-powered equipment is covered. Included are troubleshooting, diagnosing and repair procedures. Experienced individuals may contact the instructor to gain admittance to this course.
    Prerequisite: DSL 145  
    Competencies
    1. Develop basic troubleshooting skills
      1. List the types of electrical faults
      2. Discuss the symptoms of an open, high resistance, short to voltage, short to ground
      3. Relate each type of fault to the proper troubleshooting strategy
      4. Explain the steps in a logical order used to locate each of the faults
      5. Identify the type of fault in an actual circuit
      6. Locate the fault in an actual circuit
      7. Troubleshoot a relay circuit
    2. Make measurements on or trace an electrical circuit
      1. Show how to measure voltage drops on a circuit
      2. Explain what is an acceptable reading for each voltage drop measurement made on the circuit
      3. Show how to trace power and ground on a circuit
      4. Explain what reading is acceptable at each point traced
      5. Compare testing with a multi-meter to using a test light explaining where each is appropriate to use
    3. Analyze the basic common circuits used with diesel equipment
      1. Draw basic electrical diagrams of common circuits
      2. Explain the basic operation of common circuits
      3. Explain the basic operation of a relay circuit
    4. Interpret electrical schematics and troubleshooting manuals
      1. Identify the symbols used on schematics
      2. Isolate and trace a given circuit on a schematic
      3. Locate various components, connectors, wires, etc. on the vehicle using a manual or schematic
      4. Troubleshoot a circuit fault on the vehicle
    5. Analyze battery condition on the vehicle
      1. Practice the proper procedures in testing the batteries
      2. Diagnose the battery condition
      3. Examine parasitic load
      4. Recommend any corrective measures needed with the batteries or vehicle
    6. Examine the starting system on the vehicle
      1. Identify each starting system circuit
      2. Inspect all relevant connections and wiring
      3. Test the condition of each circuit
      4. Recommend any corrective action required
    7. Assess the charging system on the vehicle
      1. Identify each charging system circuit
      2. Inspect all relevant connections, wiring and belts
      3. Test the condition of the charging circuit
      4. Test the condition of the alternator
      5. Recommend any corrective action needed
    8. Practice proper repair techniques
      1. Explore different connector types and related tools
      2. Make proper repairs to wiring and various connectors
      3. Demonstrate proper soldering and weatherproofing procedures
    9. Explore other unique circuits
      1. Describe trailer wiring, color-coding, pin configuration
      2. Explain 3+1, 2+2 starting systems
      3. Assess the operation of other unique electrical systems

  
  • DSL 330 - Diesel Engine Tune-Up

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Information on preventive measures to eliminate failures and diagnose engine problems. Instruction related to tune-up procedures.
    Competencies
    1. Identify and define fuel injection components and principles
      1. Define fuel injection terms
      2. Identify fuel sub-systems and components
      3. Troubleshoot possible fuel injection problems
    2. Identify and define the lubrication system and components
      1. Define properties and classifications of oil
      2. Identify and measure components
      3. Interpret oil analysis and define oil change intervals
      4. Troubleshoot lubrication system problems
    3. Identify and define cooling system and components
      1. Define properties and classifications of coolant, sca’s, and anti-freeze
      2. Identify and measure coolant systems components
      3. Troubleshoot coolant system problems
    4. Identify and define engine breathing systems and components
      1. Identify and measure intake and exhaust components
      2. Compare roots blower and turbo chargers
      3. Identify variable Geometry turbochargers and explain operation
      4. Identify and test charge air heat exchangers
      5. Troubleshoot engine breathing system
      6. Demonstrate waste gate adjustment
      7. Identify exhaust and emission components
    5. Identify and define compression brake components
      1. Identify electrical components and read electrical schematics for braking systems
      2. Identify components and trace oil and air flow in the braking compression systems
      3. Demonstrate adjustments for proper operation
      4. Troubleshoot engine compression braking systems
      5. Operate compression brake
    6. Demonstrate proper bridge, valve, valve actuators and injector adjustment on assigned engines
      1. Demonstrate correct procedure from the appropriate service manual
      2. Demonstrate correct bridge, (crosshead, yoke) adjustment
      3. Demonstrate correct unit injector adjustment
      4. Demonstrate correct valve adjustment

  
  • DSL 356 - Diesel Engines I

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction provided in the technical and nontechnical aspects of diesel engines. This information will give students the basic understanding needed to continue in the Diesel Mechanic program.
    Competencies
    1. Use different types of hand, shop and measurement tools
      1. Identify various measurement tools
      2. Read an English micrometer
      3. Read a metric micrometer
      4. Read an English dial indicator
      5. Read a metric dial indicator
      6. Identify and demonstrate correct use of hand tools
      7. Identify, use and maintain shop tools
    2. Distinguish between fasteners
      1. Determine cap screw size
      2. Determine cap screw hardness
      3. Identify course thread cap screw
      4. Identify fine thread cap screw
      5. Identify metric thread cap screw
    3. Introduction of role technicians in the diesel industry
      1. Identify qualifications and careers in diesel industry
      2. Identify the types of training needed
      3. Identify people and inventions that have developed the diesel engine
    4. Identify, define and demonstrate basic diesel engine principles
      1. Define engine terms
      2. Compare four-stroke versus two-stroke engines
      3. Identify engine systems and circuits.
    5. Identify and define power formulas in diesel industry
      1. Identify and use power formulas
      2. Define how much power is needed
      3. Use calculations to define engine outputs 
    6. Disassemble a diesel engine
      1. Remove cylinder head correctly
      2. Remove all pistons correctly
      3. Remove wet liner, dry sleeve and cylinder pack correctly
      4. Remove camshaft and gear train correctly
      5. Remove flywheel correctly
      6. Inspect engine parts for reuse
      7. Measure parts per measurement sheet and service manual
      8. Prepare engine parts and surfaces for assembly
    7. Assemble a diesel engine per engine manual
      1. Install wet liner, dry sleeve and cylinder pack correctly
      2. Demonstrate the correct use of plastigage
      3. Install camshaft and gear train correctly
      4. Install all pistons and rods correctly
      5. Install cylinder head correctly
      6. Demonstrate ability to check flywheel housing concentricity
      7. Install flywheel correctly
    8. Start a diesel engine
      1. Demonstrate engine pre-lube process
      2. Demonstrate starter hook-up
      3. Identify engine leaks
      4. Analyze engine for proper operation

