Dec 08, 2022  
2020-2021 Course Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions & Competencies


The following are standard, approved subjects. Availability of any subject depends on the scheduling, program and student needs at the time. The receiving college or university determines the transferability of courses.

Course Types

Adjunct Adjunct courses may be temporary or experimental and may be used to fulfill elective credit in programs that lead to a degree or diploma. Adjunct courses may not be used to fulfill or substitute for required or option courses in any degree or program.

General Noncore courses identified as freshman-sophomore courses.

Open Occupationally specific courses corresponding to courses in certain professional programs at four-year institutions.

Voc/Tech Occupationally specific courses. Transferability is generally limited. Only 16 credits can apply to the AA/AS degree.

Core Traditional liberal arts courses in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree.

College preparatory (Coll Prep) College preparatory and skill building courses. College Preparatory courses cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements.

P/F Indicates courses taken pass/fail.

Prerequisites Successful completion of a course or other criterion necessary for a student to succeed in a higher level course.

Corequisites A course that must be taken concurrently or prior to the course.

*An instructor may deny enrollment in or drop a student from a specific course if a course
Prerequisite has not been met.

 

Agriculture-Horticulture

  
  •  

    AGH 146 - Soil Science for Horticulture

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of the management and properties of soils and rooting media for horticulturalists. The course will study the physical, chemical and biological aspects of soil management. This course also includes the study of soil amendments for fertilization, pH and salt control.
    Corequisite: AGH 147  
    Competencies
    1. Describe importance and function of soil and rooting media.
      1. Evaluate role in supporting life.
      2. Identify unique role in plant growth.
      3. Assess agricultural and non-agricultural uses.
    2. Evaluate soil and rooting media components.
      1. Describe 3 phase system: solids, liquids, gases.
      2. Identify major components of soil and how they impact the 3 soil phases.
      3. Identify components of rooting media and their impact on the 3 soil phases.
      4. Correlate impact of components to soil and rooting media uses.
    3. Summarize soil origins and development.
      1. Identify parent materials.
      2. Explain climate influence.
      3. Assess role of soil organisms.
      4. Evaluate impact of topography.
      5. Interpret the influence of time.
      6. Analyze human influence.
      7. Differentiate soil horizons.
      8. Interpret the changes in soil forming process: additions, losses, translocations, and transformations.
    4. Evaluate role and function of soil water.
      1. Explain how plants take up and use water.
      2. Identify forces that act on soil water.
      3. Describe types of soil water.
      4. Describe water movement and retention in soil.
      5. Calculate indicators to measure soil water.
      6. Explain importance of soil drainage and its management.
      7. Assess general irrigation systems.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the soil classification and survey.
      1. Differentiate major soil orders.
      2. Identify land and land forms on soil survey maps.
      3. Assess land based on soil survey maps.
    6. Analyze the impact of physical properties on soil and rooting media use.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of soil texture.
      2. Calculate indicators of soil compaction and porosity.
      3. Identify sources of compaction and solutions.
      4. Evaluate impact of soil management on soil temperatures.
      5. Assess the impact management practices have on soil physical properties.
    7. Describe the role of organisms in soil processes.
      1. Identify the types of organisms in the soil.
      2. Describe organism function in nutrient cycling, soil aggregation, plant growth, and break down of chemicals.
      3. Evaluate soil conditions and practices that impact soil organisms.
    8. Explain the role of organic matter in soil and rooting media.
      1. Define organic matter.
      2. Explain functions of organic matter.
      3. Describe formation and decay of organic matter.
      4. Evaluate factors that influence soil organic matter.
      5. Analyze role of organic matter in the carbon cycle.
    9. Evaluate soil and rooting media chemistry.
      1. Identify plant nutrients.
      2. Describe cation exchange capacity and how it impacts soil management.
      3. Identify forms of nutrients in the soil and the impact they have on soil management.
      4. Describe generally how plants take up nutrients.
      5. Explain development of soil pH.
      6. Explain impact of pH on plant and soil management.
      7. Evaluate impact of salt conditions in soil.
      8. Explain difference in soil and potting media.
    10. Evaluate use of soil and rooting media amendments.
      1. Interpret soil amendment labels such as fertilizer and lime.
      2. Analyze tools for assessing a need for soil amendments such as soil and tissue tests.
      3. Determine if a need exists for soil amendments.
      4. Evaluate fertilizer types.
      5. Calculate proper rates for soil amendments.
      6. Describe in depth the nitrogen cycle.
      7. Explain the fate of applied fertilizers.
    11. Analyze non-native soils.
      1. Evaluate conditions of disturbed soils.
      2. Identify practices specifically needed in disturbed soils
      3. Evaluate soils engineered for specific uses.
      4. Assess unique properties and uses of potting media.
    12. Explain role of conservation in soil management.
      1. Evaluate impacts of compaction.
      2. Describe factors and practices that impact erosion.
      3. Assess agriculture’s impact on water use and conservation.
      4. Identify government programs which work with conservation and agriculture.

  
  •  

    AGH 147 - Soil Fertility for Hort.

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides a study of the practical application of soil management to the various aspects unique to soil and potting media management in horticulture.
    Corequisite: AGH 146  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate soils and rooting media.
      1. Correlate attributes that can impact plant growth and impact land use.
      2. Demonstrate use of USDA Soil Survey Maps.
      3. Assess topography and its impact on soil use.
      4. Assess the three phase system of soil and potting media on an individual site basis.
    2. Evaluate construction of non-native soils and rooting media.
      1. Demonstrate construction of potting media mixes for targeted plants and production systems.
      2. Demonstrate basic knowledge of soils constructed for athletic use.
      3. Evaluate soil engineering options in disturbed soils.
    3. Compare the physical properties of soil and rooting media.
      1. Identify soil separates.
      2. Determine soil texture using the ribbon test and texture triangle.
      3. Compare soil profiles.
    4. Interpret soil and rooting media fertility information and develop a plan for amendment.
      1. Assess pH and the potential limitations for a crop.
      2. Calculate effectiveness and rates of materials used for pH adjustment.
      3. Interpret soil and plant tissue tests and correlate.
      4. Develop species specific nutrient management program based on soil and plant tissue tests.
      5. Calculate and compare fertilizer costs.
      6. Investigate methods of fertilizer application.
      7. Investigate impact of cation exchange capacity on nutrient and pH management.
    5. Evaluate site specific soil erosion.
      1. Identify land management practices that impact erosion.
      2. Explain concept of T value.
      3. Calculate projected soil loss for a selected site and crop management system.
      4. Determine practices that can be implemented to reduce erosion for a site.
      5. Estimate economic impact of soil erosion.
    6. Develop a comprehensive soil management plan.
      1. Determine water management and drainage concerns for selected site and crop.
      2. Determine water management and drainage concerns for selected site and crop.
      3. Develop a basic soil fertility plan for a specific site and crop.

  
  •  

    AGH 154 - Residential Landscape Design

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    Fundamentals of landscape design for homes are presented. Introduction to principles of landscaping as they apply to residential landscaping. Students are given opportunities to draw basic residential landscape plans.
    Prerequisite: AGH 159  

     
    Competencies

    1. Distinguish between the career channels of a landscape designer and a landscape architect
    2. Outline the principles of art and design utilized in landscape design
      1. Identify the art principles used in landscaping
      2. Demonstrate the basics of good design
    3. Interpret landscape plans
    4. Use drafting techniques to draw a basic landscape plan to scale
    5. Reproduce blueprint coloring techniques
      1. Use colored pencils to color a blueprint
      2. Compose a colored blueprint using colored markers
    6. Interview a client, and develop a list of wants for a plan
      1. Use effective listening skills
      2. Follow oral and written directions
    7. Develop a planting plan for public, private and service areas using appropriate plant material for the design concept and cultural conditions
    8. Describe the features of a landscape plan to the client
    9. Accept critical analysis of a project by peers and instructor
    10. List landscape terms used in landscape design
    11. Identify the legal terms used in landscaping
    12. Describe the history of landscaping
      1. Discuss the influence of early civilizations on landscaping
      2. Diagram the European background on formal landscape design
      3. Relate the influence of English landscapes on American design
      4. Explain Asian interpretation of landscapes

  
  •  

    AGH 156 - Landscape Design II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the landscape design of residential, commercial and public areas with an emphasis on advanced planting and hardscape design.
    Prerequisite: AGH 154  and AGH 159  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate plant selection to be used for landscaping.
      1. Determine site limitations due to exposure, moisture, soil limitations, etc.
      2. Prioritize plants which are most adapted to site attributes.
      3. Select adapted plants that meet aesthetic and functional goals
    2. Assess proper and application of hardscapes at a given location.
      1. Determine limitations of hardscapes.
      2. List potential benefits of hardscapes.
      3. Select hardscape materials appropriate for the location and design goals.
    3. Support the role of a master plan in the design process.
      1. Perform graphic skills commonly used in a master plan.
      2. Estimate the costs the master plan design.
      3. Construct a viable master plan.
    4. Evaluate the role of the client in the design process.
      1. Interview clients about landscape projects.
      2. Determine the attributes a client desires in their landscape design.
      3. Demonstrate how to present a master plan to a client.
      4. Incorporate different methods to assist clients in understanding of the design
    5. Produce an approach to selling a landscape design.
      1. List key features.
      2. Recite key phrases
      3. Develop methods to address common customer questions.
    6. Outline potential for value added components to landscapes.
      1. Describe options for lighting systems.
      2. Compare irrigation systems.
      3. Appraise potentials for outdoor furnishings, kitchens, pools, etc in the landscape.
    7. Evaluate existing landscapes.
      1. Attend field trips local landscape sites
      2. Critique positives and negatives of completed landscape projects
      3. Assess positives and negatives of potential landscape projects.
    8. Develop interpersonal skills important to the landscape process.
      1. Prepare an oral presentation about a landscape design.
      2. Give examples of interpersonal skills required for the entire landscaping process.
      3. Define the value of each role in the landscaping process from initial client contact to follow up after the job is completed.

  
  •  

    AGH 159 - Landscape Graphics

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an introduction to landscape graphics and the associated drafting equipment and materials.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the role of presentation graphics in the landscape design process
      1. Identify key features of presentation graphics
      2. Explain the purpose of section drawings
    2. Operate drafting equipment effectively.
      1. Use appropriate drawing tools for a given graphic
      2. Select appropriate templates for a given graphic
      3. Use a protractor, architect’s scale and engineer’s scale
    3. Calculate measurment conversions
      1. Convert measurements from an architect’s scale
      2. Convert measurements from an engineer’s scale
    4. Demonstrate proper lettering for landscape presentation graphics
      1. Produce consistent lettering
      2. Select appropriate placement of lettering
      3. Generate graphics with proper line quality and weight
    5. Develop suitable graphics for plant materials
      1. Draw appropriate graphics for individual woody plants
      2. Produce appropriate graphics for herbaceous plant materials
      3. Generate graphics with proper line quality and weight
    6. Create suitable graphic symbols for non plant materials.
      1. Produce proper graphics for structures
      2. Demonstrate appropriate graphics for water, paving and other non plant materials
    7. Design a plan drawing
      1. Draw border and title block
      2. Label symbols on plan drawing
      3. Create a plant list for a plan drawing
    8. Draw color graphics
      1. Determine appropriate texture and shading for landscape graphics
      2. Apply suitable color to landscape graphics
    9. Create a completed black-line copy of plan drawing from a given set of information
      1. Draw border and title block
      2. Label symbols on plan drawing
      3. Create a plant list for a plan drawing

  
  •  

    AGH 161 - Irrigation Systems

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of the design, installation, use, repair and maintenance of the different types of irrigation systems used in the production of horticulture crops. Irrigation system components, materials and estimates of operation costs will be discussed.
    Competencies
    1. Compare and contrast the various types of irrigation systems used to produce crops.
      1. Correlate different horticulture crops and associated watering/irrigation methods.
      2. Name the different irrigation systems commonly used to produce the different horticulture crops.
      3. Attend field trips to assess different irrigation systems.
    2. Summarize the components of the various irrigation systems.
      1. List a variety of water sources
      2. Describe the functions of anti-backflow devices.
      3. Name the different types of valves used in different systems.
      4. Discuss the functions of controllers.
      5. Explain the various wetting actions of different emitters.
      6. Identify quick-couplers and associated function
    3. Assess various piping materials
      1. Give examples of piping materials used
      2. List advantages and disadvantages of different piping materials.
    4. Characterize the relationship of soils, plants, and water.
      1. Describe the soil properties of porosity and permeability.
      2. Identify the impact of soil amendments on porosity and permeability.
      3. State plant water requirements and variations in water use rates.
      4. Asses the impact of the soil on the plants’ water requirements.
      5. Distinguish variations in water quality due to variable water sources.
      6. Discuss limited water resources and associated demands for water.
    5. Evaluate companies currently dealing in irrigation systems.
      1. List the companies specializing in materials supply, system design, installation and maintenance.
      2. Discuss strengths and weaknesses of various companies.
    6. Formulate the costs of a basic irrigation system
      1. List the component parts and prices.
      2. Estimate the numbers of each listed component needed to complete the system.
      3. Calculate the complete system component costs.
      4. Estimate the total number of hours of labor needed for the installation of the system
      5. Total the installed price of the designed system.
    7. Outline irrigation problems.
      1. Detect common irrigation system problem areas.
      2. Determine the causes of common irrigation system problems.
      3. Analyze whether or not plants are receiving appropriate irrigation applications.
    8. Correct basic irrigation problems
      1. Determine the parts and tools needed to fix the problem.
      2. Apply an appropriate solution to solve an irrigation problem.
    9. Operate a basic irrigation system.
      1. Use mechanical and electric irrigation control systems.
      2. Determine when plants require irrigation applications.
      3. Calculate the amount of water being applied.

  
  •  

    AGH 200 - Landscape Estimating & Bidding

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course investigates the development of landscape bids and estimates.
    Prerequisite: AGH 142  
    Competencies
    1. Interpret landscape construction documents and specifications.
      1. Compute the material being handled for a hardscape and plant installation.
      2. Calculate dimensions materials needed for an installation
      3. Calculate units materials needed for completion of the project
      4. Calculate materials needed to be removed for the completion of the project.
    2. Estimate amount of time needed for each installation
      1. Quantify the time needed to install each materials
      2. Calculate the total installation time needed based on quantity of materials being handled.
    3. Plan work flow and delivery of materials for a landscape installation
      1. Determine timing of material delivery.
      2. Design layout of work area.
      3. Develop sequential steps for work flow.
    4. Develop orders for materials needed from the landscape installation
      1. Indentify businesses which supply the materials needed
      2. Construct a viable order.
      3. Calculate all costs associated with the materials needed
      4. Summarize effective relationships with material suppliers.
      5. Determine effective methods of payment and invoicing
    5. Construct a document that can be provided to a landscape customer.
      1. Determine which information is pertinent to the customer.
      2. Determine which information is pertinent to the sales person.
      3. Produce an accurate estimate.
      4. Produce an accurate bid.
      5. Determine effective methods of payment and invoicing.

  
  •  

    AGH 211 - Advanced Turfgrass Management

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Turf management practices on golf and recreation areas with practical experience in maintaining turf on outdoor campus facilities.
    Prerequisite: AGH 112  
    Competencies
    1. Identify common weeds
      1. Recognize common broadleaf weeds in turf
      2. Recognize common grassy weeds in turf
    2. Describe recognized broadleaf weed life cycles
    3. Describe recognized grassy weed life cycles
    4. Control weeds by selecting appropriate herbicides
    5. Identify common turf insects/pests
      1. Recognize common above-ground turf insects/pests
      2. Recognize common below-ground turf insects/pests
    6. Describe recognized above-ground insect/pest life cycles
    7. Describe commonly recognized below-ground insect/pest life cycles
    8. Control insects/pests by selecting appropriate insecticides
    9. Identify common turf diseases
      1. Recognize common cold-weather turf diseases and their life cycles
      2. Recognize common cool/moderate weather turf diseases and their life cycle
      3. Recognize common hot weather turf diseases and their life cycles
    10. Describe the life cycles of cold, cool/moderate, and hot weather turf disease life cycles
    11. Select appropriate fungicide for control of cold, cool/moderate and hot weather turf diseases
    12. Calibrate sprayers and spreaders for the proper operation required for chemical and fertilizer applications
    13. Label sprayer and spreader components
    14. Describe the impact of ground speed variations on application rates
    15. Explain the impact of variations in pressure on application rates
    16. Compute application rates using ground speed, pressure, and nozzle size (sprayer) or plate setting (spreader) per 1000 ft2 per acre
    17. Demonstrate the correct use and operation of turf maintenance equipment
      1. Select the proper piece of equipment for the maintenance task to be performed
      2. Demonstrate the ability to operate each piece of turf maintenance equipment
    18. Explain the proper timing (seasonal) for the use of each piece of turf equipment
    19. Describe the impact (physical/physiological) each piece has on the turf
    20. Cite the history of turf associated recreational activities
      1. Recall the approximate date of origin of various recognized recreational activities performed on turf
      2. State the size/area of playing surface needed for each recognized activity
    21. Identify employment opportunities in recreational turf maintenance
      1. Recall census figures on various types of recreational turf facilities
      2. State approximate potential income ranges
    22. Outline the construction steps of a golf course
      1. Describe the construction steps of putting greens, tees, and hazards
      2. Explain the construction steps of fairways
    23. Demonstrate knowledge of good business management practices

  
  •  

    AGH 221 - Principles of Horticulture

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A course designed to introduce the student to the principles of botany that are basic to plant life. Topics covered include plant cell chemistry, cell structure, functions, photosynthesis and transpiration.
    Competencies
    1. List the life supporting importance of plants
    2. List economic importance of plants
    3. Identify plant origin centers of the world
      1. Name environmental characteristics of each center
      2. Name species of plants associated with each center
    4. Identify plant communities (biomes).
      1. Name environmental characteristics of each biome
      2. Name species of plants associated with each biome
      3. Detail the features of the grassland/Central Iowa biome
    5. List the five critical environmental factors that when properly managed have the greatest influence on plant growth
    6. List the ten characteristics of a living organism
    7. Identify the seventeen chemical elements essential to plant growth
      1. Name the six macro nutrients/elements
      2. Name the three to four secondary nutrients/elements
      3. Name the six to seven micro/trace nutrients/elements
    8. Identify plant cell anatomical features
    9. Describe the functions of plant cell anatomical features
    10. Explain the independent plant cell anatomical features functions as they relate to the function of the cell as a whole
    11. List the five phases of mitosis
      1. Identify what happens in each phase of mitosis
      2. Describe how the five critical environmental factors influence mitosis
      3. Identify where mitosis takes place within a plant
      4. Explain how mitosis ultimately influences the formation of plant tissues
    12. List the five plant hormones that influence mitosis and growth
      1. Identify the plant growth hormones that have a positive influence on plant growth
      2. Identify the plant growth hormones that have a negative influence on plant growth
    13. Identify essential plant tissues
      1. Describe the functions of simple permanent tissues
      2. Describe the functions of complex permanent tissues
      3. Explain how simple and complex tissues fit together to form anatomical structures
    14. Identify plant anatomical structures
      1. Label the greater anatomical features of roots
      2. Label the greater anatomical features of stems
      3. Label the greater anatomical features of leaves
      4. Label the greater anatomical features of flowers
    15. Describe root, stem, leaf and flower functions
    16. Explain transpiration (xylem) and phloem transport movements throughout roots, stems, and leaves.
    17. Explain tropism movements of leaves, stems and roots
    18. Identify the major phases in photosynthesis
      1. List the sequence of activities within the light phase of photosynthesis
      2. List the sequence of activities within the dark phase of photosynthesis
    19. Identify the major steps in plant respiration
      1. List the sequence of activities of glycolysis
      2. Identify the activities of the Kreb’s cycle
      3. Identify the primary product of the Electron Chain Transport step of respiration
    20. Contrast the stages of meiosis with the stages of mitosis
      1. Identify where meiosis takes place within a plant
      2. Explain how meiosis influences inheritance
    21. Explain the role of DNA as it relates to inheritable traits of a plant
      1. Contrast dominant vs. recessive traits.
      2. Contrast phenotype vs. genotype as it relates to inheritable traits
    22. Construct a Punnett square for a monohybrid cross
    23. Construct a Punnett square for a di-hybrid cross

  
  •  

    AGH 223 - Tree Physiology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The course investigates tree growth patterns and reactions to abiotic influences.
    Prerequisite: AGH 281  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the biological cycles within trees.
      1. Review basic plant growth and development as is applies to woody plants.
      2. Outline ideal stages of tree growth when management should be applied.
      3. Discuss unique physiology of woody perennial plants.
    2. Differentiate between abiotic and biotic stresses to trees.
      1. Identify key indicators of tree pathogens and pests.
      2. Identify key indicators of abiotic stresses to trees.
    3. Analyze the impact abiotic factors have on tree growth, development and decay.
      1. Explain the role and limitations of soil management with trees.
      2. Identify nutrient deficiency symptoms of trees.
      3. Evaluate the role of sun exposure, wind and temperature on tree growth.
    4. Outline basic concepts of pruning techniques used in arboriculture.
    5. Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of arboriculture management techniques.
      1. Describe the past, present,and likely future arboriculture management techniques.
      2. Explain the likely effectiveness of arboriculture management techniques.
      3. Predict tree response to arboriculture management techniques
    6. Interpret indicators of tree health status.
      1. Identify key indicators of tree health status.
      2. Determine possible causes and outcomes of tree health status indicators.
    7. Demonstrate the application of proper arboriculture management techniques to trees.
    8. Generate a course of action for a commercially relevant tree management scenario.
      1. Determine strengths and risks a given tree scenario.
      2. Calculate potentials costs of inaction.
      3. Develop a list of potentially affective management options.
      4. Calculate the costs of appropriate tree management options.

  
  •  

    AGH 224 - Tree Maintenance

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course investigates the maintenance techniques used in tree care. Emphasis is placed on the pests, pathogens and treatment of tree diseases.
    Prerequisite: AGH 281  
    Competencies
    1. Develop tree care profiles.
      1. Determine what intensity of management is appropriate for tree scenarios.
      2. Select appropriate practices for tree care profile scenarios.
    2. Identify tree maintenance risks.
      1. Describe risks from pest and pathogens.
      2. Examine risks from improper cultural practices.
    3. Perform annual inspections for tree maintenance.
      1. Compare typical and atypical leaf and stem tissues.
      2. Identify proper tree root and crown development.
    4. Distinguish between major tree biotic diseases and pests.
    5. Compare and contrast tree pest management techniques.
      1. Outline potential soil remedies to tree pest infestations.
      2. Discuss options for tree spraying and injection.
    6. Inspect trees for biotic diseases and pests.
      1. Identify signs and symptoms of key diseases.
      2. Investigate trees for signs and symptoms of key arthropod pests.
    7. Evaluate predisposition to health risks based on species of tree.
    8. Evaluate the industry potential for future tree health and maintenance risks.
      1. Assess the role monoculture has in pest outbreaks.
      2. Outline ways humans can spread pathogens.
      3. Explain the impact the industry and construction have on tree health.

  
  •  

    AGH 225 - Tree Climbing and Pruning

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course investigates the basic steps and equipment needed for safe tree climbing and pruning techniques used in tree management.
    Prerequisite: AGH 281  
    Competencies
    1. Outline key safety concerns associated with tree climbing and pruning.
      1. Determine if a tree is safe to climb.
      2. Explain safety concerns for tree workers in elevated positions and on the ground.
    2. Investigate equipment used in climbing and rigging.
      1. Demonstrate proper knot tying.
      2. Explain safe rigging technique.
    3. Examine the application of pruning equipment in tree care.
      1. Identify types of pruning equipment.
      2. Determine the appropriate use of saws, loppers and shears.
      3. Identify when power equipment is needed.
    4. Evaluate tree species specific pruning practices.
      1. Determine optimal time of pruning for each tree group.
      2. Determine which pruning practices are appropriate for each tree species.
    5. Assess outcomes of pruning practices.
      1. Estimate the path and potential safety concerns of limb removal.
      2. Predict tree growth responses to pruning practices.
    6. Evaluate the need for pruning at different stages of tree growth.
      1. Assess tree structure at planting.
      2. Determine appropriate tree structure needed during juvenility.
      3. Determine key structure needed for mature trees.
    7. Demonstrate proper pruning and climbing technique.

  
  •  

    AGH 233 - Plant Propagation I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to plant propagation with emphasis on grafting, herbaceous and hardwood cuttings, and greenhouse and nursery seeds. Propagation schedules, equipment, structures and growth regulators will be discussed.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106   or BIO 104  or BIO 112  or BIO 135  or BIO 138  or BIO 145  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the environmental factors affecting plant growth
      1. Describe water and nutrient uptake.
      2. State the impact of temperature on the rate of cell division.
      3. Recall the role light plays in the growth process.
    2. Summarize the functions and operations of various propagating structures and associated equipment and materials.
      1. Compare greenhouses, hotbeds, cold frames, and lath houses as propagating structures.
      2. Evaluate structure coverings of glass, plastic, polyethylene, fiberglass, wood lath,and screening.
      3. Contrast soil, sand, peat, vermiculite, perlite, sawdust, compost, and other materials as propagating medias
      4. Identify the various containers used to hold propagating medias.
      5. List the characteristics of a effective propagating media.
      6. Explain the function of temperature within the propagating media.
      7. Describe the function and operation of a mist bench.
    3. Explain the formation and development of a seed in sexual reproduction.
      1. Contrast pollination and fertilization.
      2. Identify the parts of a seed.
      3. Describe the function of each seed part.
    4. Describe the principles of propagation by seed.
      1. State the importance of seed quality in the germination process.
      2. List the environmental factors conducive to the germination of seed.
      3. Identify the stages of the germination process.
      4. Name the factors of dormancy which may impact germination.
    5. Demonstrate seed treatments involved with scarification and stratification.
      1. List the various scarification methods
      2. Describe what happens to seed in the scarification process.
      3. List the various stratification methods.
      4. Describe what happens to seed in the stratification process.
    6. Explain how plant anatomy impacts propagation by cuttings.
      1. Identify the different types of cuttings used in asexual propagation by cuttings.
      2. Recall which types of cuttings are used to propagate each general plant group.
    7. Explain how plant physiology affects propagation by cuttings.
      1. Define what a plant hormone is.
      2. Identify the plant hormones.
      3. Define what a plant growth regulator is.
      4. Identify the plant growth regulators.
    8. Describe the physiology of a grafted plant.
      1. Describe the role of rootstock and scion meristematic tissue contact.
      2. State the sequence of the wound healing process.
      3. Recall the tissue differentiation sequence which follows callusing.
      4. Cite how the laying down of new vascular tissue is a requisite for a successful graft union.
    9. Demonstrate grafting techniques
      1. Identify the components of a graft; rootstock, scion, interstock.
      2. Name the equipment and materials used in making grafts.
      3. List the different types of grafts and the purpose of each.
      4. Explain the importance of polarity when making grafts.

