Dec 08, 2022  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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ANT 125 - Applications of Anthropology

Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 0
Practicum Hours: 0
Work Experience: 0
Course Type: General
Applied anthropology uses anthropological and interdisciplinary theory and research to address social issues. This course introduces students to basic concepts in four-field anthropology, with an emphasis on cultural anthropology, and it provides an overview of major specializations and current research topics. Students will engage in primary, community-based research through a course project on a topic of choice within one applied specialty. Students in all programs of study at DMACC may benefit through better understanding of qualitative research processes, the broad array of social issues that applied anthropologists study, and the critical thinking and writing that are necessary to problem-solving and understanding of culture and society.
Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ANT 105  or instructor approval
Competencies
  1. Demonstrate an overall understanding of how anthropology has been organized in North America.
    1. Define the four-field approach from the perspective of holism and comparativism.
    2. Outline the history of the four-field approach.
    3. Outline the importance of ethnographic study in ethnology and anthropological theory.
  2. Assess the differences between applied and academic modes of anthropological work.
    1. Examine the differences and overlaps between applied and practicing anthropology.
    2. Explain the emergence of publicly engaged anthropology.
    3. Identify ways in which anthropological praxis speaks to non-academic audiences.
    4. Identify potential broader societal impacts and public outreach of the applied anthropology approach.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the major arguments in deconstructing the practice vs. theory paradigm.
  3. Critically evaluate research methods and paradigms and their applications in learning about social issues.
    1. Outline the major elements of ethnographic methods including participant observation, types of interviews, fieldnotes, and recordings.
    2. Define participatory action research as a method of inquiry in a four-field, applied perspective.
    3. Explain the use of decolonizing and Indigenous methodologies as part of anthropological practice in collaborating with Indigenous communities amidst postcolonial realities.
    4. Explain the main characteristics of program evaluation and its use in anthropological praxis.
    5. Analyze context-specific interpretations of deficit and strength-based research paradigms.  
  4. Apply the key tenets of research ethics and research compliance.
    1. Outline the key points of the American Anthropological Association’s Statement on Ethics.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) and the (Institutional Review Board) IRB process.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of ethnographic research and common ethical dilemmas and problems researchers face in anthropological praxis. 
    4. Understand the proper use of anonymity and confidentiality as part of community-engaged research.
    5. Explain the informed consent process and its role in ethical research practices.
    6. Demonstrate a clear understanding of plagiarism and research misconduct as ethical violations.
  5. Discuss different ways in which applied anthropologists and anthropological insights inform policies and policymakers.
    1. Identify the key points of the American Anthropological Association’s Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights.
    2. Explain the concepts of self-determination and Indigenous sovereignty as outlined in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).
    3. Identify strategies anthropologists use in communicating research results to stakeholders and policymakers.   
  6. Analyze case studies that are using an applied anthropological approach to produce concrete, practical solutions and outcomes.  
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of major applied research trends and theoretical areas in the medical anthropology and community well-being.
    2. Examine the basic concepts of ecological/environmental anthropology as it applies to human interactions with the natural environment and notions of sustainability.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of anthropological practice in contributing to the mission of federal and state governments and agencies.
    4. Survey the uses of anthropological methods and theories in organizational and corporate settings.
    5. Examine the historical discourse on ownership, repatriation, and cultural property rights in heritage preservation that led to the NMAI (National Museum of the American Indian) Act and NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act).
  7. Contextually adapt anthropological research methods and ethics to address a concrete social issue through community-engaged research.
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of collaboratively developed research design with concrete outcomes.
    2. Choose research methods that are appropriate to address the research question.  
    3. Show a thorough understanding of professional responsibilities in research design, data analysis, project management, and dissemination of research results.
    4. Explain the benefits of anthropological knowledge as a set of direct and transferable job skills in the non-academic workplace.

 
Competencies Revised Date: 2020



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