  
  • DSL 366 - Diesel Engines II

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in diagnosing problems and the nature of repairs needed. Information on preventive measures to eliminate failures.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: DSL 356  
    Competencies
    1. Identify, define and analyze fuel injection components and principles
      1. Define fuel injection terms
      2. Identify fuel sub-systems and components
      3. Troubleshoot possible fuel injection problems
    2. Identify, define and analyze the lubrication system and components
      1. Define properties and classifications of oil
      2. Identify and measure components
      3. Interpret oil analysis and define oil change intervals
      4. Troubleshoot lubrication system problems
    3. Identify, define and analyze cooling system components
      1. Define properties and classifications of coolant, supplemental coolant additive, and anti-freeze
      2. Identify and measure coolant system components
      3. Troubleshoot coolant system problems
    4. Identify, define and analyze engine breathing systems and components
      1. Identify and measure intake and exhaust components
      2. compare toots blower and turbo chargers
      3. Identify variable geometry turbochargers and explain operation
      4. Identify and test charge air heat exchangers
      5. Troubleshoot engine breathing systems
      6. Demonstrate wastegate adjustment
      7. Identify exhaust and emission components
    5. Identify, define and analyze engine exhaust brake, compression brake and retarding systems
      1. Identify electrical components and read electrical schematics fro braking systems
      2. Identify components and trace oil and air flow in the braking systems
      3. Demonstrate adjustments for proper operation
      4. Troubleshoot engine braking systems
      5. Operate compression brake and brakesaver hydraulic retarder
    6. Demonstrate the ability to rebuild a cylinder head
      1. Dissemble a cylinder head
      2. Inspect head for cracks
      3. Measure valve guides, valves, seats and springs for wear
      4. Resurface valves correctly
      5. Use valve seat grinder correctly
      6. Examine valve for proper contact
      7. Assemble cylinder head
    7. Perform Cummins fuel injection timing
      1. Demonstrate the correct procedure
      2. Explain each step of the procedure
      3. Read the gauges correctly
      4. Change the reading per instructor’s direction
    8. Demonstrate proper bridge, valve and injector adjustment on assigned engines: Detroit 60 series, Cummins M-11 and N-14, caterpillar 3176, 3406 E, C-11, Mack and seven other engines
      1. Demonstrate correct procedure from the appropriate service manual
      2. Demonstrate correct bridge, (crosshead, yoke) adjustment
      3. Demonstrate correct unit injector adjustment
      4. Demonstrate correct valve adjustment
    9. Demonstrate how to time and in-line fuel pump
      1. Remove fuel pump
      2. Position the engine for fuel pump timing
      3. turn the fuel pump for proper fuel pump timing
      4. Explain the importance of the engine and fuel pump positions
      5. Install the fuel pump correctly timed to the engine
      6. Instructor verification
    10. Demonstrate how to time a rotary fuel pump
      1. Remove fuel pump
      2. Position the engine for fuel pump timing
      3. turn the fuel pump for proper fuel pump timing
      4. Explain the importance of the engine and fuel pump positions
      5. Install the fuel pump correctly timed to the engine
      6. Instructor verification
    11. Demonstrate correct crankshaft and flywheel housing removal and installation
      1. Remove and install flywheel housing
      2. Demonstrate proper measurement of flywheel housing total indicated runout (TIR).
      3. Demonstrate removal and installation of crankshaft in block
      4. Demonstrate removal and installation of main bearings, in-chassis and out of chassis
      5. Demonstrate correct measurement techniques of crankshaft using plastigage, outside mic and dial indicator
      6. Instructor verification
    12. Demonstrate trouble shooting techniques
      1. Identify a cylinder with a miss
      2. Show the uses of a monometer
      3. Use a compression tester
      4. Use spill port timing to confirm correct fuel pump to engine timing
      5. Demonstrate ability to follow troubleshooting charts, manuals and logic to solve problems
    13. Disassemble a diesel engine
      1. Remove cylinder head correctly
      2. Remove all pistons correctly
      3. Remove wet liners correctly
      4. Remove camshaft and gear train correctly
      5. Remove flywheel correctly
      6. Inspect engine parts for reuse
      7. Measure parts per measurement sheet and service manual
      8. Prepare engine parts and surfaces for assembly
    14. Assemble a diesel engine per engine manual
      1. Install wet liners correctly
      2. Demonstrate the correct use of plastigage
      3. Install camshaft and gear train correctly
      4. Install all pistons and rods correctly
      5. Install cylinder head correctly
      6. Demonstrate ability to check flywheel housing concentricity
      7. Install flywheel correctly
    15. Start a diesel engine
      1. Demonstrate engine pre-lube process
      2. Demonstrate starter hook-up
      3. Identify engine leaks
      4. Analyze engine for proper operation

  
  • DSL 409 - Diesel Electronics

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 6
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of electronic fundamentals, lab work with electronic components and testing equipment. Computer-controlled diesel engines are used in lab to demonstrate applications of electronics on diesel power that will meet the demands of the future. Experienced individuals may contact the instructor to gain admittance to this course.
    Prerequisite: DSL 145  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the categories of components in an electronically controlled system
      1. List the three major categories of components
      2. Identify all components and circuits relevant to a particular computerized system
      3. Distinguish an item’s function as an input, control or output
    2. Examine the common types of input circuits and components
      1. List the types of basic input circuits
      2. Define common terms such as: reference voltage, supply signal, return, etc
      3. Explain the basic function of a thermistor and potentiometer
      4. Discuss the operation of two wire and three wire sensor circuits
      5. Explain the function of switch to ground and switch to power circuits
      6. Summarize the operation of speed/position sensors
      7. Relate each type of circuit with its susceptibility to problems like electrical noise and corrosion
      8. Distinguish an analog signal from a digital signal
    3. Analyze the operation of control components, the related service equipment and software
      1. Connect an electronic and/or PC based diagnostic service tools to various electronically controlled systems
      2. Navigate through the menus of a variety of service tools and diagnostic software
      3. List several common screens or menus explaining the purpose of each.
      4. Differentiate factory parameters from customer parameters
      5. Outline common parameters explaining the purpose of each
      6. Describe the difference between a prom and an eeprom
      7. Retrieve diagnostic codes from an ECM
      8. Make necessary programming changes to an ECM using the electronic or PC based service tool
    4. Examine the electronic operation of several types of output devices
      1. Relate electronic terms such as pulsewidth and response time to the operation of electronic unit injector systems
      2. Correlate electronic outputs to the operation of servos and solenoids as used with electronic injection pump systems and timing advances
      3. Compare electronic outputs to the function of regulators and solenoids as used with hydraulically actuated electronically controlled injector systems
    5. Develop skills to systematically troubleshoot and correct a problem
      1. Organize all facts regarding the problem or complaint
      2. Identify all relevant components and their locations
      3. Interpret the manufacturer’s schematics to determine the operation of various electronic systems
      4. Identify and locate specific wires and connectors
      5. Relate the schematics to the actual hardware
      6. Interpret the manufacturer’s troubleshooting manual to determine an effective strategy
      7. Measure voltages and resistance’s in a system using the manufacturer’s adapters or tees as required
      8. Analyze measurements and test results to form a diagnosis
    6. Explore the different manufacturer’s electronic systems
      1. Relate basic concepts to the manufacturer specific systems such as Caterpillar, Cummins, Detroit, Mack, International, John Deere and others
      2. Examine the unique components used by manufactures such as Caterpillar, Cummins, Detroit, Mack, International, John Deere and others
      3. Analyze the software features of the ECM’s and service tools of manufacturer?s such as Caterpillar, Cummins, Detroit, Mack, International, John Deere and others
      4. Practice manufacture specific adjustment of and/or replacement procedures for the manufacturer specific components relating to the electronic system
      5. Review various connector types and repair procedures
    7. Investigate other electronic concepts
      1. Examine the function and application of transistors
      2. Outline the operation of several spark-ignited systems
      3. Explore computer-related principles

  
  • DSL 438 - Diesel Fuel Systems

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The student will be introduced to basic fuel system principles, operational theory and fundamentals of electronic systems of commonly used fuel systems, as well as general repair and diagnostic procedures with exposure to several electronically controlled engines and their diagnostic tools.
    Prerequisite: DSL 366  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the basic principles involved in a diesel fuel system.
      1. List the five operations any fuel system must perform.
      2. Explain the combustion cycle in a diesel engine.
      3. Compare the characteristics of diesel fuel.
      4. Describe the difference between cetane and octane.
      5. Compare the different fuel sybsystems.
      6. Test transfer pump inlet restriction.
      7. Test transfer pump pressure.
    2. Investigate the fundamentals of the injection nozzle.
      1. Identify the components of a nozzle.
      2. Inspect the parts of a nozzle.
      3. Describe the fuel flow of a nozzle.
      4. Explain the operation of a nozzle.
      5. Text a nozzle.
    3. Examine the principals of diesel engine controls.
      1. Explain the basic operation of mechnaical governor.
      2. Identify the adjustments of amechanical governor.
      3. Explain the operation of a ECM.
      4. Interpret the parameters of the ECM.
      5. Describe the inputs, outputs, and processing of the ECM.
    4. Investigate the fundamentals of Detroit Diesel fuel system.
      1. Indentify the components of a Detroit unit injector.
      2. Explain the operation of a Detroit unit injector.
      3. Indentify the components of a DDEC fuel system.
      4. Describe the fuel flow of a DDEC fuel system.
      5. Examine the status of the DDED fuel system.
      6. Describe calibration codes for a DDEC injector.
      7. Inspect the parameters of the DDEC fuel systems.
      8. Describe the fuel flow of a detroit fuel amplified common rail system.
    5. Analyze the fundamentals of Catepillar fuel system.
      1. Identify the components of a new scroll pump.
      2. Describe the fuel flow of a new scroll pump.
      3. Indentify the components of a PEEC fuel system.
      4. Identify the components of a MEUI fuel system.
      5. Describe the fuel flow of a EMUI fuel system.
      6. Indentify the components of a HEUI fuel system.
      7. Describe the fuel flow of a HEUI fuel system.
      8. Describe the E-Trim codes for a MEUI injector.
      9. Inspect the parameters of the ADEM electronic system.
      10. Describe the fuel flow of a Catepillar common rail system.
    6. Examine the fundamentals of Cummins fule system.
      1. Identify the components of a PT fuel system.
      2. Describe the fuel flow of a PT fuel system.
      3. Identify the components of a Cummins CELECT Plus fuel system.
      4. Describe the fuel flow of a Cummins CELECT Plus fuel system.
      5. Indentify the components of a Cummins CAPS fuel system.
      6. Describe the fuel flow of a Cummins CAPS fuel system.
      7. Identify the components of a Cummins HPI-TP fuel system.
      8. Describe the fuel flow of a Cummins HPI-TP fuel system.
      9. Inspect the parameters of the Cummins electronic system.
      10. Describe the fuel flow of a Cummins common rail fuel system.
    7. Explore the principles of the Bosch and Delphi fuel system.
      1. Identify the components of a Bosch injection pump.
      2. Describe the fuel flow of a Bosch injection pump.
      3. Indentify the components of a Bosch EUP fuel system.
      4. Describe the fuel flow of a Bosch EUP fuel system.
      5. Identify the components of a Delphi EUI fuel system.
      6. Describe the fuel flow of a Delphi EUI fuel system.
      7. Describe the claibration codes for a Delphi EUI injector.
      8. Describe the fuel flow of a Bosch common rail system.
    8. Explore the fundamentals of diesel exhause emissions.
      1. Identify noxious exhauset gases.
      2. Describe a diesel exhaust gas recirculation system.
      3. Explain the operation of a diesel particulate filter.
      4. Classify the different types of diesel particulate filter regeneration.
      5. Understand the use of selective catalytic reduction.