  
  •  

    AGH 253 - Insects and Diseases

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Identification of pests that frequently infest horticulture crops will be covered in this course. Pest lifecycles and methods to disrupt pests will also be investigated.
    Competencies
    1. Examine major arthropod pest infestations of horticultural plants.
      1. Relate symptoms to a specific arthropod pest.
      2. Differentiate between signs of arthropod pests.
    2. Diagnose major fungal pathogens of horticultural plants.
      1. Correlate symptoms to a specific fungal pathogen.
      2. Differentiate between signs of specific fungal pathogens.
    3. Classify major bacterial pathogens of horticultural plants.
      1. Associate symptoms to a specific bacterial pathogen.
      2. Distinguish between signs of specific bacterial pathogens.
    4. Describe major viruses that infect horticultural plants.
      1. Outline key vectors for virus transmission.
      2. Identify major groups of plant viruses.
      3. Correlate symptoms to a group of viruses.
    5. Characterize major nematode pests of horticultural plants.
      1. Differentiate between predator and parasitic nematodes.
      2. Correlate signs and symptoms to specific nematode pests.
    6. Analyze plant diseases
      1. Differentiate between biotic and abiotic plant diseases.
      2. Determine when infestations cause economic damage.
    7. Illustrate the lifecycles of the groups of major horticultural pests.
      1. Differentiate between complete and incomplete metamorphosis.
      2. Examine the complex life cycle of major fungal pathogens.
      3. Distinguish bacterial life cycles from fungal lifecycles.
      4. Summarize nematode life cycles.
    8. Apply the concept of the disease triangle.
      1. Outline ways to disrupt the disease triangle.
      2. Calculate growing degree days.
      3. Apply basic concepts of pest prediction models.
      4. Determine the impact of various cultural practices on pest infections.
    9. Summarize basic knowledge of pest control products.
      1. Explain the concept of resistance groups.
      2. Discriminate between different physical modes of action.
      3. Outline the potential use of biological control.

  
  •  

    AGH 262 - Fruit and Vegetable Science

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of tree fruits, small fruits and vegetable culture, including varietal selection, planting, pruning, fertilizing, disease and insect control programs.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106   or BIO 104  or BIO 112  or BIO 135  or BIO 138  or BIO 145  
    Competencies
    1. Relate history and origin of fruit production
      1. Name the country of origin of commercially important fruits produced in Iowa
      2. Recall the history of fruit production in Iowa
    2. Cite trends in the fruit industry
      1. Recall production trends (increasing/decreasing).
      2. State market trends (fresh/processing).
    3. Explain the management of apple orchards for Iowa
      1. Identify the factors in site selection
      2. Select adapted apple cultivators
      3. Name the planting systems with advantages/disadvantages of each
      4. Explain training and pruning of apple trees
      5. Identify the spray programs and/or IPM
    4. Explain the management of strawberries in Iowa
      1. Identify the factors in site selection
      2. Select adapted strawberry cultivators
      3. Name the planting systems with advantages/disadvantages of each
      4. Identify the spray programs and/or IPM
      5. Analyze harvesting/marketing options
      6. Describe patch renovation/renewal
    5. Explain the management of brambles in Iowa
      1. Identify the factors in site selection
      2. Select adapted bramble cultivators
      3. Name the planting systems with advantages/disadvantages of each
      4. Explain the pruning of brambles
      5. Identify the spray programs and/or IPM
      6. Analyze harvesting/marketing options
    6. Identify other kinds of fruits commonly grown by homeowners in Iowa
    7. Explain the factors in site selection
    8. Select adapted cultivators
    9. Name the various planting systems with advantages/disadvantages of each
    10. Explain various pruning/training programs
    11. Describe the spray programs and/or IPM
    12. Cite trends in the vegetable/crop industry
      1. Recall production trends (increasing/decreasing)
      2. State market trends (fresh/processing).
    13. Discuss the vegetable crop industry in Iowa
      1. Cite production acreage’s per crop
      2. State percentage of consumer demand satisfied by Iowa production
    14. Describe the marketing factors of Iowa vegetable crops
    15. Identify kinds and varieties of vegetables
      1. State origin of each
      2. Name insect pests of each
      3. Name disease problems of each
    16. Recall importance of each in terms of production tonnage/where
    17. Explain vegetable irrigation
      1. Contrast overhead irrigation with trickle irrigation
      2. Describe hydroponics

  
  •  

    AGH 272 - Nursery Production I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduces the student to site selection, equipment and supplies with an introduction to field production, harvesting and marketing. Basic nursery and landscape skills will be developed on- and off-campus.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106   or BIO 104  or BIO 112  or BIO 135  or BIO 138  or BIO 145  
    Competencies
    1. Summarize the importance of the major nursery states in the production and marketing of nursery stock in the United States of America
    2. Defend the importance of Iowa nursery industry to the state and country
      1. Explain the historical impact the Iowa nursery industry had on the national nursery industry
      2. Discuss Iowa’s placement in the national nursery industry
    3. Explain factors affecting plant growth: light, temperature, humidity, nutrients, soil, atmosphere, and pollutants
    4. Classify hardiness zones
      1. Select the hardiness zones which directly affect the United States of America
      2. Point out Iowa’s location on the U.S.D.A. hardiness map
      3. Explain the significance of Iowa’s position on the USDA’s hardiness map
    5. Develop a wholesale nursery layout
      1. List the four major planting schemes used in the nursery industry
      2. Generated a planting scheme for a wholesale field nursery
    6. Compare production practices and schedules for container and field grown plants
    7. Discuss propagation and production facilities required in nurseries
    8. Prepare and plant woody shrub and tree seed and cuttings
      1. Make cuttings of hardwood deciduous and evergreen cuttings
      2. Locate and gather seeds of ornamental plants
      3. Build a seed bed
      4. Sew seed in an outdoor bed
    9. Process, transplant trees and shrubs for container production
      1. Describe how one would handle and plant trees and shrubs in containers
      2. List the precautions one must use to protect transplants in storage
    10. Prune or shear plants and trees in appropriate manner
    11. Compare methods of irrigating container and field nursery stock
      1. Distinguish between the various systems for irrigating field crops
      2. Describe the components of container irrigation systems
    12. Justify weed and pest control in the nursery
      1. Explain the methods of nonchemical weed control
      2. Compile the different methods of chemical control
      3. Identify the troublesome nursery pests
      4. Describe methods of pest control
    13. Describe a healthy tree or shrub
    14. Use the American Nursery Association’s grades and regulations in determining nursery stock grades

  
  •  

    AGH 276 - Greenhouse Production II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the techniques used to produce Spring crops in a commercial greenhouse. Students will be responsible for the daily growing of a commercial greenhouse crop and its marketing. Field trips to commercial greenhouses are included in this course.
    Prerequisite: AGH 132   and AGH 133  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the different aspects of crop culture for spring bedding plants.
      1. Describe crop specific management of light, temperature and media.
      2. Measure the impact of differing light, temperature and media scenarios.
    2. Support crop specific media management for spring bedding plants.
      1. Calculate fertilizer programs for different crops and crop stages.
      2. Evaluate methods of pH monitoring.
      3. Assess methods of electrical conductivity monitoring.
      4. Choose what media mixtures are appropriate for each crop.
    3. Maintain a commercial spring bedding plant crop from establishment to market.
      1. Demonstrate proper care for various of propagation materials: seed, unrooted cuttings, plugs, liners, etc.
      2. Plant a crop properly.
      3. Apply proper pinching techniques.
      4. Use proper rates of fertilization.
      5. Manage moisture status of plants.
      6. Adapt crop production practices based on gathered information.
    4. Select appropriate plant growth regulators for each crop
      1. Calculate appropriate rates
      2. Determine optimal mixtures.
    5. Evaluate commercial bedding plant greenhouse operations.
      1. Attend field trips to commercial greenhouses.
      2. Assess the positives and negatives of each location and production method.
      3. Determine key differences of success in different greenhouse operations.
    6. Analyze the economics of greenhouse operations.
      1. Calculate costs of production.
      2. Determine the impact of plant spacing, crop scheduling and crop selection on profitability.
      3. Determine cost effectiveness of grower propagation, unrooted cuttings and various plug sizes.
    7. Develop crop schedules and production plans for the next production cycle.
      1. Assess current schedule and adapt based on crop conditions.
      2. Compile sales information and apply that to the future crop cycle.
      3. Reconcile desired production plan with ordering limitation.
      4. Prepare an order that can be bid on by plant associates.
    8. Formulate methods for treating unhealthy spring bedding plants.
      1. Develop procedures of correcting nutrient deficiencies.
      2. Apply most effective method of controlling a particular deficiency.
      3. Identify pest control products for major greenhouse pests.
    9. Classify the diversity of spring bedding plants.
      1. Identify major crops by botanical name, common name, and cultivar groups.
      2. Identify minor crops by botanical name, common name, and cultivar groups.
      3. Report ways of utilizing and applying diverse plant materials to specific situations.
    10. Evaluate use of spring greenhouse products.
      1. Evaluate plant performance in the greenhouse.
      2. Assess plant performance outdoors.
      3. Assess plant performance in mixed containers.
      4. Identify historically important and increasingly important spring crops.
    11. Organize production area by crop requirements.
      1. Group plants by pH, nutrition, and temperature requirements.
      2. Determine space requirements.

  
  •  

    AGH 281 - Arboriculture

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A study of tree culture with emphasis on propagation, pruning, transplanting, pest control, urban environmental concerns and recognition of hazards and liabilities. Methods of evaluation of values also studied.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106   or BIO 104  orBIO 112  or BIO 135  or BIO 138  or BIO 145  
    Competencies
    1. Calcualte the value of a tree using the formula method.
      1. Determine the cross-sectional area of any given tree in square inches using the correct mathematical formulas if given either the circumference or the diameter.
      2. Calculate base dollar value using current lumber price times area in square inches.
      3. Read the percent value for species from the species list.
      4. Estimate the percent value for location using position in the landscape.
      5. Estimate the percent value for condition by using observations.
      6. Multiply base dollar value by percentage vlues for species, location and condition to calculate final value.
    2. Calculate the value of a tree using the replacement method.
      1. Acquire the price of a 4” caliper of the same species as the original tree within a 500 mile radius of the site of the original tree.
      2. Acquire the estimated cost to transport the tree from source to site of original tree.
      3. Determine the costs to remove any and all of the original tree parts, planting of the replacement tree, and any agreed upon values for follow up care for agreed number of years.
      4. Add to fixed costs any additional accrued value based on a percentage of total of cost, transport, and care added over several years, percentage and number of years usually determined by law.
    3. List other values of trees/shrubs.
      1. Identify evenironmental values.
      2. Identify landscape values.
    4. Review the physical anatomy of a tree/shrub.
      1. Identify potential for root development relative to both physical characteristics of a soil and potential microbe community.
      2. Identify potential for stem development relative to soil, microclimate exposures, species characteristics, and precipitation patterns.
      3. Identify potential for canopy development relative to soil, microclimate exposures, species characteristics, and precipitation patterns.
      4. Identify potential for both flower and fruit development relative to soil, microclimate exposure, species characteristics, precipitation patterns,a nd temperature ranges/fluctations.
    5. Assess the physical factors of any given location to determine the correctness of the site for the placement of a tree/shrub.
      1. Compare microclimate exposures.
      2. Identify previous land usage impact on surface and internal drainage characteristics of soils at the site.
      3. Evaluate soil physical properties to determine potential influence on tree/shrub establishment and growth.
    6. Match the right tree/shrub to any particular location/site.
      1. Identify the growth requirements of a selected tree species.
      2. Compare site assets to growth requirements of selected tree.
    7. List the proper planting times of year for specific tree/shrub groups and associated root packaging offerings.
      1. Identify the proper planting times for deciduous trees/shrubs.
      2. Identify the proper planting times for narrow-leaved evergreen trees/shrubs.
      3. Identify the proper planting times for broad-leaved evergreen shrubs.
      4. Identify the proper planting time for bare-root, balled and burlaped, and container grown/containerized trees/shrubs.
      5. Identify the proper planting time for fleshy rooted trees/shrubs.
      6. Explain the importance of these proper planting times relative to transplanting success.
    8. Define successful transplanting of a tree/shrub.
      1. Recognize the diagnostic sequence dealing with tree insects/diseases
      2. State the diagnostic equipment used in each step of the sequence
      3. Point out the benefits of a diagnostic questionnaire to an arborist
    9. List the correct sequence of all of the proper steps in transplanting a tree/shrub.
      1. Identify the proper digging of the planting hole.
      2. Identify the proper setting of the tree/shrub.
      3. Identify the proper soil amendments.
      4. Identify the proper back filling procedures.
      5. Identify all additional follow-up steps in transplanting a tree/shrub.
    10. List the four major reasons for fertilizing a tree/shrub and the proper season for each.
    11. Explain how to fertilize a tree/shrub.
      1. Identify the potential root spread of a tree/shrub.
      2. Compute the soil surface area of the potential root spread.
      3. Compute the size of the tree/shrub to determine the amount of fertilizer needed.
      4. Select the correct method of application for the chosen amount and analysis of fertilizer.
    12. Perform correct pruning of trees/shrubs.
      1. Assess tree/shrub condition/vigor.
      2. Determine pruning needs on basis of tree/shrub vigor/condition.
      3. Select proper pruning equipment.
      4. Demonstrate proper pruning techniques.
      5. Explain the advantages/disadvantages of each season (4) regarding tree/shrub response to pruning.
    13. Explain risks versus benefits when considering preservation and/or repair efforts on trees.
      1. Differentiate between preservation and repair.
      2. Assess the condition of a tree.
      3. Determine the feasibility of perservation.
      4. Determine the feasibility fo repair.
      5. Identify potential target(s) in the eventuality of failure of the tree.
      6. Compare potential for damages to costs to implement repairs.
    14. Identify tree/shrub diagnostic procedures for insect and/or disease problems.
      1. Identify the diagnostic sequence.
      2. Describe the diagnostic equipment used in each step of the sequence.
      3. State the benefits of a diagnostic questionnaire to an arborist.

  
  •  

    AGH 283 - Pesticide Application Cert

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Types of chemicals will be identified and how to use and apply them properly will be studied. The safe handling of chemicals and calibration of spray equipment will be covered. Includes study of core manual and category for commercial pesticide license.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the types and kinds of horticulture crop pests
      1. List commonly occurring diseases of greenhouse crops, ornamentals, turf and fruit and vegetable crops
      2. Name commonly occurring insect pests of greenhouse crops, ornamentals, turf and fruit and vegetable crops
      3. Cite commonly occurring weeds of greenhouse crops, ornamentals, turf and fruit and vegetable crops
    2. Compare the characteristics of pesticides
      1. Differentiate pesticides by target pest
      2. Classify pesticides by toxicity groupings
    3. Interpet pesticide labels
      1. Analyze directions for use
      2. Explain the meaning(s) of the label signal word(s)
      3. Explain how the label acts as an extension of the written laws reguarding use
    4. Interpret pesticide labels
      1. Analyze directions for use
      2. Explain the meaning(s) of the label signal word(s).
      3. Explain how the label acts as an extension of the written laws regarding use
    5. Explain how the pesticide can impact human health
      1. Identify how pesticides can enter the body
      2. Distinguish between acute and chronic toxicity
      3. Explain requirements for decontamination and first aid provided
      4. Explain the fate of pesticides in the human body
    6. Outline proper pesticide handling procedures
      1. Identify the protective clothing required for safe application of pesticides
      2. Explain application procedures that meet EPA regulations
      3. State regulations that protect the general public
    7. State regulations that protect the general public
    8. Select proper pest control methods for control, economy, and environmental considerations
    9. Formulate spray mixtures
    10. Compute proper calibrations of sprayers, granule applicators, and dusting equipment
    11. Demonstrate proper equipment operation and general maintenance equipment
      1. Identify the protective clothing required for safe application of pesticides
      2. Explain application procedures that meet EPA regulations
      3. State regulations that protect the general public
    12. Explain the parts of an Integrated Pest Management system
      1. Define Integrated Pest Management
      2. Define Economic Thresholds
    13. Complete, successfully, the state commercial pesticide applicators core and category tests

  
  •  

    AGH 291 - Hort. Business Operations

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an overview of wholesale and direct-to-consumer horticulture businesses. Various methods of marketing, economic feasibility, roles of personnel and startup for horticulture businesses will be investigated.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106  
    Competencies
    1. Analyze green industry business operations.
      1. Provide the evolution and scope of the modern green industry
      2. Compare various ownership and management styles used in wholesale and direct to consumer horticulture businesses.
      3. Describe the business protocols of local horticulture business professionals.
      4. Distinguish between positive and negative methods of customer service.
    2. Analyze economic scenarios related to purchasing and selling horticultural goods.
      1. Determine the difference between gross markup and gross profit.
      2. Compute different pricing scenarios.
      3. Calculate breakeven prices.
      4. Determine ways to assign overhead costs.
      5. Explain variable and fixed costs.
      6. Summarize important financial ratios.
    3. Summarize wholesale and retail ordering practices for horticulture products.
      1. Determine product mix throughout the season based on seasonal trends and consumer preferences.
      2. Develop orders for a horticulture business.
    4. Assess the unique aspects of banking relations and obtaining capital for horticulture businesses.
      1. Quantify the impacts of interest rates and the period of a loan.
      2. Describe information needed for a positive working relationship with financial institutions.
      3. Develop an introductory business plan.
      4. Compose a net worth statement and an income statement.
    5. Compare and contrast marketing concepts used in the green industry.
      1. Examine various methods of pricing goods and services.
      2. Assess effectiveness of point of purchase
      3. Determine the economic feasibility of sales
    6. Evaluate proper signage and layout for horticulture businesses.
      1. Identify types of product displays.
      2. Design a display.
      3. Develop ways to introduce new products into a horticulture business.
    7. Compare and contrast various types of media advertising.
      1. List different media that can be used for advertising.
      2. Describe the various groups that horticulture products are marketed to.
      3. Develop advertising focused on a target audience.
      4. Develop advertising focused on a target audience.
    8. Evaluate basic inventory and billing procedures
      1. Identify advantages and disadvantages of itemization.
      2. Examine advantages and disadvantages of various methods of payment.
      3. Assess impact of delayed payment and billing.
      4. Formulate a basic plan to track inventory.
    9. Point out traits of a professional work place for a horticulture business.
      1. Determine appropriate functions of management.
      2. Characterize roles of employees.
      3. Explain professional relationships between employers and employees.
      4. Illustrate some of the unique aspects of family operated businesses.

  
  •  

    AGH 296 - Commercial Landscape Industry

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides preparation for Iowa Certified Nursery Professional certification and provides an introduction to the commercial landscape industry. Students in this course must be a member of the Iowa Nursery and Landscape Association and attend the Iowa Shade Tree Short Course.
    Prerequisite: AGH 120 , AGH 123 , and AGH 142  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate herbaceous landscape species
      1. Identify more than 100 herbaceous annuals, groundcovers, herbaceous perennials and ornamental grasses commonly used in the Midwest landscape industry.
      2. Contrast species based on reproduction morphology.
      3. Differentiate species based on vegetative morphology.
    2. Evaluate woody landscape species
      1. Identify more than 100 coniferous trees, deciduous trees and vines commonly used in the Midwest landscape industry
      2. Separate species based on reproduction morphology.
      3. Differentiate species based on vegetative morphology.
      4. Classify species present based on microclimate of a given location.
    3. Compare and contrast woody shrub species
      1. Identify more than 80 woody shrubs commonly used in the Midwest landscape industry.
      2. Determine species based on reproduction morphology.
      3. Compare species based on vegetative morphology.
      4. Predict species likely present based on microclimate of a given location.
    4. Assess successful plant management in the landscape.
      1. Explain impacts of rooting environment.
      2. Summarize proper installation
      3. Distinguish between healthy and unhealthy plants.
      4. Judge appropriate methods of manage unhealthy plants in a given scenario
    5. Appraise the traits of successful nursery and landscape businesses and individuals.
      1. Attend field trips to successful businesses.
      2. Recognize the challenges of the commercial landscape and nursery industry.
    6. Develop a presentation on a given topic related to the landscape and nursery industry.
      1. Conduct research.
      2. Create and outline of the presentation.
      3. Practice oral presentations skills.

  
  •  

    AGH 805 - Horticulture Internship I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 10
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Experience in a business setting related to the student’s career objective. Taken over a five-week period.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite: Must be in program major.
    Competencies
    1. Assemble information for supervised employment experience
    2. Prepare for an appointment with supervised training station
    3. Identify goals for the supervisor training period
    4. Identify skills, physical, and emotional requirements of the supervised training
    5. Practice good employment skills
      1. Show willingness to accept supervision
      2. Follow and listen to verbal instructions
      3. Exhibit dependability, responsibility and punctuality
      4. Adapt to change
      5. Demonstrate flexibility
      6. Demonstrate personal hygiene and cleanliness
    6. Practice positive interpersonal skills
      1. Interact with co-workers in a courteous, tactful manner
      2. Practice enthusiasm and initiative
    7. Comply with safety and health rules
    8. Operate equipment correctly as shown demonstrated by supervisor
    9. Review supervised employment experience with supervisor on a bi-weekly basis
    10. Complete supervised employment forms on time and as scheduled
    11. Submit completed supervised employment forms on time and as scheduled

  
  •  

    AGH 912 - Current Topics in Hort.

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This is a capstone course for the Horticulture program. This course provides an overview of current and potential future trends in the green industry. Case studies will be investigated.
    Prerequisite: AGH 106   or BIO 104  or BIO 112  or BIO 135  or BIO 138  or BIO 145  
    Competencies
    1. Critique the current trends in the green industry
      1. Determine positive and negative industry trends.
      2. Assess the impact of trends on current horticulture businesses.
      3. Propose ways horticulture business can capitalize on current trends.
    2. Generate ideas on future trends in commercial horticulture.
      1. Assess what horticulture industry aspects may be out of date.
      2. Determine what horticulture industry aspects may see greater demand.
      3. Propose ways horticulture can capitalize on possible future trends.
    3. Analyze case studies of different green industry scenarios.
      1. Explain how a person would react in the situation.
      2. Assess whether or not the appropriate decisions were made.
      3. Devise an appropriate plan based on the all the information available.
    4. Complete a project on a given topic related to the horticulture/green industry.
      1. Generate a well thought out view point.
      2. Create a presentation that is appropriate for a given audience.


Agriculture-Mechanics

  
  •  

    AGM 125 - Alternative Energy in Ag

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to acquaint students with alternative energy sources in agriculture and their impact on the industry. Major areas of study will include petroleum, ethanol, biodiesel, wind energy and second-generation fuel sources. Emphasis on application and selection, equipment operations, storage and handling procedures and federal regulations will be addressed.
    Competencies
    1. Summarize the current industry issues.
      1. Explain the economic impact on the state, nation, and the world.
      2. Identify industry production trends.
      3. Define issues that impact the future of the industry.
      4. List career opportunities.
    2. Assess the legal aspect of alternative energy sources in agriculture.
      1. Identify pertinent legal issues.
      2. List current environmental laws.
    3. Develop a merchandising plan.
      1. Outline the various ways to market products.
      2. Explain the basis of pricing.
    4. Compare agricultural building structures, construction techniques, building materials, repairs, and maintenance requirements.
      1. Identify proper procedures for handling and storing of traditional and alternative
      2. Review the legal requirements associated with the alternative energy field.
    5. Develop a general knowledge of the impact of alternative energy of equipment operation.
      1. Explain how engine power is impacted by alternative fuels.
      2. Select the proper octane rating for gasoline engines with different compression ratios.
      3. Select the proper grade of fuel for diesel engines using cetane ratings.
      4. Describe procedures for conserving fuels during equipment operation.
      5. Describe crankcase oil classifications and grades.
      6. Identify gear lubricants and uses.
      7. Identify hydraulic fluid grades.
      8. Define lubricating grease by class and grade.
    6. Assess alternative fuel sources.
      1. Identify alternative fuel sources.
      2. Defend the beneficial use of alternative fuels.
      3. Contrast the benefits of petroleum based vs. agricultural based alternative fuels.
    7. Define second generation alternative fuel sources.
      1. Identify cellulosic ethanol production sources.
      2. Discuss the implications on natural resources from cellulosic ethanol production.
      3. Discuss the use of algae as a second generation fuel alternative.


Agriculture-Precision Ag

  
  •  

    AGP 333 - Precision Agriculture Appl.

