Jul 04, 2022  
2021-2022 Course Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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PHI 105 - Introduction to Ethics

Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 0
Practicum Hours: 0
Work Experience: 0
Course Type: Core
Comparative study of different traditional moral theories. Application of moral theories to different contemporary moral problems.
Competencies
  1. Characterize the introductory distinctions and tasks of ethics.
    1. Distinguish between descriptive and normative ethics.
    2. Distinguish theoretical ethics versus applied or practical ethics.
    3. Outline the basic tasks of theoretical ethics.
    4. Outline the basic tasks of practical ethics.
  2. Distinguish between teleological and deontological moral theory.
    1. Explain the difference between teleological and deontological moral theory.
    2. Distinguish specific teleological and deontological moral theories.
    3. Distinguish between act, rule, and character ethics.
  3. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of at least four of the following moral theories: Divine Command Theory, Natural Law Theory, Utilitarianism, Deontology, Egoism, and Virtue Ethics.
    1. Outline the moral theory.
    2. Infer basic theoretical and practical implications of the moral theory.
    3. Describe the process of moral judgment for the moral theory.
    4. Explain the arguments for and against the moral theory.
    5. Analyze the arguments for and against the moral theory.
  4. Evaluate the comparative merits of the selected moral theories.
    1. Compare the relative merits of the various ethical theories.
    2. Critique each ethical theory in comparison to the others.
  5. Elaborate a theory of moral value or ‘the good’ to support teleological moral theory.
    1. Distinguish moral value from non-moral value.
    2. Distinguish different senses of ‘good,’ e.g., relative or absolute.
    3. Explain hedonism, egoism, altruism, eudaimonia, and duty as theories of the
    4. good.
    5. Explain arguments in defense of hedonism, egoism, altruism, eudaimonia, and duty.
    6. Analyze arguments in defense of hedonism, egoism, altruism, eudaimonia, and duty.
    7. Compare and contrast the arguments for and against hedonism, egoism, altruism, eudaimonia, and duty.
  6. Categorize moral theories by their foundational moral values.
    1. Recognize the moral values of a given ethical theory.
    2. Explain how those moral values indicate its theory of moral value.
  7. Summarize how to use ethical theories to make moral judgments.
    1. Identify the theory of moral judgment of a moral theory.
    2. Describe the theory of moral judgment.
    3. Interpret how a person would apply the theory of moral judgment.
  8. Apply moral theories to contemporary moral problems. Discuss some of the following suggested moral problems:
    1. Abortion, marriage, pornography, prostitution, privacy, state surveillance, surveillance drones, drone strikes, immigration policy, genetic engineering, capital punishment, war, killing in self-defense, marijuana legalization, euthanasia, suicide, animal rights, environmental ethics, religious tolerance, and justifiable lying or theft.
    2. State the basic facts relevant to a contemporary moral problem.
    3. Investigate the characteristics of the moral problem relevant to the particular theory of moral judgment.
    4. Determine what an adherent of the theory of moral judgment would reasonably conclude and why.
  9. Evaluate the differing judgments of moral theories on contemporary moral problems.
    1. Compare and contrast the reasoning and conclusions of various ethical theories.
    2. Analyze the relative merits of differing moral judgments.
    3. Critique moral theories according to differing moral judgments.



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