  
  • DSL 546 - Power Trains I

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Class and lab activities in the design and operation of drivetrain components including clutches, manual transmissions, drive lines, rear axles and wheel bearings.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of clutches on a written test
      1. Identify the parts of a clutch assembly
      2. Describe the operation of a clutch
      3. Describe the adjustment of a push-release clutch
      4. Describe the adjustment of a pull-release clutch
      5. Outline the procedure for removing and replacing a clutch
      6. Describe the function of a clutch brake
    2. Adjust a pull release clutch in a vehicle
      1. Obtain specific procedure from service manual
      2. Adjust to manufacturer’s specifications
    3. Remove a pull-release clutch from a flywheel
      1. Select proper tools to remove the clutch
      2. Inspect the clutch for wear patters
      3. Reinstall the clutch in the correct order
      4. Install the transmission with the release linkage in the correct position
    4. Remove a SOLO clutch
      1. Demonstrate the procedure obtained from service manual
      2. Demonstrate ability to reset pressure plate to correct clearance for reuse
      3. Demonstrate ability to reinstall clutch assembly and remove caging bolts
      4. Explain setup procedure and demonstrate application of the setup procedure
    5. Explain how the DM clutch operates
      1. Demonstrate ability to remove and install a DM clutch
      2. Identify the parts in a DM clutch
      3. Evaluate a clutch for worn components
    6. Demonstrate a working knowledge of clutch linkages
      1. Describe how to perform adjustments for the clutch brake with mechanical linkage
      2. Explain how to adjust clutch pedal free travel when mechanical linkage is used
      3. Describe how to perform clutch brake adjustments when hydraulic release mechanisms are used
      4. Demonstrate the ability to bleed a hy6draulic release clutch
      5. Identify the parts of a mechanical release and a hydraulic release clutch
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of standard transmissions on a written test
      1. Identify various gear designs
      2. Identify the components of the air systems found on the RT, RTLO, and FR series Eaton transmissions
      3. Describe how each of the air system components functions in the air system
      4. Demonstrate the ability to install and trouble shoot the transmission air system
      5. Explain the relationship between speed and torque
      6. Identify the major components found in the back box on a RT, RTO, and RTLO transmission
      7. Describe how the inertia clutch performs in the RTLO series transmissions
      8. Describe the major types of shift bar housings
      9. Describe the difference between driven components and driving components
    8. Evaluate a twin countershaft transmissions
      1. Select proper tools to disassemble the transmission
      2. Inspect wear patterns
      3. Trace the power flow through each speed, including reverse
      4. Calculate the gear ratios for all speeds, including reverse
      5. Reassemble the transmission
      6. Demonstrate the ability to time the needed components
      7. Demonstrate the ability to shim the needed bearings and shafts in the transmission
      8. Test run the transmission to check for correct operation and assembly procedures
      9. Demonstrate knowledge of twin countershaft transmissions on a written evaluation
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of automated mechanical transmissions on a written test
      1. Identify the differences between an automated and standard transmission case and internal parts
      2. Identify the components that are added to the transmission to allow for automated shifting
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of how each shift is managed
      4. Perform the electrical precheck
      5. Demonstrate the ability to complete the pneumatic test
      6. Perform the electrical start up test
      7. Retrieve fault codes using the ignition switch
      8. Retrieve active and inactive codes using diagnostic software
      9. Clear all fault codes
    10. Demonstrate knowledge of drive shafts on a written test
      1. Name the parts of a drive line
      2. Define the importance of phasing a drive line
      3. Explain drive line alignment
      4. Calculate driveshaft operating angles
      5. Demonstrate the ability to remove and install a u-joint
      6. Measure drive shaft run out
      7. Demonstrate the ability to field balance a drive shaft
    11. Demonstrate knowledge of wheel bearings and wheel rims on a written test
      1. Explain the TMC method of adjusting a wheel bearing
      2. Identify Budd type wheel mounting
      3. Identify Hub Piloted wheel mounting
      4. Identify Dayton wheel mounting
      5. Explain why the different wheel mountings can not be intermixed
    12. Demonstrate knowledge of rear axles on a written test
      1. Identify different types of rear axles as used in trucks
      2. Name the basic parts of a driving axle
      3. Explain the operation of the carrier and differential assembly
      4. Explain the operation of a double reduction rear axle
      5. Explain the operation of an inter-axle differential
      6. List the five general reassembly steps for a carrier assembly
    13. Assess one single reduction carrier assembly
      1. Select the proper tools to disassemble the carriers
      2. Inspect the wear patterns
      3. Check and set the pinion bearing pre-load
      4. Set the pinion assembly depth
      5. Set the carrier bearing pre-load
      6. Set the ring gear assembly position (backlash).
      7. Check gear tooth contact pattern
    14. Evaluate a double reduction carrier assembly
      1. Select the proper tools to disassemble the carrier
      2. Inspect wear patterns
      3. Check and set the pinion bearing pre-load
      4. Set the pinion assembly depth
      5. Set the carrier bearing pre-load and the backlash
      6. Check the gear tooth contact
    15. Evaluate one forward rear axle carrier assembly
      1. Select the proper tools to disassemble the carrier
      2. Inspect wear patterns
      3. Check and set the pinion bearing pre-load
      4. Set the pinion assembly depth
      5. Set the carrier bearing pre-load
      6. Set the backlash
      7. Check the gear tooth contact pattern
      8. Reassemble the inter-axle differential (power divider).
      9. Demonstrate ability to set input shaft end play 
    16. Remove a forward rear axle carrier assembly
      1. Select proper tools to remove the carrier assembly
      2. Remove inter-axle drive shaft and through shaft
      3. Remove full floating axle shafts
      4. Remove carrier assembly
      5. Reinstall the carrier assembly and all related parts

  
  • DSL 555 - Power Trains II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction will include the basics of automatic transmissions, power shift transmissions, final drives and hydrostat drives.
    Prerequisite: DSL 546 , DSL 606  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of Torque Converters
      1. Identify the three main components
      2. Understand torque multiplication
      3. Understand power flow through converter
      4. Explain Vortex flow
      5. Explain rotary flow
      6. Identify the components in a four element torque converter
      7. Explain stall speed
      8. Explain the operation of an impeller clutch torque converter
      9. Demonstrate an understanding of a torque divider torque converter
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of planetary drive transmissions on a written test
      1. Identify parts of a planetary gear set
      2. Understand torque multiplication
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of how a multiple disk clutch works
      4. Understand power flow through an Allison AT/MT transmission
      5. Understand the hydraulic circuits of an Allison AT/MT transmission
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of Allison MD transmissions on a written test
      1. Identify the clutches found in the rotating clutch module
      2. Identify those clutches that are stationary
      3. Explain the differences between stationary and rotating clutches
      4. Demonstrate how to measure clutch clearances
      5. Demonstrate how to adjust shaft clearances internally on the transmission
      6. Explain hydraulic flow through the valve module
      7. Demonstrate the ability to test main oil pressure
      8. Explain what pressure should be recorded at the main pressure tap for each gear
      9. Understand what control main pressure is and how it is regulated
      10. Retrieve fault codes using the shift control panel
      11. Perform a stall test
      12. Monitor operating conditions using software and PC
      13. Demonstrate ability to take apart and reassemble the transmission by modules
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of heavy equipment powershift transmission
      1. Understand power flow through transmission
      2. Explain hydraulic circuits
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of directional clutches and speed clutches
      4. Explain the purpose of the pressure differential valve
      5. Explain how neutral is achieved
      6. Identify high and low clutches
      7. Identify solenoids used for each gear
      8. Demonstrate ability to retrieve clutch application pressures
      9. Demonstrate ability to test solenoids used to apply clutches
      10. Perform clutch calibration procedure
      11. Retrieve clutch calibration values
      12. Explain park brake operation
      13. Explain the function of the clutch pedal
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of hydraulic drive axles
      1. Identify components
      2. Explain power flow
      3. Explain controls for operation
      4. Explain operation of an open loop system
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of hydrostatic drives
      1. Identify components
      2. Explain how components work
      3. Explain operation of a closed loop system
      4. Understand testing of system and results
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of control by wire hydrostatic systems
      1. Identify the components needed in the system
      2. Follow electrical diagrams to determine component locations on equipment
      3. Perform electrical checks on wiring harness
      4. Use manufactures software and demonstrate ability to calibrate pump displacements
      5. Demonstrate ability to calibrate hand controls and/or foot controls