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    This course is an introduction to the general principles of Precision Agriculture. Major topic areas will include Global Positioning Systems (GPS), yield mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing equipment.
    Competencies
    1. Identify the need and use of precision agriculture in modern crop production
      1. List the areas of agriculture where precision agriculture is being used
      2. Outline the economics of precision agriculture in crop production
      3. Identify the uses and tools used in precision agriculture
    2. Identify how a site can be located through the use of satellites
      1. Explain how satellites are used in navigation
      2. Describe the steps involved with NAVSTAR satellite location
    3. Understand the types and uses of Global Position System units
      1. Demonstrate a hand-held GPS unit and their application
      2. Practice mapping an area using a hand-held GPS unit
      3. Identify the various uses of GPS’s in commercial and agricultural uses
    4. Describe the difference between GPS and DGPS
      1. Identify the variances of site marking using a GPS and a DGPS
      2. Understand the importance of satellite correction and triangulation
      3. Understand the different L-Band frequencies used by DGPS units
      4. Identify the various DGPS equipment used in modern crop production
      5. Identify the various differential signals used in modern crop production
      6. Explain the procedure of linking a DGPS unit with a yield monitor
      7. Create a boundary and grid-map a field using the DGPS unit
      8. Remove a soil sample within each prescribed grid
      9. Save data into memory and export to a Geographical Information System
    5. Identify the use and procedures of using Geographical Information Systems
      1. Describe the benefits of GIS to agriculture
      2. Explain the relationship between GIS and GPS
      3. Recognize how GIS are rational databases
      4. Identify the various GIS software packages on the market
      5. Describe how GIS is used in recordkeeping and management
      6. Differentiate between GIS and mapping programs on the market
      7. Understand the characteristics of Raster vs. Vector data
      8. Create maps using GPS data and digitizing techniques
      9. Recognize techniques used to enhance maps
      10. Transform aerial soil maps to a geo-referenced image that is GIS compatible
      11. Create an event using imported soil test information
      12. Create other events that will provide background layers for a particular participant
      13. Explain the agronomic mapping prescription for an individual field
      14. Understand the process of remote sensing and how it is used in precision farming


Agriculture-Animal Science

  
  •  

    AGS 101 - Working with Animals

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A hands-on introductory course in skills for proper care and management of domestic animals. Husbandry skills including health observation, animal movement, identification, management procedures, and environmental assessment are covered.
    Competencies
    1. Assess the integrated contributions of form, function, behavior and health on productive expectations of livestock (domesticated animals)
      1. Observe and recognize normal behavior and indicators of animal well-being
      2. Summarize typical growth rates and production cycles
      3. Describe and classify animals by commonly accepted terms for each species
      4. Identify and label anatomical parts of animals 
      5. Articulate the implications of anatomical differences on performance and longevity
      6. Classify livestock breeds by type and accompanying contributions to the industry
      7. Perceive and prioritize traits in the context of animal value towards fulfilling a specific purpose
    2. Evaluate safe, humane and effective animal handling and restraint techniques
      1. Recognize indicators of dangerous behavior rooted in fear, aggression or protective instinct
      2. Examine the function and intended purpose of animal handling facilities and equipment
      3. Demonstrate capability to appropriately use basic animal husbandry tools
      4. Display comprehension and appropriate utilization of animal flight zones
      5. Identify factors which alter typical behavior 
      6. Utilize restraint techniques appropriate for the species and individual animal based on informed judgments of their temperament
      7. Distinguish acceptable and unacceptable animal handling practices
      8. Acknowledge factors which inhibit animal movement
      9. Predict animal response to various stimuli
    3. Summarize the rationale and justification, alternative methods and implications of timing of standard animal agricultural management practices
      1. Recognize commonly performed procedures in food animal production
      2. Describe the merit of these basic applications in the context of consumer demand, producer safety and animal well-being
      3. Comprehend the predictable and potential consequences of electing not to perform these procedures on consumer satisfaction, animal health and producer profitability
      4. Know the motives of animal agricultural opponents and their publicly stated opinions
      5. Discuss and/or defend common animal agriculture production practices
    4. Compare production systems between and within species and differentiate management impacts on animal well-being, performance and consumer satisfaction with animal products.
      1. Examine historical animal housing and rearing challenges and limitations with realistic environmentally enhanced production opportunities available in the present day 
      2. Explain the benefits of key innovations towards improving the health and performance of domestic animals
      3. Cite health and performance indicators and benchmarks producers use to troubleshoot problems and establish production goals
      4. Recognize common diet ingredients and feed delivery systems utilized by various species in different production systems
      5. Understand the typical life-cycle of animals and expected time spent in each productive phase 
      6. Diagnose potential hazards and negative influences on standard animal production expectations
      7. Strategize positive augmentations to realize improved animal health and performance
    5. Critique animal handling and production practices in accordance with guiding principles established by relevant third party verification systems
      1. Implement Des Moines Area Community College Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee policies in all laboratory activities
      2. Align with all applicable Quality Assurance standards and guidelines governing the daily care, application of agriculture production practices and when making management decisions affecting livestock

  
  •  

    AGS 113 - Survey of the Animal Industry

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    An analysis of the livestock industry with emphasis on reproduction, inheritance, performance testing, selection and marketing.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the history of the development in the United States
      1. Discuss the use of animals in the first century of American history
      2. Review the influence of the Civil War on the development of animal agriculture
      3. List the factors opening the Midwest for cattle production
      4. Outline the rapid development of swine production
      5. Describe the rise in wild horse populations and the changes in the use of horses
    2. Compare the economic impact in the state, nation and the world
      1. List the rank among states of Iowa Livestock production
      2. Outline the comparison of production in the United States to the rest of the world
      3. Review the dollar value and percentage of both exports and imports
      4. State the share of Gross National Product contributed by animal agriculture
    3. Compile animal industry production trends
      1. Describe the movement to larger operations
      2. State the changes in geographical location of production for each species
    4. Compare trends in consumer preference
      1. Discuss the influence of human health concerns on animal agriculture
      2. Explain how consumer preference influences both selection and production methods
      3. State the latest United States Department of Agriculture nutritional evaluation of animal products
    5. Identify desirable traits in animals
      1. Name the parts of animals
      2. Review heritability estimates and their influence on genetic progress
      3. Distinguish economically important traits from fads
      4. Calculate performance and carcass measurements
      5. Calculate genetic progress by utilizing heritability estimates of economically important characteristics
    6. Examine the reproductive process and its manipulation
      1. Label the parts of the reproductive system
      2. State the function of the major reproduction organs
      3. Outline the reproductive cycles of the female
      4. Define the terms associated with reproductive physiology
      5. Describe recent advancements in reproduction
    7. Compare major breeds and their contribution to genetic progress
      1. List major breeds as to origin and identification
      2. Identify the most popular breeds and their contribution to animal agriculture
      3. Prepare a crossbreeding program and justify the choices
    8. Assess various animal breeding systems
      1. Define terms such as purebred, crossbred, inbreeding, crossbreeding and F-1
      2. Diagram a crossbreeding system for one species
    9. Analyze the major types of production systems
      1. Describe production systems used on livestock farms in Iowa
      2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of various systems
      3. Select a system for given circumstances and defend the selection
    10. Discuss correct timing of practices like castration, docking, and weaning
      1. Identify desirable practices for each species
      2. Outline the importance of each practice and impact of improper timing
      3. List the practices and the stage of production in which they should be carried out
    11. Examine the impact of artificial insemination and embryo transfer
      1. State the history of artificial insemination for the different species
      2. List the advantages and disadvantages of artificial insemination
      3. Describe the technique utilized with embryo transfer
      4. Outline generation turnover and opportunity for genetic improvement with embryo transfer
    12. Summarize the process of milk secretion and milk letdown
      1. Describe the internal anatomy of the udder
      2. Review the physiology of milk secretion
      3. List the factors influencing milk letdown
    13. Review proper care of dam and offspring at parturition
      1. State the length of gestation for each species
      2. Name the indicators that parturition is imminent
      3. Describe proper presentation of the fetus in a normal delivery
      4. Outline methods of resolving improper presentation of the fetus
      5. Explain handling of the newborn animal the first two days of life
    14. Explain the evaluation of the end product in the market place
      1. Name the quality grades and the yield grades of carcasses
      2. Summarize the factors affecting carcass grades
      3. List the measurements often taken on carcasses for evaluation and the minimum standards
    15. Outline production testing procedures available to livestock producers
      1. Identify procedures often used in testing livestock
      2. Name central testing facilities available in Iowa
      3. Calculate adjustments for age, size and sex in performance data
      4. Outline a production testing program for a producer in one species

  
  •  

    AGS 114 - Survey of the Animal Industry

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Ways domestic animals serve the basic needs of humans for food, shelter, protection, fuel, and emotional well-being. Terminology, basic structures of the industries surrounding the production, care, and marketing of domestic animals in the United States.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze contributions of domestic animals and animal agriculture to humanity
      1. Characterize the roles of domesticated animals in the development and advancements of civilization 
      2. Discuss the role of animal products in the global food supply and the impact of trends in the production and use of animals and animal derived products throughout human history 
      3. Compare the nutrient value of beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, milk and dairy products
      4. Describe the domestic and international nonfood contributions of livestock 
      5. Acknowledge the existence and sentiments of groups opposed to animal agriculture and prospective challenges to animal production and utilization
      6. Identify careers within animal agriculture and affiliated industries
    2. Examine the international and domestic beef, dairy, horse, poultry, sheep, goat and swine industries and nontraditional livestock enterprises
      1. Describe differences in food production and agricultural productivity between regions of the world
      2. Quantify the economic impact of the U.S. livestock industry and the role of international trade on livestock and livestock products
      3. Recognize innovations, natural advantages and other factors contributing to improved U.S. agricultural productivity
      4. Explain factors influencing domestic consumption patterns of red meat, poultry and eggs, milk and dairy products
      5. Identify common production goals and decision making dynamics influencing each segment of vertically integrated livestock production systems
    3. Assess the cumulative worth of animals products progressing through available market channels
      1.  Contrast marketing alternatives for red meat, poultry and eggs and milk products
      2.  Describe the physical structure and composition of animal products
      3.  Summarize processing of red meat, poultry, egg, milk and dairy products
      4. Recall wholesale and retail cuts of beef, veal, pork and lamb
      5. Outline the factors affecting production, processing and value of wool and mohair
      6. Identify major edible and inedible by-products from livestock and the role of the rendering industry
      7. Differentiate animals and animal product value according to market classes and calculated USDA grades
      8. Infer conformational and compositional characteristics of market animals from visual appraisal
    4. Evaluate productive capabilities of livestock utilizing application of basic biological and management principles
      1. Identify common terms and functions of primary anatomical structures and hormones associated with the reproductive process
      2. Compare and contrast standard life-cycles including duration, timing and potential manipulation of reproductive benchmarks for the major livestock species 
      3. Understand the conditions required to achieve pregnancy, the normal birthing process, proper management of newborn animals and implications of abnormal parturition
      4. Describe the potential advantages, possible disadvantages and processes involved when employing various reproductive technologies
      5. Recognize basic principles of inheritance, available predictive information and strategies to generate genetic change in a population 
      6. Categorize breeds according to original purposes, biological type and expected genetic contributions to animal agriculture
      7. Discuss applications of alternative selection methods and mating strategies by improvement oriented animal breeders
      8. Indicate the role of nutrients necessary for support of animal health and productivity
      9. Contrast digestive tract variation between species and corresponding differences in consumption and utilization of common feed ingredients
      10. Articulate animal health management and environmental conditions conducive to achieving optimum growth and productivity
    5. Outline fundamental life cycle differences among domestic animal species and justification for varying types of production systems
      1. Recognize common performance goals and ambitions of all livestock producers regardless of management style
      2. Describe production systems used on livestock farms in Iowa and around the world
      3. Explain the challenges presented by alternative housing, rearing and management methods and the influence of those decisions on productive expectations
      4. Summarize the symbiotic relationship between livestock production and other agricultural endeavors
    6. Compare organizations who support, promote and oppose animal agriculture 

  
  •  

    AGS 222 - Aquaculture/Aquarium Sci I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An exploration of aquaculture as it relates to public aquariums, aquatic research facilities and the commercial marine ornamental pet trade. A specific focus on the effects of husbandry, natural habitat mimicry and water quality will be implemented through laboratory exercises and facility site visits.
    Competencies
    1. Explore careers implementing marine aquaculture related skills
      1. Discuss Educational / Entertainment uses for marine aquaculture
      2. Identify commercial aquaculture industries
    2. Analyze feeding techniques
      1. Discuss components of proper nutrition
      2. Explore herbivore, carnivore, and omnivore feeding behaviors and requirements
      3. Demonstrate broadcast, target, and enrichment feedings
      4. Outline feeding frequency and durations
      5. Explain proper food handling techniques
    3. Critique the components of proper husbandry in the maintenance of broodstock and newly produced offspring
      1. Demonstrate proper cleaning techniques for glass aquariums
      2. Discuss the necessity of observational skills and the importance of maintaining clean aquariums for the identification of problems at the initial stages of development
      3. Evaluate cross contamination and its catastrophic effects
      4. Analyze the importance and differences of equipment disinfection and sterilization
      5. Outline management benefits associated with re-circulating systems
      6. Explain necessity of water changes
      7. Demonstrate siphoning and substrate vacuuming techniques
      8. Cite reasons for the importance of data collection
      9. Describe the importance of species selection
      10. Explain the importance of quarantine
      11. List the importance of minimizing stress
    4. Appraise how environmental mimicry can be a conditioning tool for spawning
      1. Explain aquarium STRESS and its negative effects on livestock
      2. Demonstrate creative aquascaping to relieve stress and lessen aggression
      3. Compare the effects of natural light cycles and consistent artificial lighting
    5. Defend the need for light
      1. Discuss photosynthesis in regards to heterotrophic versus autotrophic corals
      2. Examination photoperiod as a spawning and egg-hatching trigger
      3. Analyze various types of lighting systems and their individual advantages
    6. Compare and contrast the design of open versus closed aquaculture systems
      1. Identify various materials used in the manufacture of marine aquaculture systems including the advantages of using glass, acrylic, fiberglass, concrete, and plywood in broodstock holding systems
      2. Analyze the advantages of using Schedule 40 vs. Schedule 80 PVC plumbing
      3. Point out various common plumbing fittings and their proper application
      4. Demonstrate basic plumbing techniques essential for system design
      5. Assess evaporation in marine systems and the establishment of Maximum Fill Lines
      6. Calculate volume and weight of marine water
    7. Characterize taxonomical identification of on-site species
      1. Identify taxonomical names for fresh water species
      2. Identify taxonomical names for fresh salt water species
    8. Interpret the nitrogen cycle and its effect on marine aquaculture
      1. Establish protocols for testing for nitrogen levels for production tanks
      2. Identify the dissolved oxygen levels on production systems
    9. Differentiate between the essential components and pollutants of saltwater
      1. Demonstrate reverse osmosis water purification
      2. Manufacture synthetic saltwater
    10. Appraise water quality analysis
      1. Demonstrate proper water sampling and analysis techniques
      2. Measure and adjust salinity and temperature
      3. Solve for dissolved oxygen issues
      4. Analyze ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate concentrations
      5. Adjust pH and alkalinity
      6. Solve for phosphates excursions
      7. Adjust calcium and magnesium concentrations
    11. Compare and contrast biological, mechanical, and chemical filtration
      1. Assess various filters
      2. Utilize protein skimmers
      3. Outline the benefits of UV sterilization
    12. Categorize common marine diseases and treatment protocols
      1. Explain the impact of marine diseases on production levels.
      2. Prepare appropriate control treatments for each disease

  
  •  

    AGS 225 - Swine Science

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduces principles, practices and decisions impacting swine production.
    Prerequisite: AGS 319  or AGS 114  or Instructor permission.
    Competencies
    1. Assess the evolution of the swine industry
      1. Review the origins of swine production in the United States and around the world
      2. List the factors influencing establishment of breeds
      3. Describe relative strengths and weaknesses among breeds
      4. Articulate regional differences affecting where and how swine are raised
      5. Give examples of industry trends driving historical production shifts among states
      6. Summarize rationale for changing production methods over time
      7. Discuss the implications of contract production and integration in the swine industry
      8. Describe market and social dynamics influencing the current state of the pork production industry
      9. Envision production advancements in response to current and impending issues concerning consumer acceptance of pork products.
    2. Examine the different stages of a pork production system.
      1. Describe the life cycle of various categories of swine
      2. Review performance indicator traits measured and recorded in each segment to assess production efficiency
      3. List production goals and benchmarks utilized in each productive phase
      4. Describe factors determining value progressing through each segment of the swine industry
      5. Give examples of factors influencing cost of production in each segment of the swine industry
      6. Describe purchasing and marketing methods available to pork producers in each phase
      7. Discuss opportunities and challenges inherent in various marketing methods utilized to establish price as pigs move through industry segments
      8. Utilize currently available information to calculate predicted break-even, profit or loss in relevant production scenarios
    3. Evaluate management skills crucial to a modern swine operation
      1. Establish bio security protocols for a modern swine farm considering current challenges
      2. Perform sire and dam selection considering multiple genetic lines and seedstock sources utilizing available tools and pertinent information
      3. Schedule reproductive performance in various sized herds to maximize utilization of available facilities
      4. Justify common reproductive and management practices utilized in the gestation and farrowing phase
      5. Compare individual sow care and group housing options in the gestation and farrowing phase
      6. Develop a vaccination program designed to insure optimum health and performance of the sow herd and pigs moving to the next phase of production
      7. Develop health, management and nutritional protocols for starting pigs
      8. Develop an appropriate nutrition and management plan for pigs in the finishing phase
      9. Visually appraise pigs as individuals and groups for optimum market readiness recognizing relationships among frame, muscularity and finish in addition to weight
      10. Evaluate available marketing options for fed pigs to make informed selling decisions
      11. Describe appropriate animal care and handling criteria for pigs under various conditions
      12. Diagnose common problems in each phase of production in a timely manner to maximize available solutions or minimize potential for loss
    4. Evaluate consumer impacts on the swine industry
      1. Describe the historical and current utilization of pork products worldwide
      2. Identify consumer preference trends affecting pork consumption over time
      3. Discuss the contributions and concerns of pork products in a healthy diet
      4. Review pork quality improvements made through producer efforts to enhance demand
      5. Give examples of issues other than consumer acceptance impacting the future swine industry
      6. Evaluate various sources of information regarding swine industry effects on the environment
      7. Discuss the existing and potential influence of synthetic imitation products on pork consumption
      8. Formulate informed and appropriate responses to common discussion topics relating to swine production
    5. Consider careers in and affiliated with swine production
      1. Describe the roles and daily responsibilities of those working in various industry production segments
      2. Discuss opportunities and obstacles to start a swine production enterprise from scratch
      3. Establish basic requirements to start and sustain a swine production enterprise
      4. Identify potential niche production and alternative marketing arrangements
      5. List all potential sources of value in adding or expanding an existing swine operation to a crop production enterprise including enhanced soil fertility, increased yield, decreased input costs and shared labor.
      6. Relate the interdependence of swine production and agronomy.
      7. Relate the reliance of swine production on agricultural businesses including construction and manufacturing.
      8. List sales, service and additional careers associated with swine production
    6. Perform basic skills and tasks associated with swine production in a safe and effective manner
      1. Describe basic animal behavior and handling considerations
      2. Develop familiarity with animal handling tools and equipment
      3. Apply knowledge of animal behavior to read, move and restrain animals prioritizing safety for both animals and handlers
      4. Apply knowledge of animal behavior to read, move and restrain animals appropriately for the situation
      5. Give examples of common animal health protection, treatment and management practices
      6. Actively participate and contribute to completion of swine production and management tasks

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    AGS 226 - Beef Cattle Science

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Introduces principles, practices and decisions impacting beef production.
    Prerequisite: AGS 319  or AGS 114  or Instructor permission.
    Competencies
    1. Assess the evolution of the beef industry
      1. Review the origins of beef production in the United States and around the world
      2. List factors influencing establishment of breeds
      3. Compare lingering breed strengths and weaknesses derived from foundational selection pressure
      4. Articulate regional differences affecting where, how and the type of beef cattle raised
      5. Evaluate industry trends driving historical production shifts among states
      6. Describe market and social dynamics influencing the current state of the beef industry
      7. Summarize the rationale behind adoption of alternative production methods over time
      8. Propose production advancements in response to current and impending issues concerning consumer acceptance of beef products
    2. Examine the different stages of a beef production system.
      1. Describe the life cycle of various categories of beef cattle
      2. Review performance indicator traits and measured and recorded in each segment to assess production efficiency
      3. List production goals and benchmarks utilized in each productive phase
      4. Describe factors determining cattle value progressing through each segment of the cattle industry
      5. Give examples of factors influencing cost of production in each segment of the cattle industry
      6. Describe purchasing and marketing methods available to cattle producers in each phase
      7. Discuss opportunities and challenges inherent in various marketing methods utilized to establish price as cattle move through industry segments
      8. Utilize currently available information to calculate predicted break-even, profit or loss in relevant production scenarios
    3. Evaluate management skills crucial to a modern beef operation
      1. Perform sire and dam selection allowing for varying production goals, environmental and management level considerations utilizing available tools and pertinent information
      2. List and account for factors inhibiting reproductive efficiency with cost-effective solutions
      3. Describe advanced reproductive technologies including artificial insemination, sexed semen, estrus synchronization and embryo transfer
      4. Give examples of seasonally available feed resources for the cow-calf herd
      5. Describe marketing strategies for the calf crop, including backgrounding and options for retained ownership through the feedlot
      6. Develop a preconditioning program designed to insure optimum health and performance of calves moving to the next phase of production
      7. Develop health and nutritional protocols for starting calves on feed
      8. Assess performance and profit potential among feeder calves of various types, breed compositions and available sources to make sound purchasing decisions
      9. Develop a seasonally appropriate nutrition and management plan for cattle in the feedlot phase
      10. Visually appraise cattle as individuals and groups for optimum market readiness recognizing relationships among frame, muscularity and finish in addition to weight
      11. Identify available marketing options for fed cattle to make informed selling decisions
      12. Diagnose common problems in each phase of production in a timely manner to maximize available solutions or minimize potential for loss
    4. Assess consumer impacts on the beef industry
      1. Describe the historical and current utilization of beef products worldwide
      2. Identify consumer preference trends affecting beef consumption over time
      3. Discuss the contributions and concerns of beef products in a healthy diet
      4. Review beef quality improvements made through producer efforts to enhance demand
      5. Describe issues other than consumer acceptance impacting the future beef industry
      6. Evaluate various sources of information regarding beef industry effects on the environment
      7. Discuss the existing and potential influence of synthetic imitation products on beef consumption
      8. Formulate informed and appropriate responses to common discussion topics relating to beef production
    5. Consider careers in and affiliated with beef production
      1. Describe the roles and daily responsibilities of those working in various industry production segments
      2. Discuss opportunities and obstacles to start a beef production enterprise from scratch
      3. Establish basic requirements to start and sustain a beef production enterprise
      4. Identify potential niche production and alternative marketing arrangements
      5. List all potential sources of value in adding or expanding an existing beef operation to a crop production enterprise including enhanced soil fertility, increased yield, decreased input costs and shared labor.
      6. Relate the interdependence of beef cattle production and agronomy.
      7. Relate the reliance of beef cattle production on agricultural businesses.
      8. List sales, service and additional careers associated with beef production
    6. Perform basic skills and tasks associated with beef production in a safe and effective manner
      1. Describe basic animal behavior and handling considerations
      2. Develop familiarity with animal handling tools and equipment
      3. Apply knowledge of animal behavior to read, move and restrain animals prioritizing safety for both animals and handlers
      4. Apply knowledge of animal behavior to read, move and restrain animals appropriately for the situation
      5. Observe common animal health protection, treatment and management practices
      6. Actively participate and contribute to completion of beef production and management tasks

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    AGS 242 - Animal Health

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    A survey of diseases of large domestic animals, including discussion of causes, transmission, prevention and control.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the components of a herd health program
      1. Discuss the importance of sanitation to a herd health program
      2. Point out the importance of proper nutrition to a herd health program
      3. Cite reasons for the importance of record analysis to a herd health program
      4. Describe the importance of source of livestock to a herd health program
      5. Explain the importance of physical facilities to a herd health program
      6. Outline the importance of proper use of biologics and pharmaceuticals to a herd health program
      7. List the importance of minimizing stress to a herd health program
      8. Explain the importance of personnel training to a herd health program
    2. Explain the importance of sanitation in disease prevention
    3. Describe the characteristics of a healthy animal
      1. List the normal body temperature for the major species
      2. Identify the normal respiration rate for the major species
      3. State the normal heart rate for the major species
    4. Describe methods of detecting unhealthy animals and the value of proper handling and treatment
      1. Outline the importance of detecting and separating unhealthy animals
      2. Cite the value of early treatment of unhealthy animals
      3. List the observable signs of sickness in an animal
    5. Define animal health terms
      1. Select the twenty terms most commonly used in working with animals
      2. Match animal health terms with their definition
    6. List the components of a disease control program
    7. Select proper needle gauge and length as well as proper injection site
      1. Define the meaning of gauge in reference to needles
      2. Discuss the proper length of needles
      3. Identify the proper injection site in treating animals
    8. List major diseases, their clinical signs, and causes
      1. Name the diseases of the newborn and young animals
      2. Identify the major diseases of reproduction
      3. Outline the major cattle diseases and their clinical signs
      4. Identify eight troublesome swine diseases and discuss their clinical signs and causes
      5. List four serious sheep diseases
      6. Select a disease of horses and explain its clinical signs
    9. Identify major parasites and their life cycle
      1. Reproduce a drawing of the life cycle of the large roundworm in swine
      2. List the types of worms that can affect swine
      3. Describe the timing involved in worming cattle
      4. Define a systemic anthelmintic
    10. Prevent internal and external parasites through proper treatment
    11. Demonstrate the preparation of facilities/equipment for livestock use including washing and disinfecting
      1. Discuss the importance of washing and disinfecting facilities
      2. Describe the various types of disinfectants and their advantages and disadvantages
      3. Review the different merits of using cold water or hot water cleaning
    12. Explain the importance of slaughter checks and a periodic health analysis
      1. Differentiate between a conventional and an SPF swine herd
      2. Summarize the steps involved in a slaughter check
      3. Defend the merits of a periodic health visit to the herd by a veterinarian
    13. Explain the importance of using a health professional
      1. Illustrate how a veterinarian can be utilized in a herd health program
      2. List the services a veterinarian can provide a herd
      3. Discuss herd health activities a producer can perform without the assistance of a health professional
    14. Identify state and federal laws regarding animal care
      1. Review the requirements for selling breeding stock
      2. Review the requirements for interstate shipment of livestock
      3. Discuss why there are laws regarding animal care
    15. Develop a herd health management schedule
      1. Select one species for development of a herd health management schedule
      2. Design a total program including both health and general management of the herd
      3. Prepare the herd health management schedule in a typewritten form
      4. Create the herd health management schedule utilizing any available resources and expertise

