Jul 24, 2019  
2018-2019 Course Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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ART 291 - Travel Photography

Credits: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 2
Practicum Hours: 0
Work Experience: 0
Course Type: Open
Advanced principles of imaging making and presentation will be explored with spirit and knowledge that is expected to engender an appreciation for photography, travel and the visual image. This is a story telling class where students will be challeneged to express a sense of place with their images. (This class uses film or digital DSLR style cameras).
Competencies
During this course, the student will be expected to:

  1. Evaluate places that offer good photographic opportunities.
    1. Define locations that are “off the beaten path”.
    2. Explain where to photograph images of towns and cities.
    3. Identify unique, unusual, and specific interest points.
    4. Produce creative images of places.
  2. Assess how to prepare for travel photography.
    1. Cite the advantages of being familiar with equipment and accessories.
    2. Decide which camera to use for a given photographic opportunity.
    3. Recognize a photographic opportunity in good or bad weather.
    4. Explain how equipment should be packed.
    5. Analyze the image making opportunities from the beginning of a trip to the finish.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to work with all surroundings.
  3. Evaluate the ability to produce images within the camera while on location.
    1. Explain the difficulty in photographing wild animals away from protected areas.
    2. Analyze the purpose of using specified equipment to photograph in different situations.
    3. Explain the purpose of using a blind.
  4. Differentiate how photographers use various means to create artistic expressions.
    1. Relate creative expression in photography to historical locations.
    2. Demonstrate what works in terms of lighting, framing and perspective.
    3. Analyze an image that exists in your “mind’s eye”.
    4. Distinguish between what “makes or breaks” a photograph.
  5. Evaluate an interesting image.
    1. Recognize the process of creating a scene.
    2. Demonstrate a visually interesting photograph.
    3. Identify techniques in designing composition.
    4. Explore photography through the subjects level whenever possible.
    5. Identify and demonstrate the power points of close up composition.
    6. Recognize the quality, direction and intensity of light.
    7. Recognize the decisive moment of peak composition.
    8. Cite and demonstrate ways of using the Rule of Thirds.
  6. Demonstrate the balance between aperture size and shutter speed.
    1. Explain how shutter speed and aperture size are reciprocal in light exposures.
    2. Describe the settings of shutter speed and aperture as they relate to each other.
    3. Cite the advantages and disadvantages of a focal plane and leaf shutter.
    4. Describe the terms “stopping down” and “opening up”.
    5. Demonstrate the panning technique.
  7. Assess the uses of color and B & W photography in nature photography.
    1. Demonstrate the knowledge of choosing the right combination of lighting, exposure, and timing.
    2. Demonstrate the correct filtration for color images.
    3. Identify the correct combination of composition for action photography.
  8. Critque the different types of light in nature photography.
    1. Demonstrate how and when to use a flash in nature photography.
    2. Discuss the different types of flash possibility for nature photography.
    3. Describe what time of day the quality of light is at it’s best.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to prepare for a low-light outing.
  9. Examine compositional elements.
    1. Define the effects of composition.
    2. Describe the differences between good composition and poor composition.
    3. Define compositional concerns such as line, pattern, repetition, contrast and foreground/background relationship.
    4. Demonstrate ways that composition affects the content of the photograph.
    5. Compare the use of the camera controls and light to enhance composition.
  10. Evaluate the difference between landscape and cityscape in photography.
    1. List the two basic ways to photograph landscapes.
    2. Identify a landscape as a non-representational expression of color, shape and texture.
    3. Demonstrate how to photograph a landscape solely as a visual experience, unrelated to its  biological essence.
    4. Identify the impact of cityscape composition in photography.
    5. Select and complete a photographic composition which demonstrates cityscape
    6. photography.



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