  
  • DSL 606 - Hydraulics and Brakes

    Credits: 6
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 10
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The study of basic mobile hydraulics and vehicle brake systems. Introduces principles, components, fluid systems and circuits of hydraulic systems. Vehicle braking studies hydraulic and air brake systems.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the fundamentals of hydraulic ISO symbols.
      1. Identify hydraulic component symbols.
      2. Interpret the meaning of hydraulic symbols.
      3. Draw schematics of each test stand using ISO symbols.
    2. Calculate the force of a given cylinder under given pressures.
      1. Compute the area of a piston.
      2. Determine the force of the cylinder using the force-area pressure formula.
      3. Compute the effective area on the rod side of the piston.
      4. Identify the force of a cylinder retracting using the force-area pressure formula.
    3. Inspect a hydraulic jack.
      1. Analyze the seals on the pump and piston.
      2. Examine the valves.
      3. Trace the hydraulic oil passage ways.
    4. Evaluate a gear pump for possible repairs.
      1. Disassemble the gear pump.
      2. Inspect the pump for wear patterns.
      3. Explain the operation of the gear pump.
      4. Determine necessary gear pump repairs.
      5. Reassemble the gear pump.
    5. Analyze a vane pump for possible repairs.
      1. Disassemble the vane pump.
      2. Identify this pump as a balanced or unbalanced pump.
      3. Inspect the pump for wear patterns.
      4. Identify necessary repairs.
      5. Reassemble the vane pump.
    6. Evaluate a piston pump for possible repairs.
      1. Disassemble the piston pump.
      2. Identify this pump as a radial or an axial piston pump.
      3. Inspect wear patterns.
      4. Identify necessary repairs.
      5. Reassemble the piston pump.
    7. Examine a hydraulic cylinder.
      1. Disassemble the hydraulic cylinder.
      2. Analyze the piston seals.
      3. Inspect cylinder condition.
      4. Determine necessary cylinder repairs.
      5. Reassemble the hydraulic cylinder.
    8. Assess pump GPM on test stands and machines.
      1. Use the flow meter to obtain the GPM readings.
      2. Compare flow rate GPM with specifications.
      3. Evaluate the condition of the pump.
    9. Evaluate the principles of circuits on test stands.
      1. Observe the cushion action on a cylinder.
      2. Compute extend and retract times of a regeneration circuit.
      3. Explain the use of a pressure compensated flow control valve.
      4. Demonstrate the use of a counterbalance valve.
      5. Evaluate the action of pressure reducing valves.
      6. Describe resistances in series.
    10. Examine the fundamentals of machines.
      1. Time the extension and retrction of the cylinders.
      2. Compare the actual times to the specifications.
      3. Analyze the times for the correct repair.
      4. Check the cylinder drift of the cylinders.
    11. Evaluate the principles of brakes.
      1. Explain the factors the effect braking.
      2. Describe friction.
      3. Determine the effects of speed and weight.
      4. Define the differences between trucks and tractors.
      5. Identify hydraulic brake functions.
    12. Analyze the fundamentals of a brake system.
      1. Identify major components of a brake system.
      2. Explain the operation of a dual circuit brake system.
      3. Compare operations of disc and drum brakes.
      4. Describe the operation of the parking brake.
      5. Interpret the operation of ABS.
      6. Define brake balance.
    13. Assess the drum brake rebuild procedure.
      1. Remove drum brakes.
      2. Inspect lining and components.
      3. Assemble drum brakes.
      4. Adjust the drum brakes.
    14. Assess the disc brake rebuild procedure.
      1. Remove brake pads.
      2. Inspect brake pads and components.
      3. Assemble the disc brakes.
      4. Adjust the disc brakes.

  
  • DSL 733 - Air Conditioning

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course on basic air conditioning theory and design. Emphasis will be placed on various system controls and service operations.
    Competencies
    1. Explain basic air conditioning terms
      1. Explain heat and its movement
      2. Explain temperature and its units of measurement
      3. Define a British thermal unit
      4. Describe latent heat and how it is useful
      5. Explain sensible heat
      6. Define boiling
    2. Explore air conditioning concepts
      1. Describe how temperature and pressure are related
      2. Explain what happens to heat during evaporation and condensation
      3. Describe how pressure affects the boiling and condensation point of refrigerant
      4. Relate superheat and sub-cooling to an a/c system
      5. Correlate air temperature and humidity to a/c
      6. Relate the importance of the non-compressibility of a liquid to an a/c system
    3. Demonstrate over all operation of AC systems
      1. Show the components, in proper order, that are involved with TXV and CCOT systems
      2. Differentiate the high and low sides of an a/c system
      3. Differentiate where liquid and gas exists in an a/c system
      4. Identify major components on the vehicle
      5. Trace refrigerant flow, identifying its state, on the vehicle
      6. Explain the purpose and operation of different a/c compressors
      7. Describe the functions of a thermostatic expansion valve and orifice tube
      8. Explain the function of a condenser
      9. Explain the function of an evaporator
      10. Describe the purpose of a receiver/dryer and accumulator
      11. Tell what a suction throttling valve does for a system
    4. Explain important safety issues involved with AC service
      1. List safety precautions to take when working with refrigerants
      2. Explain the hazards involved with refrigerants
      3. Explain important precautions to take when using a gauge set or recovery equipment
    5. Examine environmental issues related to AC
      1. List the common refrigerants used in mobile a/c systems and how they affect the environment
      2. Tell what types of contaminates must be removed when recycling used refrigerant
      3. Explain EPA requirements for refrigerants including alternatives
      4. Describe some common changes that may have to be made for a conversion
    6. Service an AC system
      1. Explain the operation of a gauge set and its valves
      2. Locate the vehicle’s service ports
      3. Describe the major operations performed when servicing a/c
      4. Demonstrate how to properly recover refrigerant
      5. Demonstrate how to properly evacuate a system
      6. Tell what types of oils are used and how they can be added to the system
      7. Explain how to charge on the high side and low side
      8. Tell several ways to determine the amount of charge
      9. Demonstrate how to make a complete charge using a recovery/recycle machine
      10. Demonstrate how to charge using a gauge set
      11. Replace common components
    7. Evaluate the condition of an AC system
      1. Tell what can harm an a/c system
      2. Explain the purpose of an identifier
      3. Describe the procedure for stop-leak detection
      4. Describe several methods to detect refrigerant leaks
    8. Examine the electrical subsystem
      1. Explain the operation and purpose of each electrical component including clutches
      2. Identify symbols for electrical components
      3. Explain the functions of binary and trinary switches
      4. Trace an electrical schematic and check a basic system
      5. Describe the basic principles of a computer-controlled system
    9. Describe blend air operation
      1. List components in proper order of air flow
      2. Identify air door functions
      3. Tell several methods used to control air temperature
      4. Explain the reasons for re-circulating the air different applications
    10. Diagnose the operation of the AC system
      1. Give examples of questions to ask the customer
      2. List various observations to make
      3. Explain normal gauge readings to have under different conditions
      4. Relate abnormal gauge readings to possible causes
      5. Relate other abnormal observations to possible causes 