  
  •  

    AGS 249 - Aquaculture/Aquarium Sci II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course continues the exploration of aquaculture as it relates to public aquariums, aquatic research facilities and the commercial marine ornamental pet trade. A specific focus on the breeding, spawning and rearing of ornamental marine fishes will be implemented through laboratory exercises and facility site visits. Live food culture and marine invertebrates aquaculture will be studied with hands-on experiences involving both jellyfish and live coral propagations.
    Prerequisite: AGS 222  
    Competencies
    1. Assess issues that impact the future of the industry
      1. Distinguish wild collected versus captive raised marine animals
      2. Evaluate economic impact of wild collected versus captive raised species
      3. Explain how consumer preference influences both selection and production methods
      4. Compare and contrast the work being done by SECORE versus Coral Reef Restoration Foundation
    2. Interpret data
      1. Collect data
      2. Analyze trends in larval rearing successes
      3. Predict spawning and hatching dates
    3. Diagram the reproductive cycle of the marine ornamental fish
      1. Compare protogynous versus protandrous hermaphroditism
      2. Define simultaneous hermaphroditism
      3. Discriminate benthic versus pelagic spawning
      4. Discuss mouth brooders
      5. Differentiate monogamy versus harem spawning
      6. Examine varying degrees of parental care of eggs and offspring
      7. Summarize quantitative gambling in egg production and larval survivability
    4. Evaluate benefits of live food versus frozen or prepared foods
      1. Create at least one species of green water
      2. Describe the benefits of a variety of species of alga commonly referred to as green water
      3. Produce consistent rotifer cultures
      4. De-capsulate and hatch live brine shrimp
    5. Assess coral growth dependency on physical parameters
      1. Explain available calcium and magnesium as limiting factors in coral growth
      2. Examine how phosphates inhibit coral growth
      3. Analyze coral structural growth dependency on water currents
      4. Interpret minimum light duration and intensity requirements and photo inhibition as it pertains to coral growth rates
    6. Decide water flow rates
      1. Examine water flow requirements for live coral versus fish production
      2. Assess impeller versus propeller water flow production and its sheer force effect
      3. Compare devices used in aquaculture to increase water flow taking into consideration the economics of energy consumption
    7. Describe the concept of a pseudokreisel
      1. Provide a detailed description of how a kreisel works
      2. Summarize multiple uses of kreisels in aquaculture
    8. Illustrate the life cycle of the Moon Jellyfish
    9. Demonstrate proper shipping and handling skills for animals produced in the aquaculture lab
      1. Package marine fish for a 48-hour transport
      2. Prepare package a variety of live corals for a 48-hour transport including methods involving dry shipping, flotation, and bubble wrap padding
      3. Package Moon Jellyfish for a 24-hour transport
      4. Utilizing the water balloon technique to package jellyfish for a 48-hour transport
    10. Evaluate wastewater management issues related to aquaculture
      1. Analyze the potential effects of untreated aquaculture wastewater as a pollutant
      2. Assess the impact of state and federal regulations
    11. Examine careers in aquaculture
      1. Compare commercial viability of small, medium, and large commercial start-up ventures
      2. Give examples of jobs outside the aquaculture field that utilize the skills obtained through aquaculture

  
  •  

    AGS 319 - Animal Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    Examination of nutritional principles, digestive systems, composition and nutritional characteristics of common feedstuffs, ration formulation and recommended animal feeding programs.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze the role of nutrients and their functions regarding animal health and productivity
      1. Define a nutrient
      2. Align nutrient categories with their respective functions
      3. Explain the relationship between those nutrients providing energy in animal diets
      4. Articulate factors affecting the partitioning and utilization of feedstuff energy
      5. Differentiate essential amino acid requirements among species
      6. Associate important minerals with common deficiency and toxicity symptoms
      7. Characterize important vitamins according to deficiency indicators
      8. Discuss the importance of clean water and its availability to livestock
      9. Determine and describe proper quality, delivery, and consumption of feed and water
      10. Utilize commonly accepted units of measure to express animal nutrient needs and feedstuff nutrient density.
    2. Evaluate digestive system differences between species.
      1. Define digestion of feedstuffs and absorption of nutrients
      2. Use terms relating to digestive and absorptive processes in context
      3. Label digestive system anatomy common among species
      4. Explain the function of digestive system components in simple stomached animals
      5. Distinguish differing digestion capabilities among monogastric animals
      6. Articulate digestive mechanisms unique to avian species
      7. Describe the anatomy and function of the ruminant stomach
      8. Summarize the roles of mechanical, chemical, enzymatic and microbial digestion
      9. Recall the absorbable end products of digestion and their role in animal health and performance
      10. Differentiate digestive tract capabilities and limitations regarding utilization of various feedstuffs by species
    3. Evaluate feedstuffs relative to nutrient composition and animal requirements.
      1. Examine International Feed Names and Numbers
      2. Match feedstuffs available with the proper feed class
      3. Review procedures for evaluating the nutritional value of feedstuff
      4. Compare various nutrient sources
      5. Describe the difference between roughages and concentrates
      6. Name the protein supplement classes and the species for which they are used
      7. Utilize proximate analysis and general nutrient tables regarding composition of feeds
      8. Identify feedstuffs suitable for each species based on digestive capabilities
      9. Calculate the protein level of given feedstuffs and convert nutrient densities from dry matter and as-fed basis
      10. Explain the physical evaluation of feedstuffs
      11. Cite growing, storage and handling impacts on the nutritional value of feedstuffs
      12. Summarize methods and advantages of processing feedstuffs
    4. Formulate rations based upon animal nutrient requirements.
      1. Describe an animal to be fed
      2. Recall the expected feed intake for the five major animal species
      3. Identify suitable production benchmarks for each species
      4. List various methods of delivering feed and water to livestock
      5. Outline the method of balancing rations using the Pearson Square
      6. Demonstrate the ability to balance a simple animal ration
      7. Calculate balanced rations using two feed sources
      8. Calculate balanced rations using three or more feed sources
      9. Calculate balanced rations using fixed ingredients
      10. Find, interpret and apply data feedstuff composition data to balancing animal diets
      11. Analyze diets based upon cost of production
    5. Outline the impact of commercial feed regulations on animal production.
      1. Consider effects of commercial feed laws on the animal feeding industry
      2. List items which must be included in the guaranteed analysis of a feed tag
      3. Select a feed tag and be ready to discuss its content in class
      4. Apply record keeping rules, guidelines and best practices regarding feed ingredient inventory and utilization
      5. Contemplate implications of commercial feed laws for feed manufacturers and animal producers
    6. Examine the role of additives in animal health and production.
      1. Identify feed additives and their applications
      2. Describe the appropriate use of implant products on growth promotion and feed efficiency
      3. Give examples of regulations regarding utilization feed grade antibiotics and additives
      4. Deliberate issues related to additive usage and implications for food animal producers

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    AGS 323 - Animal Nutrition II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Open
    The practical application of feeding principles. An indepth study of the various nutrients, their requirements and uses. An analysis of research feeding trials, research procedures and manufacturing terminology.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: AGS 319   
    Competencies
    1. Identify recommended nutritional requirements for swine feeding
      1. Discuss the life-cycle swine feeding program
      2. Identify different nutrient needs within the life cycle
      3. Identify different additives used within the life cycle.
    2. Name various feeding methods used in swine production
      1. Describe feeding systems used for the breeding herd
      2. Identify feeding systems used for the and finishing herd
    3. Demonstrate the ability to formulate swine diets
      1. Review the swine ration worksheet
      2. Calculate swine ration problems
    4. Identify recommended nutritional requirements for the beef breeding herd
      1. Discuss a life-cycle cattle feeding program
      2. Identify specific nutrient needs within the life cycle
      3. Identify specific additives used within the life cycle
      4. Explain feeding systems for the beef breeding herd
    5. Identify recommended nutritional requirements for finishing market cattle
      1. Explain feeding systems for finishing market cattle
      2. Outline the merits of a system of protein evaluation for cattle
    6. Describe the principle of rumen by-pass protein
    7. Demonstrate the ability to formulate feedlot cattle rations evaluating metabolizable protein needs of animals and feedstuff utilization
      1. Review the beef ration worksheet
      2. Calculate beef rations using alfalfa hay
      3. Calculate beef rations using corn silage
    8. Summarize recommended nutritional and management requirements for modern dairy production
      1. Discuss a life-cycle dairy cattle feeding program
      2. Identify specific nutritional needs within the life cycle
      3. Review specific additive needs within the life cycle
      4. Identify nutrition-related diseases and disorders within the dairy cattle life cycle
    9. Identify recommended feeding practices for all types of sheep operations
      1. Outline and discuss a life-cycle sheep feeding program
      2. Identify specific nutritional needs within the life cycle
      3. Review specific additives used within the life cycle
      4. Identify nutrition-related diseases and disorders with the sheep life cycle
    10. Describe the nutritional recommendations and feeding practices involved in caring for horses
      1. Outline nutrient and energy requirements related to the functions of a horse
      2. Recall feedstuffs commonly used in horse diets
      3. Outline horse feeding program
      4. Identify nutritionally related diseases and disorders in horses


Agriculture-Technology

  
  •  

    AGT 120 - Agricultural Appl in Biotech

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will explore through discussion and laboratory demonstration the impact that biotechnology has in all agricultural applications. A variety of application techniques will be used in both the agronomic and animal science areas to provide students with an understanding of these significant developments and how they will be able to communicate more effectively with a customer base that utilizes the products being developed.
    Competencies
    1. Explain biotechnology and its impact on society.
      1. Identify the different types of biotechnology classifications.
      2. Review society perceptions and concerns for biotechnology.
      3. Identify the current regulations and legislative issues affecting agricultural biotechnology.
      4. Discuss the ethical implications associated with biotechnology in agriculture.
    2. Describe the hands-on experiences with biotechnology.
      1. Identify current uses associated with agriculture.
      2. Develop a list of current uses and their benefits to the agricultural industry.
    3. Debate both the cost and benefits assciated with the use of biotechnology in agriculture.
      1. Identify the benefits of using current technologies.
      2. Evaluate the cost relationship between biotechnology and non-biotechnology production.
    4. Explain the relationship between DNA and current applications in the food, fiber and fuel system.
      1. Identify the benefits of using current technology through laboratory application.
      2. Establish laboratory protocols for using electrophoresis in DNA sampling.
    5. Understand the history and development of biotech advancements and how it relates to agriculture.
      1. Develop a flowchart of the biotechnology advancement for agriculture.
      2. Explain the importance of these advancements on a global society.
    6. Explain the importance of biotechnology research on the new frontiers of agricultural application.
      1. Research the role that biotechnology research has on agricultural production.
      2. Identify new applications of biotechnology that will impact agriculture over the next decade.
    7. Demonstrate through laboratory experiences a variety of current technologies to reinforce the value of biotechnology in agriculture.
      1. Identify the protocols of conducting laboratory activities.
      2. conduct bioassay and microbial surveys.
      3. Incorporate a laboratory experience that uses different types of food enzymes and micro-organisms to demonstrate food safety and development protocols.
      4. Develop tissue cultures using aseptic and non-aseptic techniques.
      5. Conduct a laboratory on the fermentation of preferential sugars.
      6. Establish a laboratory that utilizes current technologies cellulosic and biodiesel fuels.


Agriculture-Veterinary Technology

  
  •  

    AGV 109 - Pharmacy Skills

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course reviews the basic concepts of animal anatomy and physiology in relation to medicine administration. Students are familiarized with veterinary drugs, their modes of administration and specific function in animal body systems.
    Prerequisite: AGV 120  , AGV 245  , AGV 129  , AGV 128  and AGV 133 .
    Competencies
    1. List routes of administration of medications.
      1. Select appropriate equipment for administration of different delivary forms of a medication.
      2. Demonstrate according to established criteria the location of appropriate intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection sites.
      3. Demonstrate proper oral medication administration, for both tablet and liquid.
    2. Describe basic principles of pharmacokinetics.
      1. Identify all routes of pharmaceutical administration.
      2. Identify how routes of administration differ in absorption, distribution transformation and excretion.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the systems of measurement for dosages.
    4. Demonstrate proper procedures for adminisering medicines.
    5. Create lists of the most common medicines use in each of the specific body systems.
    6. Discuss and abide to the laws and regulations governing medications for use in the United states of America.

  
  •  

    AGV 120 - Veterinary Medical Terminology

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Covers medical terminology with a veterinary emphasis.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMACC Veterinary Technology program
    Competencies
    1. Recognize common root words, prefixes, suffixes, and combining vowels.
      1. Identify prefixes used in anatomical terminology related to veterinary medicine.
      2. Recognize root words used in anatomical terminology related to veterinary medicine.
    2. Interpret medical language.
      1. Combine words to form diagnostic medical terms related to veterinary medicine.
      2. Consolidate word parts to form surgical medical terms related to veterinary medicine.
      3. Merge word parts to form medical terms related to pathological conditions for veterinary medicine.
    3. Evaluate medical terms related to pathological conditions for veterinary medicine.
      1. Interpret diagnostic terms related to veterinary medicine.
      2. Analyze surgical terms related to veterinary medicine.
      3. Recognize, correctly pronounce, and appropriately use common directional terms.

  
  •  

    AGV 128 - Introduction to Veterinary Technology

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course introduces the basics of animal identification, husbandry, behavior, safety and healthcare to the student. Career opportunities in animal-related fields are explored.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMACC Veterinary Technology program.
    Competencies
    1. Examine domestic animal species and species specific behavior.
      1. Recognize the differences in domestic animal species.
      2. Identify the behaviors associated with each domestic species.
      3. Recognize the specific needs of each domestic species for appropriate care
      4. Discuss domestic breeds and their specific needs and behavior.
      5. Describe common identification methods for domestic animal species.
    2. Appraise responsibilities and techniques for keeping kennels and cages clean and disinfected, and maintaining proper records on care.
      1. Recognize legal responsibilities for maintaining animal care facilities and records.
      2. Demonstrate proper procedures for sanitizing pet care facilities.
      3. Discuss legal implications of medical records.
      4. Identify the components of the legal medical records and logs.
      5. Recognize advantages and disadvantages to different methods of formatting medical records.
    3. Interpret animal demeanor based on observation of body language and demonstrate proper use of restraint and safety equipment.
      1. Employ proper techniques for safe restraint of domestic species.
      2. Identify equipment for restraining domestic species.
      3. Demonstrate proper technique for basic physical exams and grooming of domestic species.
    4. Compare and contrast the roles of veterinarians, credentialed veterinary technicians, certified veterinary assistants, kennel attendants and other personnel in a professional working environment.
      1. Discuss the history of veterinary technology.
      2. Understand the laws and ethics governing the veterinary profession.
      3. Identify the professional organizations relating to veterinary technology.
      4. Summarize the requirements to becoming a credentialed veterinary technician.

  
  •  

    AGV 129 - Veterinary Physiology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Physiology with a veterinary clinical emphasis. Provides the basis for study of confirmation, production and pathological processes of diseases of domestic animals.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMACC Veterinary Technology program
    Competencies
    1. Review basic biology.
      1. Define homeostasis.
      2. Discuss basic molecular biology as it relates to cellular function
      3. Explain cellular anatomy
      4. Describe organization of tissues into body systems.
    2. Summarize the anatomy and physiology of the immune system.
      1. Identify components of the immune system.
      2. Outline the integument system.
      3. Describe blood and lymph.
    3. Explain normal physiology of cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
      1. Identify the heart chambers, sounds and valves.
      2. Trace the pathway of blood through the hearts systemic and pulmonary and circulatory system.
      3. Describe the normal functions of the respiratory system.
      4. Illustrate the conduction pathway of the heart.
    4. Explain the function of muscular and skeletal systems.
      1. Describe how bones are formed and grow.
      2. Outline bone healing process.
      3. Identify the structure of the major types of joints in the selected species body.
      4. Define different types of muscles.
      5. Discuss control of muscle fibers.
    5. Understand physiology of the digestive and urinary systems.
      1. Describe ruminant vs simple stomach digestion.
      2. List the accessory organs for digestion and functions.
      3. Explain renal function and urine production.
    6. Summarize the function of the nervous system.
      1. List the sensory organs and their function.
      2. Outline the parasympathetic vs sympathetic nervous systems.
      3. Describe anatomy and physiology of the brain and spinal cord.
    7. Understand physiology of the endocrine and reproductive systems.
      1. Discuss neurohormonal feedback loops.
      2. Outline reproductive cycles of various domestic species.
    8. Review body systems and functions of various species.
      1. Recognize avian anatomy and physiology.
      2. Recognize reptilian anatomy and physiology.

  
  •  

    AGV 133 - Veterinary Clinic Pathology I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers parasite identification and testing and various sample collection, procedures and interpretation for common diagnostic testing performed in the veterinary laboratory.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMACC Veterinary Technology program
    Competencies
    1. Perform collection and processing of animal samples in a veterinary laboratory.
      1. Establish appropriate procedure for collecting samples in a veterinary laboratory.
      2. Process samples utilizing current technologies and safety procedures.
      3. Dispose of samples according to established procedures and current laws.
      4. Utilize a compound microscope properly.
      5. Report and log results.
    2. Classify common internal parasites and review diagnostic tests, treatment and prevention of internal parasitic infection.
      1. Identify common internal parasites associated with domestic species.
      2. Describe treatments for appropriate control internal of parasites.
      3. Give examples of prevention plans to control internal parasite life cycles.
      4. Review life cycles of internal parasites for owners.
      5. Discuss zoonotic internal parasites.
      6. Understand the legal role veterinary technicians play in educating clients about transmission of internal zoonotic parasites.
    3. Classify common external parasites and review diagnostic tests, treatment and prevention of external parasitic infection.
      1. Identify common external parasites associated with domestic species.
      2. Describe treatments for appropriate control of external parasites.
      3. Give examples of prevention plans to control external parasite life cycles.
      4. Review life cycles of external parasites for owners.
      5. Discuss zoonotic external parasites.
      6. Understand the legal role veterinary technicians play in educating clients about transmission of external zoonotic parasites.
    4. Justify selection of routine diagnostic tests for detection of parasites.
      1. Summarize routine diagnostic test options for detection of parasites.
      2. Discuss enzyme-linked immunoassays.
      3. Interpret test results and discuss aberrant results.

  
  •  

    AGV 134 - Veterinary Clinic Pathology II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Continues Veterinary Clinical Pathology I with emphasis on common blood and urine tests performed in a veterinary laboratory.
    Prerequisite: AGV 120 , AGV 128  , AGV 129  and AGV 133  
    Competencies
    1. Perform a complete blood cell count and other hematological tests.
      1. Prepare and stain a blood smear
      2. Identify and describe various RBC’s
      3. Identify various WBC’s
      4. Discuss normal values for blood cells
      5. Perform reticulocyte counts
    2. Demonstrate Urinalysis procedures.
      1. Demonstrate collection techniques
      2. Discuss normal/abnormal values
      3. Record properly results of tests
    3. Demonstrate common cytological diagnostic tests and sample preparation.
      1. Demonstrate sample collection techniques and preparations
      2. Discuss normal and abnormal characteristics of cells
    4. Evaluate blood chemistry panel.
      1. Identify various blood chemistries and their application
      2. Evaluate individual tests and their use
      3. Perform blood chemistry panel

  
  •  

    AGV 138 - Clinical Pathology Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    A review of current clinical laboratory practices in veterinary pathology.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 , AGV 164 , AGV 172  and AGV 266  
    Competencies
    1. Assess individual tests and their use.
      1. Identify various panels and their application
      2. Discuss results of panels and their significance
      3. Perform test procedure for blood chemistry panel
    2. Perform a complete blood cell count.
      1. Discuss WBCs
      2. Discuss RBCs
      3. Discuss interpretation of complete CBC
    3. Interpret Coagulation Tests.
      1. Evaluate platelet counts
      2. Perform coagulation tests
    4. Perform urinalysis procedures.
      1. Describe collection procedures
      2. Explain physical examination
      3. Discuss microscopic examination
    5. Illustrate advanced sampling techniques and procedures.
      1. Describe how to collect blood gas samples
      2. Explain a patient’s acid-base status

  
  •  

    AGV 140 - Veterinary Pharmacology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to provide advanced knowledge in specific drug classification, usage and effects. This course will outline the technician’s role and responsibilities in the pharmacy with regards to regulation of drugs, categories of drugs, labeling prescriptions, controlled drug logs, legal use of drugs, client education, calculations, measurement and compliance with manufacturer recommendations.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 , AGV 109  , AGV 151 , AGV 166 , AGV 932  
    Competencies
    1. Outline common delivery systems of drugs.
      1. Demonstrate parenteral, enteral and local applications.
      2. Discuss pros and cons of parenteral, enteral and local applications.
      3. Discuss possible combinations of usage.
    2. Characterize common drug uses in veterinary medicine.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to read manufacturer labels and follow manufacturer instructions.
      2. Discuss various targeted body systems of application.
      3. Discuss safety in veterinary drug dispensing.
      4. Determine cost-plus of various treatments.
    3. Discuss common interactions of drugs.
      1. Define synergistic activity.
      2. Define antagonistic activity.
      3. Define complementary activity.
    4. Determine desired response.
      1. Demonstrate calculations for doses.
      2. Describe conversion factors for different species.
      3. Demonstrate proper monitoring of therapeutic response.
    5. Demonstrate proper dispensing.
      1. Discuss proper counting techniques.
      2. Dispense drugs with required labeling information.
      3. Discuss labeled use vs. extra label use.
    6. Illustrate the Doctor - Patient - Client relationship.
      1. Discuss legal purchase of biological, therapeutics and pesticides.
      2. Discuss regulated categories, over the counter vs. prescription and controlled substances.
      3. Demonstrate proper use of pharmaceutical terminology and abbreviations.
      4. Discuss dispensing instruction with client.
    7. Construct groups and categoreis of drugs.
      1. Describe the drug’s most common use.
      2. Describe the drug’s method of action.
      3. Describe the drug’s contraindications.
      4. Describe the drug’s adverse side effects.
    8. Break down accurate veterinary pharmaceutical record keeping.
      1. Demonstrate accurate recording of in a patient record.
      2. Demonstrate the proper recording needed for controlled substance dispensing.
      3. Demonstrate the proper inventory procedures for controlled substances.
    9. Examine use of chemotherapy explain common interactions of drugs.
      1. Define proper dosage methods.
      2. Discuss potential sever adverse reactions.
      3. Review information regarding human safety.

  
  •  

    AGV 145 - Animal Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Animal Nutrition provides instruction regarding essential nutrients and the role of each in an animal’s metabolism. Topics include basic clinical and therapeutic nutrition, pet food analysis, nutritional deficiencies, and toxins. Emphasis is on dogs and cats with an introduction to large animal nutrition, feeds and feeding.
    Prerequisite: AGV 164 , AGV 172 , AGV 266  
    Competencies
    1. Appraise all key nutrients
      1. Understand 6 nutrient classes
      2. Identify the 3 classes that provide energy
      3. Define each nutrient’s function(s)
      4. Explain the function of water as a nutrient
    2. Evaluate carbohydrates role in nutrition
      1. Identify different classes of carbohydrates
      2. Differentiate those that produce energy for different species
      3. Outline classification of carbohydrates based on number of sugar molecules
    3. Assess and define key fats
      1. List different classes of fats
      2. Explain fatty acid structure and bonding
    4. Compare and contrast key amino acids and proteins
      1. Categorize amino acids
      2. Understand a limiting amino acid
      3. Characterize essential amino acids for dogs and cats
      4. Summarize protein quality and biologic value
    5. Evaluate key vitamins and minerals
      1. DIfferentiate water soluble vitamins
      2. Differentiate fat soluble vitamins
      3. Classify vitamin-like substances
      4. Outline macrominerals
      5. Illustrate microminerals
    6. Compare and contrast animal digestion and absorption of nutrients by species
      1. Outline a simple digestive tract (dog, cats, pigs)
        1. List all the parts of the simple digestive tract
        2. Explain function of each part of the simple digestive tract
      2. Explain hormones involved in digestion
      3. Describe the function of hormones involved in digestion
    7. Differentiate Energy Balance
      1. Understand RER, BER, MER, DER, ME, kcal
      2. Explain energy expenditure
      3. Determine estimated energy requirements
    8. Interpret Pet Food Regulation in the USA and Pet Food Labels
      1. Outline the role of regulation in production and sales
      2. Examine required components of a pet food label
    9. Interpret Nutrient Content of Pet Foods
      1. Understand how nutrient information is obtained from product lables
      2. Coorelate the role of feeding trials
      3. Understand metabolizable energy (ME)
    10. Compare and contrast Food Additives and Pet Food Preservatives
      1.  Categorize the role of antioxidants
      2. DIstinguish synthetic versus naturally derived antioxidants
    11. Evaluate Body Scores utilizing Body Condition Scoring schemes
      1. Assess two primary body condition scoring scales used
      2. Understand what is normal, underweight, overweight and obese
    12. Compare and contrast the nutritional requirements of common domestic species
      1. Compare anatomic adaptations of common domestic species
      2. Classify physiologic adaptations of common domestic species
      3. Differentiate metabolic adaptations of common domestic species
    13. Categorieze nutritional support of convalescent domestic species
      1. Formulate guideline for nutritional support
      2. Break down nutritional assessment
      3. Classify routes of administration
      4. Understand importance of feeding orders
    14. Appraise the nutritional requirement of birds and small mammals
      1. Characterize role of nutritional deficiencies in birds and small mammals
      2. Compare diets and treats
      3. Contrast pelleted versus mixed diets
      4. Report key nutritional factors for birds and small mammals

  
  •  

    AGV 151 - Intro Vet Tech Clinical Skills

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course introduces the student to the basics of radiology, anesthesia, surgical preparation, veterinary customer service, veterinary computer programs, veterinary recordkeeping and other skills students will use during their internship.
    Prerequisite: AGV 120 , AGV 128  , AGV 129  and AGV 133  
    Competencies
    1. Perform production and control of x-rays.
      1. Identify parts of equipment and functions.
      2. Discuss safety measures for handling equipment.
    2. Demonstrate ability to obtain and process radiographs.
      1. Position small animal patients.
      2. Demonstrate use of automatic processing.
    3. Categorize the stages of anesthesia.
      1. Identify the physiological changes that occur during the various planes of anesthesia.
      2. Calculate dosages.
      3. Establish procedure for administering.
      4. Explain patient care and monitoring during anesthesia.
    4. Outline the basic concepts of veterinary surgery.
      1. Identify the steps of surgical preparation.
      2. List the steps of surgical pack preparation.
      3. Identify common surgical instruments.
      4. Demonstrate proper cleaning and maintenance.
      5. Demonstrate proper sterilization techniques.
    5. Perform basic veterinary office procedures.
      1. Maintain medical records.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of control drug log and other logs in compliance with regulatory guidelines.
      3. Develop veterinary software computer skills.
      4. Understand and observe legal boundaries of veterinary healthcare team members.
      5. Demonstrate effective client communication skills(phone, face-to-face, written)

  
  •  

    AGV 160 - Anesthesia/Surgical Assistance

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the common surgical procedures performed in the veterinary clinic. Emphasis is placed on sanitation, patient observation, surgical preparation, assisting in anesthesia and postoperative patient management.
    Prerequisite: AGV 141, AGV 164 , AGV 172 , AGV 180,  AGV 266  
    Competencies
    1. Assess stages of anesthesia.
      1. Calibrate dosages
      2. Establish procedure for administering
      3. Review post surgical procedures for anesthesia and pain control
    2. Examine basic concepts of veterinary surgery.
      1. Explain proper care and monitoring during anesthesia
      2. State the steps of surgical preparation
      3. List the steps of surgical pack preparation
      4. Describe common surgical procedures
    3. Characterize surgical instruments and their use.
      1. Show proper cleaning and maintenance.
      2. Show proper sterilization techniques.
      3. Select proper instruments for specific procedures.
    4. Perform pre-surgical induction procedure.
      1. Demonstrate dosage calculation
      2. Discuss proper recording of controlled substances
      3. Demonstrate endotracheal intubation
      4. Discuss proper monitoring
    5. Perform surgical procedures for monitoring.
      1. Set up equipment for monitoring
      2. Demonstrate proper use of equipment
      3. Discuss importance of various monitoring values
      4. Demonstrate record monitoring information.
    6. Incorporate post-surgical procedures.
      1. Complete post-surgical sanitation and clean-up
      2. Maintain animal record of condition post-surgically
      3. Assist in post-surgical recording and documentation of supplies and drugs used
    7. Characterize oral and dentistry procedures.
      1. Demonstrate proper evaluation of oral disease
      2. Demonstrate proper cleaning of teeth
    8. Develop proper techniques for releasing animals.
      1. Discuss information to be released to the owner
      2. Use of Elizabethan collar.
      3. Instruct Owner of proper return period for aftercare.

