Jul 04, 2022  
2021-2022 Course Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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PHI 110 - Introduction to Logic

Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 0
Practicum Hours: 0
Work Experience: 0
Course Type: Core
Learn to recognize and construct good arguments. Study of deduction including categorical and truth functional arguments. Study of induction. Examination of informal fallacies.
Competencies
  1. Explain introductory concepts of logic
    1. Define logic
    2. Define premise, conclusion and argument
    3. Define valid and invalid argument
    4. Define sound and unsound argument
  2. Explain introductory concepts and operations related to categorical argu­ments
    1. Identify the four kinds of categorical sentences
    2. Identify the quantity and quality of each kind of categorical sen­tence.
    3. Show with Venn Diagrams the information conveyed by each kind of categori­cal sentence
    4. Generate valid inferences involving contradictories, contraries, and subcontraries
    5. Generate valid inferences involving conversion, obversion and contraposition
  3. Judge the in/validity of syllogistic arguments through Venn Diagrams and the Method of Aristotelian Rules
    1. Rewrite categorical statements in standard form
    2. Define a standard form syllogism
    3. Identify the major term, minor term, middle term, and mood and figure of a syllogism
    4. Demonstrate the in/validity of syllogisms with Venn Diagrams
    5. Demonstrate the in/validity of syllogisms with the Aristotelian rules
    6. Rewrite nonstandard form syllogisms in standard form in order to be able to apply Venn Diagrams or the Method of Aristotelian Rules to ascertain in/validity
  4. Explain introductory concepts pertaining to truth tables
    1. Distinguish between atomic and compound statements
    2. Symbolize atomic and compound statements
    3. Define logical connectives with truth tables
  5. Appraise the in/validity of arguments using truth tables
    1. Demonstrate in/validity of arguments with full truth tables
    2. Determine the in/validity of arguments with abbreviated truth tables
    3. Show with truth tables whether different statements are logically equivalent
    4. Assess with truth tables whether compound sentences are tautolo­gous, contra­dictory, or contingent
  6. Prove the validity of arguments using natural deduction techniques
    1. Demonstrate the validity of arguments using infer­ence rules and logical equivalence rules
    2. Demonstrate the validity of arguments using Conditional Proof and Reductio Ad Absurdum Proof
  7. Explain introductory concepts relative to informal fallacies
    1. Define what a logical fallacy is
    2. Distinguish formal fallacies from informal fallacies
  8. Assess informal fallacies involving irrelevant premises
    1. Define Ad Hominem Fallacy
    2. Identify arguments that commit Ad Hominem Fallacy
    3. Identify arguments that commit Ad Hominem Fallacy
    4. Identify arguments that commit Straw man Fallacy
    5. Define appeal to Force Fallacy
    6. Identify arguments that commit Appeal to Force Fallacy
    7. Define Appeal to the People Fallacy
    8. Identify arguments that commit Appeal to the people Fallacy
    9. Define Appeal to Pity Fallacy
    10. Identify arguments that commit Appeal to Pity Fallac
    11. Define appeal to Ignorance Fallacy
    12. Identify arguments that commit Appeal to ignorance Fallacy
  9. Assess informal fallacies involving ambiguity
    1. Define Equivocation Fallacy
    2. Identify arguments that commit Equivocation Fallacy
    3. Define Amphiboly Fallacy
    4. Identify arguments that commit Amphiboly Fallacy
    5. Define composition Fallacy.
    6. Identify arguments that commit Composition Fallacy
    7. Define Division Fallacy
    8. Identify arguments that commit Division Fallacy
  10. Assess informal fallacies involving unjustified assumptions
    1. Define begging the question fallacy
    2. Identify arguments that commit begging the question
    3. Define false dilemma fallacy
    4. Identify arguments that commit false dilemma
    5. Define appeal to unreliable authority fallacy
    6. Identify arguments that commit appeal to unreliable authority
    7. Define false cause fallacy
    8. Identify arguments that commit false cause fallacy
    9. Define complex question fallacy
    10. Identify arguments that commit complex question fallacy



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