  
  • DSL 830 - Operation & Maintenance

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the proper methods of maintaining all equipment. Safety will be emphasized.
    Competencies
    1. Explain safety in operation
      1. State personal safety rules
      2. State rules for general job safety
      3. State safety rules for operating different pieces of equipment
      4. State safety rules for driving truck
    2. Demonstrate general shop knowledge
      1. Identify different fasteners
      2. Identify hose
      3. Identify tubing
      4. Using measuring tools properly
      5. Demonstrate use of lifting equipment
      6. Demonstrate use of hand tools
      7. Demonstrate use of air tools
    3. Demonstrate maintenance of truck and equipment systems
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of different oil and grease lubricants
      2. Perform oil change and grease equipment
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of cooling systems
      4. Perform cooling system tests
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of air intake and exhaust systems
      6. Perform air intake system checks
      7. Demonstrate knowledge of air brake systems
      8. Perform air brake system tests
      9. Demonstrate knowledge of steering components
      10. Perform steering inspection
      11. Demonstrate knowledge of suspension components
      12. Adjust truck rear air suspension
      13. Demonstrate knowledge tires
      14. Perform tire inspection
      15. Demonstrate knowledge of wheel alignment
      16. Perform wheel alignment inspection
      17. Demonstrate knowledge of track components
      18. Perform track inspection
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of truck operation
      1. State duties and responsibilities of operator
      2. Perform DOT walk around inspection
      3. Demonstrate proper application for shifting gears
      4. Demonstrate the ability to back-up a tractor/trailer combination
      5. Perform trailer hook-up and unhook
      6. Demonstrate dynamometer tests
    5. Demonstrate equipment operation
      1. State responsibilities of operator
      2. Perform equipment walk around
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of equipment controls
      4. Operate equipment in designated area
      5. Demonstrate knowledge to load and lash equipment

  
  • DSL 845 - Heavy Equipment Repair

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the repair and service of equipment relating to the heavy equipment industry. This includes all phases normally done in a general repair shop. Instruction is given under structured lab and field conditions. Experienced individuals may contact the instructor to gain admittance to this course.
    Prerequisite: DSL 366 , DSL 546 , DSL 606 , DSL 145  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate safe use of following shop tools
      1. Jack and jack stands
      2. Hoists
      3. Battery chargers
      4. Welder
      5. Cutting torch
      6. Grinders.
    2. Service brake systems
      1. Inspect brake chambers, shoes, disc, and parking brakes (Visual inspection).
      2. Check for air leaks
      3. Repair worn shoes or discs
      4. Adjust all brakes (wheel and parking).
      5. Check brake pressures
    3. Perform cooling system checks
      1. Pressure test radiator
      2. Check anti-freeze protection
      3. Inspect all hoses
      4. Inspect belt tension and condition 
    4. Perform engine tune-up
      1. Remove and install injectors/nozzles
      2. Clean injectors
      3. Test injectors/nozzles
      4. Adjust valves
      5. Adjust injector travel
      6. Remove injection pump
      7. Re-time injection pump to engine
      8. Test turbo wastegate
      9. Test air-air cooler
    5. Examine a drive line
      1. Inspect u-joint
      2. Inspect slip-shaft
      3. Measure driveline angles
    6. Perform transmission inspection
      1. Check charge pressure
      2. Check pressure regulator setting
      3. Check forward/reverse clutch pressure
      4. Check high/low clutch pressure
      5. Measure hydrostatic transmission pressures
    7. Perform differential inspection
      1. Check differential lock pressure
      2. Check FWD disengagement pressure
    8. Perform safety and operational checks on the electrical system
      1. Inspect battery condition and connections
      2. Perform battery load test
      3. Measure voltage drop at starter
      4. Perform alternator output test
    9. Perform hydraulic system checks on equipment
      1. Check fluid level and check for leaks
      2. Measure pump output
      3. Check relief valve pressure setting
      4. Check actuation times and record
    10. Evaluate track condition
      1. Measure track pitch
      2. Measure track rollers
      3. Measure support rollers
      4. Measure bushing wear
      5. Inspect sprocket wear
      6. Adjust track tension
    11. Investigate failure analysis
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of types of cast iron
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of difference between cast iron and steel
      3. List types of fractures
      4. List types of wear

  
  • DSL 855 - Truck Repair

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Instruction in the repair and service of equipment relating to the trucking industry. This includes all phases normally done in a general repair shop. Instruction is given under structured lab, classroom and field conditions. Experienced individuals may contact the instructor to gain admittance to this course.
    Prerequisite: DSL 366 , DSL 546 , DSL 606 , DSL 145  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate safe use of the following shop tools
      1. Jack and jack stands
      2. Hoist
      3. Battery chargers
      4. Welder
      5. Cutting torch
      6. Grinders
    2. Repair king-pins
      1. Inspect for wear
      2. Remove king-pin
      3. Investigate repair procedures
      4. Assemble and adjust clearances
    3. Inspect suspension systems
      1. Identify suspension types
      2. Identify wear points
      3. Measure air ride height
      4. Adjust ride height
      5. Perform steering gear tests
    4. Perform wheel-bearing inspection
      1. Remove wheel
      2. Remove bearings
      3. Inspect wheel bearings
      4. Install wheel seals
      5. Adjust wheel bearings
    5. Service brake systems
      1. Inspect brake chambers, shoes, disc and parking brakes (visual inspection).
      2. Check for air leaks
      3. Repair all air leaks
      4. Replace worn shoes or discs
      5. Adjust all brakes (wheel and parking).
    6. Perform cooling system checks
      1. Pressure test radiator
      2. Check anti-freeze protection
      3. Inspect all hoses
      4. Inspect belt tension and condition
    7. Perform engine tune-up
      1. Remove and install injectors/nozzles
      2. Clean injectors
      3. Test injectors/nozzles
      4. Adjust valves
      5. Adjust injection travel
      6. Remove injection pump
      7. Re-time injection pump to engine
      8. Test turbo wastegate
      9. Test air-air cooler
    8. Examine a drive line
      1. Inspect u-joints
      2. Inspect slip-shaft
      3. Inspect center support bearings
      4. Measure driveline angles
    9. Inspect a clutch
      1. Evaluate clutch operation
      2. Inspect linkage/cable
      3. Measure internal adjustment
      4. Measure free-play adjustment
      5. Check clutch brake contact
      6. Investigate hydraulic clutch
    10. Perform safety and operational checks on all electrical equipment
      1. Inspect battery condition and connections
      2. Perform battery load test
      3. Measure voltage drop at starter
      4. Perform alternator output test
    11. Perform ABS brake inspection
      1. Check system for fault codes
      2. Identify ABS system
      3. Measure AC voltage at wheel end
      4. Measure component resistance
      5. Remove inactive fault codes
    12. Evaluate electronic engine
      1. Hook-up test equipment
      2. Check active and inactive fault codes
      3. Troubleshoot active fault codes
      4. Perform system tests
      5. Follow manufactures schematic
      6. Investigate latest engine technology


Dietary Management

  
  • DTM 350 - Health Field

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Roles of dietary personnel in health facilities and state and federal guidelines. Explore managerial aspects within facilities.
    Competencies
    1. Interpret the organization chart of a health care facility
    2. Create an organization chart for a dietary department
    3. Distinguish levels of care in health care facilities
    4. Identify characteristics (the meaning) of a mission statement
    5. Identify the role of a licensed dietician in patient assessment, care planning, menu planning, recipe standardization, and in-service education
    6. Identify the role of a dietary manager in patient assessment, care planning, recipe standardization, and in-service education
    7. Describe motivational techniques for the health care team members to work together to promote improved nutritional care plans for residents
    8. List the agencies that survey health care facilities and the procedure they use
    9. Discuss ethics as a supervisor in all employee and resident relationships
    10. Identify techniques for dealing with a fragile segment of our population
    11. Identify self-help devices available for maintaining residents’ independence in eating
    12. Evaluate and discuss the role of the dietary department personnel and their relationships with other departments for the purpose of providing optimum resident care
    13. Summarize information in a medical record pertinent to the nutritional care plan

  
  • DTM 351 - Food Preparation

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Basic principles and development of techniques as they apply to the preparation of each food group and the criterion for evaluating product quality. Laboratory experience.
    Competencies
    1. Apply accepted principles of quantity food preparation to the serving of quality food which contributes to the health and satisfaction of residents in health care facilities
    2. Compute and prepare ingredient and texture modification variations as needed for individualized nutritional care plans for residents
    3. Develop standardized recipes
    4. Identify cost-control measures
    5. Maintain good kitchen sanitation practices for infection control
    6. Prepare appetizing high quality food in the most efficient method possible
    7. Garnish plates and present food in a creative fashion
    8. Operate efficiently and clean equipment used in food preparation, service and storage
    9. Present in-services on food preparation and sanitation
    10. Integrate principles of work simplification in all areas of food production