  
  •  

    AGV 164 - Clinical Mgmt Domestic Species

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the management and husbandry of animals housed in a hospital or shelter situation. Proper kennel cleaning and disinfection, recordkeeping, monitoring of health parameters, nutrition, bathing, administration of common medications and diagnostic sampling.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 , AGV 109  , AGV 151 , AGV 166 , AGV 932  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstration knowledge of basic large animal care.
      1. Recognize common breeds of equine, bovine, ovine and swine.
      2. Enumerate permanent ID methods used for large animals.
    2. Differentiate domestic animal species and species specific behavior.
      1. Recognize the differences in large animal species.
      2. Identify the behaviors associated with each species.
      3. Recognize the specific needs of each species for appropriate care.
      4. Understand timing and types of pregnancy.
    3. Perform basic large animal restraint techniques.
      1. Demonstrate halter, tie and lead technique with horses and cattle.
      2. Demonstrate application of an equine twitch
      3. Demonstrate application of bovine restraint techniques.
      4. Demonstrate application of swine restraint techniques.
    4. Perform routine venipuncture techniques
      1. Utilize a syringe and vacutainer system to obtain a sample.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of venipuncture sites, equine, bovine, porcine, ovine.
    5. Explain and perform veterinary technician duties for physical examinations.
      1. Develop a list of vital signs for large animals and how to interpret them.
      2. Recognize characteristics of health and sickness in large animals.
    6. Enumerate and perform proper techniques in assisting with routine medical procedures.
      1. Explain and utilize proper clean-up and disinfecting of area and equipment utilized
      2. Demonstrate oral medication techniques: balling gun, dose syringe, oral speculum and stomach tube, NG tube.
      3. Demonstrate collection of milk samples and conduct mastitis test.

  
  •  

    AGV 165 - Clin Mgmt Lab/Exotic Species

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to introduce the common species, husbandry procedures and basic nutrition, restraint and handling, common diseases, diagnostic procedures and medications used in various laboratory and exotic pet settings.
    Prerequisite: AGV 164 , AGV 172 , AGV 266  
    Competencies
    1. Explain the basic principles of animal research.
    2. Apply knowledge of state, federal, and local animal welfare regulations.
      1. List the regulations
      2. Discuss regulations
    3. Perform procedures on rabbits and rodents.
      1. Recognize and restrain
      2. Determine sex
      3. Perform and/or supervise basic care procedures (e.g., feeding, watering, breeding, identification, and handling)
      4. Administer medications using appropriate sites and routes in all common species
      5. Collect blood samples
      6. Perform oral dosing
      7. Know anesthetic and recovery procedures
      8. Explain common disease signs
    4. Understand restraint of non-human primates.
      1. Recognize restraint devices and how to utilize them.
      2. Understand zoonotic diseases associated with non-human primates.
    5. Perform procedures on avian, exotic animals, and fish.
      1. Recognize and restrain caged birds, reptiles, amphibians, ferrets, and other common exotic pets
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of husbandry, nutrition, housing, and routine preventative procedure for common species
      3. Review with owners proper husbandry and care of various species
      4. Perform and/supervise basic animal care procedures (e.g., feeding, watering, breeding, identification, caging, and aquarium care)
      5. Administer or inject drugs using appropriate sites and routes for each species
      6. Collect appropriate body tissue or fluids from live animals and perform laboratory procedures
      7. Understand and perform anesthesia of avian and exotic animals
      8. Explain inadvisability of keeping wildlife as pets

  
  •  

    AGV 166 - Veterinary Nursing Care

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduces the fundamentals of animal nursing, including common procedures, restraint, venipuncture techniques, medication or fluid administration. Emphasis will be placed on nursing care for the hospitalized patient.
    Prerequisite: AGV 120 , AGV 128  , AGV 129  and AGV 133  
    Competencies
    1. Perform common diagnostic procedures.
      1. Demonstrate a manual blood pressure
      2. Demonstrate a pulse oximetry reading
      3. Demonstrate vision tests
    2. Administer medications.
      1. Administer IV, SQ, PO, IM and topical medications
      2. Administer oxygen therapy
    3. Outline handling of wounds.
      1. Describe development of a wound
      2. Prepare proper medicants and dressings for bandaging and splints
      3. Discuss with owners proper aftercare for wounds and bandages
    4. Outline proper handling of recumbent patients.
      1. Discuss prevention and treatment of decubitus ulcers
      2. Develop aftercare procedures for owner’s home-care
    5. Evaluate fluid dynamics of the animal.
      1. Determine levels of hydration
      2. Perform a cephalic and saphenous IV catheter
      3. Administer fluids and blood products
      4. Assess treatment responses
    6. Perform routine venipuncture techniques.
      1. Prepare a sample using a syringe or vacutainer for sample collection
      2. Understand how to find and palpate the jugular, cephalic and saphenous vein for sample collection

  
  •  

    AGV 170 - Veterinary Anesthesiology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    “This course involves the study of pharmacology, application of anesthetic agents, the physiological effects and means of monitoring them, principles and administration of inhalant anesthetics, and a broad overview of anesthetic protocol and care. Emphasis will be on anesthetic practical skills and anesthesia equipment.”
    Prerequisite: AGV 140  , AGV 164  , AGV 172  , AGV 182  and AGV 266 .
    Competencies
    1. Summarize considerations for anesthetic preparation in veterinary medicine.
      1. Describe fundamental challenges and risks associated with anesthesia.
      2. Demonstrate proper procedure for admission and discharge of patients.
      3. Perform preoperative patient evaluation.
      4. Assign a patient one of the five physical status classifications as specified by the American Society of Anesthesiologists.
      5. Calculate IV fluid infusion rates and prepare equipment for use with patients.
    2. Identify and operate veterinary anesthetic machines and carrier gas banks.
      1. Troubleshoot malfunction of and make adjustments to veterinary anesthesia machine.
      2. Demonstrate set up and leak test of an anesthetic machine.
      3. Understand function of both rebreathing and non-rebreathing circuits.
      4. Explain oxygen maintenance including calculation of oxygen flow rates, tank PSI, tank volume, and patient use rate.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of commonly used anesthetic agents and adjunct agents.
      1. Classify common anesthetic agents and adjuncts principal effect or chemistry.
      2. List anesthetic agents and adjuncts commonly used as pre-anesthetic medications and describe their indications, mode of action, effects, and adverse effects.
      3. List the inhalation anesthetic agents in common use and describe their indications, mode of action, effect, adverse effects and use.
      4. Show proper technique of administration of anesthetic agents by injection, mask and endotracheal tube.
      5. Organize and implement balanced anesthetic protocol on a canine or feline patient.
    4. Summarize concepts of analgesia.
      1. Discuss the pain pathway and ways to affect nociception.
      2. Define multimodal pain therapy.
      3. List the consequences of untreated pain.
      4. Describe the techniques used in local anesthesia.
      5. Understand the differences between the two classes of neuromuscular blocking agents, including mode of action and reversibility.
      6. Illustrate methods of balanced anesthetic technique.
    5. Compare and contrast the equipment used to monitor animals under sedation and/or anesthesia.
      1. Explain the tracing of the ECG in small animal patients
      2. Perform endotracheal tube placement in the dog or cat using a laryngoscope.
      3. Use the esophageal stethoscope to monitor small animal patients under sedation and/or anesthesia.
      4. Discuss the information given by the capnograph relative to patient ventilation.
      5. Explain the difference between assisted and controlled ventilation.
      6. Recognize and react to equipment malfunctions.
    6. Describe anesthetic techniques specific to certain domestic large animal and exotic animal species.
      1. Describe anesthetic techniques commonly used in equine practice.
      2. Explain the special anesthetic challenges resulting from patient temperament, large body size and equine anatomy and physiology.
      3. Describe the main physiologic and anatomic differences that influence anesthetic management of ruminants and swine.
      4. Explain how to position a ruminant for recovery.
      5. Explain the anesthetic concerns and challenges regarding anesthetizing pigs.
      6. Summarize the common problems that may arise when anesthetizing rodents and rabbits.
    7. Demonstrate proper technique for various nursing skills.
      1. Show appropriate technique for administration of eye and ear medication in the small animal patient.
      2. Administer an IM injection to a dog and a cat.
      3. Use proper technique for bathing a small animal patient.
      4. Perform a Shirmer Tear Test on a dog.

  
  •  

    AGV 172 - Large Animal Medicine/Surgery

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to introduce common species, husbandry and management procedures, proper restraint and handling, common procedures, medication, administration and surgical concerns for common species of domestic large animals.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 , AGV 109  , AGV 151 , AGV 166 , AGV 932  
    Corequisite: AGV 170  
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate knowledge of husbandry practices used with large animals.
      1. Describe the castration procedure
      2. Describe the tail docking procedure
      3. Summarize the dehorning procedure
      4. Demonstrate knowledge and technique (as available) hoof trimming on ruminants and equines
    2. Illustrate knowledge of surgical procedures and related equipment.
      1. Describe the caesarian section technique
      2. Summarize the laparotomy technique
      3. Describe the dystocia treatments
      4. Identify common prolapsed organs
    3. Demonstrate the proper procedures to collect milk samples and conduct mastitis testing (CMT and/or bacterial culture).
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of common reproduction techniques in large animals.
      1. Show proper semen evaluation technique
      2. Discuss the procedures and purpose of cleaning the sheath in equines
      3. Explain timing and types of pregnancy testing
      4. Assist with artificial insemination
      5. Perform (as available) preparation of mare for vaginal examination and cervical culture
    5. Demonstrate understanding of equine leg injuries.
      1. Show proper application of equine leg and tail wraps
      2. Describe and perform taking of large animal X-rays

  
  •  

    AGV 182 - Diagnostic Imaging

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is designed to introduce the student to diagnostic imaging. Topics include safety, patient positioning techniques, processing of film, proper machine use, technique chart, quality control and standard diagnostic procedures. It will also introduce the student to digital radiography, ultrasound MRI, CT and nuclear technologies.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 AGV 151 , AGV 166 , and AGV 932  
    Corequisite: AGV 109  
    Competencies
    1. Discuss production and control of x-rays.
      1. Identify parts of equipment and functions.
      2. Recite safety measures for handling equipment.
    2. Outline the use of technique charts.
      1. Develop technique charts.
      2. Use technique charts in taking diagnostic radiographs.
    3. Generate diagnostic radiographs.
      1. Position large and small animal patients.
      2. Use Orthopedic Foundation of America (OFA) applications/positioning for canine hip dysplasia.
    4. Perform processing of diagnostic radiographs.
      1. Describe hand processing.
      2. Establish quality control.
      3. Demonstrate proper labeling, filing, and storage of film.
      4. Perform automatic film processing.
      5. Review radiographs for proper position and exposure.
      6. Discuss changes in procedure to increase quality.
    5. Demonstrate proper care of equipment.
      1. Clean screens/replace screens.
      2. Clean and service automatic film processor.
      3. Recognize faulty equipment operation.
    6. Use both stationary and portable radiograph machines.
      1. Demonstrate proficiency using portable radiograph machines.
      2. Demonstrate proficiency using stationary radiograph machines.
      3. Maintain radiographic logs, reports, files and records.
    7. Understand various contrast media studies.
      1. Discuss use of contrasts in radiographs.
      2. Discuss media applications.
    8. Demonstrate knowledge of ultrasonography.
      1. Maintain ultrasonographic equipment.
      2. Develop proper techniques for fathering ultrasonographic data.
      3. Review the interpretation and results of ultrasonography.
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of endoscopy.
      1. Maintain endoscopic equipment.
      2. Develop proper techniques for gathering endoscopic data.
      3. Interpret the results of endoscopy.
    10. Demonstrate basic knowledge of computed tomography.
    11. Demostrate basic knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging.
    12. Demonstrate basic knowledge of nuclear diagnostic procedures.

  
  •  

    AGV 238 - VTNE Review Course I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will summarize learning within the Veterinary Technology program. The course will emphasize the connection between classroom learning and the practice of veterinary technology in the professional world. It will help to enhance the student’s preparation for the state and national veterinary technology examinations.
    Prerequisite: Instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Illustrate understanding of pharmacy and pharmacology.
      1. Apply mathematics to medications.
      2. Categorize drugs according to pharmaceutical class.
      3. Demonstrate understanding of medication administration.
      4. Discuss legal requirements for preparing storing and dispensing medications.
      5. Summarize contraindications, side effects, normal and abnormal drug reactions and interactions.
    2. Assess understanding of animal care and nursing.
      1. Explain fluid balance and therapy.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of common animal diseases.
      3. Discuss normal anatomy and physiology.
      4. Show animal handling and restraint techniques.
      5. Review animal husbandry techniques.
      6. Explain animal first aid, triage and emergency/critical care techniques.
      7. Discuss disease control procedures.
      8. Explain concepts animal nutrition.
      9. Demonstrate assessment and monitoring techniques.
    3. Illustrate understanding of diagnostic imaging.
      1. Discuss diagnostic imaging equipment and procedures.
      2. Review quality assurance and safety for diagnostic imaging.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of veterinary laws and jurisprudence.
      1. Understand the difference between Iowa Code and Iowa Administrative Rules
      2. Paraphrase the Veterinary Practice Act

  
  •  

    AGV 245 - Introduction to Animal Disease

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course covers the disease processes, primary and contributing causes, treatments and prevention of common medical and surgical diseases in domestic animals.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DMACC Veterinary Technology Program.
    Competencies
    1. Differentiate disease and disease categories.
      1. Infectious and noninfectious.
      2. Zoonotic and nonzoonotic.
      3. Geographically common vs. foreign animal diseases.
    2. Describe the reasons for vaccination protocols for common domestic species
      1. List core and noncore canine vaccines.
      2. List core and noncore feline vaccines.
      3. List core and noncore ruminant vaccines.
    3. Identify disease processes that occur in the each of the organ systems of the body
      1. List disease processes that occur in the canine body.
      2. List disease processes that occur in the feline body.
      3. List disease processes that occur in the ruminant body.
      4. List disease processes that occur in the equine body.
    4. List the most prevalent diseases that occur in each common domestic species based on a body systems approach
      1. List the prevalent diseases that occur in the canine species.
      2. List the prevalent diseases that occur in the feline species.
      3. List the prevalent diseases that occur in the ruminant species.
      4. List the prevalent diseases that occur in the equine species.
    5. List differential diagnoses for common diseases
      1. List the diagnosis for common diseases for the canine species.
      2. List the diagnosis for common diseases for the Feline species.
      3. List the diagnosis for common diseases for the Ruminant species.
      4. List the diagnosis for common diseases for the equine species.
    6. Discuss treatment options available for each disease
      1. Identify preventative methods for each disease for the canine species.
      2. Identify preventative methods for each disease for the feline species.
      3. Identify preventative methods for each disease for the ruminant species.
      4. Identify preventative methods for each disease for the equine species.
    7. Identify preventative methods for each disease and for general disease control

  
  •  

    AGV 266 - Adv Veterinary Nursing Care

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Continues Veterinary Nursing Care with emphasis on advanced veterinary nursing procedures.
    Prerequisite: AGV 166 , AGV 134 , AGV 109  , AGV 151 , and AGV 932  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate understanding of advanced nursing procedures
      1. Place a stomach tube
      2. Discuss gastric lavage
      3. Administer enemas
    2. Calculate and administer appropriate fluid therapy
      1. Determine/maintain fluid infusion rate
      2. Monitor patient hydration status
      3. Review and practice IV catheter placement
    3. Illustrate critical care procedures.
      1. Understand how to maintain chest, tracheostomy and pharyngeostomy tubes
      2. Discuss central venous pressures
      3. Demonstrate ability to take a diagnostic ECG
      4. Understand types of feeding tubes and their maintenance
    4. Prepare and monitor a patient for sedation or anesthesia
      1. Operate anesthetic machine
      2. Monitor the sedated or anesthetized patient
      3. Place simple sutures
    5. Perform preparation of samples for shipping.
      1. Understand how to handle a rabies suspect specimen.
      2. Follow accepted methods of sample preparation for shipping pathogenic samples

  
  •  

    AGV 338 - VTNE Review Course II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will continue to summarize learning within the Veterinary Technology program. The course will emphasize the connection between classroom learning and the practice of veterinary technology in the professional world. It will help to enhance the student’s preparation for the state and national veterinary technology examinations.
    Prerequisite: Instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of veterinary laws and jurisprudence.
      1. Understand the difference between Iowa Code and Iowa Administrative Rules
      2. Paraphrase the Veterinary Practice Act
    2. Assess surgical preparation and assisting.
      1. Discuss aseptic techniques
      2. Review different sterilization techniques.
      3. Show patient positioning techniques.
      4. Examine common surgical procedures.
      5. Identify surgical instrumentation.
      6. Compare suturing methods.
    3. Evaluate anesthesia and analgesia.
      1. Discuss pre and post anesthetic assessment and care.
      2. Perform anesthetic induction, maintenance, monitoring and recovery techniques.
      3. Assess pain and analgesic medications.
    4. Assess Laboratory procedures.
      1. Perform sample collection, preparation, storing and shipping techniques.
      2. Discuss laboratory diagnostic principles and procedures including those for immunology, microbiology, and Parasitology.

  
  •  

    AGV 920 - Spanish for the Veterinary Technician

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech

    This course is designed to meet the needs of students of veterinary technology who will practice in an environment in which the use of Spanish for accurate client communication is essential. Students will acquire a working vocabulary of technical and clinical veterinary terms which will enable them to communicate professionally with Spanish speaking clients, farm managers, or other animal care givers. They will able to ascertain accurate client information and schedule appointments. They will identify the clients primary complaint, take a clinical or farm history which will allow them to correctly identify the animals disease condition. Finally they will accurately communicate prescribed treatments and follow up care with clients. Students will be provided resources for reference or further study in their species of interest.
    Prerequisite: Three years of high school Spanish or two semesters of Elementary Spanish or Instructor Approval
    Competencies

    1. Reception of the client.
      1. Greet clients.
      2. Solicit and record accurate client information such as name, address, billing information etc.
      3. Communicate fee schedules, payment options and collect fees
    2. Determine the client’s reason for the visit.
      1. Find out the type of care is required: Emergency care, office or farm visit, routine well patient care or herd health care.
      2. Solicit a brief clinical history.
      3. If the visit is for routine wellness, check records for vaccination, routine visits, dental care, nutritional care etc.
      4. If it is for injury or illness, determine if he animal is in distress, injured, ill, giving birth etc.
      5. Determine the primary symptoms.
      6. Determine for how long the animal has displayed these symptoms.
      7. Determine if the animal has been seen by this clinic previously for the same condition.
      8. Ascertain current treatments for patient.
      9. Schedule the appointment with the veterinarian.
    3. Assist in the performance of a physical exam.
      1. Convey to the client the need for restraining the animal. There will be species specific vocabulary such as a twitch, halter, leash etc.
      2. Tell the client what you are going to do ie. Listen to its breathing, take radiographs, give it medication etc.
    4. Assist the veterinarian.
      1. Communicate the problem to the veterinarian.
      2. Accurately communicate the clinical history and ask the client to elaborate when clarification is needed.
      3. Tell the client what the veterinarian is going to do to the animal- take radiographs, give it an injection, hospitalize it, take blood for tests, anaesthetize the animal etc.
    5. Communicate follow up care through client education and instruction.
      1. Confirm that the client knows how to administer medications.
      2. Confirm that the client can identify symptoms that require further care.
      3. Give instructions on taking stool samples, feeding, changing of bandages , husbandry etc.
      4. Schedule follow-up appointments.
    6. Educate the client about husbandry.
      1. Recommend licensure for the pet owner or animal caregiver.
      2. Convey vaccination requirements.
      3. Convey requirements for health papers if animals are transported or sold.
      4. Educate the client on the need for proper nutrition and wellness exams.
    7. Ethic and Culture

  
  •  

    AGV 932 - Vet Technology Internship

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 20
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Internship experience within a veterinarian-related business with an emphasis on animal care procedures.
    Prerequisite: AGV 134 , AGV 109  , AGV 151  and AGV 166  
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate career opportunities related to career goals
      1. Outline your own personal career goals
      2. Investigate career opportunities in veterinarian medicine
    2. Demonstrate ethics in business
      1. Discuss ethics in business with your supervisor
      2. Prepare a list of potential situations that may challenge personal ethics
      3. Predict how you would handle those ethical situations
    3. Develop employable skills pertaining to the chosen career direction
      1. Discuss employable skills with your supervisor
      2. Identify employable skills that you want to develop during the internship
      3. Review those skills with your internship supervisor
      4. Practice employable skills selected for the internship
    4. Explain the importance of the team concept in the workplace
      1. Develop a diagram of the organization of the business dealing with employee responsibility
      2. Show the relationship between each team member
      3. Review the end results when the team concept doesn’t work
    5. Perform proper record keeping and reporting techniques.
      1. Develop proper procedure for maintaining client contacts
      2. Inventory all supplies, medicines, materials utilized during daily procedures
      3. Record all animal care procedures in a timely fashion for client review
    6. Prioritize with the supervisor desires for additional training opportunities
      1. Schedule weekly meetings with the supervisor for evaluation
      2. Enumerate various training opportunities desired
      3. Construct time schedule for each opportunities in the internship workplace


Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANT 105 - Cultural Anthropology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    Introduction to the cross-cultural study of human cultural diversity through anthropological theory, fundamental concepts, and ethnographic case studies. The course explores cultural change on a local-global continuum by examining integrated aspects of past and current human lifeways. Students will develop an understanding of anthropological perspectives and learn to apply them to interpret diverse human experiences and societies.    
    Competencies
     

    1. Discuss basic concepts of anthropology as a scientific approach to studying human phenomena.  
      1. Define the four subfields of anthropology and how they provide an integrated approach.
      2. Show the differences and overlaps between applied and academic modes of doing anthropological work.
      3. Demonstrate the significance of holism in ethnographic work and comparativism in ethnological study.
      4. Through an ethnography, apply anthropological principles to the analysis of ethnographic material.  
    2. Examine the concept of culture as a key operating principle of anthropology.  
      1. Compare two or more definitions of culture and their implications. 
      2. Identify major milestones in the history of anthropological theory: Diffusionism, Unilineal Evolution/Social Darwinism, American Historical Particularism, British Functionalism, Structuralism, Feminist Anthropology, and Symbolic/Interpretive Anthropology.
      3. Define strong and tempered forms of cultural relativism and ethnocentrism.
      4. Understand the role of emic and etic perspectives in culturally specific “Thick Description.”
      5. Analyze the global-local continuum as part of human adaptation strategies.
    3. Identify the processes and methods of ethnographic field work, data analysis, and ethical considerations.
      1. Demonstrate the colonial beginnings and postcolonial legacies of anthropology. 
      2. Explain the purpose and proper application of participant observation, interviews, recordings, surveys, mapping, and different varieties of fieldwork. 
      3. Outline the principles of ethical research practices, IRBs, informed consent, data sharing with research participants, and collaborative research design.
    4. Examine the basic concepts of ethnicity, race, and social identity. 
      1. Explain why race is a biological myth and, at the same time, a social reality. 
      2. Demonstrate how race has been historically used for the exploitation of human populations.
      3. Analyze the concepts of racial stratification, racial profiling, ethnic cleansing and genocide, as defined by the United Nations, and their implications for a multicultural society.
    5. Discuss the differences between the concepts of sex and gender.
      1. Describe basic anthropological perspectives on gender, gender division of labor, and gender stratification across cultures. 
      2. Examine basic principles of biological sex. 
      3. Explain the difference between intersexuality and transgender identity from a non-binary perspective.
    6. Explain kinship as a cultural meaning of relatedness. 
      1. Define categories of kin as consanguine, affinal and fictive. 
      2. Explain forms of descent, unilineal and bilateral descent systems and their implications for post-marital locality, household membership, and descent group membership.
      3. Define marriage in an inclusive way including monogamy, polygamy, polygyny, and polyandry. 
      4. Explain the significance of recognizing cross- and parallel cousins in a unilineal descent system. 
      5. Demonstrate the use of kinship charting basics and kinship diagrams.
    7. Formulate an anthropological definition of religion, religious belief, and spirituality as a meaningful part of a holistic approach to culture.  
      1. Explain the four basic forms of religious belief: animism, animatism, polytheism, and monotheism. 
      2. Examine the concept and role of shamanism as an integrated form of religious practice in small-scale societies. 
      3. Explain the three phases and socially transformative effects of the rite of passage. 
      4. Interpret the anthropological perspective of magic, sorcery and witchcraft through ethnographic examples.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of anthropological approaches to communication and language. 
      1. Define language as a culture-specific system of verbal and non-verbal communication.  
      2. Demonstrate the importance of linguistic relativity to understanding culturally symbolic meaning.
      3. Define the building-blocks of language and linguistic analysis. 
      4. Describe how languages change over time, specialized uses of language, linguistic diversity, and language revitalization.  
    9. Analyze the correlations between social organization and modes of subsistence. 
      1. Compare the four main modes of subsistence and their characteristics: foraging, pastoralism, horticulture, and agriculture. 
      2. Compare the four main types of political organization and their characteristics: band, tribe, chiefdom and state. 
      3. Examine the significance of adaptive stategy in terms of the carrying capacity of the land and social organization. 
      4. Demonstrate the cultural relevance of different approaches to power, authority, social control, and social hierarchy as a continuum. 
      5. Explain the three modes of exchange and the three types of reciprocity. 
      6. Understand the concept of reciprocity as a mechanism for generating social obligations and connections.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    ANT 125 - Applications of Anthropology

