Oct 18, 2019  
2018-2019 Course Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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HIS 280 - Family History Research

Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 0
Practicum Hours: 0
Work Experience: 0
Course Type: General
The student will learn to use various resources and methods in researching, specifically, family history and genealogy. These would include, but not be limited to, census records, various legal documents, obituaries, cemetery lists, family Bibles, diaries, city directories, local histories, immigration records, military records, photographs, etc.
Competencies
  1. Develop a basic understanding of the basics of genealogy and family history.
    1. Differentiate between genealogy and family history.
    2. Contrast primary and seocndary sources and original documents and derivative ones.
    3. Compare the validity/reliability of various sources.
    4. Distinguish among various genealogical forms such as family group sheets, ancestry charts, etc.
    5. Explain basic genealogical terminology and family relationships.
    6. Introduce various examples of software used in genealogy record-keeping.
    7. Assess the importance of historical context.
    8. Analyze the importance of critical, analytical thinking.
  2. Know the various information sources both on-line and on-site.
    1. Develop the ability to use general search engiens and subscription-based and free genealogy sites.
    2. Compare variousebsites that focus on specific areas/subfields of genealogy.
    3. Discover how to use email in making contacts and gathering information; specific tips.
    4. Demonstrate familiarity with the use of mailing lists.
    5. Use message boards to post queries.
    6. Be sensitive to various on-line dos and don’ts.
    7. Familiarize yourself with on-site such as country courthouses, historical societies, libraires, cemeteries.
  3. Discover ways to obtaining, organizing and sharing research.
    1. Explain the importance of recordkeeping through such means as research and corresondence logs.
    2. Develop the proper kinds of paper recordkeeping techniques and computer data bases.
    3. Develop methods of sharing research through the Internet and by other means of communciation.
  4. Assess the basic methods of collecting genealogical information.
    1. Explain the importance of chronology in collecting and arranging information.
    2. Demonstrate basic interviewing techniques and the importance of oral history.
  5. Demonstrate how use census records as a means of gather genealogicl information.
    1. Examine the various census forms, and explain how they have changed over the decades.
    2. Explain where to find census records especially in the Internet.
    3. Develop an understanding of various search strategies.
    4. Assess the value of other census populations and non-population records.
  6. Classify and use various kinds of vital statistics such as birth, death, and marriage certificates, wills and inventories, other legal documents, land records, and the like.
  7. Classify all kinds of non-government primary sources such as church records, diaries and journals, letters and correspondences, obituaries, family bibles, and local newspapers..
  8. Examine such secondary sources as local histories, biographies, history texts, oral histories, etc.
  9. Appraise immigration and naturalization records.
    1. Develop a familiarity with ethnicity, American and European history and immigration patterns.
    2. Locate and contrast information from passenger lists.
    3. Examine the basic naturalization process and explain how to locate and use naturalization documents.
  10. Glean information from military records.
    1. Demonstrate a familiarity with American military history, wars, and military organization.
    2. Evaluate military records as DD-214s and draft cards.
  11. Design and execute a genealogical research trip.
  12. Demonstrate knowledge of various genealogical special topics.
    1. Develop a basic understanding of photographic analysis.
    2. Compose a family history.
    3. Assess information from DNA tests and medical histories.
    4. Discuss special populations such as African Americans and Native Americans.
    5. Explain the difficulties and methods associated with researching ancestors outside the United States.



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