  
  • DTM 352 - Sanitation/Meal Service

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Methods of efficiently serving safe, pleasing food. An awareness of sanitation will be created for all areas of food service.
    Competencies
    1. Identify relationships between bacteria and food-borne illness
    2. Use sanitary techniques for warewashing and dishwashing
    3. Practice good personal hygiene
    4. Establish an appropriate dress code for food service workers
    5. Develop proper procedures for storage of food and supplies
    6. Maintain serving area, equipment, and dishes in safe, sanitary, and attractive condition
    7. Serve attractive and appetizing food following a written menu
    8. Select proper serving utensils for food
    9. Set table and serve meals correctly following state and federal sanitary regulations
    10. Assist in selection of feeding devices for residents who would benefit from their use

  
  • DTM 353 - Nutrition Life Cycle

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An in-depth study (social, physiological and psychological need) of residents from infancy to geriatric. Explore the therapeutic role of food.
    Competencies
    1. Use the Daily Food Guide to plan menus for a licensed health care facility
    2. Use the Daily Food Guide to evaluate nutritional adequacy of menus
    3. Identify factors that affect nutritional status throughout the life cycle
    4. Describe the major functions and sources of the essential nutrients
    5. Discuss digestion and absorption site of essential nutrients
    6. Calculate caloric values of food

  
  • DTM 354 - Modified Diets

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An assessment of special diets, using the approved diet manual, a review of food guidelines and hints for making modified diets more appetizing.
    Competencies
    1. Identify major functions of key nutrients
    2. Apply the Food Group Guide to menu planning
    3. Write routine modified diets specific to disease conditions using approved diet manual with guidance from a licensed dietician
    4. Use the exchange system for diabetic diets
    5. Calculate nutritive value of menus
    6. Identify ways to supplement diet using nourishments
    7. Select seasonings and garnishes appropriate for modified diets
    8. Discuss nutritive value variance related to food processing

  
  • DTM 355 - Food Production Management

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Total production needs, equipment layout, work methods, food storage, food preparation, service, sanitation and use of computers in food service.
    Competencies
    1. Design food production worksheets for a health care facility
    2. Maintain recipe files and records to support production, nutritional analysis and food costs
    3. Adapt menus to equal nutritional value when a substitution is required
    4. Outline new work flow procedures to save time and energy
    5. Develop energy conservation measures in dietary department
    6. Discuss new and innovative food production methods and food processing techniques
    7. Create a disaster plan for food services
    8. Define quality assurance in food preparation

  
  • DTM 356 - Food Service Management

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The management functions required to organize and maintain an efficient, quality, dietary department are developed.
    Competencies
    1. Define overall functions of each department in a health care facility.
    2. Note how food service relates to all other departments
    3. Write major policies and procedures for dietary department as directed
    4. Document nutritional status of residents through assessments, reassessments, and progress notes with guidance from the licensed dietician
    5. Develop dietary cardex or other component systems
    6. Draw an organization chart for a dietary department
    7. Describe Dietary Manager’s Code of Ethics
    8. Write job descriptions and task breakdown for major positions in food service
    9. Develop efficient work schedules and production schedules
    10. Identify procedural changes of job functions during emergencies
    11. Design a training program for new employees
    12. Discuss interview techniques when interviewing prospective employees
    13. Explain techniques to use when evaluating employee’s performance
    14. Devise required record systems and construct filing procedure for storage of records
    15. Explain how to construct an annual budget
    16. Discuss newest data processing systems and techniques related to food industry
    17. Identify communication techniques to use with surveyors, administrators, preceptor, staff, union, and residents
    18. List ways to cope with stress
    19. Plan preventive maintenance schedule for all kitchen equipment and set up equipment file system
    20. Propose long-range plan for dietary department

  
  • DTM 361 - Food Prep Field Experience

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of food preparation in a healthcare facility. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Supervise preparation of foods using a standardized recipe and calculate cost
    2. Describe the preparation of and the difference in texture modification as needed for persons with disabilities that impair chewing or swallowing
    3. Develop criteria for recipe acceptability and add to faculty recipe file
    4. Identify the use of special seasonings to enhance patient/resident mealtime experience
    5. Apply effective work methods in food preparation
    6. Apply sanitary practices in food preparation
    7. Present the meal in a creative manner, following the menu
    8. Discuss the importance of quality standards for preparation of food products after evaluating menu items for one week

  
  • DTM 362 - Sanitation/Meal Srvc Field Exp

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of sanitation and meal service in healthcare facilities. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Interpret State and Federal survey requirements for sanitation and meal service
    2. Update policy and procedures that address sanitation and meal service
    3. Identify the relationship of microorganisms to clean, safe food
    4. Use sanitary techniques for warewashing and dishwashing
    5. Practice appropriate personal hygiene for food service work
    6. Plan an inservice on personal hygiene for presentation to dietary personnel
    7. Practice proper sanitary procedures for food and supply storage
    8. Describe cleaning procedures and schedule for cleaning, updating as necessary
    9. Plan an inservice on the use of cleaning compounds, with an explanation of MSD’s for presentation to dietary personnel
    10. Develop a policy and procedures for facility pest control program; update as needed
    11. Practice safety methods in the preparation, storage and serving of food, and cleaning operations
    12. Plan an inservice on the safe use of equipment for presentation to dietary personnel
    13. Develop a disaster plan/procedure for facility
    14. Coordinate disaster plan/procedure with other facility departments
    15. Complete a one-week menu evaluation for serving attractive and appetizing food for diets by following a written menu
    16. Select and discuss proper serving utensils for a given menu
    17. Update policies and procedures addressing Meal Service for discussion with other dietary staff
    18. Interpret Work Simplification process to make jobs easier to accomplish

  
  • DTM 363 - Nutrition Life Cycle Field Exp

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of nutritional aspects in healthcare facilities. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Identify the calorie needs of an age group that is not found in the everyday work situation and the amounts of food needed to fulfill those needs
    2. Discuss the components of energy balance as they apply to personal body weight after recording food intake and physical activity for one week
    3. Interview a sample of three people of different ages for their food preferences, quantities consumed, reasons for food selections and describe differences made by people at different ages
    4. Describe how charted information about a resident or patient may vary from the understanding that the patient himself/herself may have of that information
    5. Document residents’ acceptance of menu items by assisting with nutrition care plans

  
  • DTM 364 - Modified Diet/Field Experience

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of modified diets in healthcare facilities. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Write route modified diets specific to disease conditions using approved diet manual
    2. Identify nutritive value variance (calories and nutrients) of a specific food by altering methods of food preparation
    3. Plan an inservice on nutrient/drug interaction for presentation to dietary personnel
    4. Identify ways menu would need to be changed for certain ethnic groups of choice
    5. Describe the facility’s present diet order policy with an understanding of origin and implementation
    6. Identify ways to supplement diet using nourishment
    7. Evaluate nourishment procedure and delivery system
    8. Identify seasoning and garnishes appropriate for modified diets
    9. Identify what dietary information is needed for care conference.

  
  • DTM 365 - Food Production Field Exp

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of food production in healthcare facilities. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Identify the food preference of facility population through the usage of a questionnaire
    2. Analyze a menu to determine if it meets nutritional needs of the house population
    3. Identify and apply principles of food purchasing, receiving and storage
    4. Describe current inventory procedure
    5. Evaluate inventory system for accuracy, time involvement and use of latest available technology
    6. Describe procedure for selecting a meat purveyor
    7. Define quality assurance use on meat purchasing decisions
    8. Develop awareness of the need for continuing education to be informed of new and innovative food production methods, products, and/or equipment
    9. Develop a form to document food quality and recipe accuracy
    10. Use large and small equipment available in institution effectively
    11. Write specifications for certain food items and equipment
    12. Develop standardized recipe files and records to support production
    13. Describe the food transport system
    14. Evaluate the food transport system
    15. Alter menu to equal nutritional value when substitution is required

  
  • DTM 366 - Food Service Mgmt Field Exp

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 4
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Application and evaluation of food service management in healthcare facilities. Practical experience in a selected healthcare facility supervised by a registered dietitian.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)

    Competencies
    1. Interpret the organization chart of the facility and detailed organization chart for the dietary department
    2. Describe the role of and the interaction among staff members in a care plan meeting
    3. Develop an efficient work schedule for employees in the dietary department
    4. Describe the facility’s employee evaluation procedure
    5. Identify the correct contents of an employee file
    6. Describe the procedure for rewarding/correcting dietary employees
    7. Describe proper procedure for evaluation of employee performance with major goal of motivating the employee
    8. Design orientation program for new employee
    9. Write dietary department job descriptions
    10. Plan and conduct a department meeting
    11. Write specifications for piece of major equipment