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Applied anthropology uses anthropological and interdisciplinary theory and research to address social issues. This course introduces students to basic concepts in four-field anthropology, with an emphasis on cultural anthropology, and it provides an overview of major specializations and current research topics. Students will engage in primary, community-based research through a course project on a topic of choice within one applied specialty. Students in all programs of study at DMACC may benefit through better understanding of qualitative research processes, the broad array of social issues that applied anthropologists study, and the critical thinking and writing that are necessary to problem-solving and understanding of culture and society.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ANT 105  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an overall understanding of how anthropology has been organized in North America.
      1. Define the four-field approach from the perspective of holism and comparativism.
      2. Outline the history of the four-field approach.
      3. Outline the importance of ethnographic study in ethnology and anthropological theory.
    2. Assess the differences between applied and academic modes of anthropological work.
      1. Examine the differences and overlaps between applied and practicing anthropology.
      2. Explain the emergence of publicly engaged anthropology.
      3. Identify ways in which anthropological praxis speaks to non-academic audiences.
      4. Identify potential broader societal impacts and public outreach of the applied anthropology approach.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the major arguments in deconstructing the practice vs. theory paradigm.
    3. Critically evaluate research methods and paradigms and their applications in learning about social issues.
      1. Outline the major elements of ethnographic methods including participant observation, types of interviews, fieldnotes, and recordings.
      2. Define participatory action research as a method of inquiry in a four-field, applied perspective.
      3. Explain the use of decolonizing and Indigenous methodologies as part of anthropological practice in collaborating with Indigenous communities amidst postcolonial realities.
      4. Explain the main characteristics of program evaluation and its use in anthropological praxis.
      5. Analyze context-specific interpretations of deficit and strength-based research paradigms.  
    4. Apply the key tenets of research ethics and research compliance.
      1. Outline the key points of the American Anthropological Association’s Statement on Ethics.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) and the (Institutional Review Board) IRB process.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics of ethnographic research and common ethical dilemmas and problems researchers face in anthropological praxis. 
      4. Understand the proper use of anonymity and confidentiality as part of community-engaged research.
      5. Explain the informed consent process and its role in ethical research practices.
      6. Demonstrate a clear understanding of plagiarism and research misconduct as ethical violations.
    5. Discuss different ways in which applied anthropologists and anthropological insights inform policies and policymakers.
      1. Identify the key points of the American Anthropological Association’s Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights.
      2. Explain the concepts of self-determination and Indigenous sovereignty as outlined in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).
      3. Identify strategies anthropologists use in communicating research results to stakeholders and policymakers.   
    6. Analyze case studies that are using an applied anthropological approach to produce concrete, practical solutions and outcomes.  
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of major applied research trends and theoretical areas in the medical anthropology and community well-being.
      2. Examine the basic concepts of ecological/environmental anthropology as it applies to human interactions with the natural environment and notions of sustainability.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of anthropological practice in contributing to the mission of federal and state governments and agencies.
      4. Survey the uses of anthropological methods and theories in organizational and corporate settings.
      5. Examine the historical discourse on ownership, repatriation, and cultural property rights in heritage preservation that led to the NMAI (National Museum of the American Indian) Act and NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act).
    7. Contextually adapt anthropological research methods and ethics to address a concrete social issue through community-engaged research.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of collaboratively developed research design with concrete outcomes.
      2. Choose research methods that are appropriate to address the research question.  
      3. Show a thorough understanding of professional responsibilities in research design, data analysis, project management, and dissemination of research results.
      4. Explain the benefits of anthropological knowledge as a set of direct and transferable job skills in the non-academic workplace.

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 2020

  
  •  

    ANT 150 - Global Issues-Local Perspec

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General


    Examines a variety of ways in which global connections affect cultural groups. Introduces the concepts and historical backdrop needed to understand global processes with specific cases from anthropological research that illuminate ties between local effect and general changes. The concept of “culture” is explained from critical and historical perspectives, along with recent shifts in theorizing and applying anthropological knowledge. The uses of qualitative field research in studies of globalization are emphasized. Students conduct a small topic-focused research project to see how globalization affects local processes in Iowa.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: ANT 105  or instructor approval
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic anthropological concepts and theories.
      1. Define the basic characteristics of culture and their use in anthropological discourse.
      2. Define basic concepts in cultural anthropology including emic/etic, cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, race as a biological myth and social reality, sex and gender, culture specific meaning, and cultural logic.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of key anthropologists and their theoretical contributions.
      4. Define ethnography and explain basic ethnographic field study methods.
      5. Explain the four fields on North American anthropology through a holistic perspective.
    2. Examine anthropological perspectives on global change and their local effects.
      1. Explain globalization and the problems in defining it.
      2. Identify modes of human adaptation to local environments.
      3. Explain the mobilization of local human agency to oppose the effects of globalization.
      4. Analyze the local-global continuum and its relevance to ethnographic research and ethnology.
      5. Outline key components of global interactions including time-space compression, wealth accumulation, and uneven development.
    3. Examine the history of colonization as it relates to globalization.
      1. Summarize the effects of colonialism and their relevance to anthropological theory.
      2. Identify the legacies of colonialism and their consequences on postcolonial social issues.  
      3. Examine case studies to understand postcolonial realities through global and local perspectives.
      4. Explain the World Systems Theory as set forth by Immanuel Wallerstein and the implications of the theory for a global social structure.
      5. Analyze the social tensions embedded in Indigenous self-determination and sovereignty in contrast to everyday realities as part of a nation state.
    4. Critically evaluate current issues in globalization as they relate to anthropological theories.   
      1. Discuss cross-cultural research on gender and gender stratification and how globalization processes can affect gender equality.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the intersections of global and local economic spheres.
      3. Survey political strategies for managing diverse and mobile populations.  
      4. Explain human strategies of adaptation to the changing natural and social environments.
    5. Formulate an understanding of the role of new technologies in addressing old and new problems as well as sources of new social issues.
      1. Outline the approaches and goals of cultural anthropology in studying new technologies.
      2. Explain the concept of the digital divide.
      3. Analyze human interactions in cyberspace as proponents and opponents of globalization.
      4. Examine concepts of cross-cultural communication and their roles in local internalization of new cultural ideas.  
    6. Design a research project on a topic that engages with the global-local continuum by using anthropological methods and perspectives.
      1. Develop a research idea using anthropological perspectives.
      2. Summarize key findings from a targeted literature review.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of anthropological analysis of ethnographic data.
      4. Construct a coherent analysis of the research data as it speaks to human interactions with globalization.  

     
    Competencies Revised Date: 3/2/2020

  
  •  

    ANT 202 - Human Origins

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Core
    This course provides an introduction to biological anthropology and archaeology. Human origins are examined through the study of the biological and cultural evolution of humans. Topics such as skeletal biology, human variation, genetics, primatology, paleoanthropology and archaeological research methods will be included.
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of what is included in biological anthropology and archaeology.
      1. Define biological anthropology and its subdisciplines.
      2. Define archaeology and its subdisciplines.
      3. Understand how biological anthropology and archaeology fit into the 4-field approach to anthropology.
    2. Apply the process of science, the scientific method, and its application to biological anthropology and archaeology.
      1. Utilize scientific terminology.
      2. Explain the process of the scientific method.
      3. Distinguish between hypotheses and theories in science.
    3. Summarize biological evolution.
      1. Gain an understanding of the history of the development of the theory of natural selection.
      2. Describe the evidence for evolution, including evidence from direct observations, homology, the fossil record, biogeography and molecular biology.
      3. Give an example of a phylogenetic tree and a cladogram.
      4. Understand the mechanisms for evolutionary change, including natural selection, mutation, genetic drift and gene flow.
    4. Outline the importance of culture to the biological evolution of humans.
      1. Define culture.
      2. Describe the concept of biocultural evolution.
    5. Characterize the fundamentals of genetics
      1. Describe the structure and function of DNA
      2. Define chromosomes, genes, and alleles.
      3. Identify the principles of inheritance.
      4. Define dominance, recessive, phenotype and genotype.
      5. Utilize a punnet square and pedigrees to predict inheritance.
    6. Summarize human skeletal biology.
      1. Identify the major bones of the axial and appendicular skeleton.
      2. Recognize areas of similarity and difference between the human and nonhuman primate skeletons.
    7. Understand modern human biological variation.
      1. Compare the historical views of human variation to the view from the modern evolutionary-based approach.
      2. Explain how biologists and anthropologists view the concept of race as it pertains to humans.
      3. Describe well-documented genetic polymorphisms of humans.
      4. Provide examples and environmental causes of modern human adaptations.
    8. Characterize the primates.
      1. Describe the suite of traits that distinguish primates.
      2. Understand the classification and placement of humans within the primate order.
      3. Distinguish primates from other mammals.
      4. Chart the evolution of the primates, including hypotheses for the origin of primate traits.
      5. Outline the fundamentals of primate ecology, behavior and cognition.
      6. Identify the species that encompass the strepsirhines and haplorhines groups.
      7. Describe the traits that define lemurs, lorises, monkeys, and apes.
      8. Examine threats to wild primates and primate conservation.
    9. Evaluate archaeological and paleoanthropological techniques.
      1. Describe how material culture is studied at archaeological sites.
      2. Define and provide examples of artifacts, features, ecofacts, and context.
      3. Analyze the goals and methods of ethnoarchaeology and experimental archaeology.
      4. Describe the process of fossilization.
      5. Summarize absolute and relative dating techniques.
      6. Outline the geologic time scale.
    10. Interpret discoveries in paleoanthropology to describe the biological evolution of humans.
      1. Define a hominin.
      2. Describe anatomical requirements of bipedalism.
      3. Summarize the documented hominin genera and key species, including morphology, distribution, and inferred behavior and adaptive patterns.
      4. Compare the archaeological discoveries and cultural remains of various hominin species.
      5. Distinguish between the Lower, Middle and Upper Paleolithic.
      6. Describe molecular techniques used to analyze extinct hominins.
      7. Paraphrase the evolution of language and culture in the context of hominin evolution.
      8. Discuss models to explain the evolution of modern Homo sapiens.
      9. Discuss the dispersal of humans throughout the Old World and into the New World.
      10. Describe hypothesis and the archaeological and biological evidence to explain the initial human populating of the Americans.
      11. Identify key Paleo-Indian sites.
      12. Identify key Mesolithic and Epipaleolithic sites in the Old World.
      13. Give examples of hunting and gathering lifeways during the early and middle Holocene. 
    11. Diagram the dispersal of Homo sapiens throughout the world.
      1. Explain the archaeological evidence for the origins of agriculture and domestication.
      2. Compare the development of farming throughout the world.
      3. Identify the biocultural consequences of the development of agriculture.
      4. Describe the archaeological evidence of the earliest civilizations.


Apparel Merchandising

  
  •  

    APP 109 - Creative Design Foundations

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Introduction to design theory and the creative process with a focus on fashion products.  Students will explore the elements and principles of design, color theory, sources of inspiration, and fashion illustration.  Emphasis on design communication and presentation using industry standards.  Students complete an unconventional garment. 
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate designs against the essential principles and elements of good design.
      1. Investigate the Principles of Design and their applicability to fashion products.
      2. Investigate the Elements of Design and their applicability to fashion products.
      3. Use essential design concepts and language. 
      4. Employ the basic principles of color theory.
    2. Examine the fashion figure proportions and forms.
      1. Sketch a 10-head fashion figure by hand.
      2. Draw front, back, and profile views.
      3. Demonstrate a variety of fashion figure poses.
      4. Sketch the details of face, hair, hands, and feet.
      5. Draw garments and accessories.
    3. Render using markers and colored pencils
      1. Practice basic marker and colored pencil rendering.  
      2. Illustrate fabric textures and patterns.
      3. Illustrate various drapery and construction details.
    4. Use garment terminology to communicate apparel design concepts.
      1. Identify garment categories and styles.
      2. Name the components and details of garments.
      3. Express design lines and silhouettes.
      4. Explain the fit and fit details of a garment. 
    5. Evaluate the aspects of apparel design.
      1. Identify the characteristics of functional design.
      2. Determine how structural design affects garment design.
      3. Identify types and placement of decorative design.
    6. Examine creative methods of thinking.
      1. Identify creative influencers.
      2. Examine avant-garde design.
      3. Experiment with unconventional textile materials.
      4. Create a wearable avant-garde design. 
    7. Demonstrate the design process for a collection.
      1. Use design research methods and resources.
      2. Compile research and documentation in sketchbooks.
      3. Forecast emerging design trends.
      4. Identify a theme.
      5. Discover creativity and inspiration.
      6. Create visual concept boards, which include mood, textile, & color.
      7. Render an originally designed fashion collection using the fashion figure. 
    8. Assemble presentation boards using cutting and layout skills.

  
  •  

    APP 209 - Textile Science

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Focus will be on an application-oriented study of natural and manufactured fibers, yarns, fabric construction, printing and dyeing methods and finishes to determine the performance properties, quality and serviceability of fabrics in relation to end use.
    Competencies
     

    1. Examine the textile industry and fabrics
      1. List the major production segments of the textile industry
      2. Discuss the primary fabric resources
      3. List several ways man-made fibers are marketed
      4. Identify licensed brand name or trademark programs
    2. Recognize textile fiber characteristics
      1. Identify the fiber properties of natural fibers
      2. Describe the fiber properties of man-made fibers
      3. Explain how man-made fibers are produced
    3. Evaluate yarn characteristics
      1. Identify spun and filament yarns
      2. Compare blends and mixtures of yarns
    4. Analyze construction of woven fabrics
      1. Compare warp yarns and filling yarns
      2. Identify the basic weaves
    5. Analyze construction of knitted fabrics
      1. Describe knitted fabrics
      2. Define wales and courses
      3. Identify the different types of knitting stitches
      4. List the types of fabric that are created with weft knitting
      5. Classify the types of specialized weft knits
      6. Discuss the classifications of warp knits
      7. Describe important differences between knitted and woven fabrics
    6. Identify textile dyeing processes
      1. List categories by which color is imparted to textiles
      2. Describe the various types of dyeing that take place at certain stages of a textile
    7. Identify textile printing processes
      1. Discuss the methods of printing for textiles
      2. Describe the basic types of prints
      3. Identify pigment prints
    8. Identify textile finishes
      1. List the differences between permanent, durable and temporary finishes
      2. Describe functions of textile finishes
    9. Determine care and labeling requirement for textile products
      1. Identify appropriate cleaning/care processes based on fiber content
      2. List the important items that must appear on garment labels

  
  •  

    APP 211 - Textiles

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Focus will be on an application-oriented study of natural and manufactured fibers, yarns, fabric construction, printing and dyeing methods and finishes to determine the performance properties, quality and serviceability of fabrics in relation to end use.
    Competencies
    1. Explore the textile industry and fabrics
      1. List the major production segments of the textile industry
      2. Discuss the primary fabric resources
      3. List several ways man-made fibers are marketed
      4. Identify licensed brand name or trademark programs
    2. Recognize textile fiber characteristics
      1. Identify the fiber properties of natural fibers
      2. Describe the fiber properties of man-made fibers
      3. Explain how man-made fibers are produced
    3. Recognize yarn characteristics
      1. Identify spun and filament yarns
      2. Compare blends and mixtures of yarns
    4. Analyze construction of woven fabrics
      1. Compare warp yarns and filling yarns
      2. Identify the basic weaves
    5. Analyze construction of knitted fabrics
      1. Describe knitted fabrics
      2. Define wales and courses
      3. Identify the different types of knitting stitches
      4. List the types of fabric that are created with weft knitting
      5. Classify the types of specialized weft knits
      6. Discuss the classifications of warp knits
      7. Describe important differences between knitted and woven fabrics
    6. Identify textile dyeing processes
      1. List categories by which color is imparted to textiles
      2. Describe the various types of dyeing that take place at certain stages of a textile
    7. Identify textile printing processes
      1. Discuss the methods of printing for textiles
      2. Describe the basic types of prints
      3. Identify pigment prints
    8. Identify textile finishes
      1. List the differences between permanent, durable and temporary finishes
      2. Describe functions of textile finishes
    9. Determine care and labeling requirement for textile products
      1. Identify appropriate cleaning/care processes based on fiber content
      2. List the important items that must appear on garment labels

  
  •  

    APP 212 - Textile Science Lab

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Textile Science Lab (APP 212) complements Textile Science (APP 209 ) and is designed to support and parallel the concepts discussed in lectures.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: APP 209  
    Competencies

    1. Interpret laboratory exercises
      1. Complete fiber identification
      2. Assess fabric analysis
      3. Evaluate fabric performance testing
      4. Appraise dyeing methods
      5. Determine finishing methods
    2. Analyze test results of laboratory exercises
      1. Explain test results in relation to applicable scientific principles for fiber, yarn, construction methods/structure, and finish
      2. Operate the purpose of standard laboratory equipment used for textile identification and testing

  
  •  

    APP 235 - Visual Merchandising Studio

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course provides a practical view of the components involved in creating store environments that sell.  Students learn the visual strategies used to project a brand’s image, display and style merchandise, and motivate consumers to buy.   Students design and physically install window displays. 
    Competencies
    1. Identify the role visual merchandising plays in retailing
      1. Define visual merchandising
      2. Discuss how & why retailers use visual merchandising
      3. Identify effective visual strategies
    2. Assess display locations
      1. Identify the visual elements related to the exterior & interior of a store
      2. Recognize a variety of architectural window formats
      3. Evaluate the visual merchandiser’s role in nontraditional retailing
      4. Describe key locations for product display 
    3. Distinguish display methods used for different types of merchandise
    4. Examine how retailers use atmospherics
      1. Develop skills to design attention grabbing displays
      2. Discuss a variety of processes for creative thinking
      3. Identify the elements & principles of design as they relate to visual display
      4. Assemble inspiration boards to communicate a display project
      5. Follow the steps in the design process to install a window display
    5. Select the appropriate tools to display and promote merchandise
      1. List the different types of signs
      2. Identify when and how to use signage effectively
      3. Design signage to communicate a message
      4. Identify the functions of lighting
      5. Define the different types of mannequins and mannequin alternatives
      6. Select mannequins that match a store or brand image
      7. Dress and maintain mannequins
    6. Evaluate interior retail displays.
      1. Analyze the impact of walls on customer traffic patterns and sales
      2. Categorize a wide variety of floor and wall fixtures
    7. Design and install a full scale window display
      1. Apply basic window display theory to meet design directive
      2. Illustrate design concept through an inspiration board & sketches
      3. Present a formal analysis and design concept
      4. Procure and prepare appropriate materials and design elements for efficient installation
      5. Prepare window for design installation
      6. Build-out window display

  
  •  

    APP 255 - Intro to Garment Construction

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course is intended for the student with very little or no sewing experience who would like to learn the basics of sewing. The course includes construction of two or more simple garments and/or projects. Students are encouraged but not required to provide their own sewing machine and are required to furnish their own sewing kit (straight pins, tape measure, pin cushion, hand sewing needles/sharps, seam ripper, small scissors for trimming, sewing gauge) as well as fabric and notions to complete projects.
    Competencies

    1. Operate the sewing machine and sewing equipment.

    1. Identify the parts of the sewing machine 

    2. Thread the sewing machine and bobbin correctly

    3. Replace the sewing machine needle

    4. Follow simple trouble-shooting procedures for problems with the machine or stitching                 

    2. Demonstrate correct body measurements and simple pattern alterations.

    1. Take bust, waist, hip, back waist, rise, inseam, outseam and arm length measurements   

    2. Complete simple length and width pattern alterations using the pattern pieces

    3. Demonstrate basic sewing and pressing techniques

    1. Use the press after sewing rule.

    2. Press seams and other construction details appropriately

    3. Describe the difference between pressing and ironing

    4. Use appropriate iron temperature and technique for fabric used

    5. Demonstrate basting, regular, reinforcement, topstitching and zigzag stitches

    6. Demonstrate straight, french, flat felled, stitch in the ditch, understitch, rolled hem, and gathered seams

    7. Complete a casing

    8. Complete a facing and interfacing

    9. Demonstrate how to sew a button hole and sew on a button

    10. Demonstrate hand stitching, running stitch, whipstitch, blind stitch, slip stitch

    11. Demonstrate a machine hem while using appropriate presser feet

    12. Demonstrate other sewing techniques as time permits; i.e., zipper, pockets, different fabrics, etc. 

    4. Use the pattern envelope to select appropriate fabric and notions

    1. Identify fabric yardage and/or lining and interfacing requirements to complete a project by using fabric width, size, and pattern view information

    2. Identify notions needed to complete a sewing project using the correct pattern view

    5. Use the pattern guide sheet to layout and cut fabric correctly

    1. Identify pattern symbols and shading to fold fabric correctly

    2. Identify pattern symbols and shading to place pattern pieces on to fabric correctly

    3. Follow pattern symbols for fold lines and cutting lines to cut fabric out correctly    

    6. Use the pattern guide sheet to interpret and follow sewing directions

    1. Identify guide sheet terminology and shading to interpret the instructions for sewing and pressing according to the pattern guide sheet

    2. Use the correct view to construct the garment/project

    3. Encourage independent work in class so students can continue outside of class in the future

  
  •  

    APP 260 - Fashion Analysis and Design

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Emphasis is placed on all phases of the apparel business planning process, including strategic planning, merchandise planning, creative planning, technical planning and production planning, as well as discussions of the various types of retailers that sell the apparel products to the consumer. Design elements and design principles are applied to apparel design analysis. Basic garment styles are studied. Fashion forecasting and sources of inspiration are discussed. Current trends are prepared by the student in a research project. Students will learn how to develop a successful group line. Designer history and concepts are researched and shared in a project prepared by the student. The wide variety of fashion-related careers is also covered in this course.
    Competencies
    1. Explain the role of product development in the apparel supply chain
      1. Describe product development
      2. Describe a linear apparel supply chain
      3. Describe components of a virtual apparel supply chain
    2. Explain product development variations
      1. Define wholesale brands
      2. Define store brands
      3. Define private labels
      4. Define mass customized products
      5. Define licensed products
    3. Give examples of Technological Management Tools used to achieve Quick Response (QR)
    4. Describe the business planning components of the apparel industry
      1. Explain strategic planning
      2. Explain merchandise planning
      3. Explain creative planning
      4. Explain technical planning
      5. Explain production planning
    5. Describe the three stages of apparel product development (Line concept, line development & line presentation).
      1. Describe the difference between a prototype sample and a production sample
    6. Explain considerations regarding the apparel product mix
      1. Define Haute couture, Designer RTW (prêt-a-porter), Contemporary Designer, Bridge, Better, Moderate, Fast Forward or Low End Contemporary, junior/tweens, mass market (budget, discount)
    7. Explain how apparel developers (designers) identify their target market
    8. Describe general consumer trends in apparel
    9. Describe each phase in the fashion cycle
      1. Define a trend, a fad and a classic
    10. Discuss resources and techniques used for trend, color and fabric forecasting
      1. Prepare a current trend project
    11. Explain considerations in the fabric selection process made by the product developers (designers).
    12. Describe methods used for developing design ideas (sources of inspiration).
    13. Identify the six elements of design in apparel design
      1. Select examples of apparel for each of the six design elements
      2. Describe illusions that each of the elements can create
    14. Identify the five design principles in apparel design
      1. Select examples of apparel for each of the five design principles
      2. Describe illusions that each of the design principles can create
    15. Identify basic garment styles: (knit tops, sweaters, shirts & blouses, jackets, coats, dresses, skirts, pants, necklines, collars, sleeves).
    16. Explain line development
      1. Define an item line
      2. Develop a balanced group line using the parameters of line development on a concept board
    17. Describe methods used for pattern development
      1. Define flat pattern (2-D)
      2. Define draping (3-D)
      3. Define grading
      4. Define markers
    18. Identify size categories of women’s, men’s and children’s apparel
    19. Discuss sourcing alternative in apparel production
    20. Prepare a cost sheet for a specific garment in a specific current pattern book using a budget and good design principles
    21. Explain the role of wholesale sales in the product development and production process
    22. Explain how wholesale pricing and retail pricing differ with regard to mark up
    23. Describe the apparel production process
    24. Discuss the different forms of apparel retailing
    25. Identify design concepts used by well known (past & present) designers
    26. Prepare a designer research report with visual aids
    27. Explain the variety of careers available in the fashion industry

  
  •  

    APP 261 - Fashion Industry Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This course will be an introduction to both apparel and interior fashion industries. Students will uncover fashion from the past, interact with current fashion trends & events, and learn about the future of fashion. A wide variety of fashion-related careers will also be explored.
    Competencies
     

     

    1. Examine product development variations
      1. Define wholesale brands
      2. Discuss store brands
      3. Define private labels
      4. Define mass customized products
      5. Give examples of licensed products
    2. Describe the business planning components of the apparel industry
      1. Explain strategic planning
      2. Define merchandise planning
      3. Define creative planning
      4. Explain technical planning
      5. Explain production planning
    3. Describe the three stages of apparel product development (Line concept, line development & line presentation).
    4. Evaluate resources and techniques used for trend forecasting
      1. Describe general consumer trends
      2. Explain how apparel developers (designers) identify their target market
      3. Assemble an appropriate target market for an identified trend
      4. Conduct color and fabric forecasting
      5. Compile current trend forecasting research
      6. Describe methods used for developing design ideas (sources of inspiration)
      7. Defend a current trend project
    5. Show line development
      1. Define an item line
      2. Identify size categories of women’s, men’s and children’s apparel
      3. Develop a balanced group line using the parameters of line development on a concept board
    6. Interpret a historical perspective of fashion
      1. Prepare a historical designer research report
      2. Describe design concepts used by well known (past & present) designers
      3. Synthesize historical insight to educate a modern perspective on fashion
      4. Explain considerations regarding the apparel product mix
    7. Explore the variety of careers available in the fashion industry