Drama-Film and Theatre

  
  • DRA 101 - Introduction to Theatre

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    An introductory survey of the elements, techniques, and foundations of theatre as live performance and a cultural event. The course will identify skills and practices of both practitioners and patrons of theatre. Attendance of theatrical performance may be required.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the value of arts education, particularly theatre.
      1. Relate the benefits of engaging in the arts and arts education.
      2. Distinguish why training and education in theatre is unique.
    2. Classify the elements of theatre.
      1. Distinguish the basic facets of a play on paper.
      2. Distinguish the basic facets of a play in production.
      3. Prioritize what makes a play effective.
      4. Chart the methodology and practice of bringing a play from the page to the stage.
    3. Interpret dramatic literature with clear and interesting storytelling.
      1. Break down traditional script analysis.
      2. Demonstrate comprehension of dramatic literature
      3. Create a distinct directorial interpretation of at least one play.
    4. Evaluate the various professional opportunities for practitioners and patrons in the field of theatre.
      1. Assess how training in theatre affects theatre practitioners.
      2. Correlate how theatre and arts education applies to other fields.
      3. Determine the practicalities of working in the arts, particularly theatre.
    5. Outline the elements of performance as they affected society and/or culture throughout history.
      1. Distinguish trends that affect contemporary theatre.
      2. Point out the impacts of society and culture on theatre and vice versa. 
    6. Synthesize an imaginative application of the elements of a production as a script, or other theatrical and creative project.
      1. Use the elements of script analysis within an imaginative project.
      2. Apply the elements of a play to the same project.
    7. Perform the functions of at least one member of the theatrical creative team.
      1. Design effective foundations of a creative act of live storytelling in a theatrical setting.
      2. Develop the design.
      3. Relate the design as a presentation.
    8. Critique a live theatrical production.
      1. Evaluate the effectiveness of two aspects of the play.
      2. Argue why each aspect was or was not effective, citing specific examples.

  
  • DRA 105 - Budgeting for Artists

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 15
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A practical course intended to provide students who may be entering an arts based gig economy with useful tools to support a clear and sustainable financial situation as industry professionals.
    Competencies
     

    1. Classify contractual terminology that is industry standard for artists.
      1. Define independent contractor.
      2. Review the current state of the gig economy.
      3. Determine the union status of a contract.
      4. Compare potential standards of compensation in example markets.
    2. Distinguish essential facets of understanding taxes for independent contractors.
      1. Differentiate federal and state taxes.
      2. Examine examples of deductions that could possibly be claimed.
      3. Point out the current monetary threshold of income from a single payer for filing as an independent contractor.
      4. Outline important dates related to filing as an independent contractor.
    3. Produce effective record keeping tools that support a sustainable career as an artist.
      1. Break down examples of effective record keeping tools that support sustainable careers of gig workers.
      2. Organize receipts associated with possible deductions effectively.
      3. Design a personal budgeting tool that effectively shows expected business expenses.
      4. Design a personal budgeting tool that effectively shows expected personal expenses.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DRA 111 - Survey of Musical Theatre

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 45
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    An exploration of musical theatre and its effect on society and culture from the art form’s roots to current trends on stage and screen. Students will engage with musical theatre’s effects on a wide array of cultural topics, the business of Broadway, and creative advancements through lecture, reading, and video. Attendance at a theatrical performance may be required.
    Competencies
     

    1. Examine the value of arts education, particularly musical theatre.
      1. Relate the benefits of engaging in the arts and arts education.
      2. Distinguish why training and education in musical theatre is unique.
    2. Distinguish elements of theatre specific to effective musical theatre.
      1. Classify the basic facets of a musical theatre play on paper.
      2. Classify the basic facets of a musical theatre play in production.
      3. Prioritize what makes a musical theatre play effective.
      4. Chart the methodology and practice of bringing a musical theatre play from the page to the stage.
    3. Interpret musical theatre plays with clear and interesting storytelling.
      1. Break down traditional script analysis for musical theatre.
      2. Illustrate how moments of storytelling that are heightened with musicality affect the story.
    4. Distinguish the various professional opportunities for practitioners and patrons in the field of musical theatre.
      1. Assess how training in musical theatre affects theatre practitioners.
      2. Correlate how musical theatre and arts education applies to other fields.
      3. Determine the practicalities of working in the arts, particularly musical theatre.
    5. Outline the role of musical theatre performance as it has been effected by society and/or culture throughout history.
      1. Point out the impacts of society and culture on musical theatre.
      2. Correlate the impacts of musical theatre on society and culture.
    6. Analyze the work of musical theatre practitioners who have had a profound impact in the field of musical theatre.
      1. Identify artists who made significant impacts on the development of musical theatre.
      2. Characterize what makes the work of specific musical theatre practitioners profound.
    7. Evaluate the relevance of reviving musical theatre productions for contemporary audiences.
      1. Distinguish historical trends that have effected contemporary musical theatre.
      2. Assess the relevance of musicals in today’s cultural environment.
    8. Synthesize an imaginative application of the elements of a musical theatre production as a theatrically creative project.
      1. Outline the potential stageworthiness of an element or theory of musical theatre.
      2. Produce an example of musical theatre as a project, performance, or script that is composed of multiple aspects of musical theatre training delivered throughout the term.
    9. Critique musical theatre in performance.
      1. Evaluate the effectiveness of more than one musical theatre element within the performance.
      2. Argue why each element was or was not effective, citing specific examples.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DRA 125 - Introduction to Play Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A detailed discovery of the fundamental structure of widely produced and emerging dramatic literature. Students will focus on reading, analyzing, discussing, and interpreting plays as written and with intent on how analysis practically affects production of a play. Attendance at a theatrical performance required.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the foundational elements of a theatrical production.
      1. Establish which aspects are fundamental to the majority of effective plays.
      2. Relate effective elements between varieties of plays.
    2. Examine the foundational structure of effective storytelling.
      1. Break down each fundamental aspect of effective plot.
      2. Infer the potential effectiveness of non-traditional plot structure.
    3. Distinguish how script analysis is different for directors, actors, and designers.
      1. Analyze a play (or scenes within) from various professionally oriented perspectives.
      2. Compare the differences in analyses with attention to putting analysis into practice.
    4. Classify the benefits of effective play analysis.
      1. Determine how analysis is practically applied to work on stage in performance.
      2. Outline the process of analytical ideation to production realization.
    5. Interpret plays with intent to produce them.
      1. Distinguish specific effective elements that may propel a play to a clear and interesting production.
      2. Organize a cohesive and effective analysis for each play read.
    6. Compare and contrast variant analyses of individual plays.
      1. Defend one’s interpretation of effective analyses.
      2. Assess the effectiveness of peer’s analyses with considerate criticism.
      3. Develop an ability to constructively receive feedback.
    7. Assess effective non-traditional play structure.
      1. Differentiate fundamental elements of non-traditional plays from traditional ones.
      2. Justify non-traditional effective analyses.
    8. Measure effective production outcomes of play analysis.
      1. Point out examples of effective aspects within staged productions.
      2. Correlate those effective aspects to fundamentals of play analysis.

  
  • DRA 127 - Stage Combat

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 45
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Students will have the opportunity to safely learn the fundamentals of stage combat as it applies to theatrical storytelling. Course includes full, physical participation in staged combat and performance with memorized dialogue from a play. Each term will specialize in one weapon, including, but not limited to, unarmed, rapier, broadsword, quarterstaff, knife, sword and shield, etc. May be taken more than once for additional credits.
    Competencies
     

    1. Integrate the fundamental safety protocol necessary to perform stage combat in a consistently healthy manner.
      1. Identify terminology that is fundamental to safety within the practice of stage combat.
      2. Establish consistent use of eye contact with stage combat scene partners prior to engaging in stage combat.
      3. Show the ability to consistently engage in stage combat at the pace prescribed by the instructor.
    2. Examine the essential history of how stage combat has been used to enhance storytelling.
      1. Describe effective examples of stage combat as executed for the purpose of forwarding a story.
      2. Discuss the effect of the stage combat in relation to how a person’s physiology would be affected by the maneuvers, should they have happened as described within the imaginary circumstances.
    3. Distinguish the historical relevance of the weapon of study for the term.
      1. Classify each part of the weapon being used.
      2. Identify when the weapon was likely used throughout history.
      3. Characterize how the weapon was historically used.
    4. Prove that effective stage combat is an aspect of effective storytelling that is connected to the fundamentals of acting.
      1. Discuss the ways stage combat is dependent upon acting fundamentals.
      2. Show an example of stage combat that is also an example of effective acting fundamentals.
    5. Practice a wide array of effective, fundamental stage combat maneuvers, independent of dialogue.
      1. Break down fundamental terminology used in the practice of stage combat.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to perform each move of stage combat with precision.
    6. Perform one or more scenes where the staged combat feels like truthful behavior within the imaginary circumstances of the story.
      1. Incorporate stage combat into a scene with dialogue in a way that makes the stage combat feel necessary to the story.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to connect stage combat to the fundamentals of acting.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
  
  • DRA 130 - Acting I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Foundational training for beginners in the craft of acting. Focus on the fundamentals of discovering truthful performances in the context of contemporary plays. Opportunities for both actors and non-actors to gain confidence in acting, performing, presentations, and social interaction. The course includes exercises, analysis, and memorized performances. Attendance at a theatrical performance may be required.
    Competencies
    1. Break down the definition of acting.
      1. Experiment with the theory of imaginary circumstances.
      2. Experiment with the theory of truthful behavior.
    2. Examine the foundational terminology for the craft of acting.
      1. Discuss relevant terminology used in the field.
      2. Use studied terminology practically in exercises, discussions, assignments, rehearsals, and performances.
    3. Incorporate the tools of the voice, body, and impulse into truthful behavior as perceived by an audience.
      1. Identify an individual’s habitual and/or learned mannerisms.
      2. Establish neutrality of mannerisms.
      3. Develop mannerisms that can be perceived as truthful behavior within imaginary circumstances.
    4. Determine how an actor analyzes scene work.
      1. Develop a methodology for analyzing a scene for acting effectively within it.
      2. Develop a methodology for scoring a text.
    5. Interpret a character as written in the context of a play.
      1. Decide what analysis and scoring is strongest in support of clear and effective storytelling.
      2. Assess how effective the analysis is and how well it was implemented.
    6. Create a performance for two memorized scenes.
      1. Perform each memorized scene more than once with truthful behavior in relation to the given circumstances of each performance.
      2. Apply character analysis and scoring from the script.
      3. Discover the value of being present.
    7. Critique a performance within a live theatrical production.
      1. Evaluate the performer with clear communication of effective and/or ineffective acting choices.
      2. Argue how effective the performer’s acting choices were by citing specific examples.

  
  • DRA 132 - Acting II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Building upon Acting I, this course provides in-depth training in the craft of acting in contemporary professional theatre. Focus on executing dynamic truthful performances in the context of both contemporary and stylized plays. Course includes exercises, analysis, and memorized performances. Attendance at a theatrical performance encouraged.
    Prerequisite: DRA 130  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze all assigned characters.
      1. Decide what analysis and scoring is strongest in support of clear and effective storytelling.
      2. Develop effective, clear, and succinct character analyses and scored scripts.
      3. Show an improved grasp on semantics.
    2. Create a performance for at least two memorized scenes and/or monologues.
      1. Perform each memorized scene more than once with truthful behavior in relation to the given circumstances of each performance.
      2. Apply character analysis and scoring from the script and one’s imagination.
    3. Defend character analyses and acting choices.
      1. Assess how effective the analysis is and how well it was implemented.
      2. Justify the analysis and implementation, citing specific examples.
    4. Incorporate the ability to fight against emotion in imaginary circumstances.
      1. Determine when emotion is present as a by-product.
      2. Develop tools to truthfully fight against emotion in the context of storytelling.
    5. Discover theatrical metaphysics.
      1. Break down the conditions present when a story is brought to presence.
      2. Produce moments that truthfully exist within the full imaginary circumstances of a play or story.
    6. Generate tools for effective acting beyond the dialogue.
      1. Perform a scene with definitive subtext.
      2. Incorporate truthful behavior in substantial moments of silence.
      3. Establish consistent ability to demonstrate effective gestures and movement.
      4. Integrate responsive vocal dynamics in speaking.
    7. Prove an ability to clearly relate truthful behavior within effective storytelling to an audience.
      1. Develop an ability to be heard and understood by audiences on a consistent basis.
      2. Demonstrate the skill of motivated movement that allows the audience to consistently see the visual elements of the story.
    8. Perform one scene and/or monologue from a stylized play.
      1. Perform each memorized scene more than once with truthful behavior in relation to the given circumstances of each performance.
      2. Show a fundamental understanding of how to apply that style on stage.
    9. Examine two or more styles of theatre beyond contemporary realism as they apply to acting.
      1. Characterize non-realistic styles used in contemporary theatre.
      2. Distinguish how truthful behavior is effectively portrayed in those circumstances.

  
  • DRA 134 - Improvisational Acting

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Foundational training in acting and interpersonal behavior in non-scripted scene work. Emphasis on the skills of listening, feeling comfortable in new situations, adding to stories and ideas, and truthful behavior and relationships. Course includes in class performances and exercises. Attendance at a theatrical performance required.
    Competencies
    1. Take part in ensemble building.
      1. Determine what an ensemble is.
      2. Establish an environment conducive to creating.
    2. Examine detailed listening.
      1. Separate the means and levels of listening.
      2. Demonstrate effective listening.
    3. Classify fundamental improvisation terminology.
      1. Examine the basic premises of successful improvisation.
      2. Apply improvisation fundamentals to exercises and performances.
    4. Distinguish the value of improvisation in other fields.
      1. Correlate improvisation fundamentals to processes and procedures in other academic majors and professions.
      2. Infer how improvisation fundamentals affect day-to-day behavior.
    5. Interpret effective non-scripted storytelling methods.
      1. Break down the elements of storytelling that apply to effective improvisation.
      2. Propose ideas that generate effective storytelling in improvisations.
    6. Generate an ability to agree in scene work.
      1. Modify habitual contradictory responses in exercises and performances.
      2. Characterize the benefits of agreement in improvisation.
      3. Develop an ability to show a variety of effective agreement in improvisation.
    7. Create characters.
      1. Invent specific classifications of characters, one at a time.
      2. Characterize behavioral tendencies for specific onstage characters.
    8. Construct stories.
      1. Invent relationships.
      2. Generate effective plot points.
      3. Incorporate all of the ensemble’s additions to the story.
    9. Evaluate improvisations for effective fundamentals.
      1. Assess effective storytelling.
      2. Critique truthful behavior.
      3. Evaluate the strength of performer’s application of improvisation fundamentals.

  
  • DRA 139 - Acting for the Camera

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Foundational training in the vocal, physical, and behavioral practice of truthful acting for on camera projects. Participants will be expected to memorize and perform copy and dialogue on camera.
    Competencies
    1. Break down the definition of acting.
      1. Experiment with the theory of truthful behavior.
      2. Practice with the theory of imaginary circumstances.
    2. Examine the foundational terminology for the craft of acting.
      1. Discuss relevant terminology used in the field.
      2. Use studied terminology practically in exercises, discussions, assignments, rehearsals, and performances.
    3. Distinguish the principal differences between acting for the camera versus acting on stage.
      1. Discuss how truthful behavior in imaginary circumstances is used most effectively on the stage during live performance.
      2. Explore effective truthful behavior while acting on camera.
      3. Determine how effective performed acting choices are on camera.
    4. Incorporate the tools of the voice, body, and impulse into truthful behavior as perceived by the camera.
      1. Experiment with a wide range of vocal-physical choices on camera.
      2. Develop an ability to gauge how effectively the intensity of vocal-physical tools are being applied to storytelling on camera.
    5. Interpret a character as written in the context of a television show or short film.
      1. Decide what character analysis will be strongest in support of clear and effective storytelling on screen.
      2. Determine how effectively the analysis can be implemented.
    6. Interpret copy as written in the context of a commercial.
      1. Prepare copy to be effectively shared multiple ways in the context of a video commercial.
      2. Compare and contrast the variant copy performance styles.
    7. Create an audition length performance of at least one film or television character.
      1. Perform each memorized scene more than once.
      2. Synthesize character analysis preparation with any performance.
    8. Perform audition length copy from at least one commercial.
      1. Present each memorized script more than once.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to apply variant directions.
      3. Show a capacity to hit consistent marks.
    9. Critique performances of actors on camera in various forms.
      1. Evaluate the performer with clear communication of effective and/or ineffective acting choices.
      2. Argue how effective the performer’s acting choices were by citing specific examples.
      3. Distinguish the variant effective choices as related to their forms of delivery.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2020
 

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