  
  •  

    APP 265 - Fashion Styling

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Emphasis is on all phases of the styling process from personal styling to editorial or film styling. Learn how to develop a look book or a mood board for clients to communicate a look or creative direction. Develop a business plan incorporating a brand identity for your business through social media and promotional materials.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the Fashion Styling Profession
      1. Discuss what fashion styling entails
      2. Describe the three main types of fashion stylists
      3. List the personality traits and skills stylists need to possess
    2. Explore the Fashion Styling Terms, Icons, and History for the Styling Industry
    3. Analyze the Five Fashion Personality Types
      1. Identify celebrities who fit each of the fashion personality styles
      2. Select articles of clothing that would fit each personality types
      3. Select accessories for each of the fashion personality types
    4. Explain How to Conduct a Personal Style Evaluation on a Client
      1. List personality traits that are consistent with your client’s behavior
      2. Define demographically who your client is
      3. Discuss values and beliefs that are important to your client
      4. Make sense of the findings about your client to place into a specific target market
      5. Review a lifestyle evaluation chart
      6. Identify clothing stores that cater to different target markets
    5. Discuss How to Conduct a Closet Evaluation for a Client
      1. Point out how to examine a closet from a fashion personality point of view
      2. Discuss how to sort clothing in a closet from a pull, sort, and analyze (3 step) process
    6. Perform a Body Type Evaluation
      1. Identify the four body types of women
      2. Identify the body types of men
    7. Justify the Six Wardrobe Selection Factors
      1. List the style fit rules for garments
      2. Demonstrate how to take accurate body measurements for women’s, women’s petite, and women’s plus sizes
      3. Demonstrate how to take accurate body measurements for men’s, young men’s and big and tall men’s
      4. List the basic characteristics and its’ relationship to individual clothing choices
      5. Analyze the difference between excellent, good, and poor quality clothing
      6. Select appropriate garment style/silhouette shape choices for each body type
      7. Discuss how color can create illusions for body types
      8. Discuss how lines can create illusions for the body types
      9. Discuss how texture can create illusions for the body types
    8. Role Play /Conduct an Effective Consultation or Creative Meeting to Understand the Needs of the Client
      1. Develop questions that would help address need of client
      2. Practice active listening skills
      3. Discuss ways to build successful relationships with clients
      4. Research the brand of a client
    9. Using the Cluster Concept Create a Look Book for a Specific Client with Coordinated Outfits of Apparel and Accessories that Define their Fashion Personality and Enhances their Body Type
      1. Describe the cluster concept
      2. Describe a look book
    10. Discuss the Styling Coordination Planning Process Involved in Styling for Print, Advertising,and Commercials
      1. Describe the purpose of a mood board
      2. List the criteria needed on a mood board
      3. Create a mood board for a specified client’s needs
      4. Describe the responsibilities of all who are a part of the creative team
    11. Discuss the Styling Planning Process for the Entertainment Industry
      1. Describe a storyboard
      2. Describe the components needed on a storyboard
      3. Create a storyboard to plan scenes
    12. Describe How to Prepare for a Test Shoot
    13. Develop a Business Plan
      1. Build a personal brand to be included in the brand image for all aspects of your business
      2. Create business documents needed for your business
      3. Put together a menu of services with set rates (hourly or project billing)
      4. Discuss methods of effective advertising for your business
      5. Design marketing materials for your business
      6. Build network with local industry professionals and retailers

  
  •  

    APP 270 - Fashion Buying

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Fashion moves quickly so the buyer must be in tune with current trends and suppliers who can provide the best quality merchandise, delivery and pricing. Vendor analysis, open-to-buy and timing are studied, including the development of a six-month merchandise plan.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: BUS 112  , MAT 121  , or MAT 141  
    Competencies
    1. Describe the buyer’s role in the retail supply chain.
      1. Explain the scope of the buyer’s job.
      2. Discuss the various qualifications, qualities, and abilities needed for a buying career.
      3. Identify the roles and responsibilities of a buyer.
      4. Explain the ways buyers are regularly evaluated on their performance.
      5. Discuss the need for buyers to extensively travel to make the purchase. 
    2. Explain basic buying principles, processes, and terminology.
      1. Discuss the different types of retail operations.
      2. Discuss the chain of command in the merchandising division of a retail store organization.
      3. Identify how buying resources help buyers with buying plans.
      4. Discuss the different buying approaches used by buyers.
      5. Describe the different types of market settings in which buyers make their initial selections.
    3. Analyze consumer buying behaviors.
      1. Define demographics and the role it plays in providing information to the buyer.
      2. Perform trend analysis
      3. Identify the different buying seasons.
      4. Outline the fashion supply chain.
    4. Evaluate the mathematical importance in buying success.
      1. Identify the importance of controlling expenses in order to maximize profits.
      2. Practice the process of negotiating with vendors.
      3. Discuss the process of dating and how discounts are offered.
      4. Explain the importance of markup when pricing merchandise.
      5. Identify factors that affect retail pricing.
      6. Analyze the different causes of markdowns.
      7. Identify the effect of sell-through on pricing.
      8. Define retail deductions.
      9. Explain the differences among book inventory, physical inventory, and estimated physical       inventory.
      10. Discuss why retailers use the retail method of inventory.
    5. Apply merchandising math used in the retail buying process.
      1. Complete a profit-and-loss statement.
      2. Calculate different types of discounts given to the retailer by the vendor.
      3. Calculate dollar markup and markup percent.
      4. Define and calculate three types of markup: initial, maintained, and cumulative.
      5. Calculate sell-through
      6. Calculate dollar markdown and markdown percent.
      7. Calculate shrinkage based on book and physical inventory figures.
      8. Calculate gross margin return on inventory.
      9. Determine the average inventory and stock turnover rate.
    6. Prepare a six-month merchandise plan
      1. Use the open-to-buy formula to determine how much money is available for purchasing    goods.
      2. Discuss plan

               

  
  •  

    APP 291 - Fashion Study Tour

    Credits: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The student will participate in a supervised study tour, location to be announced, in which a concentrated time will be spent touring a market center and researching a variety of fashion businesses from manufacturing and marketing to merchandising, promoting and selling apparel.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the inner workings of the fashion industry within a major fashion hub. 
      1. Summarize information gathered by visiting buying offices, designer showrooms, design studios, and product development labs.
      2. Outline the apparel process from design concept to manufacturing.
      3. Illustrate the flow of apparel goods from manufacturer to consumer.
      4. Explain the role of marketing in retail sales promotion.
      5. Recall the functions of apparel industry services.
      6. Relate classroom theory to industry practice
    2. Analyze current trends and issues affecting the global fashion industry today.
      1. Break down the effects social responsibility and sustainability in fashion.
      2. Identify innovation efforts in production and distribution.
      3. Describe how brands are responding to changes in consumer buying habits.
    3. Predict emerging trends in color, textile prints, and silhouettes.
      1. Examine street fashion in a variety of cultures.
      2. Compare a variety of retailers in a high fashion environment.
      3. Discuss emerging trends with fashion forecasters.
      4. Identify studios and libraries with appropriate fashion resources. 
    4. Improve social-emotional development
      1. Utilize critical thinking skills.
      2. Navigate themselves and peers in a large city.
      3. Develop perspective and tolerance.
      4. Build relationships with peers.
    5. Develop a career plan for entry into the industry.
      1. Survey a variety of careers in different segments of the fashion industry.
      2. Discuss career and internship opportunities with industry professionals
      3. Network with industry experts

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    APP 295 - Digital Product Design

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Using a fashion designer approach, students digitally create fashion illustrations, textile prints, technical drawings, and merchandise presentations, using fashion industry CAD software. 
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: GRD 301  
    Competencies
     

    1. Navigate the CAD software interface and working environment.
      1. Define menu commands and panels.
      2. Select by name and function the various tools in the Tools panel.
      3. Configure work environment preferences.
      4. Create new documents and set up artboards and workspaces.
      5. Identify between file formats.
      6. Identify printing methods.
    2. Create basic vector images
      1. Demonstrate proper use of tools in the Tools panel.
      2. Modify line segments and objects using the Control panel. 
      3. Create and organize document using the Layers panel.
      4. Create and edit symbols using Symbols panel.
      5. Create compound shapes by using Pathfinder panel.
      6. Use a clipping mask to creatively crop one object into the shape of a second object.
      7. Transfer swatches from one document to the next.
      8. Manage colors in the Swatch panel.
      9. Retrieve patterns, colors, and symbols from the panel library.
    3. Design motifs and textile prints.
      1. Edit Illustrator’s built-in pattern swatches to create new variations.
      2. Build simple, intermediate, and complex skill-level patterns.
      3. Apply patterns to a garment shape.
      4. Reposition, rescale, and rotate patterns within a garment shape. 
    4. Create multiple colorways of a print design.
      1. Match colors between actual fabric and printouts.
      2. Plan multiple colorways for a textile print.
      3. Build stylized templates to use as fabric swatches in presentations.
      4. Create fabric swatch layouts in multiple colorways using drop shadows.
    5. Draw fashion flats using illustration software.
      1. Use the various pen drawing and editing tools to build a garment.
      2. Set a grid to assist in the accuracy of drawing a garment to scale.
      3. Draw stitch lines and construction details.
      4. Use masking to build callouts of the details of the garment.
    6. Create detailed fashion illustrations.
      1. Place scanned or digital artwork onto the artboard.
      2. Develop a series of stylized fashion croquis of various heights and fashion poses.
      3. Draw hair and facial details on a croquis.
      4. Distinguish garment drape in relation to a pose.
      5. Produce original garments and apply to a croquis.
      6. Apply colors and patterns to garment designs.
      7. Illustrate the weight and texture of fabrics
      8. Apply highlights and shadows to garments and fashion figures to create dimension.
    7. Develop an apparel collection using industry CAD software.
      1. Apply design elements and principles in designing apparel to meet specific customer variables.
      2. Prepare a mood, color, and textile board.
      3. Draw multiple garment objects using CAD software.
      4. Fill garments with patterns and colors that are cohesive.
    8. Construct a professional design presentation.
      1. Make a cohesive design board that includes inspiration, croquis, and designs.
      2. Build a multiple-page tech pack.
      3. Explain design concepts using industry terminology.

    Competencies Revised Date: 2019
  
  •  

    APP 300 - Fashion Events & PR

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course teaches the basic skills and methods used in developing, promoting and producing successful events specifically for the fashion industry. Learn how to incorporate the use of public relation strategies, fashion communication and event planning to produce an actual fashion event. Students must be prepared to work the entire day of the event.
    Prerequisite: APP 109 , APP 261 , APP 235  
    Competencies
    1. Examine past and current fashion events.
      1. Define what a fashion event is.
      2. Name the key players in the history of fashion events.
      3. Explore the business of fashion events.
    2. Organize and manage a production team.
      1. Identify the role of the fashion show producer.
      2. Define available jobs on a production team.
      3. Operate within a designated role on the production team.
      4. Display skills in critical and creative thinking, teamwork, delegation, time management, and effective communication.
    3. Develop a creative vision for a fashion event.
      1. Draft a fashion event proposal.
      2. Outline the purpose or message of the event.
      3. Create and storyboard a theme for an event.
      4. Assist in creating a working title or name for an event.
      5. Pitch an event concept.
    4. Plan a fashion event.
      1. Create timelines, budgets, and planning calendars.
      2. Identify target markets.
      3. Determine the purpose of the event.
    5. Execute a well-organized PR plan.
      1. Describe the functions of PR for an event.
      2. Write a press release.
      3. Use social media.
      4. Create a media/press kit.
      5. Produce invites and save the dates.
      6. Promote event through a variety of free and creative channels.
    6. Secure model talent.
      1. Identify the types of models.
      2. Discuss the role of model agencies.
      3. Hold a model casting call.
      4. Create a custom contact sheet, release form, and application for models.
    7. Analyze  designs for an event.
      1. Pull and inventory merchandise.
      2. Create style boards.
      3. Assemble a style notebook or “look book”.
    8. Design the event space.
      1. Create a basic layout and floor plan.
      2. Discuss and select entertainment options.
      3. Identify staging and lighting needs.
      4. Outline backroom layout and positions.
      5. Organize the backroom in three basic stages; the setup, the show, and the breakdown.
    9. Execute a fashion event.
      1. Create an event schedule.
      2. Develop a day of and production timeline.
      3. Write a contingency plan.
      4. Discuss event expectations with talent and volunteers.
      5. Build and dismantle set props and fixtures.
      6. Write thank-you notes to all volunteers, staff, and designers.
    10. Assess a fashion event.
      1. Discuss the importance of evaluations.
      2. Identify the types of evaluations.
      3. Create an evaluation for your event.
      4. Review evaluations from your event. 

  
  •  

    APP 600 - Industry Career Development

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    This is a preparatory course for students taking the Internship I.  With this course, students will compile an effective and professional portfolio to aid in the acquisition of an internship within their chosen career area. There will also be components including interview prep, professional image, negotiating job offers, navigating conflicts in the workplace, establishing connections within the industry, and creating professional networking profiles.
    Competencies
     

     

    1. Define and demonstrate professionalism, etiquette, courtesy, and ethics expected in the fashion industry today.
      1. Identify components of a professional image in the fashion industry.              
      2. Describe the process of negotiating job offers.
    2. Develop writing skills needed in today’s professional world.
      1. Compose a cover letter.
      2. Write thank you letter(s.)
    3. Create a professional electronic portfolio.
    4. Demonstrate effective communication skills.
      1. Execute the necessary steps to accomplish a successful interview.
      2. Explore different networking tools & opportunities.
      3. Investigate & utilize conflict resolution techniques.
    5. Create a professional resume.
    6. Design professional social media profiles to utilize in the job search.
      1. Use Linkedin.
      2. Use either Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

  
  •  

    APP 602 - Internship I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech


    One semester of successful on-the-job training with a cooperating employer. Emphasis must be specific to career goals.  (This course is Pass/Fail).
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: APP 600  
    Competencies
    1. Create cooperative working relationships with peers, subordinates, and supervisors.
      1. Interpret the opinions and feelings of others and respond accordingly.
      2. Demonstrate conflict resolution strategies.
      3. Display ability to adapt to a variety of situations and communication styles.
      4. Show empathy towards people and situations on the job.
    2. Generate professional written communication.
      1. Write clearly and effectively.
      2. Use appropriate style, format, grammar, and tone.
    3. Execute effective verbal communication.
      1. Demonstrate professional tone, clarity, inflection, volume, and rate of speech.
      2. Sell a tangible product, service or idea.
    4. Establish professional presence.
      1. Develop poise, self-confidence, and a positive attitude.
      2. Choose appropriate style; dress and grooming.
      3. Practice a firm handshake.
      4. Show strong eye contact and relevant facial expressions.
    5. Support productive initiative, critical thinking, and problem solving skills.
      1. Demonstrate personal responsibility.
      2. Develop alternative courses of action.
      3. Analyze decisions based on fact.
      4. Structure time efficiently and effectively. 
    6. Understand ethical and organizational norms in job-related activities.
    7. Develop a deeper understanding for the meaning and purpose of business etiquette.
      1. Show the skill of making small talk.
      2. Explain the importance of making great first impressions.
      3. Use appropriate business dining etiquette.
    8. Adhere to the job duties and responsibilities of internship.
      1. Work a minimum of 180 hours.
      2. Obtain a satisfactory employer evaluation.

     

     

     

  
  •  

    APP 700 - Internship Seminar & Capstone

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    Students take a closer look at the fashion industry, as it applies to their cooperating internship.  With the help of the instructor and industry mentors, students will be able to apply the knowledge they have acquired throughout their education.  The course includes an industry study tour. 
    Prerequisite: APP 600  
    Corequisite: APP 702  
    Competencies
    1. Articulate and analyze their internship site, including its mission, culture, and structure.
      1. Explore the relationship between internship employer and industry.
      2. Share work-related experiences with other interns.
    2. Examine future career options
      1. Reflect upon their academic and professional aspirations.
      2. Write professional goals.
      3. Research job opportunities within and outside of current internship experience.
    3. Evaluate internship goals
      1. Demonstrate self-understanding, self-confidence, and interpersonal skills.
      2. Measure professional knowledge and skills gained during the internship.
    4. Connect with industry mentors and experts.
      1. Attend networking events.
      2. Interview professionals in career-related positions.
      3. Visit different markets and tour areas of interest. 

     

  
  •  

    APP 702 - Internship II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 12
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    One semester of successful on-the-job training with a company in the fashion industry.  Emphasis must be specific to career goals.
    (This course is Pass/Fail.)
    Prerequisite: APP 600 , APP 602  
    Corequisite: APP 700  
    Competencies
    1. Create cooperative working relationships with peers, subordinates, and supervisors.
      1. Interpret the opinions and feelings of others and respond accordingly
      2. Demonstrate conflict resolution strategies
      3. Display ability to adapt to a variety of situations and communication styles
      4. Show empathy towards people and situations on the job        
    2. Generate professional written communication
      1. Write clearly and effectively
      2. Use appropriate style, format, grammar, and tone
    3. Execute effective verbal communication
      1. Demonstrate professional tone, clarity, inflection, volume, and rate of speech
      2. Sell a tangible product, service or idea
    4. Establish professional presence
      1. Develop poise, self-confidence, and a positive attitude
      2. Choose appropriate style; dress and grooming
      3. Practice a firm handshake
      4. Show strong eye contact and relevant facial expressions
    5. Support productive initiative, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills
      1. Demonstrate personal responsibility
      2. Develop alternative courses of action
      3. Analyze decisions based on fact
      4. Structure time efficiently and effectively
    6. Evaluate the relationship between internship employer and industry
      1. Identify ethical and organizational norms in job-related activities
      2. Analyze the internship site, including its mission, culture, and structure
      3. Examine competitors, products, and operations
    7. Plan for future challenges and opportunities within the company
      1. Broaden skills, interests and experiences
      2. Examine future career opportunities within the company
      3. Reflect upon professional aspirations 
    8. Adhere to the job duties and responsibilities of internship
      1. Work a minimum of 180 hours
      2. Obtain a satisfactory employer evaluation


Architectural Millwork

  
  •  

    MLW 440 - Blueprint Reading and Layout

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to blueprint reading and layout and the application of this knowledge with the use of specific tools.
    Competencies
    1. Analyze sketches used in architectural millwork projects
      1. Describe plan views
      2. Describe elevations
      3. Describe sections
    2. Classify tools used in doing sketches
      1. Identify measuring tools
      2. Identify tools for doing straight lines
      3. Name tools for doing curves and radiuses
    3. Create sketch drawings
      1. Create plan views
      2. Create elevations
      3. Create sections
    4. Produce architectural blueprints
      1. Identify scales used in blueprints
      2. Describe views, elevations and sections
    5. Originate Layouts of architectural millwork projects
      1. Draw full size plan view to scale
      2. Draw full size elevation to scale
      3. Draw full size section to scale
    6. Create parts list
      1. Identify parts from sketches or blueprints
      2. Specify hardware for sketches and blueprints
      3. Specify quantity of materials
    7. Produce estimate of project
      1. Calculate value of project based on quantity of materials
    8. Create estimate of time for projects
      1. Calculate time required to do projects based on quantity of parts and amount of machining

  
  •  

    MLW 441 - Material Identification/Usage

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the materials used in making architectural millwork products.
    Competencies
    1. Identify different solid woods used in architectural millwork
      1. Explain the differences in hardwoods and softwoods
      2. Specify what applications both would be appropriate
    2. Classify different veneered products
      1. Identify wood veneered products
      2. Identify plastic laminate veneered products
      3. Identify melamine veneered products 
    3. Name different solid surface products
      1. Determine the different chemical properties of various solid surface products
      2. Determine different chemical properties
    4. Analyze different adhesives used on architectural millwork products.
      1. Classify adhesives used on wood products
      2. Classify adhesives used on plastic laminates
      3. Classify adhesives used on solid surface products
    5. Analyze the different abrasives used on architectural millwork products.
      1. Identify abrasives used on wood and wood veneer products
      2. Identify abrasives used on solid surface products
    6. Identify hardware used on architectural millwork
      1. Classify fastening hardware
      2. Classify interior cabinet hardware
      3. Classify construction hardware
    7. Work with finish materials
      1. Identify wood fillers
      2. Identify wood stains
      3. Identify wood lacquers, varnishes and water based topcoats

  
  •  

    MLW 442 - Introduction to Portable Tools

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the safe use and proper care and selection of power tools.
    Competencies
    1. Operate hand tools
      1. Identify hand tools
      2. Maintain hand tools
    2. Operate with electric portable power tools
      1. Identify electric power tools
      2. Explain the capabilities of various electric power tools
      3. Display safe usage of equipment
    3. Maintain power portable tools
      1. Replace of worn or damaged parts
      2. Replace of dull or worn cutting tools
    4. Operate battery operated tools
      1. Identify battery operated portable power tools
      2. Explain various applications for battery operated tools
      3. Display safe handling, operation and storage of portable battery operated tools 
    5. Operate pneumatic portable tools
      1. Identify various pneumatic tools
      2. Explain various applications for pneumatic tools
      3. Demonstrate safety and maintenance of pneumatic tools
    6. Operate portable clamping devices
      1. Identify various portable-clamping devices
      2. Explain various applications for portable clamping devices
      3. Demonstrate safe handling, operation and proper storage of portable clamping devices

  
  •  

    MLW 443 - Stationary Equipment

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    The purpose of this course is to train the student in the identification, operation and maintenance of stationary equipment.
    Competencies
    1. Operate band saws
      1. Perform safety routine on band saw
      2. Cut radiuses and circles from layouts
      3. Re-saw lumber as specified
    2. Operate table saws, beam saw, horizontal saw, and vertical saw
      1. Perform safety inspection on saws
      2. Identify specific operations of each saw
      3. Perform specific cutting operation as it relates to each saw
    3. Operate wide belt sander
      1. Perform safety routine on wide belt sander
      2. Select proper sandpaper grit for assigned project
      3. Set up the sander
      4. Perform the sanding assignment
    4. Operate stationary power drills
      1. Perform safety inspection on drilling equipment
      2. Select the proper drill bits for the specific assignment
      3. Set up the assigned project
      4. Drill the assigned project
    5. Operate planer and joiner
      1. Perform safety routine of planer and joiner
      2. Mill material to specific dimensions
    6. Operate shapers and molder
      1. Perform safety routine of shapers and planer
      2. Select proper cutting knifes for the assigned profile
      3. Set up the assigned project
      4. Mill the assigned project
    7. Maintain and operate edge bander
      1. Perform maintenance and safety routine on edge bander
      2. Select proper edging for project
      3. Set up edge bander
      4. Edge band the assigned project

  
  •  

    MLW 444 - Advanced Equipment Techniques

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course gives the student the opportunity to become proficient on the following equipment and associated software: CNC router operation and programming; Point-to-Point Machine Center operation and programming; Molder operation including template making, setup and maintenance; Beam saw programming, operation and maintenance; Edgebander operation programming and maintenance.
    Prerequisite: MLW 440 , MLW 441 , MLW 442 , MLW 443  
    Competencies
    1. Demonstrate proficiency at operation and programming of CNC router
      1. Draw and generate NC code for cabinet parts
      2. Home the CNC and setup and touch off tooling
      3. Set machine and mill parts
      4. Set up riser supports and set new home to mill parts on riser
    2. Demonstrate proficiency at operation and programming of P to P machine center
      1. Draw and generate NC code for cabinet parts
      2. Home the P to P and setup and touch off tooling
      3. Set machine and mill parts in A and D fields
      4. Set up fixtures and mill small parts
    3. Demonstrate proficiency at grinding knives, setup, operation and maintenance of moulder
      1. Produce custom knives
      2. Demonstrate proficiency at understanding all controls and maintenance items on moulder
      3. Setup all spindles on moulder and run moulding
    4. Demonstrate proficiency at operating, programming and maintaining a beam saw
      1. Start up and operate beam saw in various manual modes
      2. Create program for beam saw using Cabnetware.
      3. Operate beam saw in automatic mode
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of general maintenance of beam saw
    5. Demonstrate proficiency at Edgebander operation and maintenance
      1. Set up and operate the Edgebander for various types of thicknesses of edgebanding and part types
      2. Show how to program the PLC controller for a specific banding operation
      3. Perform maintenance on the Edgebander including the following

  
  •  

    MLW 445 - Millimeter Cabinet Tech

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course is an introduction to the rationale of cabinet-making and millwork.
    Prerequisite: MLW 440 , MLW 441 , MLW 442 , MLW 443  
    Competencies
    1. Identify projects
      1. Determine millwork projects
      2. Determine cabinet projects
    2. Develop cut lists for wood trim project
      1. Estimate amount of material that will be used.
      2. Estimate amount of time that will be needed to do machining
    3. Machine project
      1. Set up appropriate equipment
      2. Operate machining equipment
    4. Develop cut lists for cabinet project
      1. Estimate amount of material that will be used
      2. Estimate the amount of time that will be needed
    5. Determine machining operations that will be required
      1. Set up machinery as required
      2. Operate machinery
    6. Select hardware to be used
      1. Calculate amount of hardware
      2. Install hardware
    7. Install project as required

  
  •  

    MLW 446 - Millwork Techniques

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to the initial steps of applying various millwork techniques to projects.
    Prerequisite: MLW 440 , MLW 441 , MLW 442 , MLW 443  
    Competencies
    1. Apply different techniques to construct joints
      1. Prepare joints with power hand tools
      2. Prepare joints with stationary equipment
      3. Construct joints with adhesive
    2. Apply reveals using different machining techniques
      1. Manufacture reveals using hand power tools
      2. Manufacture reveals using stationary power equipment
      3. Sand reveals by hand and/or power sanders
    3. Apply edging using different techniques
      1. Prepare edging using stationary equipment
      2. Apply edging using hand tools
      3. Apply edging using stationary equipment

  
  •  

    MLW 447 - Introduction to Application

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will allow students to begin combining their knowledge of the previous courses in Architectural Millwork to produce mock-up projects.
    Prerequisite: MLW 440 , MLW 441 , MLW 442 , MLW 443  
    Competencies
    1. Identify project
      1. Determine between millwork and casework
    2. Develop layouts as required
      1. Draw plan views as required
      2. Draw elevations as required
      3. Draw sections as needed
    3. Develop progression of steps to be taken
      1. Specify required material
      2. Calculate quantity of materials needed 
    4. Specify machining to be completed
      1. Determine machining location
      2. Demonstrate machining operations
    5. Construct project
      1. Assemble components.
      2. Assemble main project as required
    6. Complete project
      1. Install millwork as required
      2. Install case work as required
    7. Critique project

  
  •  

    MLW 448 - Adv Millwork Application I

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will combine the skills learned from the previous courses to begin producing completed projects.
    Prerequisite: MLW 444 , MLW 445 , MLW 446 , MLW 447  
    Competencies
    1. Identify millwork project
      1. Distinguish between millwork and cabinetwork
    2. Organize project
      1. Develop sequence of steps to be taken
      2. Specify materials to be used
      3. Calculate the amount of material to be needed
    3. Design project
      1. Draw layouts where required
      2. Draw plan view as required
      3. Draw elevation as required
      4. Draw sections as required
    4. Develop machining list
      1. Specify where cutting is to be completed
      2. Determine dimensions for cutting sizes
      3. Determine machines to be used for processing parts
    5. Construct project
      1. Assemble sub components as required
      2. Assemble finished product as required
      3. Assemble main project as required
    6. Prepare area for installation
      1. Inspect area for installation
      2. Create a safe work environment
    7. Complete project
      1. Install wood trim as required
      2. Install cabinets and counters as required
    8. Critique project

  
  •  

    MLW 449 - Adv Millwork Application II

    Credits: 5
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 8
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    This course will combine the students’ previous courses to produce a completed project from beginning to installation.
    Prerequisite: MLW 448  
    Competencies
    1. Fabricate a solid surface counter top with sink
      1. Size material
      2. Assemble components
      3. Prepare sink cut out
      4. Install sink
      5. Attach back splash
      6. Machine the edging profiles
      7. Sand all surfaces
      8. Buff all surfaces
    2. Complete entire project
      1. Design project
      2. Sketch project
      3. Produce lay out
      4. Determine cut lists
      5. Formulate cost estimate
      6. Formulate time estimate
      7. Size material
      8. Machine parts
      9. Assemble components
      10. Finish project
      11. Install project.
      12. Critique project


Architectural Technologies

  
  •  

    ARC 110 - Intro to Architectural CAD

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Practical application of the basic skills of architectural CAD involving the mechanics and necessary thought process. Projects will revolve around Architectural Drafting I projects.
    Corequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Summarize CAD hardware and software
      1. Recite differences between hardware and software
      2. Describe computer requirements for CAD
    2. Employ basic elements of a CAD environment
      1. Describe the Windows Operating System
      2. Define program execution
      3. Identify the User Interface (UI)
      4. Label the various screen Menus/Ribbons
      5. Define basic Input Devices
      6. Describe environment navigation
      7. View the Help Utility
      8. Recite File Commands
      9. Practice environment navigation
      10. Utilize basic Windows operations
    3. Illustrate 2-D Coordinate Entry techniques
      1. Define the Cartesian coordinate system
      2. Describe “absolute”, “relative”, and “polar” coordinates
      3. Enumerate “direct” input methods
      4. Recite keyboard shortcuts
      5. Summarize all coordinate entry systems
    4. Use basic 2D drawing setup methods
      1. Identify 2D and 3D space
      2. Recite drawing Setup Commands
      3. Demonstrate setting up a basic Drawing
    5. Explain basic 2D drawing commands and methods
      1. Review the LINE, ARC, CIRCLE, POLYGON, and ELLIPSE commands
      2. Explain the POINT command
      3. Summarize basic 2D entity creation commands
    6. Discuss basic 2D Display commands
      1. Define the REDRAW and REGEN commands
      2. Describe the ZOOM and PAN Commands
      3. Explain Transparent Commands
    7. Demonstrate basic 2D Drawing Aids
      1. Describe the SNAP and GRID Commands
      2. Explain Ortho mode
      3. Give examples of Polar Tracking
      4. Summarize Object Snap
      5. Express Object Snap Tracking
      6. Describe the UCS
      7. Make sense of Dynamic Input
      8. Illustrate the UNDO and REDO commands
      9. Describe the DIST command
      10. Use basic 2D drawing aids
    8. Employ basic 2D Editing commands
      1. Identify Pick, Window, and Crossing selection techniques
      2. Define GRIP Selection, modes and intricacies
      3. Explain the MOVE, COPY, and OFFSET Commands
      4. Describe the BREAK, FILLET, and CHAMFER Commands
      5. Define the JOIN command
    9. Use Intermediate Editing Commands
      1. Discuss LINETYPE settings
      2. Review the PROPERTIES Palette
      3. Summarize the LINETYPE SCALE command
      4. Explain the ARRAY and MIRROR Commands
      5. Enumerate on the TRIM and EXTEND Commands
      6. Describe the ROTATE and SCALE Commands
      7. Make sense of the STRETCH and LENGTHEN Commands
      8. Paraphrase the EXPLODE command
    10. Illustrate Inquiry/Utility Commands
      1. Discuss the AREA Command
      2. Summarize the LIST Command
    11. Demonstrate Text use
      1. Recall Text Placement Commands
      2. Explain Text Styles
      3. Describe Text Modification
      4. Review Text Placement and Modification Techniques
    12. Demonstrate drawing layers
      1. Explain Layers
      2. Describe the LAYER Palette
      3. Interpret the “BYLAYER” setting as it pertains to layers
      4. Discuss professional “etiquette” pertaining to layer color override
      5. Illustrate the use of Layers
    13. Utilize Dimensioning
      1. Identify Dimension Components
      2. Describe Associative Dimensions
      3. Explain Linear, Angular, Diameter/Radial, and Arc Length Dimensioning
      4. Discuss Dimension Editing ?ethics?
      5. Describe a MULTILEADER
      6. Demonstrate proper Dimensioning and Multileader technique
    14. Employ other 2D Entity Creation commands
      1. Paraphrase the PLINE and SPLINE Commands
      2. Review the HATCH command
      3. Demonstrate the Hatch command and its options
      4. Describe TABLES

  
  •  

    ARC 111 - Intermediate Arch 2D CAD

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course will teach the more advanced level commands and skills used in Computer Aided Drafting for architectural documents, including industry standards and the industry thought process.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Evaluate the meaning of a “Plan” view
      1. Discuss a “Site Plan”
      2. Describe a “Floor Plan”
      3. Explain a “Reflected Ceiling Plan”
      4. Interpret a “Framing Plan”
      5. Relate drawing scales to be used
      6. Assess paper sizes used
      7. Utilize the AIA Layer Standard
      8. Predict architectural style project units
    2. Employ Dimensioning
      1. Discuss dimensioning rules
      2. Review dimensioning commands
      3. Critically place linear, diameter, radius, arc length, and angular dimensions
      4. Summarize the Dimension Styles Manager
      5. Explain Annotative Objects
    3. Use 2D Analysis Tools
      1. Describe the AREA command
      2. Summarize the LIST command
      3. Paraphrase the DIST command
    4. Apply Hatching Poché
      1. Review the purpose of Poché
      2. Explain the difference between a poché used for “cut” objects and objects in “projection”
      3. Describe Hatching with “Select Object”
      4. Describe Hatching with “Pick Point”
      5. Explain the difference between “Select Object” and “Pick Point”
    5. Distinguish Block creation from a WriteBlock from using Design Center
      1. Construct a BLOCK
      2. Perform a WRITEBLOCK
      3. Review the INSERT dialog box
      4. Discuss DesignCenter
    6. Construct an Attribute
      1. Define an Attribute
      2. Characterize Attributes
      3. Modify an Attribute
      4. Comprehend the uses of attributes within blocks to using standard text
    7. Relate the use of External References and Image Files
      1. Attach an External References in a drawing
      2. Perform in-place editing of an external reference
      3. Crop the Xref using the XCLIP command
      4. Determine hazards relating to Xrefs as well as benefits
      5. Attach an Image file
      6. Describe the SCALE command
      7. Scale the Image file using the Scale command with the reference option
      8. Crop the Image using the Image Clip option
    8. Reference Model Viewports and Layouts
      1. Define a Layout
      2. Describe the uses of Layouts
      3. Locate multiple Layouts/Sheets within a drawing file
      4. Explain the uses of Viewports
      5. Implement user-defined rectangular and custom-shaped viewports
      6. Construct multiple Layouts, each using multiple Viewports of varying scales
      7. Discuss Linetype Scale within the drawing environment
      8. Discuss PaperSpace Linetype Scale control
      9. Examine settings within the Layer Manager to control properties of layers within each viewport
    9. Demonstrate Utility Commands and Internet Utilities
      1. Describe the DWGPROPS command
      2. Explain the CAL command
      3. Discuss the PURGE command
      4. Paraphrase the MULTIPLE command/modifier
      5. Describe the DRAWORDER command
      6. Summarize the AUDIT command
      7. Summarize the RECOVER command
      8. Review Exporting procedures
      9. Discuss Importing procedures

  
  •  

    ARC 113 - Architectural Drafting I

    Credits: 4
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course focuses on fundamental drafting skills and how they are applied to the architectural drafting profession. The course presents current drafting standards and trends in the architectural industry. It emphasizes standardization and the necessary foundation of drafting training as well as implementation of a common approach to drafting.
    Corequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Utilize basic architectural tools and techniques
      1. Identify the uses and differences between architectural and engineering scales
      2. Define the architectural lettering/font preferences
      3. Describe architectural sketching vs artistic sketching
      4. Enumerate on the purpose of architectural sketching and the importance and expectation of legibility
      5. Employ and develop proper architectural sketching technique
    2. Produce vignette projects as an introduction to three-dimensional thinking
      1. Measure and carefully sketch Plan, Front and Side Elevations of the bench outside the South entrance to Building 3W within one class period using proper care and technique
      2. Using CAD, illustrate and dimension previously sketched views within one class period using proper care and technique
      3. Measure and carefully sketch Plan, Front Elevation, and Section views of the Building 3W “Curtain Wall” entry within one class period using proper care and technique
      4. Using CAD, illustrate and dimension previously sketched views within one class period using proper care and technique
    3. Create assigned building Floor Plans
      1. Define “Plan” vs “Floor Plan” and identify plan guidelines
      2. Distinguish between different types of Plan views
      3. Discuss sheet placement and appropriate scales for detail level required
      4. Discuss expectations and required standards
      5. Produce Basement and Main Floor Plans (or Main Floor and Upper Floor Plans for 2 Story building) using proper techniques and architectural CAD standards
      6. Annotate all Plans using required tools and techniques
    4. Construct Roof Plan and Exterior Elevations
      1. Define “Roof Plan” and identify standards
      2. Discuss and demonstrate proper sheet placement and appropriate scale
      3. Prepare the Roof Plan for your assigned building
      4. Illustrate and annotate all ridge, hip, and valleys correctly
      5. Locate and dimension overhangs and rakes, both typical and non-typical
      6. Identify and illustrate all required roof elements
      7. Draw exterior building Elevations
      8. Identify proper “Elevation” technique and standards
      9. Delineate all four (Front, Left, Rear, and Right) Exterior Elevations using proper architectural CAD technique and standards
      10. Properly place all annotation to class standards
    5. Illustrate a Typical Wall Section
      1. Discuss reasons for drawing Wall Sections and appropriate scales
      2. Determine section location
      3. Infer the wall construction depicted in the section
      4. Delineate the Wall Section using proper technique, construction and architectural CAD standards
      5. Annotate Wall Section using proper technique and standards
      6. Reference Wall Section within drawing set

  
  •  

    ARC 115 - Arch 3D Computer Modeling

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course will teach the introductory skills used in 3D modeling for architectural visualization and communication.
    Prerequisite:   with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Examine the concept of a Cartesian Coordinate Axis
      1. Explain how going from 2 axis to 3 axis is not just a linear increase in difficulty, it’s exponential
      2. Give examples how users can distinguish their orientation within 3D computer space
    2. Summarize the difference between 2D shape and 3D form
      1. Recite some of the basic 2D shapes
      2. Name some of the basic 3D forms
      3. Identify which 2D shapes create 3D forms
      4. Summarize how these 2D shapes are modified to create each basic 3D form
    3. Examine the transformation of a 2D shape into a 3D form using Extrusion
      1. Relate this process using a simple Extrusion
      2. Construct a more complex form by extruding a 2D shape along a path
    4. Characterize the transformation of a 2D shape into a 3D form using Revolve
      1. Predict various 3D form variations depending on the axis of rotation
      2. Estimate variations on 3D forms when Revolved using full vs partial Revolves
    5. Distinguish Mass from Void
      1. Generate additive objects using Mass objects
      2. Produce subtractive objects using Void objects
      3. Utilize a Mass to subtract from another Mass
      4. Employ a creative use of Masses and Voids
    6. Organize 3D objects in the computer modeling environment
      1. Characterize the use of good organization to improve efficiency
      2. Compare organization methods to improve control over elements
    7. Incorporate shade and shadow effectively
      1. Discuss “Architecture is form in light”
      2. Break down Shade vs Shadow
      3. Examine geo-locating your project to get correct Shade and Shadow
      4. Manipulate the control of Shade intensity
      5. Modify Shadow intensity
      6. Discuss the ramifications of architecture sitting on and in the earth as it relates to Shade and Shadow
    8. Examine the use of Materials
      1. Discuss when it is appropriate to show materials
      2. Assess when it is appropriate to show transparency
      3. Explain when it is appropriate to show color
    9. Construct a 3D computer model of a house using principles from this course
      1. All walls, windows, doors and floors must be constructed to assigned standards in order to achieve an average or “C” grade

  
  •  

    ARC 123 - Arch Residential Drafting I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course will apply practical application of the basic skills of drafting involving the mechanics and the necessary thought process in the development of residential construction documents.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:   with a C or better and   with a C or better or Instructor Approval
    Competencies
    1. Critically Illustrate Floor Plans
      1. Produce a Floor Plan and Foundation Plan of the assigned residential project, based on examples provided, to prescribed standards
      2. Fully dimension and annotate all Plans per prescribed standards
    2. Graphically Construct Front, Sides, and Rear Exterior Elevations
      1. Prepare Exterior Elevations for the assigned residential project, based on examples provided, to prescribed standards
      2. Discuss and select sheet placement and appropriate scales for each view
      3. Dimension and annotate all Elevations per prescribed standards
    3. Develop a Roof Plan
      1. Predict from other views to produce a Roof Plan for the assigned residential project to prescribed standards
      2. Discuss and select sheet placement and appropriate scale
      3. Dimension and annotate Roof Plan per prescribed standards
    4. Infer Building Sections
      1. Predict from provided views to produce assigned Building Sections for the assigned residential project to prescribed standards
      2. Discuss and select sheet placement and appropriate scales
      3. Fully dimension and annotate Building Sections per prescribed standards

  
  •  

    ARC 124 - Arch Residential Drafting II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    This course will apply practical application of the basic skills of drafting involving the mechanics and the necessary thought process in the development of residential construction documents.
    Prerequisite:    with a C or better.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:    or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Construct an architectural Typical Wall Section
      1. Explain purpose of Wall Sections
      2. Discriminate an appropriate location of a Typical Wall Section
      3. Interpolate from established views to produce appropriate Typical Wall Section for the assigned residential project to prescribed standards
      4. Choose sheet placement and appropriate scale
      5. Establish dimensions and annotation for Wall Section per prescribed standards
    2. Compose an architectural Stair Section
      1. Summarize purpose of Stair Sections
      2. Distinguish an appropriate location and direction of the Stair Section
      3. Predict construction materials and assemblies used in project to determine construction of stair
      4. Select sheet placement and appropriate scales
      5. Produce dimensions and annotation for Stair Section using prescribed standards
    3. Create architectural Window Details, including Head, Jamb and Sill details
      1. Examine purpose of Window Details
      2. Select appropriate location of the window for these details
      3. Determine known construction materials and assemblies used in project to determine construction around window
      4. Discuss and select sheet placement and appropriate scales
      5. Prepare dimensions and annotation for Window Details per prescribed standards
      6. Use manufacturer’s provided CAD symbols to represent window profiles
    4. Generate Construction Details
      1. Discuss purpose of Construction Details
      2. Select appropriate location and direction of Construction Details
      3. Compare known construction materials and assemblies used in the project to determine construction used in detailed areas
      4. Discuss sheet placement and appropriate scales
      5. Delineate proper dimensions and annotation for the Construction Details per prescribed standards
    5. Formulate Interior Elevations
      1. Discuss purpose of Interior Elevations
      2. Select appropriate locations of the Interior Elevations
      3. Characterize known construction materials, products and assemblies used in project to determine Interior Elevation elements
      4. Review and establish sheet placement and appropriate scales
      5. Produce appropriate dimensions and annotation for Interior Elevations per prescribed standards

  
  •  

    ARC 133 - Commercial Architecture/BIM I

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    The Building Information Modeling process is used to develop a small commercial building.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:    with a C or better and   with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Summarize architectural computer tools and techniques specific to commercial structures
      1. Identify issues related in ARC123 and ARC124 and discuss differences between residential and commercial documents (materials, assemblies, specification coordination, sheet size, layout, etc.)
      2. Describe differences in the Project Delivery Process between using CAD and BIM
    2. Generate the Structural Grid, Exterior Walls of Main Floor and Penthouse Levels based on the provided example drawing set
      1. Discuss differences between residential floor plans and commercial floor plans
      2. Interpret the different concepts of wall construction and connections
      3. Draw the Structural Grid which the entire layout will be based on
      4. Place Exterior Walls for Main Floor and Penthouse Levels
    3. Place Interior walls on Main Floor based on the provided example drawing set
      1. Review differences between residential wall and commercial wall materials and construction
      2. Locate interior walls for all levels
      3. Use dimensions and text to fully annotate plan views
    4. Construct Doors, Windows and Tags
      1. Discuss differences between residential and commercial door and window construction and annotation techniques
      2. Thematically investigate concepts and methodologies for creating high quality custom content
      3. Examine doors (with 3D elements and 2D plan representations) and windows per project requirements
      4. Generate, insert, and Tag all Doors and Windows for all levels
    5. Produce Door and Window Schedules and Legends
      1. Characterize properly formatted door and window schedules with correct reference annotation
      2. Examine and revise previously created door and window families as necessary to correctly show in the required legends and schedules properly
    6. Construct Curtain Wall
      1. Examine Curtain Wall Concept and discuss its various uses
      2. Choose Curtain Grid placement and modifications
      3. Utilize Curtain Wall Doors
      4. Construct Curtain Wall Mullions, install, and locate

  
  •  

    ARC 134 - Commercial Architecture/BIM II

    Credits: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 4
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    Using the Building Information Modeling process to complete the development of a small commercial building.
    Prerequisite:   with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Produce Exterior Elevations
      1. Review previous exterior elevations to discuss standard appearance of exterior elevations for commercial structures
      2. Extrapolate exterior elevations, place them on appropriate sheets and dimension and annotate properly
      3. Modify exterior elevations using the Linework tool, Masking Regions, and Detail Lines to achieve the proper aesthetic of “high quality” exterior elevations
    2. Construct Floor slabs and roof slabs with proper delineation and annotation, as well as stairs and room tags
      1. Review previous roof plans to discuss the differences between residential roof construction and standard commercial roof construction
      2. Comprehend requirements for floor slabs, inclines, ramps, and entry mats
      3. Summarize the requirements and construction of low-slope roofs
      4. Describe Linework, Model Lines, Detail Lines, dimensions and annotation necessary to delineate Floor and Roof Plans
      5. Discuss Room Tags and necessary Room Separation Lines
    3. Generate Building Sections and Wall Sections
      1. Discuss requirements for commercial Building Sections (View Depth, Level of Detail, and 2D vs 3D element use)
      2. Generalize Building Section concepts relating to structure, professional aesthetic and detail levels
      3. Review previous Wall Sections to discuss the differences between residential and commercial wall construction techniques, materials and how these differences are shown in the drawings
      4. Interpret resources to properly annotate Wall Sections
    4. Delineate Construction Details
      1. Review previous Construction Details to discuss differences in building materials and techniques between residential and commercial assemblies
      2. Locate Construction Details at predetermined assembly locations from the 3D computer model and provided examples using “Live” Views, Drafting Views, and AutoCAD file imports
      3. Discuss Import Line weight translation table setup and loading
    5. Produce Interior Elevations
      1. Review previous Interior Elevations to discuss differences between residential and commercial Interior Elevation representation
      2. Locate Interior Elevations and discuss professional aesthetic, detail levels, appropriate dimensions, linework, and annotation
      3. Discuss Interior Elevation annotation marks and their placement in Plan views

  
  •  

    ARC 160 - Materials & Assemblies I

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: Voc/Tech
    An introduction to building materials and assemblies through the Construction Specifications Institute’s MasterFormat accounting and management system.
    Competencies
    1. Relate elements of the Building Delivery Process
      1. Identify the Project Delivery phases
      2. Recognize the Predesign phase
      3. Sequence the Design Phase
      4. Describe CSI MasterFormat and its use in Specifications
      5. Label the Preconstruction and Bid Negotiation phase
      6. Recall the various Delivery Processes
      7. Summarize the Integrated Project Delivery method
    2. Interpret Construction Regulations and Standards
      1. Recite objectives of Building Codes
      2. Define Model Codes
      3. Describe the contents of a Building Code
      4. Give examples of construction standards
      5. Explain Zoning Ordinances
      6. Paraphrase building accessibility as in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
    3. Determine loads on buildings
      1. Identify Dead Loads
      2. Identify Live Loads
      3. Explain Wind Loads
      4. Summarize seismic loads
      5. Discuss seismic vs wind loading
    4. Determine structural properties of materials
      1. Label Compressive vs Tensile strengths of materials
      2. Explain Ductility and Brittleness
      3. Review Elasticity vs Plasticity
      4. Describe Modulus of Elasticity
      5. Identify Bending and Shear stresses
      6. Summarize the concept of Bearing strength of materials
      7. Discuss Structural Safety
    5. Characterize Thermal Properties
      1. Paraphrase Thermal Properties as they relate to Building Design and Thermal Comfort
      2. Give examples of Conduction, Convection, and Radiation
      3. Interpret the R-Value of various building components
      4. Interpret the R-Value of a multilayer component
      5. Calculate the U-Value of an assembly
      6. Discuss the values of where and how much to insulate
    6. Correlate Air and Water Vapor Control
      1. Describe Air Leakage Control
      2. Define Air Diffusion Control
      3. Summarize Water Vapor in the air
      4. Review condensation of Water Vapor
      5. List materials used as Vapor Retarders
      6. Locate the Vapor Retarder in the assembly
      7. Explain the importance of Attic Ventilation
    7. Relate Fire-Related properties
      1. Identify Combustible and Noncombustible materials
      2. Describe Fire-Rated Assemblies and Compartmentalization of a building
      3. List the Types of Construction
      4. Discuss the importance of Active Fire Protection
    8. Make sense of the Acoustical Properties of Materials
      1. Label the Frequency, Speed, and Wavelength of sound
      2. Enumerate on the Decibel Scale
      3. Define Airborne and Structure-Borne sounds
      4. Describe Sound Absorption / Noise-Reduction Coefficient
    9. Establish the principles of Expansion and Contraction Control Joints and Sealants
      1. List the types of Movement Joints
      2. Describe Thermal Movement
      3. Describe Moisture Movement
      4. Define Elastic Deformation as it relates to Sealant Joints
      5. Estimate Total Joint Dimension
      6. Identify the principles of Joint Detailing
      7. Label the components of a Sealed Joint
    10. Show the Fundamentals of Sustainable Construction
      1. Identify the fundamentals of Sustainable Buildings
      2. Make sense of the assessment of Sustainable Buildings
      3. Recall the characteristics of Sustainable Building Products and Assemblies

  
  •  

    ARC 170 - Materials & Assemblies II

    Credits: 2
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Practicum Hours: 0
    Work Experience: 0
    Course Type: General
    A deeper investigation into building materials and assemblies through the Construction Specification Institute’s MasterFormat accounting and management system.
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite:    with a C or better or Instructor Approval.
    Competencies
    1. Explain building related aspects of Soil and Excavation
      1. Identify the Classification of Soils
      2. Define the aspects of Soil Sampling and Soil Testing
      3. Enumerate on the Bearing Capacity of Soil
      4. Describe Earthwork as it relates to Excavation and Grading
      5. List Open Excavation Support systems
      6. Recall the importance of keeping Excavations dry
    2. Relate elements of Foundations Systems and Basements
      1. Summarize Shallow Foundation
      2. Summarize Deep Foundations
      3. Discuss Piles, Piers, and Caissons as Deep Foundations
      4. Explain the importance of Foundation Drainage
      5. Illustrate Frost-Protected Shallow Foundations
      6. Describe Basement Construction and Waterproofing
    3. Assess the various types of lumber and applicable characteristics in Wood Construction
      1. Review Growth Rings and Wood’s Microstructure
      2. Cite various Softwoods and Hardwoods
      3. Paraphrase the process wood goes through from Logs to Finished Lumber
      4. Describe the Drying process of Lumber
      5. Explain Lumber Surfacing
      6. Enumerate Nominal vs Actual Dimensions of Lumber
      7. Cite how to measure Board Feet
      8. Explain rating Lumber Strength and Appearance
      9. Interpret Fungal Decay
      10. Discuss Termite Control
      11. Paraphrase Preservative-Treated Wood
    4. Classify Engineered Wood Products, Fasteners, and Connectors
      1. Define Glulam
      2. Define Structural Composite Lumber (LVL & PSL)
      3. Enumerate on Wood I-Joists
      4. Enumerate on Wood Panels
      5. Summarize Oriented Strand Board (OSB)
      6. Describe the specifying of Wood Panels and Panel Ratings
      7. Review the various fasteners for Wood Members
      8. Make sense of Sheet Metal Connectors

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 17